21 Ekim 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1

21 Ekim 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1
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VOLUME 26. beat, estate. THE ill M Co. OFFER FOR SALE HKTSIDOE3 uu ism This Company wants to sell within the next few months its entire list of unsold prop erty. We have 8,000 FEET OP DOCKED WATER PROMT, AM ' 600 LOTS FOR HOUSES', We tiling parties desiring Site;s for Manufacturing, Si'tes for Iron Foundries, Sites for Iron Furnaces, Sites for Grain Elevators, Cannot fail of finding satisfactory locations, both as to cost and convenience. • The attention of Foundry Proprietors is particularly called to this tract. It is all situated between Chicago-av. and Uorth-av., from Halsted to Noble>sts. We offer entire blocks of water front, al ready docked, on the river and tb«*. canal, and entire blocks adjacent to the waterfronts, both having railway track connections. Also blocks of‘rations sizes lying on the North western Railway, with from one to three street fronts, and at moderate cost. Chicago-av., Division-st., and North-av., are all built to grade andpaved right through the property to and beyond the river, so that teams have short routes to the locality over Nicolson Pavement, by taking - any of the main thoroughfares from the South Division. THE RESIDENCE LOTS Are very desirable to mechanics, both in lo cation and price. The entire property is offered in single lots, or in such lots or parcels os purchasers may •want, and at prices so low as will insure their aale. The amount of each payment will be ffxed about as the buyer may wish,—long extension being given to the balance at 7 per cent interest. Apply to x>. 00-xxeust. Trustee, or H, B. BOGUE, Secretary, Office of Ogden, Sheldon & Co., Hoom 24, northeast corner Monroe andLaSalle-sta. AUCTION SALE OF afi Mm Lots, On the highest ground inside the old city limits. Sale to take place on the ground, Tuesday Next, Oct. 22. These lots are situated east of the Terrell Rouse, and near Milwaukee-av. They are ac -oesable by street cars, three lines of omnibuses. *nd the new Chicago 4 Pacific Railroad, depot located within two blocks. Trains will run •every 30 minutes each way. Fare on either of these but 5 cents, which renders this property aa accessible as any on the West Side. Ground as high enough to get a dry cellar. We have retailed about 100, this season, at prices ranging from $450 to S6OO each. Sale made to close partnership interest. Every lot must he sold. Title is perfect. Full Warranty Deed Ab stract given each purchaser when first payment is made. TERMS OF SALE—SIOO cash on each lot; balance In gonreqaal payments, payable in 6,15,18. and 24 months. With 8 per cent interest. A deposit of $55 will be required «n the ground. Omnibuses will leave oar office atl:3op. mjy Tuesday, Oct. 23. For foil Information and free tickets to sale and return, •call at our office* Office open every evening until 9 o’cl’k. STOBEY, ALLEN & CO., 126 West Washington-st. TO RENT. OFFICES nr THE He Mill Are nearly finished. Several are yet untaken. Fire-proof, with vaults. English tile floors through out. No offices in the city equal these in every first-class respect. Plans of the Tribune Building can he seen at the office of W. C. DOW, Room No. X, Nevada Block. STATIONERY. J. D. ROBERTSON, STATIONER, Riank Rook Manufacturer, and Com mercial Printer, NO. 179 EAST MADISON-ST., ifl now prepared to supply his patrons and the public with AX* Ktffos OF STATION ERY The trade generally are invited to in spect his stock, which is complete in every branch* FURNITURE. FASHIONABLE nMITURE! V. ¥. SMB FDMTDM CO., 353 to 359 ‘W.EanMph-st., Chicago. Branch Salcsbom, Wabash-av. and 22d-st. We call special atentioa to our stock of Lew Priced Goods suitable for pcsent demands. RUDOLF9&THOIALEN 153 WISmSHffI&TOI-ST. FJNUIxD MEDIUM FURNITURE. ■ -mall profits, low prices. Small expenseSi riI&NCIAL. Xioaus 3"egotiatecL On real estate, in the a or suburbs, at current rates. Q.\ HUBBARD, Jr., ISB Eut TfM.Wx>6toa-rt» real estate. TIE IST ATTRACTIVE SALE OF THE YEAR. Beautiful droie Lots, EACH 50 FEET FRONT, : • AUOTIOKT ON THE GROUNDS, IT WiHTW KITS On SATURDAY, Oct. 26, 1872, by Beal Estate Auctioneers and Brokers. These lota we In tbo Vinoeonea Road Subdivision, being the west of southeast ot Section 19, Township 31, north of ranee 14. They are finely located, adjolnlngtbe celebrated Morgan Park on the east, and having a nalf xnile frontage on both sides of thc'Vincennes road. 'From the northeast to the southwest line of this property, Vin cennes road passes through a beautiful grove; and on a highrldgo, making it exceedingly attractive for homos, Jn fact, no point could be more desirable. The facilities for reaching the property are excellent, and cannot be surpassed. Tbo Hock Island 4 Pacific Railroad passes through the southeast corner of tbo subdivision, at which Eoint a depot will bo built, and tho Washington Heights ranch Railroad runs along tho west line of the property, - and at its junction with Vincennes road and Sharpshoot ers Fark-av. afinejdepotisbeing built*’ With two depots upon the property, great advantages and facilities aro given. In the Immediate vicinity of this subdivision Ira* grovemont* are rapidly going on; quite a number of fine oases are completed and cottages are being erected. An educational institution, upon an extensive scale, is pro* jected by parties interested in property northeast of this subdivision, and wo have assurances that it will bo a suc cess. In brief, for beauty of location, attractiveness,' and accessibility, tne Vincennes Road Subdivision is not sub* passed. Lot all interested in possessing pleasant suburban homes, with beautiful groves ana delightful surround ings, free from the dust and noise of a busy city, attend this sale. Title to property perfect. Abstract of title furnished. m a . . - »- . 