31 Ekim 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1

31 Ekim 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

VOLUME 26. SILVER WARE, WEDDING PRESENTS, ETC. WMM’S SUM AND SUM PLATE. EveVy variety of useful and ornamental Sterling Silver Ware, put up in rich Bussia Leather and Satin Cases, made expressly for us, comprising an endless variety of Tea Sets, Urns, Bruit, Berry and Cake Stands, Knives, Spoons, &c., just opening at our new Store, 26Q C&5 268 Special Attractions in way of Beautiful and Appropriate WEDDING PRESENTS. RICH RUSSIA LEATHER Bortemonnaies, Dressing-Cases, Work-Boxes, Travelling Bags, elegant Belts and Parasol- Holders, and all kinds of Ornamented Vienna and Parisian Pancy Goods. GILES. BROTHER & COMPANY. POLITIC AXi. Chicago, Oct. 20,1872. Messrs. John Kuhl, Charles Peters, Adam Sauer, John P. Koch, G. S. Dan iel Luder, John Straube, P. Pinke, Thom as Iverson, P. P. Culoth, Henry Helfrink, Wm. Herman, John McScamell, Kick Schoeneck, John Baumgarten, Christ Weiselman, John H. Hull, H. B. Draper, G. Koch, Louis Ekhardt, H. Bablfs, P. S. Schack, Henry Theis, E. Pribocsky, John Bennett, P. Wilk, P. B. Emmerich, D. DeHon, Louis Koss, H, Hammel, Adam Holzappel, Augus Hoffman, Christ Schulz, "Wm. Henneforth, Wm. Hammel, J. A. Ullrich, Pritz Peters, Henry Schafer, Louis Melzer, Johan Schack, Michel Baret, Charles Huebner, George M. French, John McGrath, and others. GENTLEMEN: Your communication, soliciting me to become a candidate for Aider man, is just received, and, in reply, would say that I accept, and, if elected, will use every effort to se cure for the people of the Fifteenth Ward the improvements which are most needed, and will endeavor to havetexation keptwithin reasonable bounds, and also to have the money raised by taxation economically and judiciously expended. Yours, very respectfully, stick: ecehardt. HATS AND FURS. BISHOP & BAMS, AT THEIR NEW AND ELEGANT STORE, 164 State-st., corner Monroe, HAVE JUST OPENED The Largest and Finest Stock of LA DIES’, MISSES’ and CHILD BEN'S FURS, ever exhibited in Chicago, a large proportion of them our own manufacture. Also, Gentc’ Dress and Business Hats, Youths’ and Chil dren’s Hats, in all styles and colors. TREES. LARGE FOREST TREES. We are now prepared to transplant any quantity of For est Trees, and warrant them to grow thriftily. For the character of our work we refer to the big trees planted by As on AsliMai ail in licoli Pari. Parties desiring trees transplanted daring the coming printer will please hand in their orders early, so we can prepare the ground before the frost sets in. NELSON & BENSON, 129 k 131 LaSalle-fit., tasement of Boone’s Block. REMOVAL. REMOVAL. FASHIONABLE FURNITURE! V. ¥. STRONG FDEITDEE CO., 266 & 268 Wabasb-av. ozzißEssiEs. DOW, MOKAJV & CO., Commission Merchants and Cheese Dealers, HAVE REMOVED TO So. 95 Boutin Water street. JOSEPH STOCKTON & 00., Teaming- and Drayage, To Room 30,1.158 fasMngton street TO RENT. TO BENT. 65 STATE-ST., Second Floor, "with Steam Elevator. 57 STATE-ST., Basement, with or without Steam Power. . Apply on the premises. J. W. MIDDLETON. FOB SALS. LUNCH COUNTER FOB S-A-IjIB. Range, Broiler, and general fix tures for Bunch Counter, in the Cen tral Saloon, comer of Washington and Clark-sts., will be sold at Auc tion THIS MORNING (31st), at 10 o’clock. WANTED. W-A-ZtSTTIBID. The Equitable life Assurance Society of the United States, whose business is larger than that of any other in the world, want three or • fonr of the best men in tire city to represent the Company here as Agents and Solicitor's. Apply .at the office of the Northwestern Department, corner Dearborn and AVashingtou-sts. BUSINESS CARDS. DR. H. TOMBOEKEN leave to inform his patrons and friends that he has • ’ from Europe and resumed his medical practice •ted-et., northeast corner of Madison, Room 25. ■Zi ffVin 9 to 10 a. m. and 3 to 3 d. m. INSURANCE. PENNSYLVANIA PIREI INSURANCE COMPANY. Nearly 50 Years Old. Cash Assets, $1,250,000.00. W. H. CUNNINGHAM, Agent, ORIENTAL BLOCK, 120 LA SALLE ST., - - CHICAGO. NEW PUBLICATIONS. EQUAL TO ANTHONY TEOLLOPE, AND BETTER THAN WTT.KTF. COLLINS, MISS BEADDON, OR MBS. WOOD.— Springfield Republican, -A- ZESTS YV STORY, MES. AMIE EDWAEDS, Author of “ Archie Lovell,” H Ought We to Visit Her," THE 08111 FOB IM Ore Vo!,, 12m0., Fancy Cloth, $1,50. “ “ Paper, 1.00. Written with the care of a practised and sure band. It is an admirably natural and interesting story, admirably told. We like It.—[Buffalo Express. One of the brightest and best novels it has been oar for tune to read lately is 44 Ought We to Visit Her,’ 1 by Mrs. Edwards. Mrs. Edwards’ Novels are always good.—[New Haven Palladium. It is a novel of great merit. In eveiy part, plot, thought, character and style, it is strikingly excellent.—[Taunton Gazette. MBS, ANNIE EDWARDS’ RECENT NOVELS. Ought We to Visit Her, - SI.OO Archie Lovell, - - - 1.00 Stephen Lawrence, Yeoman, 1.25 Susan Fielding, - 1.00 fy Either of the above sent by mail, post-paid, on re ceipt of the price. SHELDON & COMPANY, 677 Broadway, New York. ASSURANCE. London Assurance Gorooration LoisTDonsr. XjooaX Committee. J. P. GIRAUD FOSTER, GORDON NORRIE, Of Foster A Thomson. Of Boorman, Johnston A Co. CHARLES M. FRY, HOWARD POTTER. No. S3 Wall-st. Of Brown Bros. A Co. GOOLD H. REDMOND, Of Dennis to un A Co. Total Funds,. Gold, - $13,234,4=25 Fire Assets, Gold, - - $5,064,000 GEO. 0. CLARKE, Agent, 3 and 4 Bryan, Block. Insurance effected on Business Buildings, Merchandise, Provisions, Dwellings and their contents. FINANCIAL. LOANS ON REAL ESTATE. We are prepared to negotiate some large loans on choice prop erty for a term of years, BAIRD & BRADIEY, 90 LiaSalle-st. WE WANT Yonr overdue Claims, Bills, Notes, Accounts, &c., for . collection. Frazier’s Mercantile