5 Kasım 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1

5 Kasım 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1
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VOLUME 26. GENERAL NOTICES. C?Jk.FtID I To fte Trade. The, Horse Distemper having proved so severe as to temporarily prevent delivery of goods at the various Railroad Depots, hy the ordinary means, we have this day made arrangements to deliver all goods ordered of us, at all the rail road depots named helow, hy means of a Steam Barge, via river, the arrangement to hold good un til horses can be again used: GMcago, Burlington k Quincy, W, I. Quai k Co., Chicago k Mwesteni, HurMt k Ml. Chicago, EocE Island k Fasilc, Boies, Fay k con Key, Chicago & Atlon, Warner, Harstoa k Felii, Pltlshurgh, FL W, k CUcap, Hamon, Eesser & Co,, KicMgan Central. 01 TEAMS. "We are happy to intorm our cus tomers that we have secured Ox Teams, and that there will he no delay in the shipment of goods from our house. MILLER BEOS. & KEEP, Hotels Hariware & cmisrp, 19 Lake-st. No Delay! On account of HOESE DISTEM ¥EE. AH orders will be filled promptly, and skipped same day received. FIELD, LETTER & CO. iailsi ai Met-sts. STILL ON EARTH! Having accomplished under the circum stances the delivery of all Express matter destined to consignees in Chicago up to this evening, and having forwarded all matter delivered to us by regular connecting trains, we can now safely say to all our Chicago friends that they may rely upon it that all business entrusted to us will be not only de livered, but will be forwarded promptly by every train arriving and departing from our city. We are unable at present to make our usual calls, but as soon as we can our cus tomers will be promptly notified through our city papers. H. D. COLVIN, Agent, General Office United States Express Com pany, 59 & 61 "West ~Wn-3bing*r>n- R t. REAL ESTATE. CHEAP LOTS. MUST BE SOLD. 20 Lota on Hals+ed and Borllng-sts., between Centre and Sophla-sts, at SBOO to S9OO each. These lots are 25x 125 feet; axe just outside the fire limits, in a good neigh borhood* near street cars, schools, Ac. Title perfect. CHAPMAN & BARBEE, WANTED. WANTED. The Egnitahle Life Assurance Society of the United States, Those business is larger than that of any other in the world, want three or four of the best men in the city to represent the Company here as Agents and Solicitors. Apply at the office of the Northwestern Department, comer Dearborn and Washington-sts. WANTED. . A person of experience, who Is acting as Agent or Bro ker in FXRK INSURANCE, to join a party from the East, who can obtain Agencies of several responsible and well known Companies. Apply at DICKSON & COOPER’S, 153 lladison-st., from 9 to 12 a. m. FINANCIAL. WHY NOT Give your overdue Claims, Bills, Notes, Accounts, Ac., 1b all parts of the country, to FRASIER’S MERCAN TILE COLLECTION AGENCY, for collection. Ko attor neys’ fees. 146 East Madison-at. Loans 2ST egotiated. On real estate, in the city or suburbs, at current rates. . G. S. HUBBARD, Jr., 16S East Washington-st. MISCELLANEOUS. FOR SALE, One yoke 6-year old, well-broken, matched Oxon. Took fir t. premium for two years at lowa State Fair. Apply to S. B. CHASE A CO., 175 South Water-st. HENEY S. JAFFRAY, ARCHITECT, Has removed to No. 88 EAST "WASHING TON-st., near Dearborn. CaMars k BiU-lead Boxes, At Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co.’s, 118 and 120 Monroe-st., Chicago. J. M. W. JONES, PEXNTEE & BLANK BOOK MAKTJFACTHEEE, Railroad "Work and Office Outfits a specialty. 68 Ca nal-at-, and 509 Wabash-av. MEETINGS. Masonic. Ashlar Dodge, No. 308, A. F. A A. M.—Regular Com munication tnia (Tuesday) evening at o’clock, at their HaU in Masonic Temple. Work on F. C. Degree. Fra ternity oozdUUi Inrilta, 0. H. CRAKE, Seo’y. Wie ; c£|i£apr IPalfe WASHINGTON. General Dent as a Claim Agent for a Pecuniary Consid eration. A New Treasury Bill to be Presented to Con gress. Chief Justice Chase in Feeble Con dition. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, GENERAL DENT’S PURCHASABLE INFLUENCE. Washington, Nov. 4. —Judge Dent, who prac tices law before the President, is now outdone by General F. T. Dent, who sells his influence with foreign countries for contingent fees. In a suit between two claim agents here which comes up to-morrow for a hearing, and where an injunction is asked for to restraints defendant from collecting anything further in the way of fees, on behalf of what ia known as the Captain Williams’ Claims against New Zealand, a contract has been put in evi dence, which sets forth the following facts; That F. T. Dent, in consideration of 15 per cent, agrees to prosecute this claim against the British Government, and to use his influence for its speedy settlement. A guarantee from a re sponsible party accompanies the contract, promising that Dent shall act in good faith in carrying out the intent of the contract. A NEW TBEASUBY BILL. A bill has bern prepared by the Treasury De partment, to be presented to Congress in De cember, revising the laws in relation to an In dependent Treasury, in -which many important changes are proposed. The title of the bill is as follows : A bill to provide for the designation of an Indepen dent Treaueury of the United States ; to revise, consol idate, and amend the statutes relative to the cellection, safe-keeping, transfer, and disbursement of the public revenue, and to facilitate the settlement of the accounts of the Treasurer of the United States, and United States disbursing officers and agents. THE ARMY OF VIRGINIA. At the meeting of the Army of Northern ’Vir ginia, resolutions were passed commending the sarcophagus now in the course of construction at Lexington, Ya., to the memory of General Lee, and recommending that the ladies of the South hold memorial meetings, and, on the next anniversary of the birth of the Southern Chieftain, take such measures as seem to them best for collecting money on that day, to be specially appropriated to the decoration of his tomb. THE LEESBURG POISONING CASE. The trial of Mrs. Lloyd just terminated, for the poisoning of her children, .still continues to be the staple topic of discussion at Leesburg. She finds public opinion so much against her, not withstanding her acquittal that she avows her purpose to leave soon for Illinois, where she has a brother residing. THE STANTON PORTRAIT. The portrait of Secretary Stanton, painted for the old Washington City Government and placed in the former Council Chamber in the City Hall, has just been removed, at the instance of E. L. Stanton, son of the late Secretary, who supplied