1..t 1 - I Terms of sale, one-foarth cash, balance in one, two, and three years, with interest at 8 per cent. A deposit of lu per cent will bo required on the day of sale, and the balance of tho first payment within 30 days. A free train will leave the depot of the Rock Island * Pacific Railroad on Saturday, Oct. 20, at 10 a. m., and return after sale. A free lunch will be served on the ground.' Let all go who can, for a pleasant- ride to this charming suburb will prove beneficial to the health, and a liberal investment in lots decidedly ao to the pocket. Fiats of the property con be obtained at the office of the Auctioneers. C. 0. THAYEE & CO., 186 East Madison-st. FOE, SALE. One of the host corner lota, 50x100 feet, on West Madi son, west of Holstod-st., in the West Division. Renting for over $4,000 per annum. Mast bo sold this week. For particulars, inquire of D. COLE & SON, Real Estate Agents, 188 West Madiaoo-st. SILKS. SPECIAL SALE OF SMS. GABBO9, PIRIE & CO., 329 WEST MADISON-ST., in order to reduce their stock of PLAIN, COLORED, FANCY, AND RICH BLACK SILKS, offer the fol lowing inducements to purchasers for the next thirty days only ; OKE-FIFTH OFF, Or 20 PER CENT DISCOUNT will he deducted from all purchases of the above goods during the time mentioned. The regular prices of these goods will remain unaltered, so that customers can see that this offer is made in good faith j the discount wilj he deducted from the face of the hill. This stock consists of all the best shades of plain colored Gres Grains, Failles, Gros de Afriques, Taffettas and Poult de Soies. Fancy Stripe Silks in White, Grey and Black grounds in large variety, a few of them as low as 73c yd. ill of our Stock of Rich Black Silks over $3,25 per yard, consisting of elegant Gros Grains, Cachemires, Sublimes,* etc. of “ Bonnet's ’ and other best makes. Black Silks lower than the shove price will be sold at cost, hut the discount of 20 per cent will not apply to them. We will also offer during this sale Genuine Lyons Cloak Velvets, at such a sacrifice as will place them $3 to $5 a yard lower than tho lowest market price. BUSINESS CARDS. Sheppard & Streeter BUY AND SELL ZFLeE&I Estate, NEGOTIATE LOANS, —AND— Rent Buildings, XSe and XBB ESstst Madison-st, Hi Film WORKS, N. S. BOUTON, President, Comer Fifteenth and Dearhom-sts., Aro prepared to do all General Jobbing Work, Car, Bridge, and Bolling Mill Castings. OHDEHS SOLICITED. COR. FIFTEENTH & DEAB.BOBOT-ST3. MISCELLANEOUS; SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY! For a Liberal Newspaperman, with S4OO. Such an op* portunity is but seldom mot with. Address “X,” Trib- une office. GLAZED MD COLORED PAPER At Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co.’s, 118andl20 Monroe-st., Chicago. CK4IIE OF FIRM MB, JOHN B. RAYMOND and MR. HENRY C. BANNARD hare become partners in our house, dating from Oct. 1. feajjklh mao VEAGH & 00., Chicago. Oct, ?8.15T2. REMOVAL. REMOVAL. Schroder Bros, hove removed their Eeal Estate Office to 122 La BaUe-st., Booms 7 and 8. Oriental Building. MEETINGS. Shoemakers, Attention. A mass meeting to consider the relation of wages to labor will be hold at 77-79 Dearborn-st., Monday morning, at 9 o'clock. Strike for higher wages. AH shoemakers an reawstefl to 1?o ssupt., POLITICAL. Grand. Liberal Bally at Cairo on Sat* urday. Senator Trumbull Replies to Speaker Blaine’s Chi cago Speech* Enthusiastic Liberal Meetings at Tuscola, HI. Speeches by General Black, Governor Gross, amt Others. How Senator Spencer, of Alabama, Proposes to Secure a Re-election. LIBERAL RALLY AT CAIRO-SPEECH OP SEN ATOR TRUMBULL IN REPLY .TO BLAINE’S CHICAGO SPEECHi Special Despatch to the Chicago Tribune, ' Cilko, EL, Oct. 19.—The Liberals had a mon ster torch-light procession and demonstration here to-night. Large delegations came by steamer and special trains from Paducah, Mound City, Columbus, and other adjacent towns. Senator Trumbull addressed a vast audience of six thousand persons in one of his most forcible and effective speeches. He replied as follows to Speaker Blaine’s Chicago speech: “ Mri Blaine, Speaker of the House of Bepre sentativea, in a speech at Chicago a few days ainco, said 5 ‘ From the beginning this has been a campaign of extraordinarily vigorous lying,’ in which I quite agree with him, but the lying has been monopolized by the Badicals with whom he acts. For my own part I - have never indulged in personal attacks upon any one. I have spoken freely of existing evils and abuses of government, and of illegal and corrupt acts of officials, but of private tran sactions, and of individuals as such, never. Mr. Blaine, in endeavoring, to defend himself and the majority of the Senate from the charge of having unfairly organized and packed commit tees of investigation with partisans and especial friends of the officials whose conduct was to be investigated, said that by Mr. Trumbull’s and Mr. Schnrz’s oWn showing they desire committees to be packed against a fair bearing of the charges against the Administration of General Grant. Mr. Blaine did not and cannot adduce any proof in support of this wanton calumny. Neither of ns ever desired more than that the friends of investigations should be fairly repre sented upon the Committees. Mr. Blaine says: * Certain allegations were brought against the management of the Navy Department in the New xork Sun. Mr. Trumbull came and said that an investigation would be moved In the House by Governor Blair, of Michigan. Ho intimated to me teat be hoped that there would be more fairness in the House investigation than bad been shown in the Senate. I told him, of course, I could not say anything about the appointment of a select committee, hut what I would do in the future must be judged by what I had done in the past.’ This is not a correct statement of Mr. nlaine’e reply to my suggestion lor a fair com mittee. Can it be that he has forgotten his as surance that Mr. Blair, who offered the resolu tion, would be entitled to be Chairman, and that he wonld consult Mr. Blair as to tho composition of the committee, as soon as the resolution was adopted ? Has he farther forgotten that almost immediately on the adoption of the resolution, he announced the Committee, without such consultation ? Gover nor Blair was unwilling, in view of the frequent packing of committees with especial friends of the accused, to undertake the investigation of the alleged abuses in the Naval Department, un less he could be assured in advance that be would have a fair Committee. It was tp obtain that assurance that I called on Speaker Blaine. I obtained it, and so informed Mr. Blair. How well that assurance was kept, subsequent events and the conduct of ft portion of the Committee in conducting the investigation, as the attorneys of tho Secretary of the Navy, abundantly snow. Fortunately, it is not necessary to put my word against Mr. Blaine’s, as to a conversation of which he and I alone were cognizant, in order to show how mistaken, I will not say guilty of vig orous lying, he is in his remarks at Chicago. Truth is always consistent with itself; and, al though time is often said to be immaterial, even in contracts, it sometimes becomes the very essence of a contract, and is an infallible tost of truth. If a commission mer chant in Chicago, to whom you have shipped grain in the fall of 1871, were to report to you that the grain was destroyed in the warehouse in the groat fire which occurred in the city on the 9th of October, and it were subsequently to appear that the grain was not received hy the Chicago merchant till after the fire, what would be thought of his statement that it was consumed in that great conflagration ? so, if Mr. Blaine, speaking in Chicago this week, says that in March, 1872, he selected for tne performance of a par ticular service a class of persons who had no ex istence till the May following, the whole world will see ho is mistaken in what he says. This is his language: Mr. Blair moved tho Commit tee ; it was appointed, and vindicated the Sec retary of the Navy against the charges of tho New York Sun. Now, Mr. Trumbull intimates, in talking about it whenever ho alludes to the subject, that it was done by a packed committee. Now, that Committee consisted of five mem bers, three of whom wore Greeley men. [Cheers]. Governor Blair, of Michigan, Mr. Warren, of New York, and Mr. Archer, of Maryland, were the three Greeley men; Mr. Peters of Maine, and Mr. Sargent, of California, were the two Republican members. The record shows that Mr. Blair appointed the committee March 12,1872, nearly two months before the meeting of the Cincinnati Conven vention, at which Mr. Greeley was nominated. When the committee was raised, there were no Greeley men in existence to appoint, and, con sequently, Mr. Blaine’s statement that he ap- Eomtod three such men on the committee cannot e true. Mr. Blaine says the Committee vindicated the Secretary of the Navy against the charges of the New York Sun, hut he does not venture to say that he was properly acquitted. The very fact that a majority of the Committee vindicated the Secretary from the charge of having paid out of the Treasury, in 1870, 603,000 to naval contract* tors, who had previously been paid all that a Board of officers had reported to be or that was duo them, in violation of a law passed in 1868, which declared that the sums previously paid shall bo in full discharge of all claims against the • United States on account of the vessels upon which the Board made the allowance, furnishes the best evidence which could bo required to show the partisan character of the Committee. Mr, Blaine further says: ‘ Mr, Trumbull arraignshia associates who are supporting Mr. Greeley because three of them have determined that the Secretary of the Navy acted properly.’ How much does this statement of Mr. Blaine differ from that extra ordinarily vigorous lying of which he speaks? Does not Mr. Blaine know that no three friends of Mr. Greeley determined that the Secretary of the Navy rcted properly? So far from it, Messrs. Blair and Archer determined and reported that he paid out $93,000 to tho Secors in violation of law. Whether the relations of Messrs. Sargent and Warren to tho Secretary of tho Navy and to par ties dealing with and under obligations to him were such as to render them fit persona to in vestigate his conduct, let such judge as have a knowledge of facts of which Mr. Blaine was not ignorant.” Tho torchlight procession was nearly two miles in length, ana tves composed in part of mounted men. Many were unable to obtain torches, as there were only about 2,500 to dis tribute. Great enthusiasm prevailed. Egypt is sure for Greeley and Brown m November. SPEECH OF JOHN T. STONEMAN AT DUBUQUE. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, Dubuque, lowa, Oct. 20.—John T. Stoneman, Liberal-Democratic candidate for Congress in CHICAGO, MONDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1872. the Third District, addressed a large audience of his constituents at the Athentcum, last evening; in a clear and forcible speech of an honr and a half. Ho completely absorbed the attention of his large audience, who frequently greeted him with rounds of applause. His illustrations of points of political economy were plain and con vincing ; stooping to no petty insinuations in speaking of rivals, which won him many en comiums. In short, hia speech was logical and incontrovertible throughout. Ho opened by saying he should endeavor to say nothing that would sting the sensibilities of the many Re publicans ho noticed present. He did not be long to that class or party tb&t thought all the best men were on their side. That party was best which p’ointcd out and tried to right the wrongs of an Administration; that the greatest enemy is that’ party which reeks in corruption and wrong, and refuse to remedy it. Ho mired the honesty and spirit exhibited by men ■ severing their connection with a party confed eration in .full tide of political success* to Join a party for reform and political purity.