Oolleotion Agency, 146 BAST MADISON-ST. A. O. Slaughter, banker. Comer Clark and Madison-sts. Buys and soils Stocks, Bonds, and Gold. Receives money on deposit and tre acle a General Banking and Brokerage Easiness. Loans Uesotiateci On real estate, in the city or suburbs, at current rates. G. S. HUBBARD. Jr., ' 168 East Waahington-st. SCALES. E’OEISVTH’S U. S. Standard Scales. Forsyth’s Scale Warehouse, 4-S S. DBSPLAINES-ST. &c., &c. THE HORSE DISEASE. Undoubted Evidence of Its Pres ence in Chicago. The Disease Spreading Rapid ly—Several Hundred Horses on the Sick List. Forty Horses Down with the Disease at Evanston, 111. No Particular Change in the Situa tion in New York City, Cows Attacked with." the Plague in New Jersey, IN CHICAGO. Doubt no longer exists that tlie “ Canada dis ease ” has at last made its appearance, and is rapidly, spreading, in this city. The horses at the bams No. 612 "West Jackson street and No. 13 Marshfield avenue, as also those at No. 609 IVest Madison street, •which were reported in yesterday’s Tribune as believed to bo effected with the “ Canada disease,” were examined yes terday afternoon by Drs. B. J. Withers, veteri nary surgeon, of the Chicago City Eailway stables, and J. C. McKinzie, veterinary surgeon, of Nos. 41 and -43 Fourteenth street, by order of Dr. Bauch, the Sanitary Superintendent of this city. After having thoroughly ex amined each horse they pronounced the malady to bo the epizootic. These horses, and there are some forty of them in the three stables, are very severely affected, and some of them are said to be in a dangerous condition. Six of these were brought from Canada by a negro about the 20th of this month, and soon after showed symptoms of the disease, and to these six horses must undoubtedly bo accredited the spread of the epizootic in this city. Dr. Bart lett, veterinary surgeon, of the West Side Omni bus stables, has also examined the horses, and is confident that their malady is the disease stated. One of the horses at the Ashland Liv ery Stable, No. 609 West Madison street, had the disease some five weeks ago, which was then sporadic, or not epizootic, and is now again sick with the same disease, which this time is epi zootic. During night before last, and throughout yes terday, the disease spread rapidly, and a large number of horses in all parts of the city have since been attacked with the disease. The West Side Bailway Company’s stables report a large number of horses sick, and some fifty horses are now under the treatment by Dr. Bartlett, at the West Side Omnibus stables. Some of the horses at the Van Boren street car bam have also been attacked. AtParmelee’s Omnibus stables nearly all the horses are more or less affected. This latter place was visited yesterday afternoon by Dr. Bauch, the Sanitary Superintendent, to gether with some of the most eminent veterinary surgeons in the city, for the purpose of satisfying themselves that the malady is the real epizootic. Several horses in private stables wore also taken sick during yesterday, among them a valuable horse belonging to Judge J. B. Bradwell. With the exception of the horses at the three first named stables, the disease is yet of a mild form, and with proper care and attention may not be come so serious as to interrupt the business of the city. Dr. Bauch has given orders to disinfect all the stables in the city at once. He also cautions the public not to take sick horses from or to any sta ble. People should also be careful to keep the horses well covered with woollen blankets. Two valuable trotting horses belonging to James H. Finnigan, Esq., stabled on West Mon roe street, near Jefferson, wore taken sick last evening. Probably three hundred horses in this city have shown symptoms of the disease within twenty-four hours. AT EVANSTON. At Powers’ livery stable, Evanston, there are forty horses down with the disease in a mild form. The first symptoms of the malady were discovered on Tuesday, when three horses were taken ill, by evening fifteen more were on the sick list, and yesterday morning all the horses in the bam, fifteen in number, were laid up in hospital. There was no discharge from the nostrils, but the animala drooped and refused to eat food placed before them. LETTEBS ON THE SUBJECT. We have received the following letters on the subject of the horse disease, which will prove particularly interesting at the present time. The first is from the agent of tho Illinois Humane Society: betteb fbom mb. bbanson. To the Editor of The Chicago Tribune: Sm: As the 41 Horse-disease” Is undoubtedly hero, aed will prevail to some extent, we desire to notify the public that we shall consider it imperative upon us to prevent by all the means in our power the use of dis eased horses, and will arrest all persons working such. We consider this our duty, both as a preventive to tho spread of tho disease, and for the comfort and safety of the horse. We advise all owners of horses to use clear pine tar in and about the stables, and also in the vessels they water their horses in. Mr. Parmelee is using slippery elm freely in the water his horses drink, and with good effect. A liniment made of 3 parts tinct. aconite, 3 ports tEnct. arnica, 1 part chloroform, 1 part olive oIL 1 part opium, was used with excellent effect by Mr. C. J. Davis. 