16 Kasım 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1

16 Kasım 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1
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♦** VOLUME 26. REMOVALS. REMOVAL We Leg to inform onr Mends and tlie public generally, that Tre have moved to tbe new OTIS BUILDING, STATE AND MON BOE-STS., opposite PALMER’S GRAND HOTEL; a location eqnaUy accessible to onr cus tomers residing in tbe WEST, NORTH and SOUTH DIVISIONS of the city; where we are pre pared to exhibit tbe largest stock of musical instruments and musical merchandise, ever opened under one roof in this city. Since onr establishment in Chicago, we have continued to represent the LEADING IN STRUMENTS and other goods pertaining to onr line of busi ness ; controlling in the North west the leading Piano of the age, the Lest low and medium- PnceA Piano, the best Reed Or the largest and best Cata logue of Sheet Music and Music Books, and the best brands of smaU instruments ; hence, un like many other dealers, we are not obliged to CONSTANTLY CHANGE PROM THE GOODS OF ONE MAKER TO THOSE OF AN OTHER. We are the general Northwestern Agents for the STHNVAT PiaiP, an instrnment tliat lias recet/ed tlie stamp of nniversal approval, throughout Europe as well as America, tlie merits of wMcli are so unanimously con ceded, as to require no allusion to them here. We are the gene ral Northwestern Agents for the MBfIITT Organ, the representative Seed Organ of America, unqualifiedly acknowledged hythe musical profession and the trade gener ally to have no equal; its fac tory was destroyed hy the great conflagration hut has been re-, hnilt with treble its former manufacturing capacity. We represent, in the Northwest, the largest and best catalogue of Sheet Music and Music Books extant, that of BITiH & Oft, Comprising the various grades of standard, classical and pop ular musical works; BESIDES WHICH WE KEEP A COMPLETE LINE OP ALL OTHER A MEET CANMUSICAL PUBLICATIONS. Out European connections, being as old as onr business we command advantages upon IMPORTED GOODS Of aH kinds uneqnaHed hy any other house in the West. We respectfnUy invite dealers who are pot at present in corre spoidence with ns, to send for descriptive catalogues and "tain onr quotations and terms. LYON & HEM, SMITH & NIXON, State & Moaioe-sts., CHICAGO. STOVES. GET THE “SHINING LIGHT” CHURCH’S, 300 c&3 302 State-st. Buy Home Manufacture. MISCELLANEOUS. Tie Steamer GREAT REPUBLIC leaves ST. LOUIS Tuesday. Nov. 1?, and CAIRO Satur day, Nor. £5, a'. 10 a. m., for NEW ORLEANS, THOMAS MORRISON, Agent, 2QJ North L vee, St. Xouis. Cifil Basis it Presses, it Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co.’s, 118 and 120 Monroe-sL, Chicago. INSURANCE. RELIABLE ISIIEAIE. IMllfiS’ J&.C. 5-ENCY, OF NEW YORK. Gasb Ass®. ■ $4,000,000. The foHowing telegram was received Monday morning: New York, Nov. 11,9:50 a.m. David Beveridge, Adj’t’r, care Jas. B. Eloyd, Agent, Chicago, HL: “ Our Boston losses will not exceed One Million Dollars ($1,000,000), and will he paid as promptly as were onr CM- cago losses. (Signed) A. STODDAET, Reliable Insurance Will continue to he furnished JAMES B. FLOYD. 168 LaSalle-st., Bryan Block. ESTABLISHED BY ROYAL CHARTER, Jb.. 3E3- 1720. Lonflon Assurance Gorporatloi, LONDON, Total Funds, Gold, - $13,234,425 Fire Assets, Gold, - - - 5,064,000 This Corporation offers complete Indemnity to those de fying the protection of the best insurance. Its age of ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO years, and its immense accomnlation of assets, are sufficient guaranty of the security offered by Its policies. The Corporation commenced doing business in this country in the summer of tho present year, and has ap pointed the undersigned its attorney and agent for the State of Illinois. Policies issued at the Chicago office, 8 and 4 BRYAN BLOCK. GEORGE C. CLARKE, Acent. mmm-wmm Fire Insurance Co., OF HAHBDB&, GEffIABY. [Despatch from Company, per Cable. ] HENRY GREENEBAUM A CO.: , T . For Boston losses draw on Schroeder, of London. [Signed] KLANHOLD, Managing Director. from Company’s Agents in Boston.] H. GREENEBAUM A CO.: _ . _ . Hamburg-Bromon loses less than Forty Thousand Dol lars. [Signed] STEARNS BROS., Agents. We continue to write, as heretofore, on Mercantile Risks, Dwellings, Elevators, and