- Many declared Greeley inconsistent, and said many bitter things, but in the exciting days gone by there were few men that had not committed themselves. When the Democratic party was in power, it contained such men as Ben. Butler, Simon Cameron, and Morton, and hosts of others equally corrupt, who stood by the party while it was dominant, stood by the fives loaves and seven fishes like brave men, but who pulled up their tents like Arabs when the tide turned, and stole over to the Republican ranks. Then it was that Mr. Greeley poured hot shot into Democratic ranks, aiming only at such men, and would to God he had hit them. If the Democrats and Liberals had been inconsistent in Joining together in this new movement, he didn’t care, so long as they were right in the main. Mr. Greeley has been in consistent in his way as an humble explorer in the march of development, but the people hon ored and admired him, and he believed he would make a good President. AH accorded Mr. Greeley honesty and sincerity of purpose. Of Grant he should not say an unkind word; It is an easy matter for men to start enthus iasm by blackening the character of another. If he could ;not make his way to preferment otherwise than by the ruin and degradation of his fellows, he would bo contented to occupy an humble position, and pass through lifeuuhon orod and unsung; WHAT IT COST TO CARRY PENNSYLVANIA FOR HARTRANFT. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune . New Yobk, Oct. 20.—A Philadelphia corres pondent, who has good facilities for ascertaining what is enacted in the Grant campaign in that State, says the amount expended by the State Re publican Committee to elect Hartranft amount ed to three million dollars. The re volt of McClure, Curtin, • Forney, Heckman, Moorhead, Marshall, and a dozen or more Republican newspapers, constitute the reason for this enormous expend iture. The programme laid down by the Grant Committee was to impress the public with the estimation in which Buckolew, and Hartranft, and Cnrtin were held by their neighbors, by causinf Buckalew and Cnrtin to run far below, and Ha tranlt far above, the general average of their tickets at their respective homes. This required an expenditure of $50,000 in each of the three counties. In Luzerne, one of the strongholds of the Democrats, a much larger sum was expended, and with effect, for the Democratic majority was greatly reduced, some of Grant’s revenue officers are Ukely to bo in a condition that a pardon from Hartranft will bo necessary to their promotion. In Lancaster, greenbacks were lavished without stint, and, it is charged, on oath, that one of Grant’s revenue officers in Lancaster City was in the market to buy Democratic judges at S2OO a head, provided they reduced the Buckalew vote 100 in their respective polling places. Remarked this revenue officer: “I bad no occasion to buy Judges of Election, when an endless number of Germans offered to vote for Hartranft at from $1 to $2 a head.” This fling at the Germans is, doubtless, a malig nant deduce to obscure the fact that voters who sold themselves were Bourbon Democrats of na tive production. HOW SENATOR SPENCER, OF ALABAMA, PRO' POSES TO SECURE A RE-ELECTION. Washington, D. 0., Oct. 20. —Senator Spencer, of : Alabama, continues in trouble, he being among that unfortunate class of carpet-bag Senators whose term expires on March 4th next. Therefore he has sent on here a delegation of email local politicians, also carpet-baggers, to in duce the Administration to send troops down to that State for the purpose of ensuring a quiet election, and prevent any such opposition ma jorities as were achieved in Georgia. It is not pretended that there is any present necessity for military aid, but only that troops may be needed to bring out the full black vote in the State in November next. Senator Spencer and this retinue of his do not believe with the Con gressional Campaign Committee that Alabama is safe for Grant. They represent that the Repub lican party down there is split into more than two fragments, and that the negro vote is not by any means unanimous. It is believed here that the delegation is but the forerunner of the powerful influences which will be brought to bear on the President from all the Southern States to induce Federal interference with the November elections in the Southern States. OFFICIAL RETURNS OF THE OHIO ELECTION, Columbus, Ohio. Oct. 20.— Official returns have been received from all the counties in Ohio, and show the following Republican ma jorities for State officers: For Secretary of State, Allen Wikoff, 14,055 majority; Supremo Judge, John Welch, 10,189 majority; Member of Board of Public Works, Richard P. Porter, 16,455 majority. The total vote cast for Secre tary of State is 520,037, the largest vote ever cast in Ohio for any officer. The following are the names of the Congress men-elect in the various districts of tho State, and their respective majorities: First District, Milton Taylor, Democrat, majority, 8,569; Sec ond District, H. B. Banning, Liberal Republi can. majority, 1,502; Third District, John Q, Smith, Republican, majority, 1,269; Fourtn District, L. B. Guncklo, Republican; majority, 1,927 ; Fifth District, Charles N. Lamison, Dem ocrat, majority, 5,806; Sixth District, Sherwood, Republican, majority, 8,065 ; Seventh Die tricLLawronceNeal, Democrat, majority,l,273; Eighth District, William Lawrence, Republican, majority, 4.043; Ninth District, James W. Robin son, Republican, majority, 427; Tenth District, Charles Foster, Republican, majority, 726; Elev enth District, H. 8. Bundy, Republican, majori ty, 2,907; Twelfth District, H. J. Jewett, Demo crat, majority, 4,677; Thirteenth District, M.'J. Southard, Democrat, majority, 2,471; Fourteenth