13 Marshfield avenue, whose valuable horses are recov ering. Bub it under the throat freely as soon as you see signs of the disease. Any druggist can put it up for you. Bub the legs well with the liniment, and bandage with woollen Seths to keep warm. Let every one give their horses' good care, and we will got along well. James S. Bbanson, Agent Humane Society. LETXEB FBOU 2>B. PAABEN. To the Editor of The Chicago Tribune: ■ Sm: Havingretumedfrommy trip East, whither I went for the purpose of studying the nature of the prevailing epizootic influenza, and since my return having visited nearly all the places in this city whore the same disease is said to be raging, I have found that we have not the same disease here. From the several elaborate accounts of the disease, furnished our local papers by some of our veterinary surgeons, it would appear that the same form of dis ease exists, and has existed here nearly the whole year. Now, what is the use of trying to make people believe such talk. Ido not wish to boast of the number of stables I attend, and the number of animals which 1 have treated successfully for influenza, commonly called the distemper,—the treatment of which is in deed very simple, and with which nearly every groom is familiar. In short, the much-talkcd-of disease has been the influenza in its common sporadic form, in which, occasionally, wo And the same (liver and lung) complications, os is found in the epizootic form. It is said that cases in this city, yesterday, looked like the cases seen East. The fact is. the appearance of a horse suffering from sporadic influenza differs, in general, not much from one suffering from the disease in its epizootic form. The suddenness with which the disease, where it does exist, has affected nearly .all the-horses, is a peculiar feature of the epizootic in fluenza. This feature of the outbreak is entirely wanting here. This disease, as I have seen it In Europe, and dur ing my inspections last week in the East, is positively not in our city. I feel it a duty to express my views, after a most careful examination of all the cases I could lay my hands on, both there and here, and there is no need of imposing fears among horse-owners for the sake of having something to say. If the disease should come hero, it would very quickly speak for itself; for, with the general miserable sanitary condi tion of our stables, it is certain that, within twenty four hours after its appearance, half the horses in Chicago will be suffering ’'with the dreaded malady. Tours, &c,, N. H. Paa ben. Veterinary Editor of the Prairie Farmer. DU. paaeen’s bepobt. Ab announced in The Tbibune several dais CHICAGO, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1872. ago, the PrmVie Parmer despatched its Yeteri aiy Editor, Dr. Paaren, East, for the purpose of thoroughly examining into the character of the disease, eo as to give its readers a correct idea of its nature, and suggest such treatment, hygienic and medicinal, as bis well-known ability and ex perience would dictate* Dr. Paaren, having re turned, has made a report, from which we make the following extracts : As a rule, with symptoms more or less prominent of a general febrile condition, there is great dulness and debility, frequent and weak pulse, scanty discharge of dry excrements and high-colored mine ; appetite lost. The disease generally commences with a shivering lit, or rigor; there is a yellowness of the membrane of the eye—one of the signs of jaundice—which indicates that the liver is implicated. In a day or so, a serous deduction from one or both nostrils ousues, which be come quickly heightened in color, the eyes them selves appearing at the same time heavy and moist, the upper lid drooping; the lips are hanging; the animal’s skin is dry, and the coat staring and un healthy-looking, The ears and legs are cold. The serous exudation from the nose soon loses its Hiin character, for cough comes on, and the discharge be comes purulent, yellowish-green, streaked. According to our observations, the disease, though it occasions great temporary inconveniences to all classes in the localities where It prevails, is not of a fatal character. The terrible accounts of Its fatality and general destruction, which reached us from a few pieces at tho beginnings its spread, were most likely either produced by utter neglect, or caused by wrong measures pursued for its relief. To our knowledge, in many instances, tho accounts given of the disease, and its effects aro greatly exag gerated. The plurality of the horses affected suffer very little. Some of them recover already on the fourth or fifth day—in fact, the larger portion affected. But tho prostrating nature of the disease leaves the horses weak for a time after, and rest and good nour ishing are required to restore them. A number of the cases, particularly such horses as arc in poor condition, exhausted from over-work, and kept in unhealthy and crowded quarters, arc suffering to a greater extent. The disease here runs its course slower, and it requires more care and exertion to carry them safely through. It generally reaches height about the ninth day. As the purulent discharge from the nose becomes confirmed, and increases in quantity, tho disease grows milder, and all the symptoms begin to abate. The cough and soreness of throat lessen, the pulse moderates, tho heat of tho body becomes equable, the countenance more lively, and the horse becomes disposed to eat some favorite food. The dung, which has been before dry and in small quantities, and the urine, which has been also sparse and high-colored, return to their natural states, and the horse recovers gradually, but slowly. With regard to the treatment of this disease, it is certain that everything depends on attention and good nursing. These two things are even more essential than medicine; for many an animal will survive that has not been taking a particle of medicine, but has been assiduously tended during its sickness. Bleed ing and physicking is dangerous. All depletive measures should be avoided; the strength cannot bear it. Tho horse should be kept iu a warm, dry and wcll littcred stall or box; ventilation and cleanliness should bo attended to. The body should bo blanketed, and the legs