in its place another portrait just fin ished by a Washington artist. The latter is said to be one of the finest portraits in existence of the Great War Secretary. The body of the LATE SECRETARY RAWLINS is still in the public vault at the Congressional Cemetery, hut a few days since Geueral Babcock and a brother of the deceased went to the ceme tery, and selected a site for the burial of the re mains, in the southwest section of the inclosure. THE UNITED STATES JUDGES. It is proposed to revive the measure in Con gress, the coming session, for the retirement of the United States Judges on a pension, when they become mentally or physically incom petent to discharge their duties. * There are now several instances where the incumbents would be glad to do so, but they are too poor to resign. The report in regard to the failing condition of Chief Justice Chase’s health are only too reliable, and confirmed by the nearest associates. The grave statement is made that, unless he ceases entirely from mental labor, his decease may be almost momentarily ■looked for. It is still insisted that he will make atrip to the Pacific coast before the winter season. POST OFFICE STATISTICS. The report of the Postmaster, Fauld, of Cin cinnati, to the Post Office Department for the month of October, shows that there were 50 let ter carriers employed, who received 64,153 rand that the incidental expenses of the office were 613,750; 405,665 mail, 67,847 local letters, and 85,137 newspapers were delivered, and 808,118 letters and 21,883 newspapers were collected. TONNAGE DUES. Article 4 of the Convention between Belgium and the United States, dated July 17, 1858, it was agreed that steam vessels of the United States and of Belgium, engaged in regu lar navagation between the United States and Belgium, should be exempt in both countries from the payment of duties of tonnage, anchor age buoys, and lighthouses. At the time the. treaty was made it was regarded as & concession to the United States, as we were then striving to maintain reciprocity. Becently a Belgian line of steamships has commenced run ning between Antwerp and New York. The agent, when called on for tonnage dues amount ing to about S4OO, claimed exemption under the terms of the treaty, and paid them under pro test. The Treasury officials were highly sur prised to find the clause in the treaty, but had nothing to do but to refund. The “mostfavored nation clause,” as it is called, and which is in all the treaties of commerce and navigation with European maritime nations,-provides that any particular favor granted to other nations, in re spect to commerce and navigation, shall imme diately become common to the contracting party, who shall enjoy the same freely. This discovery of the abov? clause, by the Belgian agent, has caused the' British, German, and French Ministers to inform the State Department that under the terms of existing treaties they now rlm'm the same privileges for the steamship lines of their respective countries. This will involve a loss of over 6100,000 in tonnage dues annually, and the reciprocal privilege amounts to nothing now or prospectively. It is in our power, however, to give notice of an abrogation of the Belgian treaty in twelve months from date of notice, but that would be virtually a confession that the United States never expects to have future lines of steamships. An Immense Railway Daw-Suit. Denver. Col., Nov. 4.—The Union and-Kansas, Pacific Bailroad Companies are before the Dis trict Court to-day. The Kansas Pacific brings, suit for $1,000,000 damages against the Union Pacific for failure to comply ■with the provisions of an act of Congress, providing that no discrimination shall be made by one road against the other; and, also, to oblige the Union Pacific to comply with the said provisions. The attorneys for both companies are here conduct ing the case, the Union Pacific pleading that this Court has no jurisdiction without their voluntary appearance. Minister Mori in Connecticut* New Haven, Conn., Nov. 4.—Mr. Mori, the Japanese Minister, has been spending several days here, examining the Connecticut school system. On Friday evening “ The Club ” Com pany, the President and Professors of Yale • and other prominent institutions held a special meeting, discussing with Mr. Mori his plans for progress in Japan. He is very hopeful for the future of his country, and hopes to devote his life to the promotion of education. All present were interested by his liberal, patriotic views. War Department Weather Prognos- tics* Wab Department, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, Division of Telegrams and Beports for the Benefit of Commerce, Washington, D. C., Nov. 4.—Probabilities: In the Northwest, and thence over the upper lakes and Michigan, brisk northeasterly to southeasterly winds, with threatening weather and rain extending with southeasterly winds to Tennessee and the lower Mississippi valley. In the Gnlf States, brisk southeasterly winds, with threatening weather and rain for the South At lantic States, increasing cloudiness and occa sional rain, with possibly brisk northeaster ly winds. On the lower lakes, easterly to southeasterly winds and cloudy weather will prevail. In New England and the Middle States, light northwesterly winds and partially cloudy weather. Warning signals are ordered for New Orleans, Mobile, Duluth, Milwaukee Chicago, and Grand Haven. * FOREIGN. GREAT BRITAIN. New Toek, Not. i. —A London despatch from Tiverton says that the election there for mem bore of Parliament, to-day, is being conducted amid great excitement. Vigilance committees have been formed by both parties. One voter while depositing hie ballot, dropped dead from heart disease. The Liberal candidate ia W. N Massey; the Conservative, J. W. Waldroud. London, Not. A—A despatch from Sheffield, at noon, to-day, reports that some rioting had taken place m that city, and that the police had arrested five of the ringleaders, The cause of the disorder is not reported. The demonstrations against closing the ea loons in Liverpool during certain hours on Sun day were renewed yesterday. At one place a crowd numbering 10,060, which was being ad dressed by speakers in opposition to the act, was dispersed by the police. An American seaman was before the Courts in Bow street to-day, on the charge of murder com mitted on the high seas. He was arrested tin, der the Extradition Treaty with the United States, at the instance of Mr. Nunn, the Amer ican Vice Consul General. At the examination of the accused, the representative of the United States failed to make out a prima facie case of murder. The evidence showed that the case was only one of manslaughter, and the Justice decided that that degree of crime did not come under the provisions of the treaty. Vice' Consul Nunn concurred, and the prisoner was dis charged. GERMANY. Berlin, Nov. 4.