District, John Berry. Democrat, majority, 3,643; Fifteenth District, William P. Sprague, Repub lican majority, 991; Sixteenth District, Lorenzo Danford, Republican, majority, 3,293; Seven teenth District, L. D. Woodworth, Republican, majority, 2,262. • Eighteenth District, Jas. Monroe, Republican, majority, 4,364; Nineteenth District Jas. A. Garfield, Republican, majority, 10,955; Twen tieth District, Richard C. Parsons, Republican, majority, 2,724. Total 13 Republicans, 6 Demo crats, and 1 Liberal, in addition to tho above, O. J- Dodd, Democrat, was elected {to fill a va cancy in Hamilton County. LIBERAL MEETINGS AT TUSCOLA, ILL. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune . Tuscola, HI., Oct. 19.—Governor Bross, and the Hon, James Cunningham, of Charleston, ad dressed a large and highly pleased audience, in Commercial Hall, this afternoon. The Gover nor’s clear and truthful expose of the unprece dented frauds and corruptions of the Adminis tration fell upon fruitful ground, and will not be lost sight of, on the sth of November, by the honest yeomanry of Douglas County. Mr. Cun ningham gave a cheering account of the Liberal cause in this district. This evening, the largest crowd over assembled in this city was addressed by General Black. The General, here as else where, produced an immense sensation. Tuscola, Oct. 19.—General Black addressed the largest audience ever assembled in Douglas County at Commercial Hall this evening. He spoke from a Democratic standpoint, and for nearly two hours held his vast audience spell bound. His friends here regard it as the best effort of his life, and by far tho best speech of the campaign in Douglas County. To-day’s work has placed Liberalism above par. NEW YORK CITY POLITICS. New York. Oct. 20.—Mr. Havemeyer, nomi nated for Mayor of New York by the Eepubli cans last night, has already served two terms in that office. His selection is considered sig nificant by some as indicating a precedent for possible Presidential tactics in 1876. THE SOUTH CAROLINA ELECTION. OnARLESToy, S. C., Oct. 20.—Advices from all sections of the State show that the amendment to the , State Constitution, prohibiting any increase of the State debt, has been ratified by an overwhelming affirmative vote. Both parties very generally indorsed the measure. FOREIGN* SPAIN; New York, Oct, 20.— The London Times has the following regarding the fire at the Decimal: “ According to a statement made by the Minis ter of Finance to the Cortes yeaterdayaftemoon, the actual damage is much less than at first sup posed. Not a hook or manuscript or picture had been injured. The church and palace, with their priceless contents, are untouched. .The principal fear was for the coiling of the library, with its magnificent frescoes, and the work of Peregrin Toboldi, and Bartoleme Carducci. These works of art, which represent philosophy, grammar, rhetoric, music, astronomy, dialetics, arithmetic, and the ology, appear to tne eyes os fresh and as brill iant as when their colors were first laid on; more than 300 years figo; Fortunately they are intact, and neither fire nor water has damaged them. Fears, however, exist that in consequence of the immense weight of rubbish above it the whole ceiling may fall, hut as the work of clearing away this rubbish has commenced, and is being car ried on with extreme care, it is to be hoped no further mischief will bo done. So far as can at present he calculated, it will cost 840,000 to repair it. The idea of a National sub scription was started, bni His Majesty has knocked it on the head by insisting on fraying the whole cost out of his own private purse; Madrid, Oct. 20.—A bill has been introduced in the Cortes abolishing the penalty of death for political offences, and has passed its first read ing. ■ • • • GREAT BRITAIN. London, Oefc. 20.—8y n<s means a gratifying light is shed upon the account of the Metropoli tan Railway by the Committee of Investigation appointed last August. Dubious transactions have b ten engaged m by the management, inju dicious outlays have been perpetrated, and the dividends paid have been £400,000 in excess of the actual net earnings of the line. Mary Ann Cotton, who has been committed for trial on a charge of havingpoxsoned her hus band and four children, at West Auckland, is now implicated in a series of other charges, which, if verified, will prove her to have been a systematic poisoner from her youth. Cotton, who died in September, was her fourth husband. The first two had their lives insured at her in stance, and when they died, of what was medically certified to be gastric fever, she promptly realized her widow’s consolation, Dnnng the first marriage seven children died! The third was fatal to six more x and the fourth at West AfiManßj had reached its fifth victim, when the horrible career of crime was stopped. It is now remembered that Cotton’s own mother died under mysterious circumstances, similar to those noted in all other cases. With her’a there' will he twenty cases of suspicion. Field Marshal Sir George Pollock, Constable of Lower London, and a distinguished Last In? dian officer, died in London on the 6th inst. at on advanced age. - FRANCE. Pabis, Oct. 20.—Prince Napoleon has appealed to the Prpcnrour General of France for redress against the Minister of Interior, the Prefect of Police, and others who took part in his explo sion from France. The appeal la made in ac cordance with the provisions of the Penal Code. Should it be rejected or disregarded, the Prince will commence a personal proceeding in the Courts against the parties concerned, and will avail himself of all legal means to procure aree toration of his rights as a citizen of France, and the punishment of those who have illegally en mm from his country. The Government has resolved to support, in the . * ap proaching session ' of the Assembly’, a motion for the appointment of a Commission to investigate the acts of the Ollivier and.Pali kao Cabinets preparatory to the impeachment of tho Imperial Ministers, on a charge of having provoked the war with Prussia. This motion was made by the Left during the last session of the Assembly, but was voted down, the Governs inent at the tune taking no part for or against it. Pabis, Oct. 20 —Evening.—The elections to All the vacant seats in the Assembly took place to-day.- The returns to-night are meagre. In Bordeaux, M. Caduc, Republican, has 19,772, and Forcade Laroguette, Conservative, 5,828 votes. In the Departments of Oise, Morbitan; find Vosges, returns from towns only have been received, and show majorities for the Radical candidates, Renselle, Beaurais, andHetine. ' The Count de Chaznbord has written a letter protesting against the establishment of the Re public as the permanent form of Government. Ho says the monarchy alone can save France. There is no difference between a party of vio lence which promises peace to men while it de clares war on God, and those prudent men who seek to obtain the some ends by covert means. AUSTRIA. London, Oct. 20.