hand-rubbed, and bandaged with fiaunel or hay bands. Exposure to drafts of air should be avoided. The food should consist of sweet, aromatic hay, sliced carrots or apples, and occasional messes of soft, warm food, in small quantities, such as oatmeal gruel, boiled barley, or scalded oats. If there is a difficulty in swallowing, a mild embrocation should be applied to the throat. Setons, rowels, and blisters should be avoided. The drink should consist of pure water, from which the chill should bo removed by adding one fourth warm water. Luke-warm linseed or hay-seed tea is beneficial. Frequent sponging of the eyes and nostrils with luke-warm water. When great debility prevails, with little or no appetite, give twice daily half a drachm of tincture pcrchlonde of iron, and two drachms of tbo compound tincture of gentian. Disinfectants should be used, bat not under the nose of the horse. Chloride of lime should bo sprinkled behind the horse, diluted with twenty parts of water, or carbolic acid, same dilution. Smoking with tar will do no good, ana is positively hurtful, as it irritates the mucous surfaces of the eyes and nose, and increases the catarrhal discharge characteristic of the malady. All noise should be suppressed, all strangers forbid den to enter the stable; none must approach the ani mal but the man it is accustomed to, and he must move as quietly os possible. Whatever is to be done must be accomplished as quickly and as quietly as un der the circumstances is possible* Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune . New Yobs, Oct. 30.— The number of horses that have died during the last 24 hours in New York, Brooklyn, and Jersey City is about 140. This mortality probably represents the crisis of the epidemic, and the general impression to-day is that the disease is on the wane. The weather continues fine and the horses in the streets look better, and move with more briskness. The city passenger lines are running about half, their force, and the lines most crowded has four horses to each car. The great danger now is that the convalescent horses will be worked beyond tiieir strength, and thus swell the death list. About fifty ox teams have been brought here from points on the Hud son River. Dead horses are removed by a six ox team. No steam dummies or locomotives are in use in the streets. The cor companies say such a change would cost too much and be de feated by the first snowfall. The 150 horses in the Fire Department are nearly all very sick, though none have died. Hand engines have been overhauled and several companies organ ized to haul and work them. All post-mortem dissections show inflamed lungs containing mucus, though the throat is no? always affected. The trade blockade continues. The movement in cotton is completely ob structed. Tho number of horses that have died from all diseases in this city since last Friday exceeds 300. This is not because disease is more malig nant here, but because many sick horses were worked to death. New Tons, Oct. SO.—The weather to-day is cool, pleasant, and very favorable for relieving the prevailing which is now thought to have reached its crisis. The manifestations of the results of the disease, however, remain about the same. Deaths are constantly occur ring, about one hundred being yesterday report ed in this city and Brooklyn. Many stage lines have increased the number of their trips, but the horses seen in the streets, not only of the car lines but private vehicles, show bad symptoms of the disorder. Several firms will receive oxen to-day from Poughkeepsie, for the conveyance of ‘merchan dise. Horses of the regular armyin this vicinity are almost all afflicted, and Quartermaster Gen eral Ingalls has issued an order as to the disease and its remedy. Humanitarian Bergh announces his purpose to continue in preventing the working of the afflicted animals. Three or four Broadway stage companies have each sued Bergh’s society for in terfering with their business. Each claims $25,000 damages, and ask for an injunction against Bergh and his men. At a meeting of the Sanitary Committee of the Board of Health, yesterday, it is understood that a thorough examination of all the stables was ordered. Tho working of diseased horses without some covering is thought to bo surely fatal. The grain and fruit trade continues to Buffer heavily. The ocean steamships, which Bail to* day, mil not carry more than one-third of their usual amount of freight; The India did’not dis charge her freight on her arrival yesterday. To day an attempt will be made by lighters. Many of the sugar refineries- aro reported to have suspended business. It is the opinion of several businea men that the Washington Market,: near Yesey street, is losing nearly $50,000 a day. The Stable Superintendent thinks that work ing the diseased horses will run the distemper into glanders, and the result will be fatal. New Yobk. Oct. 30—Evening.—The condition of the horses to-day in the city stables is report ed a little better, but there is nothing to indicate a speedy abatement of the disease. The progress of the disease in the Fire De partment is most alarming. Out of 144 horses only 2 are well, and 31 are wholly unfit for duty. Beat is considered the great requi site for their cure, and this it is al most impossible to give them. Even if the disease was stopped at once two months,it is thought, would be required to get the horses into their former condition. Chief Engineer Perley has ordered a first-class steam fire-engine with self-propelling attachment. This can be run, it is said, at the rate of a .mile in three minutes, while its speed can be easily regulated. It will