—The excitement over the de feat of the Country Deform bill has subsided. The bill will again be introduced on the reopen ing of the Diet. The Emperor of Russia has written an auto graph letter to Prince Charles, brother of the Emperor of Germany, on the occasion of his fiftieth anniversary, and announcing his ap pointment to the honorary Colonelcy of a Rus sian regiment. The Czar calls to mind the glorious deeds of the allied armies of Prussia and Russia, when fighting in the holy cause, and hopes the ties of friendship between the two countries will endure for generations. Dresden, Nov. 4.—The golden wedding of the King and Queen of Saxony was celebrated here to-day with splendid ceremonies. The occasion was made remarkable by the presence of the Emperor, Empress, and Crown Prince of Ger many, who thus give proof of the complete res toration of good feeling between the German and Saxon Courts. FRANCE. New York, Nov. 4. —European advices say that Marshal Bazaine is not expected to live through his trial. Parts, Nov. 4. —France will pay to Germany, this week ? 200,000,000 francs, and will continue to make similar installments until the end of the year, so that on the Ist of January only two milliards of the war indemnity will remain un paid. The report which first appeared in the Oaulois , that the German Ambassador had demanded of Thiers a disavowal of General Ducrot’s order of the day, is pronounced untrue. THE CHOLERA. New York, Nov. 4.—Despatches from Vienna, Praene, and Berlin note the appearance of the cholera at all those places. WALL STREET. Review of the Money, Bond, Stock, Gold, and Produce Markets. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. New York, Not. 4.—A1l the Wall street markets, except gold, were dull to-day, owing to political stir. The gold market has been ex ceptionally active, the feature having been the artificial scarcity of cash gold, which cost bor rowers as high as per cent for to-day’B de liveries. On Friday and Saturday last immense speculative sales were made apparently by firms which have the reputation of being in close re lations with the Treasury at Washington. The large holders of gold, notably one of the Canada banks, took advantage of the oversold condition of the market, and compelled borrowers to pay to-day’s exorbitant rates. Owing to the gold operations, money was stringent at 7 currency to 7 gold, but, just before the close of bank hours, brokers’ balances were lent as low as 6 per cent. The closing quotation was 6to 7. Prime business paper is still quoted at 10 to 12. FOREIGN EXCHANGE was dull and unsettled. The leading drawers reduced the rates. GOVERNMENT RONDS were very dull. On the Stock Exchange scarcely anything was done. PRODUCE. The demand for .flour was chiefly confined to low grades. These are steady, and really good not plenty. Medium amber wheat extra was dull and heavy; choice family steady, but quiet; superfine in fair demand! At the close the market was quiet; good shipping firm and scarce; choice family very strong. There was a firmer feeling in wheat,but the demand was mod erate. The supply was liberal of spring. The market closes quiet and tame; shippers bold off. Winter firm. Pork-steady and moderately ac tive. Moderate trade in cut meats; bacon active for short delivery. Lard quiet and steady. The Boston Baptists on Close Com- mnnion. Boston, Nov. 4.—At the weekly conference of the Baptist clergy of Boston and vicinity, to day, the Committee on the subject of “ Close Communion ” reported as follows: First, That Christian Baptism is the im mersion of a believer in water in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost, and in profes sion orhis faith in Christ. Second, That the Christian churches ought to be composed of such regenerate persons Only as have been baptized on profession of their faith in Jesus. Third, That the Lord’s Supper ought to be observed bv Christian churches only. Fourth, That an invitation of courtesy to par take of the emblems should be given to none but orderly members of the churches properly constituted. . The report was accepted. Death on the Rail* Cumberland, Md., Nov. 4.—On Friday night two freight trains collided on the Huntington Broad Top Bailroad. Conductor Bowser and three others were instantly killed, and another person was mortally injured. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. Dockland, 0., Nov. 4. —As a passenger train on the Atlantic & Great Western Bailroad, at this place, was pulling out this morning, two young men employed on the train attempted to get aboard. One of them succeeded, nut the other, named Boss, fell under the train and ono car passed over his body, cutting him in two and killing him instantly. Cincinnati, Nov. 4.— William Boss, a newsboy, fell from a train on the Atlantic & Great West ern Bailroad at Dockland, this morning, and was run over and killed. New York Dry Goods Market* New York, Nov.- 4. —The week opens with a very light movement in all branches of trade. Cotton goods are strong and the price generally steady, but with rather less firmness in some makes of bleached shirtings, although quotations are unchanged. The correct price for Wamsutta bleached shirtings is 17#C, lower prices having been inadvertently given by a job bing house. Rolled picconetts are in good demand at reduced rates. Prints are also in fair request for fill ing orders, and stocks in first hands are light. Foreign goods are very quiet. Allegheny Cattle Market* ' Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 4. — Cattle— Market un changed; arrivals heavy; best, $6.25 to $6.50; stock s3.oo to $3.50; prospects slow. Sheep— Market slow; arrivals fair; beat, $5.25 to $5.60; prospects slow. Hogs— Market firm; arrivals fair; Philadelphia, $5.00 to $5.10; Yorkers; $5.60 to $4.70 ; prospect fair* CHICAGO, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1872. Woodhnll and Claflin Indicted by the Grand Jury. Arrest of Stephen Pearl An drews, the “Alwato” Philosopher. The Broadway Underground Railroad Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. New Yore, Nov. 4.