— The London Telegraph says Count Andressy has delivered a significant speech to the Austrian delegation. While echo ing the pacific declarations which sound so ironi cal at Paiis and Berlin, he allows them only temporary value. The background, he says, does not open a prospect of lasting peace, notwith standing the imperial fraternity and good un derstanding among statesmen. He holds that Austria will not bo safe till she can trust in her own strength. WEST INDIES. New Yobh, Oct. 20.—A special from Havana says that Henderson, the American arrested by tho Cuban authorities on suspicion of being in league with the insurgents, has been releaaed-by order of the Captain General. NEW YORK. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune* THE “HEBALD’s” CUBAN EEPOBTEB. New Yoke, Oct. 20.—The Herald says it de tailed Henderson to ascertain the exact condi tion of affairs in Cuba, and ascribes his prompt release to telegrams sent to Havana by Admiral Pozo. Though Henderson is now, it says, in danger of assassination as a suspected person, he will posh ahead with his impartial mission, for he is a picked man-of nerve. The irrepressible Sergeant Bates sailed for Europe yesterday, after dapping his flag through the streets on his way to the steamer, surrounded by a large escort of bootblacks. The Sergeant said he was robbed of $lB5 at the theatre in this city a few nights ago, which will render him penniless when he lands In England. He depends now on British hos pitality. “I am in good health,” he “and expect to win a wager when I finish. I will raise money some way, if I have to dance the highland fling under the flag. 1 will go from Glasgow to Edinburgh. I will then go to the English border, near Carlisle, and unfurl the flag. From Carlisle, I will go by way of Kendall, to Lancaster; thence to Manchester, by the way of Bolton and Preston; from Man chester through Birmingham and Warwick to Oxford, and thence along the Thames road to London. I expect to walk the entire distance in eighteen days.” MORE GREENBACKS. Another meeting of merchants and manufac turers will be held in Philadelphia to-morrow, to request Secretary Boutwell to re-issue tho $44,- 000,000 of greenbacks retired by Secretary Mc- Culloch. This proposition finds some support in the Philadelphia journals, but has as yet not received any approval from the press or com mercial public of this city. —Tho Longshoremen’s strike for $4 per day has terminated successfully in New (Orleans, the aicaznboatmen and colliers having generally ac ceded to their demands. A slight advance in cpal And freight is probable. mme. WASHINGTON. Caleb Cushing on the Gc. nre v° Miration. The Law Fixing the Date of the Opening of the Forty-third Con gress. Special Despatch to the Chicago Tribune* im. CUSHING ON THE ARBITRATION. fitATTBB. Washington, Oct. 20. —Caleb Cushing, of the American Counsel at the Geneva Conference, arrived here to-day, and will to-morrow have a conference with the President and Secretary Hsh at the State Department with reference to arbitration matters. He prophesies the best of results from the arbitration, in an international point of view, and says that our Government, independent of tlid diplomatic victory achieved, has every reason to . congratulate itself on the financial results of the award. He estimates at very low figures, about $1,000,000, the awards from, the counter claims in the mixed Commission now in session in this city. OUR PRESIDENTIAL JEHU. The President come near getting into difficul ty on account of his horse's yesterday. He was driving bis small team in the eastern part of the city, when they suddenly took fright, and the President was obliged 'to leap froni his carriage, in order to regain’ con trol of the animals. However, before they were rendered tractable, they had so* badly demolished the carriage that the President was compelled to walk home, and leave his tdrh-OUt to be brought home by some volunteer work man. SMAf.L-PQi. Owing to the continual rapid increase of thd small-pox in this city, the Board' of He&liH has divided the Washington and Georgetown Dis tricts, with a physician in each district, who will visit each house, for the purpose of vaccinating the inmates. Slued . Congress adjourned 1,257 cases have been reported, and 60 deaths have occurred. Thirty-eight of the fatal cases had never been vaccinated, and are believed to have died, and twelve died who had been successfully vaccinated. THE FORTY-THIRD CONGRESS will not meet until the first Monday of Decem ber, 1873, unless sooner, called together in extraordinary session. The impres sion prevails among many persons that the act of ' Jan. 22, 18G7, requiring a new Congress to assemble on March 4, immediately on the adjournment of its.prede cesaore, is still in force, hut this law was re pealed by the thirtieth section of the statute ap proved April 20,1871, and ia to he fonnd on page 12 of the law passed at the first session* of the Forty-second Congress. The repealiag section is contained in a. deficiency appropriation act, and the entire statute is well worth examin ing as a curious illustration of the. incongruous measures that are crowded in one hill during the expiring hours of a session of Congress. FRED DOUGLASS REBUKED. The Sunday Chronicle administers thefol-; lowing rebuke tjo-day to Fred Douglass for his in temperate abuse through his newspaper of all who differ from, him as io the issuS of the pres ent campaign : ,“ Qu£ : . friend n . Ffc<3J Douglass, of the * , new * Rational-. Era, . should * “ not • forget that • the brave men of Pennsylvania, whom hois trying id read out of the Republican party, were among the first to fight for the freedom of his race, and to take him by the hand at a time when some of his present affiliations spumed his acquaint ance, and only recognize it now for’political purposes.” {To the Associated Press] ■ : PAYMENT OK INTEREST. Washington, . Oct. 26.