bo kept near the fire headquarters, and when the occurrence of a serious fire iu any part of the city is reported, it will be despatched at once to the spot. The Chief Engineer to-day issued an order suspending for the present all leaves of absence, except in special .cases of sickness or death. Six companies have been organized as band companies, with their ranks filled by details from others. All tho old two wheeled hose carriages which could be found have been pressed into service, and will be at tached to the engines. Some of the tenders will be run by hand. Hundreds of ’longshoremen are complaining that the epidemic among the horses hag rendered elsewhere. To the Associated Press. them penniless. Host of these laborers work by the hour, and some have not obtained over three hours’ work in a week. Goods of all descriptions are piled promiscuously along the wharves on West and South streets, in some cases reaching to the height of ten or fifteen feet, completely hiding the river from view, and the small number of trucks em ployed to-day would not be able to relievo this enormous accumulation of freight in leas than six months. Eighty-seven horses died in this city yester day. Increased facilities are needed to remove tho carcasses from the streets and stables. Two persona are reported sick to-day with the horse-disease. BOSTON, Boston, Oct. 30. —There is little change to note in the progress of tho horse-disease in this city. This afternoon there were fewer teams out than on yesterday, and many deaths are occur ring. SCHENECTADY, N. Y. Schenectady, N. Y.. Oct. 30.— The horse-dis ease is spreading rapidly here. Twenty or thirty canal boats are laid up, and nearly every boat has lost one or two horses. Several hundred horses in the city are affected, and it is thought that in a day or two nearly all will be sick* It is spreading in tho country also* PATERSON, N. J. Paterson, N. J., Oct. 30. —The horse-disease is reaching alarming proportions in this city and vicinity. ROCHESTER, N. Y. Rochester, N. Y., Oct. 30.— The horse-disease is rapidly abating here. NYACK, N. J. : Nyack, N. J., Oct. 30.— Tho horse-disease has appeared hero and in this vicinity. OSWEGO, N. Y. Oswego, N. Y., Oct. SO.—There is no improve ment in the horse-epidemic. Over two-thirds of the canal horses are affected, and considerable difficulty is experienced in moving boats. CONCORD, n. n. Concord, N. H., Oct. 30. —Tho horse disease has appeared here, but only in a mild form. EAST ORANGE, N b^. New York, Oct. 30.— 1t is stated that fifty cows have recently died of the same disease as that which is afflicting the horses, at East Or ange, N. J. BALTIMORE. Baltimore, Oct. 30.—1t is estimated to-night that about 1,200 cases of the horse-disease pre vail in this city. About thirty cars were with drawn from two street car-lines to-day. PHILADELPHIA. Philadelphia, Oct. 30.— The first cases of the horse-disease reported are improving, and some are entirely well. The Market Street Rail way Company have taken off seven cars, and the Snperintedent admits that one-half of the horses are slightly affected. In the livery and private stables there is a slight increase in the number of cases. WASHINGTON. Washington, Oct. 30.— The horse-disease fully developed itself here to-day, making its appear ance in a number of livery and private stables. So for none of the horses of the street-cars have been attacked. BBOVIDENCB, B. I. Pbovidence, R. 1., Oct. 30.—A1l the horses were withdrawn this noon from the street rail ways, nearly all of them becoming weak and spiritless. Some stables report horses improv ing. CLEVELAND. Cleveland, Oct. 30. —The horse-disease spread rapidly to-day. Several of the livery stables are closed. Many of the express company’s horses are unfitted for service, and the disease has spreaa among the Fire Department horses. One of the street railroads ran cars once an hour this afternoon ; another took off all their cars at 8 o’clock to-night. Very few fatal cases are reported. DES MOINES. The Recent Decision Against llic Re public Fire Insurance Company—A ITlisstatemcnt Corrected—The State Centennial Fund* Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. DesMoeiZS, lowa, Oct. SO.—A misstatement of the decision of the United States Circuit Court of this district, in the numerous cases against the stockholders of the Republic Fire Insurance Company, having given rise to innu merable letters of inquiry, the Court to-day au thorized the following statement of their deci sion published: Under the 6th section of tho charter of the Republic Insurance Company, it is provided that in all cases of losses exceeding the means of the company, each stockholder whall be liable to the amount of unpaid stock held by him. it was decided by Justice Miller, of the United States Supreme Court, and Judge Dillon, of the St, Paul Circuit Court, and the same ruling was adhered to at the recent term of the United States Circuit Court for lowa, Judges Dillon and Love presiding, that under the charter of the Republic Insurance Company no stockholder was liable in a personal action to the Company for the unpaid stock held by him, except in cases where tho losses by fire exceed the means of the corporation to pay said losses; that there was no personal liability on the part of the stockholders to . pay assessments based upon the liabilities of the Company other than those occasioned by losses by fire ; 'and accord ingly that an assessment upon the stockholders upon the basis that the losses and liabilities of tho Company made a call necessary, was not sufficient to give a right of action, and as no assessment based upon losses by fire alone had been made, the Company could not maintain an action against the stockholders. There was no other point de cided in the case. A meeting of the lowa Centennial Board of Finance was held here to-day. General Bridgman, of the First Congressional District, was elected Chairman, and E. B. Kirk, of the Ninth Congressional District, Secretary. The Board designated all the National Banks of tho State as agents to re ceive subscriptions of stock to the Centennial Fund. CINCINNATI. General Garfield on Expanding 1 the Currency—The machine manufac turers’ Convention* CEfccntATi, Oct. 30.