Warehouses. HENRY GREENEBAUM & GO., Agents, 16 N. Canal-st. ItpKBY GBEEXEBAUW. COKEAD WITEOWSSY. FOR SALE. California Grapes. One car-load Tokay and Muscat Grapes, choice quality, prime or der. FRANCIS & WEBBER, WANTED. W-A-IsTTIEID. A man with family to manage a largo stock-farm—main ly horses; 23 miles from Chicago; can have an interest in the business; none but the most capable desired. T^T^HELMMgoWagmggtop-st. FINANCIAL. T .pans Negotiated On real estate, In the city or suburbs,‘at current rates. C. S, HUBBARD, Jr., 163 East Washlngton-st. Gen’l Agent. by WEATHER GUARDS. OnrWeatlierCnari for windows and doors Is EASILY APPLIED, IS SIMPLE, IS DURABLE, IS CHEAP, IS PERFECT. Those who once try it will have no othor. It has been fully tested. It is indorsed by tho Leading Architects, tie Leading Bnilders, tho leading citizens. It is being fitted in the Large Hotels, in Large Stores and Offices, in Dwellings of all sizes. No building Is complete without them. Call and examine, and be convinced. A few good canvassers and store agents wanted. WILSON, PIERCE & CO., Principal Office. 1011-2 Clark-st. D. W. Bosley & Co. Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Double and Single Rubber Moulding Weather Strips. "When applied to Doors and Windows they are effectual in saving fuel and in keeping out COLD. BAIN AN D DUST. Strips applied at abort notice. No. XXV' West W ashing- ton-st. OVERCOATS. EDWAKDB, BLUETT & CO. OVERCOATS, BUSINESS SUITS, DBEBS_BUITS. Boys’ ClotMi Dress & School Suits TS GEEAT VAHEETY. SOUTH SIDE STORE, No. 376 State-st. WEST SIDE, 45 & 47 West Madison-st., UNDER SHERMAN HOUSE. PICTURE FRAMES, &o. SffliS, CLARE & C 0„ 197 & 199 South 01inton-st,, CHICAGO, M AMTJF ACT U EEB3 OF SODIUMS, PICTURE FRAMES, AND 7 LOOM GLASSES, AND JOBBERS OP CHEOMOS, Engravings, &c. The LARGEST STOCK in the West. Ko Delay in Shipping. BUSINESS CARDS. JAMES J, WALWORTH, Manufacturer and Dealer in "VSTiE'cyca.grla.t Iz-ouo., a-nci Fittings, Steam Pumps, Steam Gauges, Scotch Water Gauge Glasses, Brass Valves, Cocks, Whistles and other Brass Goods. Steam and Gas Bitters’ Tools and Supplies, Leath er and Rubber Belting and Hose, Rubber, Hemp and Flax Packing, Hair Pelting. BRMFORD MALLEABLE IRON HfflGS, 243 & 245 Lake-st., Chicago. MUSICAL. A.EEED&SONS, PBOPHEETOHS OP TEMPLE OF illC, 81 Sixteenth-st DEALERS IN FIRST-CLASS HAM PROFESSIONAL, MEDICAL HTDEOEONIA CLESSON PRATT, M. D., Physician Special for Deaf ness. Catarrh, and Turoat Disease. Professional Rooms, 265 West Madlson-st., Cttlcago. Unquestionable refer* once given. . t DR: W. O. ZEiTXEsTT Has removed to the CLARENDON HOUSE. Tele* graph office in the Hotel, where messages can bo received from all stations of the W. U. Telegraph Co. Vest Side Office: 318 Madison-st. MEETINGS. Masonic. All members of Union Park Lodge are requested to at tend the communication this (Saturday] evening, for the purpose of taking action in reference to aiding oar breth ren in Bo«ton who are sufferers by the late tire. By order of the Worshipful Master. Masonic. Wm. B. Warren Lodge, No. 2u9, A.. F. & A. M.—The remains of onr deceased brother, Lonis Kormondy, will be committed to the grave at Eossbili, Sunday, Nov. 17. Funeral train leaves Milwaukee Depot at 1 o’clock p. m., sharp. Members are requested to meet in time at Lessing Hall. No. 12 North Olinton-st. aaii,ao.La«riuv; CHAS. H. SHATTUCK, W. M. Masonic. Wm. B. Warren Lodge, No. 209, A., F. &A. M.—Spe cial Communication at Lessing Hall, No. 13 North Ciin ton“- thi. (.Saturday) «vcm=^ at o’tiock. CHICAGO, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1873. FURS! Tie Best Assortment in tie Citj, aril Prices tie lowest FIELD, LETTER & GO Take pleasure in directing at-, tention to their Elegant Lines of FURS, embracing Russian and Hudson Bay Sables, first qnaHties; genuine Mink, genu ine Ermine, genuine Sealskin Sacqnes and Sets; Astrachan Sacqnes and Sets; Shetland and Alaska Seal do.; Fitch Sets, Lynx Sets, Rose Martin, Maine Mink, Black Bear, Bine Fox, Seal, and Astrachan Hats; Hna’n Ermine, Squirrel, Ima’n Black Sable, FOR MISSES and ChHdren; Seal & Persian Lamb Sacqnes, SHver Coney Sacqnes, Coney Caps ; Ladies’, Misses,’ and Children’s Seal, Astrachan, Silver Coney, Gray and White Lamb Caps, Ima’n Ermine Muffs, Scarfs, and CoUars, &c., Ac., which they commend as