—ln less than half an hour, to-day, the United States Grand Juryfouud three indictments against Mrs. Woodhnll and Tennie C. Claflin. At 11 o’clock, the balla and lobbies of the Federal building were crowded. The ves tibule was soon rendered almost impassable by the multitude. About noon, Woodhull <fc Claflin alighted from a carriage opposite the Federal building. They were in custody of the Deputy Marshal, who conducted them through a passage which had been made with difficulty. The defendants looked pale and agi tated. Soon after they had taken their seats, Mr. Howe informed them they had been sum marily indicted and would not be allowed a pre liminary examination. “Why,” said Mrs. Woodhull, “this is perse cution. One of the Sunday papers has publish ed the very same article that we have been ar rested for publishing.” When Commissioner Osborne called the case, the District Attorney said: “I desire to state, your Honor, that the Grand Jury have found in dictments against the defendants, and that re moves the case from your Honor’s jurisdiction.” Mr. Howe. I can only confess that I have heard the fact with surprise. Judge Beymart and myself have come here to-day prepared to go on with an examination in this case. We appear in behalf of these ladies, whom I say avowedly are being persecuted. They are charged with mailing an obscene paper, but their paper is in no sense obscene, Itf&ed, sir, thia blow is one against the entire freedom of the press. I notice that the indictments do not contain any reference to the charges. We are ready to show that there is not a word of obscenity in the matter for which my clients have been indicted. They are victims of a cruel persecution, instigated by private malice from a source that dare not come into court to show its malignity. They have come here pre pared to defend themselves. I desire to say that if they are to be punished, then the Holyßible itself and the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge may be suppressed. There is no telling, your Honor, where this persecution may end. Commissioner Osborne. Without passing upon the merits of this case, or the character of defendants’ journal, my duty now is to dismiss this complaint, a nigher tribunal, the Grand Juiy, having passed upon it. He now directed a Marshal to serve bench warrants upon the defendants and retain them in custody till they receive bail. It is rumored to-night that these two notorious women will be railroaded through the Court and committed to the Albany Penitentiary before next Saturday. [To the A Bsociated Pros.] THE UNDERGROUND RAILWAY. N.**w York, Nov. 4.—Prancis P. Byrne brought suit against the New York Central Underground Railway Company, to compel the performance of a contract with him. Byrne alleges that the Company made an agreement with him to build the road for $14,000,000 of bonds, and that he should buy the right of way for $8,500,000 of stock. The defendants demurred. There was no cause of action, and Judge Barret gave judgment in their favor, holding, among other reasons, that the breach of contract is not sufficiently alleged to warrant a decree for damages. Several of the stage companies Have brought suit to restrain Mr. Bergh, of the Cruelty to An imals Society, from stopping their horses and arresting their drivers. The argument was ad journed to Wednesday, The United States Grand Jury indicted Mes dames Woodhull and Clafiin to-dav, and thus precluded their hearing before the United States Commissioner. Stephen Peaj-l Andrews has been also arrested, on the charge of being im plicated with the dames. Bench warrants were served upon the female defendants, and the bail fixed in the sum of SB,OOO each, in default of which both were re manded to Ludlow Street Jail to await trial. NEW YORK CITY POLITICAL GOSSIP. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune , New Yobk, Nov. 4.—The political canvass is closing to-night with excitement running high, particularly on State and city issues. The tur moil and confusion of the triangular fight for the Mayoralty was increased to-day by the ru mored withdrawal of Havemeyer, which he de nies in a card to be published to-morrow. The' question of who is to be Mayor is now purely one of conjecture, so complicated are the divisions of. the factions and the obliteration of old party lines. In the pools sold, O'Brien and Have meyer alternate frequently as favorites, with. Lawrence far in the rear. The official programme for supervising the polls to-morrow is more extensive than ever be fore, and the deputies are empowered to make arrests at discretion. To-morrow being a legal holiday in New York, the Financial and Commercial Exchanges will be closed, and business in general virtually sus pended. The Tribune , in a final review of the situation, says: 7i If Mr. Greeley is elected to-morrow, the re forms for which the Liberal Convention declared will at once be sot in motion. If he is defeated, the movement is only delayed. In any event, it is a matter for the deepest gratification that the great Democratic party has planted it self 'do firmly on the advanced ground of pro gress that it can never in fntnre be used in the interests of reaction. Mr. Greeley has gone through the campaign without taking a step which the judgment of his supporters did. not approve, has grown steadily in esteem, alike of his friends and of his enemies. If elected to morrow, he will be elected without a solitary pledge save those which he has publicly given in his letters and addresses. If defeated, there are no broken promises to obstruct his futurepath.” The World pays an unreserved tribute to Mr. Greeley for his hearing throughout the canvass, and also to the Liberal Republicans for their good faith and patriotism, ft says further: “Li relation to the probable result of to-mor row’s vote we must speak with temperance and frankness; we will not affect a con fidence we do not feel. But although we are not puffed up with exultant hopes, we see no reason for despair. "We shall

carry this city certainly, this State with almost equal certainty; all the Southern States except South Carolina and Mississippi are pretty se curely ours, and we may safely count on Indiana. We need but about a dozen electoral votes in addition, and we have chances for these, though not brilliant chances, in four or five North ern States. In a contest so very close, there is everything to encourage strenuous effort. Victory is within our grasp if we put forth all our vigor. It is simply a question whether all Democrats will go to the polls and do their whole duty. We have no reason to im pugn the good faith of our Liberal Republican allies. It is the clear duty of the Democratic party to give a true and staunch support to the joint Presidential ticket. We cannot afford to he outdone in manliness and fidelity.” New Yobk, Nov. 4.—The usual hustle and ex citement attending the eve of a political battle was prevalent to-day- The candidates for office were industriously working for personal inter ests. The politicians were giving instructions to their followers, and pamphlets setting forth the claims of nominees were scattered broadcast through the city. James O’Brien has an enthusiastic troupe in every ward, and feels confident of his election to the Mayoralty, andhopesfor over 20,000 majority. Many of his adherents he has been promised NEW YORK. Suit. SUIT AOATNBT DEBOH. WOODHULL AND CLAFLIN, POLITICAL. a large Republican vote. Large sums of money are reported to have been distributed in bi« name among the laboring men in the np-town wards. The enthusiasm for O’Brien on the East Side has occasioned the report that a precon certed attack will be made on the Havemeyer boxes to-morrow. The rumor spread to-day that Havemeyer had withdrawn, and was the theme of universal re mark, but it has proved entirely unfounded. Tammany Hall was crowded with politicians, who exhibited much enthusiasm for Lawrence. Its challengers have been instructed to keep a close watch upon the ranks of O’Brien, as it is -reported fraud will be attempted in his interest on a large scale. In betting O’Brien is the favorite, with Have meyer close on his heels, and Lawrence far be hind. The Presidential question seems to excite little interest, bnt the struggle for Governor promises to be bitter, as certain followers of Apollo Hall, who have renounced Tammany, are unwilling to vote for Dix. Rumor says Keman tickets will be run out of all the Apollo Hall boxes to-morrow. Betting, however, is nearly two to one on Dix, Marshal Sharpe has instructed his chief depu ties to inquire calmly into all cases of arrest, and if trivial, to allow the prisoners to depart on personal application. If they think the prisoner should be held, he will be sent with the wit nesses to the nearest United States Commis sioner. AT ST. PAUL. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune , St. Paul, Minn., Nov. 4. —The Republicans closed the campaign with a dreary and dismal meeting to-night, at which only two hun dred were present. The Peakers were all local, and not over-brilliant. A Greeley man asked a respectful question, and was hurled out by the police. A call was then made for the Greeley men to leave, and two-thirds of the audience retired, cheering for Greeley. The office-holders have spent money like water in this city, during the past week, but the Liberals expect to have 300 ma jority, nevertheless. REGISTRATION IN MISSOURI, St. Louis, Nov. 4.—Registration returns from one hundred and three counties of this State foot up 301,994, an increase since 1870 of 113,142. The other eleven counties will probably increase the aggregate to 310,000. The registration of this county is now about 45,000, an increase of about 6,000. AT PEORIA. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune . Peobia, HI., Nov. 4.— Both Liberals and Re publicans are holding meetings this evening, the final rally before the struggle to-morrow. The canvass in the district has been thorough on both sides, and it is impossible to prophesy any result. AT FORT WAYNE, IND. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune , Bout Wayne, Nov. 4.—The election to-mor row excites but little attention. This county will give about 3 ; 000 majority for the Greeley Electors. The liquor saloons will be closed, in accordance with the city ordinance. Telegraphic Brevities* Some excitement exists in Westchester Coun ty, N. Y., over discoveries of gold quartz there. Thomas Carl, of Cassapolis, was burned to death at Dowagiac, Mich., on Saturday, Half an inch of snow fell at Brunswick, Me., on Sunday night. General Burnside arrived at New York, yester day, from Europe. The New York Produce Exchange will be closed to-day. The Presidential election to-day occupied the attention of many of the New York preachers on Sunday. Wm. Holbrook’s residence in Port Wayne was destroyed by fire early yesterday morning. Cause of the fire unknown. In a bar-room fight, in Cincinnati, on Sunday night, a man named Betse struck William Markland with a chair, and killed him. Secretary Belknap arrived at his home in Keokuk, lowa, last night. He was serenaded and made a brief speech. The Halifax steamer Hope, owned by Adam McKay, was burned to the water’s edge while lying at her wharf at Mill Cove, Dartmouth, on Sunday. The loss is not stated. There is a well-defined rumor in Peoria, that the Fan Handle Road has leased the Toledo, Peoria & Warsaw Bailway for a long term of years. John Hurley, alias William Graw, and George Thompson, alias Samuel Moody, two notorious thieves, escaped from Sing Sing Prison on Sat urday night. A man named McNaughton fell from the roof of a building in Bockford, yesterday afternoon, fracturing his skull. Some hopes of his recov ery are still entertained. In the case of Burke, who was arrested at Canada, for having broken jail at In dianapolis, the Canadian authorities yesterday decided to surrender him to the United States under the extradition treaty. Private advices from Pomeroy, Ohio, state that the coal miners have struck for an increase of wages from 3% to 4 cents per bushel, and that the salaried employes have demanded a corresponding advance of pay. The grocery stores of Bicher & Kenner and McLean & Lester, at Chillicothe, HI., were en tered on Sunday night by burglars. Entrance was effected by boring a hole in the door and then pushing back the holts. The amount stolen was not ascertained. Gottfried Gibhard, of St. Louis, the young boy who was bitten in the hand seven weeks ago by a dog, died on Sunday night of hydro phobia, after suitering intensely for three days. - This is the second death by hydrophobia 'that has occurred within a week. At Decatur, Ind., will take place to-day the trial of John Steaght, for attempting to kill his brother-in-law, J. Richards, by shooting hini last summer. Richards was in a critical condi tion for some time, but will now probably re cover from the effects of the shot. A man living near Bumettsville, Ind., was thrown from his wagon, yesterday, and fell to the ground. A barrel of cider, which was in the wagon at the time, fell on his leg, mashing it badly, and rendering amputation necessary, which was done just below the knee. On Friday night a hand of armed men went to the house of Samuel Hawkins, a negro living in Hickman Precinct, Fayette County, Ky., took him and Bis wife and daughter away in the direc tion of the Licking River, and, it is thought, drowned them. No cause is given for the out rage. Colonel G. W. Battles, the man arrested at Warsaw, Ind., in September, on suspicion of having burglarized the Lake County Treasury safe in June previous, was yesterday discharged from custody, the evidence not being sufficient to convict him. No person who saw the man at Crown Point previous to the burglary was found willing to swear positively to his identity, although many feel convinced in their own minds that he is the man sought for. Living 1 Veterans* From the London Daily Xeics. The public is probably not aware that of the J present Colonels in Her Majesty’s regiments at east eighteen were at Waterloo. But the histo ry of the service of manyof them does not begin .here. We are accustomed to look back upon Quatre Bras and Waterloo as the scene of the exploits of our oldest veterans; and the interest occasioned by the discovery of another “ Water loo hero ” in some little village testifies to the regard which the country has for those who fought for it in the old time. When we look at this semi-biographical lists of Colonels, however, we must begm with an earlier date. We get back to the stirring scenes of Badajoz, of Yittoria, of Ciudad Bodrigo. We find officers, who, like General Pitzgerald, had their first commissions in 1793, just after the first coalition against Prance had been declared. If the battles of the Nile, of Copenhagen, and of Trafalgar, could, by any means have been added to these lists of _ battles on land, we should have, a no ble record of one period of our national career; but even as they stand, the exploits of our army are as numerous as they are varied in scene. Take, for example, the case of the Colonel of the Pirst Dragoon Guards, General Sir James Jackson, who received his first commission in 1806. He served in the Peninsular War from 1809 to 1814, and was present at the battles of Busaco, Puentes d’Onor, Badajoz, Ciudad Bodrigo, Salamanca. Yittoria, Pyrenees and Niielle. At tfiye he was wound* Ultt ed. Ho web at Waterloo, ftr>d with the Occupation Army in France. Then we find him serving in India, then in Arabia, and finally appearing as Commander of die Forces at the Cape from 1854 to 1859. The Col onel of the Coldstream Guards, Sir W. Gomm, who was an ensign in 1794,—just seventy-eight years ago,—and who is now to become Consta ble of the Tower, in succession to Sir George Pollock, furnishes the following scrap of biogra phy : “ Served on the expedition to the Helder, in 1799, including two actions; in France and Spain, in 1800; in Copenhagen in 1807; Peninsular Campaigns, 1808-9; present at the battles of Boleia Yinuera and Corunna; expedition to Walcheren, and siege of Flushing in 1809, Peninsula, 1810, in cluding battles of Busaco and Fuentes d’Onor, Badajoz, Salamanca, Vittorio, San Sebastian, Nivelie, and Nive, and investment of Bayonne; campaign of 1815; present at Quatre Bras and Waterloo,” Of Lieutenant General Law, Colo nel of the 71st Foot, thejofficial biography says: tl Sir John Moore, at the action of Logo, and at the battle of Corunna; expedition to Walcheren; served in the Peninsula from 1810 to 1814 at at Tortres Vedras. Badajoz (wounded), battle of Nive, Pyrenees 7 Ac.. Ac.; served in the cam paign of 1815, including the battle of Waterloo (severely wounded); served three years in the Army of Occupation in France. ’ Not the least curious feature of these statements is the number of wounds these veteran heroes have survived to so great an age. The Colonel Commandant of the Rifle Brigade, General Sir Charles Yorke, was wounded at Nivelie; he was severely wounded at Orthes; at Badajoz he was again wounded. The Marquis of Tweeddale, Colonel of the Second Life Guards, was wound ed at Vittoria, at Busaco, and in the American war. The Colonel of the Sixteenth Foot, Lieu tenant General Macdonald, after having served in Hanover in 1805, in Sicily in 1806-10, in Spain in 1812, and in Canada in 1814, found himself in the Waterloo campaign. At the great battle he was wounded no fewer than times—“in the leg, in the neck, and through the body, wounding the lungs ” THE BELMONT GALLERY. Tlio Approaching Sale—Some of Its Gems. From the Kew York Evening Post, The celebrated gallery of painting owned by Mr. August Belmont, which he has been collect ing in New York for many years past, but which has been so jealously guarded as to be almost unknown to a majority of our art-lovers, is now open for public exhibition at the Leavitt Art Booms, No. 817 Broadway. This collection, which is generally conceded to be one of the best ever made in this country, has been twice, we believe, opened for public exhibition—once for the benefit of the Sani tary Commission and again In 1870 in aid of the “ Sheltering Arms. It will now remain on exhibition until Nov. 12, when it is to be sold at auction at the Clinton Hall salesrooms, Astor Place, by the Messrs. Leavitt, to the highest bidder. The pictures were selected by the owner for his own gratification, and represent the greatest names known to modern art in Europe. Among the works of the French school is Rosa Bonhenr’g “Return from the Pasture,” a young man on horseback driving before hi™ cows and sheep, a strong work, finely treated. Bonguereau is represented by an “ Italian Mother and Child,” in which the the figures are life-size and rendered with great delicacy and refinement; Toulmoucheby “The Lesson,” a charming interior, with the figure of & mother listening to a reading lesson with which her littlo daughter is occupied beside her. This is a very graceful composition and beau tiful in color; Florent Willems by “ The Card House ” and “ The Toilet,” both of which ex emplify his best style of work; Merle, by a group of “School Girls ” and “ The Christian Maiden.” The last-named work is fine in senti ment, and painted with the most refined taste and feeling; Calame, “by Summer in the Alps,” a vigorous realization of mountain scene ry and a characteristic work; Robert Fleury by a picture of grand size, one of his most celebrated works, entitled, “The Pillage of Rome by Charles d’Anjou;” Geroiue, by “Diogenes,” a strong work; Edouard Zamacois, by the interior of a coetnzzier’s shop, entitled “Preparing for the Bal Masque.” Two gentlemen are clothing themselves for a fete, while around them, on the floor and b&nging against the wall, are the grand costumes which such occasions demand. The picture is finely drawn, and its coloring is simply gorgeous. Ed. Frere, by “A Dmik of Water,” a cabinet example show ing a little girl drinking; and Beliange by “ The Wounded Yoltigeur,” a strong character subject, a view of a field of battle, with a stem-visaged soldier standing in the fore ground. He has been wounded in the hand, and as he is about to go to the rear looks defiance at the enemy. Another superb work in the French depart ment is by Meissonier, and is entitled, “Cavalier Awaiting an Audience/’ It is an interior and shows a gaily-dressed cavalier standing before an open fireplace. He is leaning against the mantelpiece, and as he does so rests one foot upon the fender. The subject is worked up with all of the minuteness and marvellous care for which this artist is so justly celebrated. Of the great masters of the German school Andreas Achenbachis represented by a superbly rendered coast scene. “A Storm Near Capri,” and a “Norway Landscape;” Professor Geyser by an interior with figures, with “Baron Mun chausen,” seated in the foreground, relating the story of his marvellous adventures; Professor Lewis Kraus, the acknowledged head of hia school of painters, by “ Pastor and Poacher,” in which a well-fed priest is in the act of reproach ing a tall cadaverous poacher for his trans gressions. This is a grand subject and brill iantly rendered. Meyerheim by “ The Peasant’s Repast;”’ Meyer Yon Bremen by “Little Brother,” a charming subject in which two little children are represented watching their sleeping baby-brother, who lies in a cradle before them. There is an attractiveness about this picture quite irresistible: and Salentin by “ The Baptism.” Among the fine representative works of the Flemish school are. “The Music Lesson,” by David Bless; “ Paying Toll,” by Billers; “ In terior,” by David Dehoter, with figures by the late Baron Leys ; “ Old Friends,” by Madou; “ The Shipwreck,” and “The Coast of Scheve ninge,” by Louis Meyer; “Death-Bed of William of Orange,” by Pieneman; “ Winter Scene in Holland,” by Schelfhart; “The Woods Near the Hague,” by Vender Maaten; and “ In terior of a Tavern,” by Van Hove. Of our American artists Eastman Johnson is represented by one of the best works from his easel, “The Chimney Sweep,” which is erro neously named in the catalogue as ‘ ‘ The Savoyard; ” Regis Gignoux, by hia great work “ Niagara by Moonlight; ” the late Emanuel Leutze, by his acknowledged masterpiece “The Maid of Saragossa; ” Herman Fuechsel, by “ View of the Narrows,” and DeHaas by “ Port of Dover.” George H. Boughton, of London, is represented by a weird composition, entitled “ The Lake of the Dismal Swamp,” evidently illustrating Moore’s poem of that name. This collection altogetherjorms a galaxy of art treasures of the most demonstrative character, and its dispersion will be regretted by all lovers of the beautiful. Mr. Belmont, it is said, con templates an extended visit and residence in Europe, hence the sale. The New Whitworth Gun* ' From the New York Times. Sir Joseph Whitworth has now invented, we are told, a field gun, better than either the new nine-pounder or the new sixteen-pounder, of which the English press has lately told us so much. This latest cannon is made of compressed steel. It is strong enough to bear twice the usual charge of powder. At 100 yards, with a charge of two pounds and three-quarters, it can put a nine-pound holt through a three-inch armor plate set at an angle of forty-five degrees; and, finally, this extraordinary weapoowill throw a projectile over a clean space of six miles. . The way in' which the strength requisite to get these results has been obtained is one, we think, : which will prove important to other mechanicians, besides the makers of artillery. The new Whitworth gun is, as we have said, made of steel, and, although no exact descrip tion of its manufacture is at hand, wo take it for granted that it is constructed of Tftminm of twisted cylinders. By all the processes hither to, steel has been more or leas defective, and wo suspect it is not made quite perfect by the new one. In each of the methods, the Besse mer included, air passes through iron, thus en dowing the latter with the carbon, whose addi tion makes the difference between iron and steel. Now a greater or leas portion of this air remains in the substance, and occasions holes find flaws. These, of course, weaken the steel and make it liable to break up. Sir Joseph Whit worth has met this difficulty by anew device. H»tus applied tffio bot ae{g. Trbjjp in JVUMBER 78 of manufacture, the tremendous pressure of twenty tons to the square inch, and has thus driven forth the atmospheric particles, tho presence of which would otherwise diminish the stability of the gun. This expedient must, ap parently, greatly increase the efficiency of bat teries in the field. The advantages of tho supe riority of range are probably of much less mo ment, however, than those of tho superiorty of endurance and the economy of the charge. * Ar tillery at great distances notoriously does little mischief, and unless from great heights, or from forts—the now gun being designed for the field— Sir Joseph’s invention on this score is unlikely to be of exceptional service. COD FISHERIES. The Supply in Canadian and New foundland Waters. Prom the Toronto Leader . Fears are sometimes expressed that Canada’s and Newfoundland’s great staple, tho cod fish eries, will, in time, become exhausted, and the enormous fish colonies around the shores will, by overfishing, become so reduced in numbers that the toils of tho fisherman cease to. be remunerative. Already, it is asserted by some, our fishing grounds are falling off in productive ness, and while the number of fishermen aro increasing, the cod and seals are decreasing. We believe there is no foundation, in fact, for such an opinion. The quantity of fish taken out of the sea by the hands of men is so small, in proportion to the whole or to the numbers de stroyed by their natural enemies, that the ab straction could make little or no impression on the immense shoals in the ocean. The fecundity of fish is enormous, and is Nature’s compensa tion for the immense waste of life through the cannibal propensities of the fish world. In the world of waters it would seem as if shoals of one species of fish had no other object in life than to chase another with a view to eat them, but in proportion to the de struction thus carried on is the power of repro duction with which they are endowed. Perhaps sixty or seventy millions of codfish arc taken from the sea annually by tho toilers of the sea around the shores of New Fdundland. But what is the quantity when we consider that the ‘cod yields three ‘ millions and a half of eggs each season, and that even eight millions have been found in the roe of a single cod! Other fish, though not equalling