—General John A. Gar field was introduced on ’Change to-day by Presi dent Covington, and, during a brief speech, said there was likely to be a raid made on Congress demanding Secretary Boutwell to reissue $44,- 000,000 of greenbacks. He said the Secretary had no right to do so under the existing law. He said Congress looked to such bodies as this Chamber for aid in their efforts against dis turbing tho currency. The General was warmly received, and was neartily applauded at times during his remarks. The National Convention of Machine Manu facturers adjourned late this afternoon, to meet hero again on Dec. 17th. During the day they discussed the subject of credit prices; uniform ity of rating horse power of engines, and rail road freights. They passed resolutions against reducing the currency below its present volume, and condemning “ comers” and combinations, and that the general Government, private asso ciations and individuals should counteract such combinations. Arrival of Xellow Fever at Stoning ton, Conn* New Yobk, Oct. 30. — A special from Nor wich, Conn., says that great excitement pre vails in tho seaport villages near that place, owing to tho report of a vessel having arrived at Stooington from San Domingo, with cases of yellow fever on board. The schooner Crown Point, which was driven into port at Stonington, on Sunday night, by stress of weather, had two men prostrated by the disease, which had broken out during her voyage. The vessel was at once ordered to quarantine in the lower harbor. No new cases have occurred, but the two sick men arc at the point of death. Xcxan Indians on tlie War-Path* St. Louis, Oct. 30.— The Republican has a brief correspondence from Texas, dated Oct. 17, reporting an Indian raid into Hood and'Parker Counties, on the Brazos Biver, and killing one woman and wounding several other persons. Part of the Indians still remained in Texas, and citizens were organizing for the purpose of driv ing them out. War Department Weather Frognos" tics* War Department, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, Division of Telegrams and Deports for the Benefit of Commerce, ■Washington, Oct. SO.—Probabilities: The bar ometer will probably continue falling oa the !';■ J>*s, -I. Y.. ;So * lower lakes, and thence to West "Virginia, with prevailing brisk southeasterly winds, threaten ing weather and belts of rain. In New England and Middle States generally; warm weather and increasing cloudiness, with southerly to easterly winds. In South Atlantic and Eastern Gulf States northerly to easterly winds, high barometer, and partly cloudy weather, with occasional rain. In Western Gulf and thence to lower Ohio Talley and Kansas, clearing weather and northerly to westerly winds with an occa sional coast rain. In Northwest and Upper Lakes southerly to westerly winds, threatening weather and rain extending to the Ohio Talley, but clearing in the latter section by to-morrow. Warning signals continue at Duluth, Milwau kee, Chicago, Grand Haven, Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, and Buffalo. POLITICAL. GAMBLING ON THE NEW YORK ELECTION. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. New York, Oct.3o.—Pool-selling on the election flourishes nightly at the comer of Broadway and Twenty-eighth street. The sportsmen on the Custom House side give slight odds on each of the Northern States going for Grant. They ven ture nothing large, however, on Indiana, New York, or New Jersey. The betting on Mayor ranges at; O’Brien, $100; Havemeyer, $95? Lawrence, sls. On tbe Governorship, Dix leads Keman slightly. The polyglot Grant meeting here, to which seven or eight different nationalities were in vited, was a mirth-provoking affair. After the resolutions were read to the babel of foreigners, the chorus of the Lucca Opera Company rose in the audience and furnished some Administration logic in the form of music. United States Commissioner Davenport dis posed of Mr. Healey’s case, to-day, -by sulkily granting an honorable discharge. Davenport turned fairly yellow as the evidence accumulated that Mr. Healey’s residence was precisely asrep= resented, and he glared at the reporters as, in a manner full of chagrin, he proceeded to release his victim without apology* Mr. Healey will sue Davenport for false imprisonment. The solid men of the Grant persuasion in New York, who signed a recent sectarian circu lar to stimulate the clergy to enter upon a re ligious crusade, and to inspire their congrega tions to do a like work in opposing Keman, be cause he Is a Catholic, are nearly all pleading that they never signed the document. They de cline, however, to denounce the Sec retary who signed their names, or to call him to account. Mr. Beers, Secretary of the Council of Political Reform, being intern viewed by a reporter, told at least part of the' truth when he said: “ None of the Executive Committee saw that document until it was printed, except Mr. Putnam and myself. It was not intended for the public at all. It was meant for the clergy only.” RADICAL ANXIETY AT MADISON, WIS. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune , ; Madison, Oct. SO.