first class goods, and lower than can he purchased elsewhere in the city. State and Twentieth, and Madison and Market-sts. HATSI STRIKE & GO., He Leading Hatters aii Farriers of the West, 231 W. Madison-st, Are showing the Largest and Best Assortment of SEALSACQUES and LADIES’ EINE EURS ever offered In Chicago. Exits manufactured to order. altered and repaired in the best manner. The Largest Stock of GENTS’, YOUTHS’, and CHILDREN’S Hats in the West. 23L West Madison-st., TO r T°~F-TH^r; CITY TRADE. We are delivering, as usual, all or ders entrusted to our care. Our Friends in Wintry Can rely on prompt attention at Alii. TIMES. The HORSE DISTEMPER has not interfered with our MDEES. VAN SOHMGE, i STEVENSON & BED). WHOLESALE DHUSSIST3, 93 Q-4L XjSt^s.e—g;t;. COAL! Maston’s Indiana Block and Minonk Coal, and Pittsburgh, and Connellsville Coke, for sale on track. MINER T. AMES & GO. die, 1 lest RfflipU. Teams wanted to haul Coal. CHUECES HOUSEKEEPERS' RESORT, REMOVED TO 300 & 302 STATE-ST. OFFICES m THE Irlie Mil Are nearly finished. Several are yet untaken. Fire-proof, with vaults. English tile floors through out. No offices in the city equal these in every first-class respect. Plans of the Tribune Building can he seen at the office of \V. C. DOW, Boom No. 1, Nevada Block. FURS AND HATS. 114 South Olark-st. GENERAi NOTICES. COAX.. REMOVAL. TO RENT. POLITICAL. Liberal Republican and Demo cratic Consultation at Columbus, O. The Joint Committee’s Address to the People of that State. The Old Democrats Unwilling to Abandon tbe Party Mame. Further Disclosures of the Enormous Frauds in Philadelphia. The New York Sun Advises the Lib erals to Wait. Fifteen Female Voters to Be Arrested. DEMOCRATIC AND LIBERAL MEETING AT CO- LUMBUS. Colthteds, Ohio, Nov, 15.—A special consul tation meeting of the Democrats and Liberal Republicans of Ohio was held here to-day. The Liberals, about forty in number, met separately and adopted resolutions, declaring, in their opinion, that it was desirable that the consolida tion of all elements favoring the leading princi- Eals enunciated in the Cincinnati platform should e effected, and that, until such consolidation is effected, the Liberal organization should be maintained <md perfected; that the Liberal State Convention should declare squarely in favor of tariff for revenue only, and invite all persons, without re gard to former political associations, to unite with them; recommending that after the next State Convention the name of Liberal Republi can. as a party name, should be dropped, and that of “The Liberal Party” bo adopted; ask ing all organizations which have thus far co operated with the Liberal Republicans to aban don the old party names, with a view to more perfect union under the name of Liberals; that, as a party, they are opposed to all special legis lation or special privileges, believing that equal rights of all should be the guiding principle in all ramifications of Governmental affairs, and under great care in selecting candidates for members of constitutional conventions. The Democratic and Liberal State Central Committees, together with a large number of other representatives of the two organizations from various parts of the State, held a consulta tion meeting this afternoon, in this city, pur suant to the call issued on the 6th Inst. A Committee had been appointed;by the Dem ocratic and Liberal Republican State Executive Committees to prepare an address to the Dem ocrats and Liberals of Ohio for the considera tion and adoption by this meeting. This com mittee consisted of Senator Thurman, General Thomas Ewing, General Brinkerhoff, and John G. Deshler. Senator Thurman, on behalf of the Committee, reported an address to the meeting. It was considered, and unanimously adopted, as fol lows : To Vie Democrats and Liberal Republicans of Ohio : The Presidential election is over, and Grant is re-elected. It is not our purpose at this time to speak of the causes of this result. It is the future that demands your attention, and a recur rence to the past is useful only to ascertain the facts and lessons that teach. A vast majority of the Democratic party, perhaps 95 per cent, voted for Greeley. A large number of citizens hereto fore of the Republican organization also voted for him. The aggregate of their votes, as near ly as we can estimate, exceeds 3.250,000. The nominal popular majority for Grant is some thing over half a million. On a vote of nearly or quite 7,000,000 there is a majority of about 7 per cent. This is the. re sult, as nearly as we are able, in the absence of official returns, to state it, but this vote does not represent, with exactness, the sen timent of the country. It is evident that a large body of electors staid away from the polls. Nearly every one of these men is an opponent of the Administration, and had they seen fit to cast their vofel‘ Grant’s popular majority would be very small, if it indeed would exist at all. The prominence of the election may bo briefly stated; 95 per cent of the Democrats voted for Greeley: of tbo remaining 6 per cent a comparatively small number voted for Grant. The greater part of them did not vote at all. Of the Liberal Republicans who joined this party of rofonn, a large majority'stood fast, while others, despairing of success, went back to their old associations, or staid at home. Now, leaving out of view the venal men, who, from corrupt motive, deserted the cause and voted for Grant, and who cannot be relied upon by any party that uses none but honorable means to further its success, it maybe safely affirmed that

the great body of electors who staid away from the polls are now, as they have been in times past opposed to the • domiannt Radical party. It is true that they did not by their votes mani fest their opposition, at the late election, and this fact is ' greatly to bo re gretted ; but let us not rashly cast harsh ceusures upon them. If they could not overcome their old feelings and prejudices, so far as to vote for a life-long opponent, we may deplore tho fact, but we should not be so unjust as to place them in the ranks of our ene mies. We have an abiding faith that, with time and reflection, they will be found, as heretofore, actively on our side. Tho Radical camp is no camp for them, nor is it the part of wisdom to draw a party tomahawk upon Democrats or Lib eral Republicans, who, from conscientious but mistaken motives, sawfit to vote for Grant. The circumstances were novel and peculiar, such as had never before been seen, and men of the best intentions were liable to err. Condemn as strong as you may tho base men who sold their votes, but be charitablo to your old friends, who, under circumstances of difficulty and embarrass ment. differed from you in opinion. Instead of repelling, strive to bring them back. Free, in dependent thought is of the very essence of Democracy and true Republicanism. It created the Demociatic party in the beginning; it baa maintained it ever since; it gave rise to the Lib eral Republican element of to-day, and to it we must look for accessions in the future. ' “ What is needed, then, is not crimination and recrimination, but just the opposite. Three and a quarter millions of electors have protested, by their votes, against the Badical misrule under which the country has suffered, and which threatens the very foundation of free government. * The rea sons for their protest ore as patent to-day as they were when they cast their votes. By every consideration of consistency and just principle these men are bound to continue to act together. The necessity for reform is likely to increase instead of dimish. The advocates of centraliza tion are likely to become more audacious than ever in their attacks upon local self-government. The exactions of combined wealth, and the cor rupt use of money in elections, are likely to be come established usages, ifnot speedily rebuked. It is no time, therefore, for any lover of free institutions, of purity in elections, and Government, and of just and equal law, to relax hia efforts. Nor is it intelligent, or wise, or manly, to despair of success. No reform party ever gained its first battle. Consolidated abuses can only be overthrown by repeated assaults. Monopoly and corruption ever die hard, but in the end they do die, when a free and virtuous people will aid their destruction. “We say, then, to every friend of reform, he of good cheer. Ohio is, we believe, the only State in which the Badical majority of 18G3has been reduced. A few more struggles and it will cease to exist.” (Signed) ** John G. Thompson, “ Chairman Democratic State Central Committee. B. BuEvKEnnoiT.' « Chairman liberal Republican State Central Com mittee.” The duty of calling the State Conventions of the two organizations was remitted to the two State Executive Committees. ■ ■ Considerable talk was elicited by the reading of the resolutions adopted by the liberal meeting, but most of the older Democrats present objected so strongly to giving 113[the nameof “ Democratic Party” and adopting in its stead that of “Lib eral Party,” that no motion or resolution on the subject was brought before the meeting. The meeting did no other business. THE BROOKLYN LIBERALS—THE VIEWS OF THE “ WORLD.” Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, New Yobe, Nov. 15.— The Liberals of Brook lyn are first in this region to determine to pro serve their organization. They have held a meeting and formally resolved to call themselves simply Liberals in future, and not Liberal Re publicans. Several members made speeches, de claring they had burned the them in leaving the Republic : 3Ao*frp ■; ■ propose to stand by the Gin lUci/Yo ' Resolutions, inviting all who w.O cessa of the Cincinnati platform to unite with them, and ordering a Committee of Thirteen to mark out a future course, were adopted; also, a resolution, that a party which, at the early age of six months, has polled 23,000 votes is too vigorous to die until it shall have reached maturity, and shall have accom plished the work for which it was organized. The World not only advocates the revival of the old Democratic party, but says the chances for its victorious re-establishment are more promising than at any time during the last fif teen years. It remarks that the positions of the war and negro questions are to he outside of the domain of party politics, as will be univer sally conceded long before 1876. There is nothing conceivable, except a forelgnwarornew acquisitions of territory, to take the place of the fiscal and commercial questions which were constantly agitated, but never decided, between the Democratic party and the old Whig party. It says that the Republican party has outlived its issues, and that the American people will not accept Senator Brownlow’s advice to make Grant President for a third term, or for life. The old Republican chiefs and leaders are either dead, disabled, or out of favor, and the Republican party, now in the hands of secondary leaders, is likely to split into fragments. The citizens will hereafter "take a vital interest in the financial and commercial actions of tho Government, be ginning with the tariff question. The World concludes that “it must be our purpose in the new era to bring those who think alike to act together. We must rebuild the Democratic edifice by bringing back the stones carried transiently into other structures, or, in plain language; we must reunite all who held Democratic doctrines before the Republican party was formed, and re inforce them by the numerous recent converts to the /same order Of economic and political ideas. To accomplish this, we Trust mere partisanship, and discuss principles.”-- _ INDIANA LEGISLATURE. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. Indianapolis, Ind., Nov. 15.—1n the Senate the Committee on Stationery and Papers re ported in favor of contracting for five copies each of the Journal and Sentinel daily; five cop ies of the Morning Telegraph , and five copies of the weekly Volkeblail for each member of the Senate; the Secretary and Assistant Secretary to be allowed S2O each for stationery and post age stamps, the Doorkeeper $lO, and the Chair men of Committees such amounts of stationery as they deem necessary. The following bills were read a first time: A bill to regulate the rates of freight and pas senger tariff for railroads in this State; a bill fixing the salaries of Judges of the Supreme Court at $5,000 per annum, of the Superior Court at $4,000, Circuit Court at $3,000, Crim inal Court at $3,000, and of the Common Pleas at $2,500 ; a bill to provide for the levying of taxes on the property of individuals and corporations in towns and cities; a hill to fix the time of holding Circuit Courts in the Third Judicial Dis trict; a bill to give a right of action for damages, direct and indirect, and to any person in jured in consequence of the intoxication of another against the person or persons sell ing or giving intoxicating liquors to such person, and against the owner or loser of such properry in which the intoxicating liquors wore sold, if such owner or loser were cognizant of the fact that liquoi was sold on the premises; a bill to require railroad companies organized under any law of the State to have their principal officers within the State, and providing that a majority of tho Board of Directors must reside in the State and along the line of the road; a bill to amend Section 5 of the act concerning mortgages, providing that on the payment of the mortgage satisfaction shall be entered by the mortgager upon penalty of a fine of not less than $5, nor more SIOO. Adjourned until next Monday at 2 o’clock p. m. In the House the old'rules were adopted, with the addition of the following; . Hule 65. A, motion to lay proposed amend ments on the table, if it prevail, shall not affect the general subject to which said amendments are offered. After a lengthy discussion it was resolved to refer the revision of the Fee and Salary law to the regular Committee, a motion to refer the subject to a special committee of one from each Congressional District having failed. Mr. Branham offered a resolution recommend ing to the clerk and door-keeper, the employ ment as pages, &c., so far os practicable, the sons of soldiers, and inmates of the Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home. Adopted. Mr. Shirley introduced a bill entitled “An act to repeal an act,” fixing the time and mode of electing a State Printer, defining his duties, and fixing his compensation, and repealing all laws coming in contact with the same. A Committee was appointed to secure the ser vices of a Chaplain. The Auditor of State was requested to report to the House the cost of the brevier reports for the past twelve years. The following bill was introduced: An act providing for the issue and sole of bonds to raise money by the civil townships of this State for the purpose of paying any debt incurred in purchasing or erecting any school building, or m the purchase of any ground whereon to erect any school building, or for the pur pose of hereafter purchasing any ground or building for school purposes, or for erecting any school building, and authorizing the levy and collection of an additional special school tax for tho payment of principal and in terest on such bonds. Eight thousand copies of the Governor’s mes sage in English and fifteen hundred in German were ordered to be printed. The House adjourned after the morning ses sion to Monday at 2 p. m. PENNSYLVANIA CONSTITUTIONAL CONVEN TION. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. New York, Nov. 15.—News from the Consti tutional Convention, at Harrisburg, indicates that Cameron mil return from "Washington to find himself snubbed a second time. A corre spondent writes that immediately after the Con vention organized, Senator White and Wayne' McVeigh, Cameron’s son-in-law, moved prompt ly, only to find, that President Meredith was coolly unconscious of their distinguished great ness, and that the same lack of discernment that characterized the President was painfully apparent among the members generally. The design to run the Convention in the interest of Cameronism, by. introducing the caucus system has proved a failure to the Bing, and the result will be that, in a few days, White and his coterie of small politicians will have spent themselves, and will move to the rear where they belong, and brains and intelligence march to the front. It is predicted that the Convention will stamp out tne infamous Cam eron system, but this seems too sanguine by half. Harrisburg, Pa., Nov. 15.— 1n the Constitu tional Convention to-day, Charles R. Buckalew was sworn in as a member, iu place of Frazer, of Columbia, who resigned for that purpose. The Convention adjourned over to Monday next, to allow the President to select the committees. THE NEW YORK SUN ON THE SITUATION, Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. New Yore, Nov. 15,—The Sun in the morning says, editorially? “It is an open question whether there is now any opposition capable of being made effective against the Administration and the party in power. Plainly enough the policy of the opposition toward the Administra tion is to give it rope enough. Utter passive ness is the card to play. The elements of the opposition, decried as they have been as dis cordant, are; as a matter of fact, perfectly, NUMBER 89. homogeneous. The party of the Administration has no principle of union. Upon nor single important question are they in accord. Upon the tariff, foreign policy, financial measures, the civil service, the franking abuse, and even upon what remains of the issue of re construction, they are at odds themselves. The duty of the Liberal opposition is to sit quietly by and let the Grant party develop all that is in it. If our assumption during the campaign was correct, that Grant’s re-election would lead to greater corruption than ever, there will be in * duo time a withdrawal from him of honest Re publicans, who will come over to swell the ranks* of opposition.” ARKANSAS RETURNS. Little Rock, Nov. 15.—The Gazette published' returns, official and unofficial, from every countv JC Etey Baxter a majority of fvJOOg r Governor. The same paper ex ■ '.j opinion that D. J. Smith, Befornr r) nop- 'r Lieutenant Governor; J. R. Berry, • ididate for Auditor; W. J. Hynes, Republican candidate for Congressman-at-Large,. are also elected. It thinks Cause, Democrat, is elected to Congress in the First District, and Gunter, Democrat, in tho Third District. It will require the official count to settle the mat ter as to Smith, Berry, Hynes and Cause. MARYLAND RETURNS. Washuigtok, Nov. 15.—The official returns from Maryland, just published, cut Greeley’s majority in the State down to 1,073. The Re publicans carried 17 out of the 22 counties of tho State, and their majority in the rural districts is 4,100. The Democratic majority in Baltimore of 5,172 alone saved the State. FEMALE VOTERS TO BE ARRESTED. BocnzsTEn, N. Y., Nov. 15.—Warrants have been issued by United States Commissioner Storrs for the arrest of Susan B. Anthony and fourteen other females who voted at the late election. The parties will probably be brought into court next week. THE DELAHAY INVESTIGATION. Leavenwobth, Not, 15.—The Congressional Committee to inquire into the conduct of Judge Delahay, took the testimony of John J. Ingalls to-day. The Committee examined Ingalls with special reference to the Osbome-IngaUa draft. NEW JERSEY RETURNS. New Yobe, Nov. 15. —The official returns give Grant 14,557 majority in New Jersey. THE WEATHER. War Department Prognostications-*' Reports from Various Sections* Was Depabthent, Office of the Chief Signal Offices, Division of Telzobaxs anj> Reposts fob the Benefit of CoiniEBCE, • vV'ah-.tjngton. D. C., Nov. 15.—Probabilities— Over the'6Si’ re Northwest and lake region, ant}' thence to the*Olud occasional light snow,j but clearing, cold weather prevail. In tha; New England and Middle "Be”tea clear, cold weather and northerly and westerly weather, frequent frosts, and northw' r eol er *> winds, with high barometer, will prevail in Ten nessee, the Gulf and South Atlantic States.! Warning signals are ordered for Duluth, Mil waukee, Chicago, and Grand Haven. ) Buffalo, Nov. 15.—The Western Union tel- * egraph operator at Angola, thisconnty. reports twenty inches of enow there, and that it is still; snowing. A train on the Lake Shore Railroad' due here at 4 o'clock a. m, did not arrive until $ p. m. Buffalo, N. Y., Not. 15.—The first snow stomr of the season set in here last night. The snow, is four inches deep on the level. Trains on thff- Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway are blockaded at Irving Station, and all trains ara behind timn. Spbingfield, HI., Nov. 15.—1t is still snow ing, but not sufficient to add any quantity to that' already on tho ground. . Memphis, Tenn., Nov, 15.—The weather ia very cold and the ground is frozen. Cbown Point, Ind., Nov. 15.—A heavy snow-' storm, the first of the season, bwa been prevail-' ing here all day. It seems now as if the storm would continue till morning. Dubuque, Nov. 15. —Heavy snow storms in Northern lowa have blockaded the Milwaukee and St. Paul's, lowa, and Dakota Division. • The St. Paul and Sioux City Road is also block aded. It has been snowing here all day. The Horse Disease* Ottawa, 111,, Nov. 15.—The epizootic is still raging to a fearful extent. A very few of our cityhoreea here are seen on the streets, and their absence makes the price of coal ran up* ward every day more and more. Pqtt3Ttt.lt:, Pa. Nov. 15.—The horse diseaser is becoming general throughout the coal re gions. The shipment of cool by canal from Schuylkill Haven has been suspended. The mules are affected by the disease. There being no shipments of ooal by canal, it is feared that several collieries will have to suspend work to* morrow. . Buffalo, Nov. 15.—A large number of horses which have been worked too hard since their re covery from the epizootic are suffering from a. relapse, and numerous deaths from affection of the kidneys and dropsy are reported. Cincinnati, Ohio, Nov. 15.—At no time since the prevalence of the horse malady has the mat ter seemed so serious as to-day. The cold, blus tering weather has made the loss of public con veyances more trying to the citizens, many of whom are now compelled to walk to distant homes in the suburbs and remote parts of the city. The embarrassments which trade is meet ing are, however, mnch greater than all others. The inability to move anything by horses is producing great dnlness in a number of departments of trade, rendering prices only nominal. Materials are accumulating, at the depots, while the consignees are able to care for them only with the greatest diffi culty. A large number of oxen have been brought to the city within two or three days, < and could be seen to-day in all parts of the city, in teams of two and four, takmg the place of horses." Man power to wagons is used more largely than ever before, wagons drawn by four ana six men having become common on all our streets. A dummy engine commenced running on the Pendleton street-car line, carrying pas sengers from Pendleton to Broadway and Third street. Since dark this evening scarcely a vehicle can be seen upon the streets on the city. Oo account of the general interruption of street travel the great Bethel Fair, which was to open next week, was to-day postponed three weeks. Among the anxious ones concerning the situa tion are those in charge of the National Baptist Sunday School Convention, to assemble here next week, they being entirely unable to provide vehicles for the six hundred delegates expected. Strangers will find a generous welcome, but wilF have to resort to first principles in locomotion. ; Washington, Nov. 15.—The Cumberland coal trade in Georgetown, D. C., has been quite se riously affected in consequence of the sickness of the horses. Along the entile line of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal manj boatmen have' tied np to await the recovery of their horses and mules, which are afflicted by the epizootic. Only 9,391 tons of coal were received at Georgetown during the past week, and 12,091 tons were shipped, a falling off of about 33 per cent. Wheeling, W. Ya., Nov. 15.—The epizootic is spreading rapidly in this city. One stable had thirteen new cases to-day. About all the stables in the city are now affected. The cars on the main line of street railway here have not been run ning to-day. To accommodate travel to and from the railroad. At Bridgeport the Comnany man aged to keep one car running on the Island branch to-day, but it will undoubtedly be com pelled to stop before morning. In several in stances horses have had to be taken from the ve hicles in the streets, to-day, being attacked with the disease.. Milwaukee, Nov. 13. —The epizootic still prevails in this city, with little or no signs of abating, and reports from interior points show it to be spreading throughout the State. None of the omnibus or street car lines in this city have as yet resumed business, and it is almost im possible to find teams to transfer baggage from the hotels to the depot. A funeral procession passed through the streets yesterday, the hearse being drawn by oxen. The liOgansport Shooting- Affray. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. Looakspoet, Ind., Nov. 15.—1t is understood Judge Dykeman is willing to let the matter be tween him and Moreau drop now. The report that Moreau was clothed a in coat of to nil is un doubtedly incorrect, as he and his friends em phatically deny that he was so, or that he was armed with two revolvers. He lies in a very precarious condition. Citizens havo been at work to induce him to leave town, but he continues to insist upon seeing the mattes clear out.

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