the cod, are also wonderfully reproductive. A herring six or seven ounces in weight is pro vided with about 30,000 ovaria. After making all reasonable allowances for the destruction of eggs and of the young, it has been calculated that in three years a single pair of herrings would produce 154,000,000. Buffon said that if a pair of herrings were left to breed and multi ply undisturbed for a period of twenty years they would yieldafish bulk equal to tho whole of the globe on which we live. The cod far surpass the herring in fecundity. Nothing can compare with the prolific power of fish in any other species of animals, except, perhaps, the white ant, which produces eggs at the rate of fifty per minute, and goes on laying for a period of un known duration. The common domestic bug, against which popular prejudice is so strongly pronounced, has great reproductive powers, as it is said to become a great grandmother in twenty-four hours. It is nothing, however, to the house-fly, which produces twenty millions of eggs in a season, or tho little unhides of .the garden, one of which produces a hundred thou sand millions of young. In the case of one of our cod that yields three millions and a half of eggs in a season, of course vast numbers never come to life at all, either from the want of the fructifying power, or from being devoured by enemies. Then of the eggs that ripen, it has been calculated that 90 per cent of the young fish perish before they are t> months old. Were it not for tills destruction of life, fish would so multiply that it would bo im possible for a boat to move in the sea. Fish prey extensively upon each other, indeed 'the very element in which they move, is ; in a sense, a great mass of living matter, and it doubtless affords, by means of minute animals, a wonder ful source of supply. Pood—Price and Consumption* An article in a German newspaper makes known, by.carefully selected statistics, the great increase that has taken place of late years in moat European countries in the consumption of articles of food and drink which our grand fathers regarded as luxuries. In Prussia,the yearly consumption of meat per head had ad vanced from 33 pounds in 1806 to 40 pounds in 1849, brandy had grown from 3 quarts to 3, and wine from quart to 2 quarts The increase in sugar, again, was from pounds to 7 pounds, and in coffee from 2-3 pound to 4 pounds. These figures do not bring us to the latest times, but the increase has been even in a greater ratio during the years since 1849. Thus, Kolb estimates the total con sumption of sugar per bead of the population in the area of the Zollverein for the year 1860 at 7.37 lb., and in the year 1864 it had advanced to 9.23 lb. The annual consumption of the popula tion of London is given, on the authority of. the Economist , as follows: In the year 1843, sugar, 16.54 lb.; tea, 1.47 lb.; cocoa, 0.09 lb.; wine, 0.22 gallon; spirits, 0.87 gallon. In the year 1865, sugar, 41.17 lb.; tea, 3.26 lb.; cocoa, 1.14 lb.; wine, 0.40 gallon; spirits, 0.89 gallon. The sugar con sumption of France per head is 7.4 kilogrammes, that of Prossia, 3.75; Austria, 2.46; Russia. 1.2 ; Holland, 7.03 ; Belgium, 4.06 ; while Eng land stands at 19.88 kilogrammes. It is the same with tea. England also uses above half as much silk as the whole of the rest of Europe. Spanish Finances* Spanish finances, like most other Spanish things, are in a bad way. The hard facts of the case are that there is a floating debt of $84,000,- 000 which no government since the revolution has shown its ability to deal with, and there is a deficit in the revenue this year of $20,000,000. The last Finance Minister-but one, Senor Angu lo, could think of no better mode of making ends meet than clapping a tax of 18 per cent on the interest of that portion of the debt held by foreign creditors, but this met with no accept ance at home, and abroad was treated as an attempt at robbery. His successor, Senor Camacho, proposed to pay l}k or 2 per cent of the foreign obligations in cash and give bonds for the remainder at the market price of Spanish securities, and the foreign creditors received this proposition fa vorably, but the Cortes did not even consider it. The present Minister, Senor Gomez, now pro poses an ingenious kind of loan, the leading fea ture of which is the payment of two-thirds of the interest due to the holders of certain classes of the public debt in money, and the other third in Government bonds during the next five years, and a loan of $10,500,000, the interest of which is to be paid in the same way, to be negotiated by the Bank of Paris and of the Netherlands. This plan is now coming before the Cortes. Senor Gomez estimates the expenditure of the coming year at $333,500,000, ana the revenue at $272,500,000. A Funny Petition. The following petition was presented to the City Connell of Hartford, Conn., on Tuesday night: To the Honorable Board of Common Council: Gentlemen: The undersigned, a long-time resident of this city, "being somewhat troubled with near-sightedness, especially after dark, and at the present time, owing to poor gas, or an in* sufficient supply of the samej not being able tc take the necessarysteps to keep out of the mud, would respectfully petition, in order that him self, as well as others troubled with a similar in firmity, may he able to ascertain the location ol the gas-lights, which often prove stumbling blocks in the way of pedestrians, that , the lamp posts may be painted white, so that more lighi may be thrown on the subject, and short-sighted citizens may be able to avoid them, and, in stead of swearing, your petitioner will ever,p.*aj (for better gas). Respectfully, Julius G. Bathbun. A Trade-Union Decision* A decision arrived at recently in the Sheriff Court Forfar, Scotland, will, if acted on else where, throw a liability on trade unions which they have hitherto escaped. Certain shoemakers in Forfar having been on a strike, when the strike was concluded compelled the employers of an other shoemaker, named Leslie, to dismiss him from a “union shop,” on the ground that he was not, like themselves, a member of the Forfar Union of Shoemakers. Leslie, who had remained at work while the others were on a strike, was ac cordingly dismissed, and brought an action against the trade unionists, claiming damages for having deprived him of his living. In tht> action he was successful, the Sheriff declaring the case to be one of moral intimidation of mas ters, and granting Leslie 28s, an aUowancfl&D|fej’ M for Iwf .ifeeta and ftteo his Jug amenfeig-F

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