—There is considerable anx iety among leading Republicans in regard to the next Legislature, on account of the number of Independent candidates and popular Liberals running, and some fears are felt lest the Liber als should get control by carrying the close dis tricts, and so secure the United states Senator. F. H. Finnin was to-day nominated for the Assembly against L.'B. Kolas, Democrat. • Several of the Republican stumpers are used up with much speaking, and are obliged to leave the field. The Chairman of the Republican Committee is much troubled to fill the appoint ments he has made. CONTEMPLATED RADICAL FRAUDS THROUGH OUT THE STATE- Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, Spbdtofield, HI., Oct. 30.—1t has been dis covered that but a small portion of the negroes of this city have been registered, and it is sus pected that this is part of a general plan throughout the Stato, under the impression that it will be much easier to swear in fraudulent colored votes than it would be to make a fraud ulent registry for frauds in this direction. Governor Palmer speaks at Macomb on Fri day next, and at Chicago on Saturday night. HON. CHARLES SUMNER'S LETTER OF DECLIN ATION. Boston, Oct. 30.— The Hon. Charles Sumner, in a letter from Faria, declining the Liberal nomination for Governor of Massachusetts, says: In acknowledging your communication, I beg to repeat this declination, most sincerely desiring that no person should vote for me. Beyond this personal wish, which I trust will not be disregarded, is the con sideration that, if chosen, I could not serve. At tho same time I express my grateful sense of tho trust re posed in me by the Conventions which united in this nomination. My acknowledgments are espe cially due the Conventions representing the fellow-citizens to whom I have for a long time been opposed on important public questions. I beg them to believe that I am not insensible to their good will, which is enhanced bythe sign it affords that past differences are absorbed in the common desire to secure for our country the incomparable blessing of peace and reconciliation, under the safeguard of good government, and with the principles of the Declaration of Independence as our rule of conduct. THE POLITICAL SITUATION IN TENNESSEE. Nashville, Oct. 30. —The Democratic State Executive Committee publish an address, in which they say they have reports from seventy two counties, twenty-two in East, thirty-one m Middle, and nineteen in West Tennessee, leav ing twenty to be heard from, some of which are largo Cheatham counties. The counties heard from report tho vote for Cheatham 77,575; John son 40,620 ; Maynard 49,800. They assert that Mr. Johnson and all other independents will be beaten, but that their running makes probable the election of three or four Bepublican Con gressmen and an increased number of Bepuhli cans to the State Legislature. The committee urge the concentration of the vote on tho party nominees to prevent this result. LIBERAL RALLY AT DECATUR. Deoatub, HI., Oct. 30.—The largest Liberal meeting of the campaign in Central Illinois was held here to-day. Five thousand persons were present. Speeches were delivered this afternoon by Hon. T. A. Hendricks and others. To-night Governor Koemer and Hon. W. W. O'Brien are addressing a very large audience at the Opera House, and the Hon. Edward Bnznnell another as large in the Court House. LIBERAL MEETING AT AURORA. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune , Aurora, 111., Oct. 80.—There was a large and enthusiastic German Greeley and Koemer meet ing here this evening.. Mr. Caspar Butzmade an eloquent and telling speech, which was fre quently applauded and elicited a great deal of enthusiasm. The meeting was composed of the heat German citizens. TROUBLE IN THE RADICAL RANKS AT CLEVE- LAND. Cleveland, 0., Oct. SO.—The Republican workingmen of Cleveland are very much put out at the flat refusal of the Chairman of the Repub lican State Central Committee to comply with their proposition of favoring the abolishing of the contract system in-the workhouses and Peni tentiaries. SIX "STRAIGHT-OUTERS” IN COUNCIL IN RICHMOND. Richmond, Va., __ Oct. SO.—The straight-out Democrats met again this morning, but as only six persons were present, they had a private conference, and adjourned without making known the result of their deliberations. PEACE IN POPE COUNTY, ARK. Little Book, Ark., Oct. 30.—Peace once more reigns in Pope County. The militia has been disbanded, and registration is quietly progress ing in the county. Everything is now quiet, and no apprehended. Foreclosure of a Railroad* Special Despatch to 7he Chicago Tribune, St. Paul, Oct. SO.—Messrs. Samuel B. Bug gies and Albion P. Mann, Trustees of the bond holders, have commenced a suit in Jtho United States Circuit Court in the St. Paul, Minn., Dis trict, to foreclose the Southern Minnesota Bail road, and ask to have a Receiver appointed. The first mortgage bonds amount to $8,600,000, and the second mortgage to $1,250,000. The road does not pay expenses under its present man agement, and lias been in bad a way for some time. NUMBER 73. HORRIBLE DISASTER. Burning of - the Steamship Missouri off the Bahamas. Tfie Passengers Take to the Boats —All Swamped but One. Seventy-nine Lives Lost—Only Twelve Persons Saved. Ten Women Among the Victims. New York, Oct. 30.—Mr. H. J. Qninan, urer of the Atlantic Mail Line, famishes the following despatch received by that Company, in relation to the loss of the steamer Missouri: Nassau, via Key West, Oct. SO. To H. J. Qoinan, Treasurer of Atlantic Mail Steamship Company: . The Missouri burnt at sea, twenty-five miles from Abaco. [Abaco is the largest of the Bahama Islands— Ed.