—The Secretory of the Treasury has authorized the Assistant Treasurer and United States Depositaries to commence Saying the’ interest maturing Nov. 1, on Mon ay, 21, without rebate. APPO] . The President has appointed the following Postmasters: Benjamin C. Sheeps, Oregon, Hl.,.trice John Sharp, resigned; C. H. Mclntyre, Yankton, Dakota, trice Wm. Pound, resigned. ILLINOIS. Klccting of tlio Illinois .Baptist Gen eral Association at Jacksonville— Society for the Promotion of Collegia ' ate and Theological Education* \Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. . Jacksonville, HI., Oct. 20. —The Illinois Bap tist General Association met again yesterday morning at 9 o’clock, in the first Baptist Church of Jacksonville, pursuant to adjournment the evening before, and the session was opened with devotional exercises, following which re ports from Committees as follows were read: On the scope of the work for the General Asso ciation; work of the Baptist denomination in foreign and home missions; church extension ; Bible Publication Society; ministerial educa tion; general statistical information; foreign population of the State, and general missionary work at homo. At the conclusion of the reading of the" re ports, which were fraught with much that was of great interest to the Church and tho work of ihe Baptists, Bev. G. J. Johnson, of St. Louis, presented, in a clear and comprehensive manner, the cause of the Bible Publication Society. • The Association then adjourned for dinner. ' At 2 o’clock the Association again-convened, and listened to the reading of several additional reports from standing committees. After the reading of these reports, the question as to the place of holding the nest annual meeting of the Association was called up, and it was voted to hold it at Canton, Illinois, in October, 1873. Bev. F. Holt, of Barry, was appointed to preach the funeral sermon at the nest meeting, and Bev. J. B. Thomas, D. D., of Chicago, was selected his alternate. The Convention brought its labors to a dose at 5 p. m., and adjourned until 7 p. m., at which time the members reassembled and devoted-an hour to a special reunion, after which a final ad journment was had, and the members in a body repaired to the Conservatory Hall by special invitation to attend a grand concert given by the faculty of the Illinois Conservatory of Music in compliment to the Association. An immence audience, composed in considerable part of members of theleamed and influential ecclesiastical body, were delightfully entertained with a splendid musical entertainment. At the termination of the music, a resolution tendering the thanks of the members of the As sociation to Dr. Sanders, President of the Con servatory of Music, and to the teachers thereof, for the (manning entertainment, was passed. To-day most of the pulpits of the churches of the city were occupied by reverend members of the Association.' Yesterday, at 11 o’clock a. m., the anmud meet ing of the Society for the Promoting of Collegi ate and Theological Education at tho West began in this city. The meeting is held at the Congre gational Church. The only business transacted at tho rooming session was the election of officers for the ensuing year; Bev, Chas. Bay Palmer, D. D., of Bridgeport, Conn., was chosen Presi dent, and Bev. 81. Q. Butterfield, of New York, Secretary. The Society adjourned at 12 m. and reassembled at 2 p. m. The first business transacted * was the reading of the report of the Secretary, covering the work of the Society for the past year. The balance of the afternoon was consumed in the transaction of some business. At 7 o’clock last evening the Society again met, and. after the opening of the session with prayer, Bev. J. M. Sturtevant, D. D., President of the niiqola College, delivered m afldww Qt welcome to the members of the Society. Thir* was followed by the reading of a^ paper on th< oat new duties are imposed upor ‘ . the existence of State tTntrer* > ax\ u6tr .W. Leonard Bacon, D. p., o| ',» ivj is ’hiS question, so elaborately and * learnedly handled by Dr. Bacon, was further dis cussed by several members of the Society. The discussion ended, the organization adjourned. This morning, at 11 o*clock, the . annual ser mon was delivered before the Society in the- Congregational Church, by Bov. G. F. ilagoun, D. D., President of lowa College, which was pronounced a most eloquent and finished dis course. ■__ * Af S o’clock, this afternoon, the Society held & session in the First Presbyterian Church. The session was opened with devotional exorcises, and the remainder of the afternoon con sumed in the discussion of the theme of ‘The relations of the Christian Col lege to the Church.” The distinguished gentlemen taking part in the discussion of this subject were Bev. H. Q. Butterfield,, of Now York: President ITcYicners, of Washington Col lege, RftTiHUH • Prof. Blaisdcll, of Beloit- College; President Merriman, of Bipon College, and Bev. Chas. Baye Palmer, of Connecticut. * This evening at 7 o’clock the Society held a meeting at the Congregational Church, and were richly entertained with the reading of a paper by BeVx % M. Post, D. D., of St. Louis, on the question whether we should seek a union of all Evangelical denominations in founding and sus taining a college. _ , • The Society will resume its work to-morrow morning at 9 o’clock. tr«nUO|ij CURRENCY INFLATiOM. Petition of Western lilcrcbnnts for the Reissue of the 940-090,000 Retired by Secretary ItZcGiilloclu PittsEUbsh, Oct. 20.—The following petition has been signed bv a largo number of the heavi est firms in Pittsburgh, and will be presented early in the week to the Secretary of the Treas ury by a large delegation of the most influential business men, who will be met At Washington City by a delegation representing a .large number of the principal cities west of the AUeghaniea: « Hon. J. S. Boutaell, Secretary of the Treasury , \TasJ> ington, V. C.: “Sib: The growth and increase of the industrial Interests of this country and the material wealth, so unprecedentedly augmented during .the past four years, especially require, in onr judgment, increased facilities for the transaction of the in ternal commerce of the country, and more par ticularly so at this time of the year; and while we entertain the highest respect for the groat financial ability which characterized your admin istration of the finances of the Government, and are, therefore, the more reluctant to make any suggestions or recommendations which might not accord with your judgment ia the premises, we would, nevertheless, most re spectfully suggest whether a reissue of the notes commonly known as greenbacks, amount ing to $44,000,000, which were retired by your predecessor, Mr. McCulloch, might not with great benefit to the industrial interests of the country be reissued in exchange for the interest bearing loan of the Government, withont-ae riously interfering with the policy you have so steadily and successfully kept in view, of ap- Sreciating the public credit. , If this can be one, it would afford a measure of relief from the present monetary stringency which is se riously embarrassing the business interests of the country.” THE CITY IN BRIEF. Previous to their departure, on.. Thursday evening last, the “Philadelphia party” express ed themselves as follows to Messrs. Gardner & Gould, proprietors of the Gardner House: “ Having enjoyed the hospitalities of your bouse for several days, we have pleasure in expressing our appreciation of its' admirable management, as wefi as of its complete adaptation to the wants 'of the travelling community.' If polite and courteous attention, if anxiety to please your guests, if a .table replete with all the • deli cacies of the season, if cleanliness and neatness in every department are elements- constituting -the main features,©! a first-class hotel, we beg leave to say to you that'your , house ..may, of right,', claim a high position among the finest hotels in the land, and *as such we voluntarily commend if to the public:”; • • .Mr. and Mrs. James T. Fields are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Griggs, No. 11 Grovoland Park. • Liberal meetings Trill be held ibis evening at No. 35 Canal street (Tenth Ward), for drill, and at 284 Division street (Seventeenth ward), where speeches will be delivered by Messrs. Le Moyne, Hamilton, and McClure. The store of M. J. Greenberg, No- 642 State street, was robbed of $125 worth of goods during last evening. This is the second time in two weeks that burglars have succeeded in robbing this store. . The frame residence and . bam No. 59 East Erie street, owned and occupied by Cornelius Conway, were damaged by fire to the. extent of $350. Cause of fire unknown. The alarm was from Box 139. Mr. Mapes, occupant of No. 280 West Madi son street, upset a lighted kerosene lamp in his front parlor, at 5 o’clock yesterday afternoon; and the resulfrwaa an explosion, which set fire to the apartment, and damaged it to a consider able extent. Mapes’ escape from a severe burn ing was remarkable. The one-story frame building No. 28 North Desplaines street, owned by the Bethel Home, and occupied by W. B. Steward as a Hour and feed store, was damaged by fire to the extent of SIOO, yesterday afternoon. Canso of tiro and amount of insurance unknown. The. alarm was sounded from Box 275. ■ While Officers Quinlan and McMahon, of the Twelfth street Station, were attempting to ar rest a disorderly character named E. Chartres, near the comer of Ewing' and Hoisted streets, yesterday afternoon, the fellow drew a revolver* and fired at Quinlan, his evident intention being to kill him. The ball passed through the officer’s right hand, inflicting a wound which may disable him for life. Tho desperado was arrested. The Combination Printing Press, donated by A. Campbell, of N. Y., to tho Chicago sufferers last fall, was claimed by Messrs James Sutton & Co'.j publishers of The Aldine, as their property. In the suit for replevin brought by them, judgment has been found in their favor for the full value of the machine, $5,000. This will necessitate the return of the machine, which we believe has never been sold, or the payment by Mr. Campbell of the judgment. Wax Department Tfcather Frognos* Wab Defabtuent, Office or - the Chief Signal Offices, Division or Teleqeams and Reposts fob the Benefit or Wash ington, D. C., Oct. 20.—The thermometer will fall on the lower lakes, with threatening weather and brisk southerly winds for New England and Middle States generally, clear weather, and winds shifting to southwesterly. On Monday, in the South Atlantic and Gulf States northerly to easterly winds, with partly cloudy weather in former, and increasing cloudiness and occasional rain on Eastern Gulf. Prom Minnesota to Dower Ohio Valley, and eastward to Lake Huron and Ohio, falling barometer, generally cloudy weather, southerly to westerly winds, with rain on upper lakes, and high northeasterly winds on Lake Superior. Cautionary signals are ordered for Duluth, Chicago, Milwaukee, and Grand Haven. Vessels Passed. Detroit* Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune* Detroit, Oct. 20. —Up—Stmr Keweenaw; props Philadelphia, Missouri; barks Bed, White and Bine, •Lottie Wolf, city of Palnesville, Nichols; schrs Es canaba, Osborne, M. E. Perew, Hears, D.S. Austin, Colonel Cook, St. Lawrence, Nabob, J. Willard, B, Gaskin, 0. Baab, Jupiter, Cecelia, Portcb, Adiron dack, Boody, Morey, Jamaica, Madeira, Juno, Os trich, Lillie, Pratt, F. Crawford, St. Andrew, Metropi oils, John Burns, Ironsides, Sky Lark, Evaline, Bates, Danforth* Newsboy. Down—-Props Colorado, Merchant, Janecki, City of Boston; bark Advance; schrs Evening Star, Onondaga, Alice, Plying Mist, Preston, Marquette. Whm-^South. Philadelphia, Oct. 20.— A fire broke out tbii morning in B. J. Lehnan’a steamship steam saw and planing-mill, in Beach street, below Hanover, destroying that building and the stables of the Knickerbocker Ice Company; also a considerable amount of lumber on Mainwright & Bryant’s wharf. John Taylor’s «nk and woollen manufactory was slightly damaged. The fire originated accidentally in the engine-room of thq ewf-milL Loss* S3o*ooo. NUMBER ,64. The Gardner. Everything-, tics* Fire*

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