13 Ekim 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1

13 Ekim 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1
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« . VOLUME 26. INSURANCE. E£ ■REMOVAL! “Home Again.” oißiiißimm Insurance Agency, 120 MSAILE-ST, ORIENTAL BUILDING. Continental Insurance Company, Ue?r York. Exchange Insurance Company, Wow York. Market Insurance Company, Hew York. Brewers’ & Maltsters’ Insurance Company, Hew York. Merchants’ Insurance Company, Wewark.. People’s Insurance Company, Hew ark. mm hssoi FIRE Insurance Company. PROGRESS SINGE 1867. ASSETS: January 1, £B6B* - $94,589.64 July 1, 1868, - * - 118,010.48 January 1,1869, - 119,768.17 July 1, 1869, - «* - 155,380.73 January 1,1870, - 189,778.56 July 1,1870, - - - 194,846.76 January 1,1871, - 289,715.95 July 1,1871, - - ■ 425,107.01 January 1,1872, - 645,417.91 July 1,1872, - - - 740,475.60 September 1,1872, 633,228.00 Dwellings, Merchandise, Grain, e|c., insured, at FAIR RATES. I. s. TIFFANY & CO., GENERAL AGENTS. Office; 156 & 158 LaSalle-st, CHICAGO. tan Am BEO. C. GLARES S GO., 3 44 BETAS BLOCK. London Assurance Corporation, . LONDON, A. D. ISO. Total Assets, Gold, 513,234,425 ~ Fire Assets, Gold, » $5,064,000 Manufacturers’ Insurance Co., BOSTON, A. D. 122. • • " $1)485)518 Assets, - Home Insurance Co., COLUMBUS. OHIO. (■ Assets, » • “ $871,453 Hoffman Fire Insurance Co., NEW YORK, Assets, - - - - $3X4,000 Northwestern National Ins. Co., WTT.WA 11k (■■K. Assets, FURNITURE. FASHIONABLE FURNITURE! f. W. STRONG FOBUITIIRE C 0. ,: 553 to 359 W.Eandolpli-st., OMcago. Branch Salesroom, Wabash-av. and S2d-st* We call special attention to our stock of Low Priced >oods suitable for present demands. XEOIE3 S Win. H. Sampson & Co.’s Exten »ive List of Stores on Third Page. PROFESSIONAL. Dr. T. J. Lewis, Bight year* In Chicago, discoverer of the cause and Rad gal core <f Catarrh, Bright’s Kidney Disease, Cousump- Son, Scrotula, Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Dysp epsia t and Crpnoid Fever. No drags used. No failures. 290 West AUCTION SALE OS' 100 CMce Mta Lots, FrutiM on Mi HalsM, Green, Peoria, Sanga m, aM Morgan-sls. ‘ On Monday Afternoon, Oct, 14, at 2 1-2 O’Clock, at Salesroom, 186 East Madison-st., * By C. C. Thayer & Co., Beal Estate Auctioneers and Brokers. Thef e lots are in ’Webster & Perkins 1 Subdivision of S. Eil tho EX of Sec. 5.J38,14. They are beautifully located, being in the immediate vicinity of the Boulevard and fine improvements, and are easy of access by the P. f Ft. W. 4 O. R. Their close proximity to the Fifty-fiflh-st. Boulevard, being only 99 feet north of the same, makes them very attractive and desirable for residences* and situated in a district where values are rapidly increasing, they present excellent advantages for an investment or speculation. Title Perfect—Abstract of Title Furnished—Terms of Sale Easy. Only SSO «*«>*, and balsnce in SSO payments every 4 months, with interest* at 8 per cent. A deposit of 10 per cent will be required at time of sale. Further information and plats of the property can be had at the office of 0. 0. THAYER & CO., 186 East Madison-st. Remember the Sale OF 30 SPLENDID LOTS IN AUSTIN, And 36 Lots in NORWOOD All near the deuot of those two flourishing suburban townst Sale to commence at 10 o’clock a. m. on MOUDAY, Oct. 14, at our salesrooms. For particulars and printed plats get circulars at 55 and 57 South Canal* at.. or at the store 1041-2 Clark-st- WM. A. BUTT2BS & CO., Auctioneers* FOR SALE BY J. Es» Warren, 18 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, Beautiful Lots at a bargain on Oakwood Boulevard, Egan av., and South Park Boule vard, in lots to suit purchas ers, and on unprecedented terms. Title unquestionable. Waimton Hits Houses, For Sale on Monthly Payments or otherwise. We hive for SAle two Urge, elegant bouses; four two story booses, and six fine cottages, with large, fine lots, at id organ Park, Washington Heights. On long time, with interest at 7 per cent, or on monthly payments if de sired. These bouses were built this season hr the Sins Island I*nd and Building Company, by days* work, and are in c»ery way first-class booses. They are pleasantly situated at Morgan Park, within one and two blocks only from the depot, from which trains run morning, noon and night to accomodate all classes wishing to do bnsinessia t Tbe*<?ompanyare making very largeimprovements there and fine water for culinary aae other pnrpojes. is foamhea from their large artesian well, now just completed, Enquire at tne office oi the 9 BLUE ISLAND & BUILDING CO., Ho. U Chamber of Commerce. FOB SALE. HOUSES IR COTTAGE GROVE $3,800. Easy Payments. Several Fine TWO-STOEY COT TAGES, 7 rooms each, BATH BOOM, WATER, &c. STANTON- A 7. near DOTJGXiAS-PXiACE. Lots 25x125 to 16-foot alley. Only two blocks from street cars and Boule vard, and short walk from Fairyiew Station, now paying over ELEVEN per cent. Possession if wanted. JNO. W. CABEINGTON, Jr., 373 Wabash-av, 82 lots in Maplewood at a great bargain. CHAPMAN & JAB BER, 90 L:iSalle-st. FOR. SALE, At a bargain, a new cottage, and lot 30t12». Terms eas7* Inqnire on the premises, at 14 Perch-st. $250.000 RUPTURE CURED 3BEAIHEST OF HEEHIA A SPECIALTI". EVEfiY APPLICATION GUARANTEED. DR. MARSH'S RADICAL CURE TRUSS Is pro nonneed by the most eminent physicians of this country to be tbe best and most effectual for the Relief and Rad ical Care of Rupture. Trasses adapted to meet every case by Dr. Marsh. DEFORMITIES. Instruments for bowlegs, knoekknees, spinal support, weak joints, and dab feet, made to order and scientific ally applied. ELASTIC STOCKINGS For varicose or enlarged veins, swollen limbs, weak joints, ynrf sprained ankles, on hand and made to order. ABDOMINAL SUPPOET, Ladies' silk elastic belts, London supporters, steel spring supporters, for support of abdomen and back; shoulder braces for ladies, gents, and children, to pro* vent habitual stooping and lor the expansion of chest; pile supporters, suspensory bandages, crutches, etc. Dr. Marsh's experience and successful treatment of the above complaints are unequalled, and his applications unexcelled. Radical Coro Truss Office of Mifisw & BOWLES, 5© Wabash-av. • “ " KV 2 attendance to wait upon ladies,... B.TIAT. ESTATE. Of GEO. E. CLAES, Agent, FOR SALE. TRUSSES. DRESS GOODS. DRESS GOODS. J. B. Shay Will, on to-morrow, Oct. 14, offer his entire stock of DRESS GOODS at greatly reduced prices. He would also call special attention to a foil line of Ladies’ and Gents’ HOSIERY and UNDERWEAR, 243 & 245 West Madison-st. CAHPETS AND MATTINGS. OFFICE MATTINGS uajsrrs CARPETS. The attention of parties about to famish OFFICES is invited to our large stock of ENGLISH and AMERICAN, STRIPED and PLAIN, COCOA, CANE, and MANILLA MATTINGS, of all widths and qualities. Also BRUSSELS CARPETS, in patterns especially adapted to office use. Particular attention given to this branch of oar trade, and satisfaction in prices and work guaranteed. A fall assortment can be found at all times at * 184 & 186 Mow-sl, near Hto. XO «S a XS CAHAX-ST., Near Randolph. E, F. HOLLISTER & GO. REMOVAL. REMOVAL. 6. S. HUBBARD, JR., REAL ESTATE LOANS, BEHOVED TO NO. 168 WASHINGTON STREET. REMOVAL . RHODES & BRADLEY, DEAXEBS IN Pig Iron and Coal, REMOVED TO 154 E. WASMGTON-ST. REMOVAL. S. S. Case & Co., LEAF TOBACCO AM CIGARS, HAVE REMOVED TO Old No., 149 South Water-st. BALTIMORE & OHIO RAILROAD. OFFICE REMOVED TO 120 WASHWeTOH-ST. ,T>MRS ffAISH. Gen*l Agent. rEsS JbLa JtSLa ■ Wm. H. Sampson & Co.’s Extensive last of Stores on Third Page. HOTELS. Continental Hotel. MDESffI S CO., Proptus. State-st., comer Eldxidge-court, Chicago, HI. TF.TURS. $3.00 PER PAY. MISCELLANEOUS. TRAGIK& & TISSUE PAPER. At Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co.’s, 118 and 130 Monroe-st.. Chicago. TTATR AND CLOTH BEUSHES. A splendid assortment of Hair and Cloth Brushes* "Wholesale and fie tail—Yery Cheap. GEETS, LUMBABE & CO., 167 East Madison-st. $3,000. " tSresnew. and of the Terr best quality and style. Firet -i.ct trade. Owner wishes to leave jh© citr fo. health. dowa t the only thing acceptable. Address B Tribune o&ce^.^^ WANTED. Wanted. Three or four more energetic men of integrity to canvass for the UdM States He Insurance Co. SAMUEL GREENE, ■ - Gen’l Affenu 23 Central Block. CHICAGO, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1873. WHI speak in German, at AURORA TIM HAIL, On Mlwankee-ay., corner of Second-st. } Monday Evening, On Tuesday Evening, Oct. 15, at SERAKOR’S HALL, corner of North-ay. and Chnrch-st. TO RENT. Chambers of tbe new and elegant 5-story building. S3. LAKE-ST. 30 feet front by 150 feet deep to al ley, 40 feet in width.; steam heating and hoisting; front, side, and rear light. To a desirable tenant these Lofts, among the very best in the city, will be leased, entire or sepa rate, on very favorable terms. Ap ply to _ C. T. RAYNOLU & CO., Michigan-av. and Washington-st. FOR RENT. Metropolitan Block. Offices in Metropolitan Block, northwest corner of Bandolph and XiaSalle-sts.; are well lighted, heated by steam, elevators, etc., one block from Sherman House and Briggs House, and near Court House snd City Hall. JSZNj Y JJEH. c So lIEE, Ho. 14 Nixon’s Building, northeast corner of Monroe and BaSalle-sts. TO RENT. 163 & 165 Fifth-av., bet. Madison and Monroe-sts., double store, fom; stories and basement. The whole or part at reasonable rates to good ten ants. S. M. MOORE & CUMMINGS, 213 East Madison-st. For M-GMCB Stores. Nos, 38 and 40 Ganal-st. Nos. 42 and 44 Canal-st., Five-story and basement stores, with steam elevators and heat, and facilities of railroad track in rear. Fob. 48 and 50 South Olinton-at,, Fob, 51 and 53 South Cjinton-Bt., Fob. 34 and 35 Waahington-st Five-story and basement stores with steam elevators and heat. Apply to m H. SAMPSON ■& CO., Beal Estate and Renting Agency, 144 liaSalle-st., Otis Block. TO RENT. A few of those fins o£ces, suitable for Company and Hail business, in the largo iron-front building, 163 Stale st.. opposite the great Potter Palmer Hotel. Inquire of JOHN TRATNOR, in the building. TO RKKTT. By D. COLE A SON, Real Estate and House Renting Agents, 1® West Madison-st.: One cf the most elegant balldlngs bnllt since the fire, situated oa Madisoa-st.. bead of Carpenter-st., stores *5x130, 17 ft ceilings, with vaults. and finished -,|n ovary respectflret-cljiws. FIERCE & BROWER, isroTiß brokers, 181 LASAILE-ST,, CHICAGO. Local Stocks bought and sold on commission. Rail road. State, County, Town, and Beal Estate Loans ne gotiated. . A. O. Slaughter, Corner Clark and Madlson-sta. Bays and sells Stocks, Bonds, and Gold. Receives money on deposit and traa acta a General Banking and Brokerage Boil aeS • claims. I shall continue to pay the vary highest rates in cash for Insurance or balances, after dividend, Chicago or Eastern Companies. J. N. WITHER ELL, SoS "Wabash-ar. Loans 3Megotiateci On real estate, in the city or suburbs, at current rates. G. S. HUBBARD, Jr., IS East Washington-st. SSEI Wm. EC. Sampson & Co.’s Extensive lost of Stores on Third Page. get the improved BOYINGTON FURNACE For haatiay jour stores, boo**?, churches, etc., etc. No gas, no smoke or dust—always reliable. Also the im proved. CABINET COOK STOVE or, RANGE, which so many speak so highly of. It is beautiful in appearance, cooks quick and even, with little foe!. Don’t buy until you have seen the BOYDiGTON FURNACE AND COOKING RANGE. RT.T3R & BBOWHy 64 South Canal St The Best Stoves in the World! Challenge Base-Burner, Oriental Store Store, City of Trey Cook Store, Sea raj’s Hot Air Furnace, Hull’s Hot Air Furnace, goods. SEAVBY <Sc CO., No. ISO and earner of State and Rapdolph^gts. All degree members of the Order are particularly ro onested to attend the Star of the West their ball, on Thursday evening next, at 7:30 sharp. Work on By order of the W. M. MAYKE . g. S . ATTENTION, SIR KNIGHTS. Special Conclave of Chicago Conunandery, No. W, K. T., Monday Evening at 75$ o’clock. Work on K. T. Order. By order of the E. H j T L E Y t Roc. Sons of Temperance. Erery member of the Order is requested to attend at the Ballot Beacon Light Division, comer Desjdaipes and' WeStLake-sts..’ on Monday evealngnexV at 7JO sharp* os business of the utmost importance. POLITICAL. OCT, 14, 1872, TO RENT. FINANCIAL. STOVES. &c. MEETINGS. A. P A. BOSTON. The Newest Boston Notion— The Women’s Course of Lectures. The First Lecture—Our Correspondent's Ex> perience. A View of tbe Strong-Minded—A Sister Loses Her Bonnet. Special Correspondence of The Chicago Tribune, Boston, Oct. 7,1872. Your correspondent gave Saturday afternoon to the Women's Lecture at the Institute of Technology, and a brief acocunfc may interest Western readers.' Tbe history of these lectures is a little oat of the common line. It appears that James T. Fields and Phillips Brooks, moved by compassion for the beauless women of - Bos ton and vicinity who cannot enjoy the advantages of evening lectures, have upon themselves the fur nishing a course of Saturday afternoon free lectures for women only* A man is as strictly forbidden en trance as a woman at a town meeting. Some of the best foleut in the country been secured. Hr. 'Whip pie, .Curtis, Eobert Collyer, and Fields himself being in the list, not to mention “the Professor.” Last Satur day Mrs. Ednah J>. Cheney opened the course,—the occasion of which lam to speak. The large ball in the Institute is capable of seating nine hundred, and we bad looked for very ample accommodations, but, when we reached the entrance, some seven minutes after the doors were opened, we found every seat filled, the crowded, a steady stream of disappoint ed females taking their disconsolate departure from the building. 1 * Eager to see and hear we crowded our way in, much to the detriment of our crinoline (but then, as my /yimpaninn remarked, “No matter if you did say l Oh, my bustlel’ there was no man to bear yon ”), and get ting a very precarious footing' immediately in front of the platform, wo took a look at the very novel assem blage, really, I never expect to see one funnier. Whoever before saw a thousand women gathered, and never a man within sight or hearing! The absurdity seemed to strike everybody, for a very general grin overspread 'every countenance, save here and there where a strong-minded sister—lntent on righting her down-trodden sex—glowered in solemn indignation at the more frivolous majority. As a whole, it was a very well-dresaed audience, with less of the outlandish element than 1 expected, though now and then I spied a countenance which carried one sud denly hade to the earlier days of the strong minded household. Soon after, my. friend whispered. “Do tell that lady she's losing her bonnet, 1 * I turned,, involuntarily, and could have shouted when 1 saw one ineffable'party ■miHng benignly around her, croea»cyed, bland, and utterly unaware that her fly-away bonnet had slid com pletely off her head and was hanging, by a etretched oci elastic, down her back. Of course it was my neigh borly duty to ten her of it, and I performed it with an attempt at gravity which was overpowering, but, later in the afternoon, when I was out of ear-shot, I saw the remarkable head-dress fairing the same backward journey, and the pladd wearer as unconscious as ever, and that time, I laughed outright. The bonnet episode over, we followed the example of many other ladies, and mounted the platform where standing room was all we could expect, but the air was better and the position more comfortable. A friend had >w»n praising the personal charms of the fair lec turer and her becoming and tasteful style of dress, and, when Mrs. Cheney appeared, 1 looked with expectant eyes. Every day X realize the wisdom of advice, apropos of his European rambles: “ Never go and see what you have a pleasant ideal picture of in your mind.” With great respect for my judgment in other matters, I could not agree with her in the matter of Mrs. Cheney's clothes, which were just as Muggins and dowdy as these strong minded womento clothes always are. Her eyes were quite remarkable and her expression very pleasant. Otherwise she looked like a good strong washerwoman. She commenced her lecture in so low a tone that we were straining every nerve to hear, when a voice in our rear, stagey and tragic in Its tone, suddenly startled us with, “ Sit down, ladies; sit down, ladies. We can neither see nor hear ; n and we turned to see one of the strong-minded, who, having seated : herself on the steps of the platform, was necessarily very much below the level of the fifty or more of us who stood on the pisiform. Considering we had nothing in the world to sit on, it struck us as rather preposter ous ’Crf* be ChftffptXbhcty Emfimesedto -aik down, that one woman, who wouldn’t stand up, might see, so we kept our positions. But the strong-minded sis ter was not so easily subdued. As louder and loader grew the assertion, “We can neither see nor hear; we <r*n neither see nor hear,” till Mrs. Cheney was brought to a standstill, and forced to inform the ag grieved woman that when the audience was quiet there would be no trouble in hearing, and the seeing was a matter for which she was not responsible. Even this did not prove satisfactory, and again, as the lec turer resumed, came the simultaneous announce ment, “We neither see nor; bear,” till a very de cided manifestation of disgust from the audience cauAd the injured female to rise in dudgeon and mnrrn out of the hall. very much as children do when they “ won’t play ” any longer. Though our range of vision was a little more extensive, we might have made a FrfTniiar complaint about bearing, for though we stood very near the lecturer, we are, to this minute, in ignorance of her subject, and of her man ner of treating it. From sundry stray sentences that floated past my ears, 1 judge ** woman” and her lit erary powers and deserts constituted the burden of her theme. I heard her speak of old Mrs. Ripley, and say, “Of course she lived in Concord,” and I heard little more, and, finding my ears of little service, I gave my attention to observing the audience. Though the masculine portion of our sex were not so folly rep resented as I anticipated, it did peep out occasionally, much to our amusement. Once my friend and I ventured a whispered comment, brief, and os quiet as we could make it, but my sen tence was scarce begun when a sudden twitch nearly palled my overskirt off the

binding, and a very energetic pair of lungs gave utter ance to such an aspirated 11 Sh ” that I wonder Mrs. Cheney didn't jump as much as I did. Turning to face the foe, I beheld a masculine-looking female, with hands on hips, no gores in her dress, a “pug” the aim of a hen’s egg, eye-glass on nose, and a mannish looking hat stuck on her head in a decidedly independ ent manner. Her feet were planted wide apart, and her air was that of intense determination. In some anger my friend remarked that “she wasn’t going to *Sh * for that old ‘thing.” Bat even that speech was abruptly terminated by a forcible repetition of the ter rible sound, which 1 find it quite impossible to de scribe with pen and ink. Disgusted, I suppose, with ,our contiguity, this female Major General finally elboweoher way to the front, and planted herself in s belligerent attitude, where whispers could no more disturb her. I have thus gone into details mmy story, because a troTnon meeting was a novelty to me, and struck me as very funny, the inborn fight in woman’s natnee did come out so unmistakably here. I must be dre loyal to my sex, and say I do think a fair admixtureis mcn would very much have Improved that audien of And still, I think Ido full justice to the kindness ca. generosity of the two men who provided this rareand portunity for beauless womankind. Oar patience gave out’long before Mrs. Cheney’s speech was ended, and ire le/U PERSONAL. Philip of the famous Bavel pantomime troupe, is dead* Governor t<ahHw is the Superintendent of the Bap tist Sabbath school at Frankfort, Ky. Cordelia Howard, the original Eva of ** Uncle Tom’a Cabin,” is still in the flesh, and is a wife and mother. William A. Peabody, the defaulting Post Office clerk in Boston, has been sentenced to three years in Dedham Jail. Queen Victoria prefers the title of <( Madame. 7 * or even u Ma’am,” to that of u Your Majesty,” in private We. Major Byron H. Kilboume, of Waukesha Conn* ty,M)nly surviving son of the founder of Milwaukee, has been nominated for the Wisconsin Legislature. John D. Noyes, Town Clerk of Stonington, Ct„ for forty-one years, died Saturday morning, aged 85 years. —Harvey Howes, who represents West Haven in the Vermont Legislature, was the only member of the Constitutional Convention of 1870 who voted for worn* on-euffrage. —The Rev. George B. Gow, of the Main Street Baptist Society, in Worcester, Mass., has resigned his pastorate to take charge of the endowment fund that it is proposed to raise for the Worcester Academy. —Bishop Nicholas Grxmdvig, eminent as theologian and poet, recently died in Denmark. He fired the Danish heart with battle-hymns daring the first Schleswig-Holstein war. —Dr. Albert Reynolds, formerly Assistant Superin tendent of tbe Insane Asylum at Flatbusb, N. Y., and later of Clinton, lowa, has been appointed Superinten dent of the Insane Hospital at Independence, lowa. —Senator Patterson, of New Hampshire, formerly a Dartmouth Professor, who has been elected President of the Ohio Agricultural College, will not actively enter upon his duties until nest spring, when his Senatorial term expiries. The Senator stumped Ohio for Gov ernor Noyes, and now gets his pay. The remainder of the Faculty will be elected in January. —Lewis Smith, colored, took out his first papers of naturalization at Columbus, Ohio, on Thursday. He was bom a slave in Virginia, escaped to Canada, be came a British subject, and now proposes to abjure British allegiance. -—J -N. English, .the first. Sheriff of Jersey County, HL, 1839-40, gave a grand dinner at his residence in JeneyyiUe, last week, and had among Ids guests his successors in office, viz: P. Silloway, Jona than Plowman, Murray Cheney, J. M. Hurd, Benjamin Wedding, C. H. Bowman, W. H, Cummings, Thomas J. Selby, Henry Belt, and Stephen H. Bowman. —Robert Bae, Esq., of Chicago, and one of the wealthy summer residents of Newport, B. L, was thrown from his carriage, last Wednesday afternoon, by a runaway horse. He was picked up insensible, and, upon investigation, it was found that he had sustained a compound fracture of both legs. He was to have left Newport on Thursday for his home. .—At Trey, 0., last Wednesday night, one of the 'O’Conor speakers in a Grant jollification meeting, Rarn McKee, made some bitter personal allusions to John W. Monde, State Senator, and had no sooner left the stand than Senator Morris attacked him with a. heavy hickory cane, with which he dealt blows thick and fast. McKee retreated into Holden’s drug store nw by, closely followed by Morris, who fired two shots of a revolver at him, but without effect. Morris was finally taken away by his friends, but was subse quently arrested on the charge of shooting with intent to Mil. —The relatives of the Prussian Lieutenant Von who eloped with the two young girls (sistors) from Berlin, and who fs now said to be with them at Salt Lake City, have published a card, in which they assert that he is insane on the subject of free-love, and that he has been misled by the pernicious teachings of a Mormon missionary. . , —A writer in the Troy (N. Y.) Times argues against men rTwngfrig their daily occupations and habits late in lifeTasSiSy to shorten their existences. He cites Thomas H. Faile, Philip Dater, and Charles Denison, three wealthy merchants who retired to rural life and soon died, and Senator Morgan, Moses Taylor, Shep ard Knapp, nHfliu, Stewart, and others well advanced in life but still active in it, as illustrations of his ***—ltis stated that Lady Herbert, of Lea, will shortly visit this country to promote some Roman Catholic object. Lady Herbert is the widow of the gentleman so much better known by his name of Sidney Herbert *y\*n by the title he bore for a very brief period. Shortly after his lamented death, at 47, his widow avowed her conversion to the Romish faith, of which she has since proved herself an ardent adher ent, THE FASHIONS. The Fall Openings—Promenade Suits— The New Poplins?--Silks—Arti ‘ fleial Flowers, The Latest Novelties in Furs, Hand kerchiefs, Jewelry, Etc. If our old fashionable places of trade have not come back tons, we have better ones, and among) the most admired features of our New Chicago will be, in all time to come, our elegant stores, now rapidly falling Into line. The fill openings of the past week have shown that our. merchants are ready with elegant stocks for the fall trade, and a review of some of the novelties offered will interest our Sunday readers. fiTBEET COSTUMES. For the promenade we have some of the most beau tiful goods on sale at the dry goods counters ever brought to the Wait, and they are nearly all imported 41roct from Paris, where business is resumed with all its old vigor and nicety of detail. The gloves all the dresses, the ribbons match the gloves, and ibe flowers match them all. The colors are quite new, or old ones modified. There are several new shades of brown,—cinnamon brown, chocolate brown, cigar,' chestnut, mahogony,’ euxr t cafe art lot/,— paler than formerly,—end the whole army of blues, among which are the Mexlque and the lovely peacock blue,—a shade that has the heaven above and the waters beneath the earth in it,—a lustrous sea-green and aky-hlne com bined, with s dash of opal light over it all. Then there is the ceil and the reseda, and all the greens, of which sage-green is the leading fashion for dress and bat. In two shades. Toad’s-back is only a new name for London smoke, another color that is intensely the mode. No bright color will be permi arable in a toil ette that is strictiy en regie . THE MATTBTAt. USED will be an the different rep goods, and rich, heavy rifts. The new colors are not yet dn pHcatedm cheap goods, so if we wear them at all we most have a rich fabric. I must except, however, the striped poplins. They are really cheap, being only 65 cents a yard, and they come in the new colors with a raised satin stripe. Of course, they wfil not wear like all all-wool goods, but they make up nicely for a season. Cashmeres in sage-green, and rtaeda win be much worn, trimmed with jet braid and yak lace; the latter fabric comes in color to suit. It follows the pattern of guipure laces, of which it ia a coarse worsted imitation. It ranges in price from 50 cents to $5, and is made of worsted thread supposed to have once been yak’s hair. It is much thicker and bravier than guipure. xas EBOCADE3> POTLWS art T-adfag goods and are designed for an upper gar? ment, tunic, or~ polonaise, with plain skirt to exact ly match in color and Tnwterial the plain part of the brocade. The pattern is large sprays of flowers on a plain ground. Those brocaded flowers or vines have a particularly soft, flossy look which gives a,very ricnappearance to the goods, which is worth from $1 to $2 a yard. Plates are given with each dress sold which show exactly how the garment is made. THE NEW BILKS for evening wear are all in those broadest patterns, or else are moire antique,—a fashion which‘will ob tain in ribbons as wall. The colors are magnificent. Cream, bluah-rose, peach, bronze-yellow, and lily, overlaid with clusters of superb brocaded flowers. Those rich fabrics are not cut up into the muititndi nous flowers and riffles of the promenade suit, but ore cut with long sweeping trains, and are trimmed with light velvets and lace applique. On a a tour of in spection, I found at Madame Stoughton’S a closet fun of such dresses, worth from SSCO to SI,OOO each. They were for a bridal trousseau, and will first be aired in Europe, with the single exception of the wedding and travelling dresses. The first is a superb white wa tered trimmed with folds cf dead-while patfp and falls of point lace. The waist is made with points in front and back; the skirt with a court tram sixty-five inches long, lined throughout with white crinoline, and faced with silk; the entire waist lined with white silk, the lace forming a berthe, caught up with orange blossoms back and front. A flounce of the point around the court train. The veil was of Brussels net, edged with D’Alencon lace. THE TRAVELLING DEXSS was of sage-green silk. In two shades, and of marvel lous richness. The flounces were piped with the second shade of the silk, edged with a cord of velvet in the first shade. The bock breadths were;trimmed with alternate flounces, graduated In width. At the side four narrow flounces were put on lengthwise; the wider ones in front to meet the short, open over skirt, with sash falling at the - side. The fpph ruffled in three rows with velvet pocket near the end, the lappel of which had a very heavy fall of jet fringe. The waist a postillion, very abort points, faced with velvet; velvet bretelles, edged with the jet fringe. A sailor bonnet in the two shades of silk and velvet, was made in folds and pipings; one long feather, half ostrich, with a tip of soft, green, fluffy feathers-and a spray of velvet and satin pansies with an end of formed the trimming. BONNETS,—OB BATS, if you please, since simply putting on strings makes the distinction,—are very pleasing to the eye this sea son. They are medium size, and are worn on the back of the head. Instead of being jammed down over the eyes, as hitherto. The Lucie is one of the loading shapes; it is a round-eared bonnet, with flaring front. The crown is trimmed with feathers ar>d loops of ribbons. The one I noticed particularly was in reseda velvet; the front was a loose bow plaiting of velvet, turned back from the face n-nd standing up at the edge to show a tighter silk lin ing. A duster of bronze wheat-ear* and velvet pansies were on one side: two feathers fell over the crown with long loops of ribbon. The only ornament on tho In side of the brim where it was turned back from the face was a humming-bird’s breast—a minute bunch of glossy green feathers in a little patch as big as a dime. artificial flowers have all come out in the new colors, in defiance of na ture. Waxen camellias, with bronzed leave*, one large while bud and one smaller green; one from the centre of the camellia rises a. white, feathery spray, composed of single fibres of ostrich, each one tipped with a water crystal. A wine-colored velvet lily was formed of six leaves of velvet ; .lined with yellow satin tufted with fine yellow fibres nestling around a bronze centre. The leaves’ were pale and bright green and bronze. This single Pari sian flower was $9. A magnificent Begoni, with tiny purplish blossoms, has great leaves veined with all the new* colors, and tinted with a beautiful autumn sunset light. Bronzed wheat, bronzed leaves, roses, and flow ers of all descriptions, are the new features. The Dolman, a fall wrap with very wide sleeves, formed by-a section of the armpiece, is to be much worn in velvet, but the polonaise will not go out this season, as it is too useful and becoming a garment to be parted with so easily. In the place of satin, moire will be used for vests and trimmings; so will bands of feather trimming and fur. Mink and sable will be largely used for cloaks. The elegant seal skin cloaks worn last winter have been improved upon for the coming season. The skin is cut to fit the form, and the jacket is made around the neck like a man’s coat, to wear open or close buttoned, with a rolling collar. Some of the nobbiest will be trimmed with narrow bands of sable fur. The cap and boa will be worn with them. Mink jackets will he a novelty, and a decided improvement on' the loose cape. - They will be cut either sailor or tight-fitting, scalloped at the edges, or plaid, with a half-flowing coat-sleeve, and slashed at the waist. There will be a splendid lot of Maine mink manufactured into furs, either in Barques, or muff, and boa and capes. There will be all kinds of shaggy cloth, Aatrachan, and tufted goods worn for cloaks, with velet collars and cuffs. The Saratoga scarf is a square, or half-square, at fringed silk worn around the neck. It should be pinned down to the dress in the back with 4 and the ends crossed in front and fastened with a brooch. _ Gloves are growing longer and longer. They are now six buttoned, ■ and are still creeping wp to the elbow* The bow tints are ©each, cgaieoa filaSi wjji VUL -andoxanga yellow; those are for evening; for th/ street, sage-green, plum, brown, pear, and reseda. . Buckles of gilt, jet, or steel are worn on Bnssiaas leather belts, and even on dress trimmings* the bows on the shoulders and backs of dressea being fastened with those ornaments. There is ■ perfect rage for jet. It is found at all the milliner? establishments in buckles, aigrettes, loops, bows, bands, butterflies, -and wreaths. Even long feather# of jet are shown, and the whole front of the bonne® sometimes consists of a bandeaux of jet laces ant» flowers. . Handkerchief rare of embroidered muslin, or fiav® a border in colors to match suit. Half border is now the sfcyle,'and if your plain linen moucholr has only a hem; see that it is six inches deep. There are *. g i-Otnany new and tasteful designs in embroidery ~ The ones with printed colors a im for common use. V/l ffWEWSLBT. The V A pink cameo carved In an» tique double rows of Urg® pearls are shown a*- <f- of a leading hous® in this city; they cam".eitheras lockJt or pin, and are of the most exqmsu^workmanship, the edge. being Fulton gold raised in numerous partitions e£ ' knife-edge setting, crusted with' pearls. . Diamond sets are shown In intricate designs and tri-colored gold, these being in sets of pin, earrings- and. finger jewels. • A medallion of. dull gold was ornamented with ara besques in a style sitnfiar to the eamparut. The cen tre Is a large oval surrounded by diamonds on a bins ground, making a lovely contrast. The medallion locket is shown here in all Myles of dull or bright gold, onyx and lapis lazuli, set with. pparlß and diamonds, and finished in the most ap proved style of art. I was also shown a splendid col- . lection of corals in antique designs and modern work manship. Those come in sets, ear jewels, necklace, bracelets and pin, and were of that beautiful polishes cose-oolor so desirable In coral.’ ’ . The heavy Uni-chain of Etruscan gold is still popu lar to wear around the neck,—the larger the links th® better and more stylish. To this the medallion is fas tened. Many prefer the heavy yellow gold cross worn so much last season. This is peculiarly fitted foe church dress. A splendid pair of solitaire diamond earrings were composed of two stones weighing a carat each, Those were in a crown setting and again encircled by a ring of gold and enamel bristling with tiny points. Within fhia H<aTnnnd swung suspended by a tiny gold loop. A pear-shaped drop of blade onyx swung in a Vtm<Tay frarrift as pendant, .the whole being plain and massive in the extreme, and very handsome. They were marked SSOO. ~ , . . . Bandsfor the wrist are of enamelled gold and of' • Etruscan made to simulate ribbon bows, cuffs, etc. The heavy enamelled bands with one or two, cluster® of diamonds were very ornate, Tasselled bracelets and chains are not quite so popu- _ lar as they were, though many very fashionable people still buy them. It is predicted that watches, as arti cles of jewelry with ladies, are going out. to give place to the large locket worn around the neck, or pendant, from the belt. - _ „ ~ _ Good taste will always dictate faithfully what to wea? and what to avoid, and to preserve the harmonies tween the too conservative and the too ultra. « Brook Farm,” Hass., the scene of a celebrated scy-. dalisfc experiment, has been converted into a Luthera® home for children. Water-fowl make their appearance rather slowly this season, the pleasant fall, so far, keeping them ia the North. —JoDaviess County, HI., has' raised an enormous tobacco crop the present season, and now the farmers are bothered to' find places to hang it up .and curs til properly, • _ —lt is rumored that the St. Paul Rood un der contemplation the removal of their machine shops, in the Fourth Ward, up the Menomonee Valley to the neighborhood of the stock yards, and the erec tion of a Union Depot on the ground now occupied by the shops in question.— Milisarikee 2fezcs. —The first attempt ever made to interest China i» the Government stocks of foreign nations was made ia the case of the new French loan. The native capital ists of fibanghwi were favorable to the loan, but tha actual reception it met with in China has yet to be as** certain ed. —So great is the rise in prices in British manufac tures that, recently, large orders for iron for marina purposes, which reached Xiondon from the Italiaw Government, were withdrawn on account of the terms demanded, and transferred to France, where they - were promptly placed. Minneapolis, Minn. r proposes a narrow gauge rail road by way of Farmington, Cannon Falls, and Bocbester, to the South State line at some point in Mower County, where the projectors hope to make » fv->fprqnni<-aHnn with McGregor, 'and possibly Chicago. The passport system of Prussia is to be enforced against auritizens of France entering German terxi» tory on and after the Ist day of November next. Tha operation of thia antiquated, quarantine against free travel will do much to isolate the people of Alsace and Lorraine from communion with their relatives and friends in the Republic. —Thousands ox acres of land In Michigan are cov ered with a growth of sweet fern, which has hitherto been supposed to be worthless, but it has been found that foe turning purposes H is unequalled, and that it yields 40 per cent extract, while hemlock yields but 14 per cent. It promises to be very valuable. —A young Bostonian attended a sociable with a faiff damsel a few "evenings since, and .when abontto re turn home found hi* 44 tile n gone. He took (accord ing to custom) the beat hat left, and remarked to his friend that. 44 he guessed he’d go. the best of that swap.” He was a'TUtle surprised'when-tije young lady’s father called upon him next day and claimed th» swapped 44 tile ”as his own. —They utilize the students, of the scientific school® at Darmouth College in laying out railroads. Th* senior does of that department is now engaged one line from Hanover to Lebanon.. Some of the Dart mouth boys were also taken ont by Professor Quimby during the summer on. his government surveys, thereby having a fine opportunity for a practical ap plication of their mathematical knowledge. —The boys who sell cigars.on the cars will have to look out for the new instructions from' Washington. It has been decided to allow them to sell only from properly stamped packages under a special tax re ceipt as dealers. The sales must also be made exclu sively in the smoking car, and the tax receipts must state the route over which the dealer travels -and thd number of.the car. , * One mark of the change of California from a spec ulative to an Industrial State may be found in the character of the State fair, which, this year for tho first time, wna a fanners’ show. The horse-racing did not constitute the sole attraction, but took it» place beside the Durhams and long-wools. A farmers* club was Organized and measures taken .to maketho fairs a more thorough exposition of the agricultural industry of the State. A consolidation of the power of the agricultural interest into a potential form, might have seme effect to render more manageable tbs railroad monopoly that now taxes every bushel o£ wheat so severely in that State.. —Edward (Bark, architect of the Capitol extension, m»dft a report to the Chairman of the House Com mittee on Public Buildings and Grounds, relative U* the enlargement of the hall of the House of Represen tatives, as contemplated by a resolution adopted by tfrut body June, 1, 1872, in which he says such en largement is impracticable, owing to the shortness of the time during which it must be done. After giving his reasons he says: 44 1t should be borne in mind thas the mors the ball is extended the more difficult it will be for a speaker to be heard from, a back seat. I ant cleacly.of opinion that the moat satisfactory way to get the increased accommodation and the least expensive, is to let the ball remain at its present dimensions, ancf to obtain new desks of smaller size, which might be arranged on the floor in a manner to save considera ble space.” .—Daniel Drew is said to bo worth. $40,000,000. On» of the most successful speculators in Wall street of late is Henry N. Smith, reported to have cleared $5,000,000 or $6,000,000 in the last twelve months. Jay Gould has added $2,000,000 to his capital since the coup d'etat in Erie, and ten or twelve other bold opera tors may be named who have bulled and beared andt gotten up corners until they have augmented their for tunes in a single year by £1,000,000 to $1,500,000 apiece. — A word now about ex-rather Hyadnthe Loyson. I noticed at St. Cloud his portrait was included in those heaps of photographs, costing one sous the carte. Sew what a fall la there, my countrymen. Itiis JokeA abroad that two hundred priests are ready to follow M. Loyeqn*» example. But where to find the widow* —with seventy-five thousand dollars, be it understood —to represent their poverty. Ah! St. Anthony was never subjected to such a temptation. —Paris Letter. —The Chase family met in Boston, last Wednesday, to devise means to establish their heirship to a large property which is said to have fallen to them in Eng land. The amount of the property was stated at about; £52,000,000, and was said to belong to Colonel Francis Townley, who was executed for treason in 1745. Th» property was in litigation for 101 it is said that the English Court established his innocence and awarded .his property to four Chase brothers. OUe was in England, and rumor traces out the other three, as persons who came to this country in 1629, Aquila, who settled at Newbury, Thomas, who settled in Eh ode Island, and William, who settled in Yarmouth. —A correspondent of the New York Herald, who lately called on Senator “ Parson ” Brownlow, says hs found him at bis home, in Knoxville, lying prostrat* on a lounge, while at his feet sat his daughter, the ministering angel of the household—a patient, pale faced girl of about 20 years. The Parson was in bto shirt-sleeves, propped up by a pillow, his hands and arms shaking violently, as if urged by some invmbla electric battery. The volume of his once powerful voice was reduced to the merest whisper, so low that hla visitor had to stoop to his pillow to hear him; cut over his stubborn soul no palsy or tremor bad come* and through his eyes flashed, at intervals, _ gl&izns of the same old fire that made his foes tremble in the day* go l'lS>' “ Fanny Jordan » toi wiU ho remmtertd by moat peeple. It was the wort of A.M. Griswold, otherwisekutrvrnas tho “Fat Contributor, accord ing to Bonn Halt, and it to a “2“' lovable than the original story. VHion the Item w»» dying out” said Colonel Halt, jn a lotterto the Wash ington Capital, ‘Gris’ conceived the rtherbriiliant id fa of interviewing Fanny at Newport, Ehode laland. whore he asserted she had just landed, fresh from her triumphs in Europe. He gave from her own hpa wha* purported to bo a history of her eventful career, and, Aznoxts other absurdities, the confounded scamp sent her abroad under tho care of Murat Halstead. This last had a run equal to the first, and the fun of it wai that Halstead, knowing it to be a hoax, did not read the last installment, and sever knew) what the entire public had been wondering over until it had died out, that his was connected with the imaginary Fan nie in the most scandalous manner. His first impulse was to write a hole through somebody. His second and wiser itaolT* wm to lettho creamy Joft die, tfiicfe itdiiL? ’ NUMBER 56. JOTJS.

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