} Eivo of the crew and the following passengers are saved: George Thackeray, John Rihus, Enrique, Yanco. Wil bur Tunnell, James Cutler, Emilias Oaterbridgo, and Ebenezer Saunders, colored. There is bat little hope of tho rest of the crew and passengers. Particulars by mini. Tho steamer Anna is at Key West waiting an answer. (Signed) Joassox. Qninan says tho above despatch covers all tho information this Company has received in rela tion to the loss of its steamer. Ho says “ I in fer that our agents first learned of the disaster from the passengers and crew saved, who doubtless landed at Nassau. The despatch was forwarded from Nassau to Key Wett by this Company’s steamer Anna,which service was prob ably performed by her only after ©very hops of saving life had passed.” The following is a list of the passengers of the burnt steamer Missouri: For Havana; Geo. Thackeray, Anthony Hop ton, Gertrude Davies aud three children, Anto Mancillas and wife, Colonel Albert S. Evans, Erastus Siegaro, Enrique Yanco, Henry Francis Fox, A. E. Outerbridge, Mrs. Mary Jane Allan and infant, Ernest Schoas, Miguel Garcia. ForNassan: Victor Zelinld, Miss Malcom, Mrs. Hepburn and infant, L. F. Cleveland and five servants, J. W. Cabrum and Wilbur Tunnell. The attaches of the steamer were: M. K Greene, Captain; John Brown, First Officer ; Lewis FarrcH, Second Officer; W. D. Hemp stead, Purser, and a crew numbering fifty-eight men. LATER DETAILS. Key West, Fla,, Oct. 30.— The steamer wa* burned at sea in a gale' on the 22d inst., about 25 miles from Abaco, en route for Havana, via, Nassau, N. P. Tho fire was discovered about 5 a. m. in the pantry, and suddenly burst out ia volumes of* flame, amidships, spreading rapidly overthe ship. The boats were launched im mediately, and all hut one were swamped at once. Those remaining on board were compelled on ac count of the flames to jump in the sea. Those saved landed in one of the boats at Abaco about 6p.m. cn tho evening of the 22d, and were taken from here in a small schooner to Nassau. It was a terrible sight lor those in the floating boat to see those in the water clinging to swamped boats, and begging for assistance. There were about ten ladies on hoard. It is not known whether any of the missing have since been picked ap. It is said that the Captain used every effort to save the lives of the passengers. Three of the saved passengers are here now. The origin of the Are ia unknown. Two of the boats of the ill-fated steamer were burned alongside the vessel, and there is no probability that any of the others reached tho shore. It is probable that not a single life would have been saved had it not been for James Calmer, a resident of Elenthera, and a passenger on board. A new boat had been pur chased in New York, and placed on deck, but, as the weather had been boisterous, she had not been secured, either by gripes or by chocks. When it was known that the vessel would be de stroyed, Culmer, with a few others, launched this boat holding fast to the painter. When he jumped overboard and swam to the boat eleven others followed him, and, even then, it it had not been for Culmer, who was acquainted with the management of a boat, and piloted her safely through the surfs, she wauld have been lost with the others. The three passengers who ore here were bound to Havana, and will- be for warded to that port. Further particulars will probably be received to-morrow. SPORTING. Racing at San Francisco—Base-Ball* San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 30.—The race be tween Lucy and Occident, at Treat's Park Course, Alameda, this afternoon, drew 10,000 people. The purse was $7,500, best three in five to harness. The track was not in good condition a portion being wet and heavy. Both horses were in good trim and excellent spirits. Pools at noon sold at Lucy S6O, Occident sls ; time pools, 2:21, S4O ; 2:19 and 2:20, sl7. A large amount of money was pending on the race, prin cipally on time pools. In the first heat, Occident drew the pole A good start was made on the second scoring. Both trotted evenly to the quarter pole, when Occident broke up and lost badly; on reaching the half mile, the horse then gathered up, and closed the breach within two lengths when Lucy passed the score. Time, 2:25. In the second heat, a fine start was made after considerable scoring. Occident commenced breaking soon after the go off. On passing the quarter, Lucy continued to gain to the end, pass ing the score and leaving Occident in the dis tance some thirty feet. Time, 2:20. Consider ing the state of the track, Lucy's time created surprise. There ia'great disappointment at the result, and people have lost confidence in the California horse. New York, Oct. 80.—Base ball: Mutuals, 5; Baltiznores, 2. The American Missionary Association* Racine, Wis., Oct. 30. —The twenty-sixth an nual meeting of the American Missionary Asso ciation commenced in this city to-day, at the Pres byterian Church, Hon. E. t>. Hollon, of Wis consin, in the Chair. The devotional exercises were conducted by the Rev. G, F. Magoun, I>. 8., President of the lowa College. The Rev. H. G. Hitchcock, of Kenosha, was elected Secretary, and J. F. Claflin, Esq., of Chi cago, Assistant Secretary. The reports of the Treasurer and of the Executive Com mittee were read by the Rev. M. E. Shleby, and Rev. George Whipple, Secretaries at Now York, and by Rev. E. M. Orooth, Field Secretary. In the evening the opening sermon was preached by the Rev. E. P. Goodwin, D. D., of Chicago. The attendance is largely of gentlemen from all parts of the country, and the meeting promises to be one of great interest. About 150 delegates are present, and more expected to-morrow. Obituary* New York, Oct. 30.—The wife of Horace Gree ley died at 4 o’clock this morning, at the resi dence of Alvin Johnson. Yesterday evening her symptoms inspired some faint hopes of her re cover, but during the night she Had two chills, after which she was vevy easy until 4 o’clock, when she passed peacefully away. The funeral will take place from Dr. Chapin's church at 12 o’clock on Friday. The remains will be taken to Greenwood.

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler