21 Kasım 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1

21 Kasım 1872 Tarihli Chicago Daily Tribune Dergisi Sayfa 1
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VOLUME 28. insurance. ORIENT INSURANCE GO..* OP HARTFOBD. AssexsNov. 1,1873 ...... . 5G5 1,000 CONNECTICUT FIRE IHS, GO., OP HARTPOED. Assets Not. 1, 1873 ...... - 3050,000 Eastern insurance go., op is-A-asra-os,. •ssetaNoT. 1, 1572 - - - - Over S400»000 LAM 0 ASSURE ■ INSURANCE go., OF KTAIfCHBSTBR, EBGLABD. Oross Assets - . - u - - - §8,861,173.88 Total Idabilities, inclndlu;? Re insurance Fund - - - - - -91,421,921.53 JSet Assets - -- -- -- - 5T,439,253.35 The above Companies have but small losses by the great Boston fire, and. will, of course, nay all losses In full. Parties desiring first-class indem nity will not fail to see the superior security offered through our agency. LW. BUSKER & GO., 148 Laßalle-st. ASS UR AW CE. Miiwetesfflii LonsriDoisr. \J FIRE | / Zjocrl Conunittso. J. P. GXRAUD FOSTER GORDON NORHIE, Of Foster A Thomson. Of Boorman, Johnston & Co. CHARLES M. FEY, HOWARD POTTER, -Ko. 89 "Wall-st. OS Brown Bros. & Co. GOOLD H. REDMOND, Of Dcnnistoua <fc Co. Total Funds, Gold, - $13,234,425 Fire Assets, Gold, - - $5,064,000 G-EO. 0. OLAESE, Agent, 3 and -4= Biyan Block. Insurance effected on Business Buildings, Merchandise Provisions* Dwellings and their contents, TUBES. LAME Fflllßf HIES. We are now prepared to transplant any quantity of For- Troos, and warrant them to grow thriftily. For the character of oar work W9 refer to the big trees planted by &soa Maito. ai it Lincoln Part Parties desiring trees transplanted during the coming winter will please hand In their orders early, go wo can prepare the ground before the frost sets in NELSON & BEESON, 129 k 131 LaSaDo-st., tessaeat of Booae’s BM, REBIOVAIiS. :r, IB .a. jl. FASHIONABLE FURNITURE! ¥. ¥. STRONG FDMTDEE CO., 266 & 268 Wabash-av. FURNITURE. ’* D.M. SWINEY&BEO. MANUFACTURERS OF FINE OFFICE FiIITOES, Counters, Partitions, Bails, Cylinder Desks, Etc. FACTORY: 507 TO 513 DSZIE-ST., COMER EEtTBEJ CENTRAL BLOCK, Room a". GENERAL NOTICES. STEAM HAIIM. famished on application. General steam jobbing, HERON, SMITH & MOOERS, 76 West Washing-ton-st. NEW PUBLICATIONS. FATHER BURKE AND FEOUDE. See tho IRISH WORLD for foil reports of Father Barice’a reply to Froudo, the English historian. BOSTON ILLUSTRATED. Tho mrsil WOULD for this week contains a splen did bird's-cjo view illustration of tho city of Boston; also JTrantlin-Bf. onj-irepthe Bains it theßnratPistrict, do. miscellaneous. Feather Dusters -At Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co.’s, ’ US and 120 Monroe-st. Chicago. SEGARS. Lewis Moss, Importer of Ha vana Segars, lias opened Ms Hew Store at 121 South Olark st. Dealers and consumers will find the largest and best selected stock in the West. Prices as low as any other Im porting House in the United States. Lewis Moss, 121 South Olark-st. Send for price list, FINANCIAL. LIT, PRESTON k IBM, SOUTH SIDE-157 LaSalle-s[. WEST SIDE-Corner Eanfloluli aii Halstel Receive Deposits; Discount Com mercial Paper; Issue Certificates of Deposit; Furnish. Letters of Credit and Commercial Credits; Transact Commercial Banking in all its branches. A. O. Slaughter, BANKER. Corner Clark and Madison*sts. Buys and sells Stocks, Bonds, and Gold. Receives money on deposit and trans acts a General Ban king and Brokerage Business. Repnic liisnreoe Csrticafes Bought and sold by Xioaxis S^'egrai'fciEi'toca. On real estate, in the city or suburbs, at current rates. G. S. HUBBARD, Jr.. 163 East Washington-st. OVERCOATS. OVERCOATS In every grade for MEI AM BOYS. The largest stock in the city, all of our own manufacture. EDWARDS, BLUETT &. CO., 4:5 and 47 West Oladison-st., Under Sherman House, and 37G t - OT3EBV/EAS. UNDERWEAR J^JSTID HOSIERY Of every description. LOWEST PEIOES. EDWARDS, BLUETT & CO., 45 and 47 West Madison-st., Under Sherman House. 378 jEs*27^A.^E , 3n=iSlTS^3BjH3T l . ROOFING MATERIAE. BOOmiATEIALS .A-iisrx) Building felt Send for Circular and Samples. BAEEETT, .MOLD & MALL, SSO Monroe-st., Chicago. TO BENT. OFFICES 321 THE Triiue iiiii Are nearly finished. Several are yet untaken. Fire-proof, with vaults. English tile floors through out. STo offices in the city equal these in every first-class respect. Flans of the Tribune Building can he seen at the office of W. C. BOW, Room No. 1, Nevada Block. FOR SALE. SAFE FOE SM A first-class Safe, of large size, as good as new, will bo sold cheap if applied for soon. Apply at the office of the Secretory of the Board of Trade, FOR SiLLS. A small job printing office, with power, quarto-medium Globo press, and cightb*mcdlum Gordon press; a fine assortment of typo. Presses and typo nearly new. A good investment for a practical printer. Will bo sold cheap. Inquire at HARDER, LUSE & CO.’s Chicago Type Foundoy, 139 and 141 Monroe-st., Chicago. FLOUR. Choice brands white winter and spring flour, for sale by LYON & KING, Commission Merchants,. 183 South Water-sfc. BUSINESS CARDS. WElllffiTi BEOS, & CO. Were uninjured by the fire, and are doing business as usual at 60 Obatmcy-st., corner of Bedford, Boston. MEETINGS. Masonic. Regular communication of Kilwinning Lodge, No. Sll, A. F. &A. M., this Thursday evening, Nov, 21, 1872. at tbo Masonic Temple, corner Halsted and Randolph-sts. Member* will pleas .• take notice and attend, as business of importance win be before the O. G. BRYANT, Private Banker, 42 West Jladison-st., Room 1. WASHINGTON. The Proposed New Interna! Eeve- cne Law. Reduction of Revenue Officials, and Consolidation of the De partment. Our Relations witli Mexico of tlie Most Cordial Character, A Brace of Murderers to Ce Hanged. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, PROPOSED INTERNAL REVENUE LAW. Washington, D. C., Nov. 20.—The following bill, drawn by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, will be submitted to the Congressional Committees of Ways and Means, and of Fi nance, at their first sitting, at the approaching session. It is one of the most important pieces of legislation that will be recommended, and will cause a greater interest in every portion of the country than any that will ho suggested. The object, as will bo seen, is to abolish, at an early date, the offices of Assessor and Assistant Assessor of Internal Bevcauo, and have the business of those officers per formed in the Kevcnuo Bureau by clerks. It is held that the office of Assessor is no longer necessary; that the little business re maining may be douo by Collectors, Supervisors, and resident officers. The bill as given below meets the approval of the President, who has given it much attention, and also of Secretary Boutwell, and the leading Supervisors through out the country. Both the President, in iiia message, and Boutwell in his annual report to Congress, will urge the passage of a "similar measure. There are now 230 Assessors in commission. whoso salaries aver age $5,000 each per year, making in salaries of assessors alone, $1,150,000. There are 1,300 Assistant Assessors who make five dol lars per day each, or $1,950,000 per year of 100 working days. The following are the main fea tures of the bill: Be it enacted &c,, That on and after tho day of 1873, the offices of Assessor and Assistant Assessor of Internal Revenue shall cease to enist, and that. Thereafter all duties imposed by law on Assessors and Assistant Assessors, except as here inafter otherwise provided, be and the same are hereby transferred to, and imposed on, Col lectors of Internal Revenue, to bo performed by them selves or by their deputies ; and that all returns and reports required by law to be made to the said Asses sors and Assistant Assessors shall bo made to the sold Collectors or to their deputies ; and that each of said Assessors shall transfer to such revenue officer as may bo designated by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue for that purpose, ail boohs, papers, and other property belonging to the Government in his posses sion, or in that of any Assistant Assessors, and shall file with bis dual account an inven tory thereof in detail, with the receipt of said revenue officer therefor; that the Commissioner of Internal Revenue is hereby authorized and required to maho tho inquiry, deter mination, and assessments of the following taxes, to wit; For deficiencies imposed by the provisions of Section 20 of an Act imposing taxes on distilled spirits and tobacco, and for other purposes, approved July 20, 1868, as amended by a subsequent act, semi-annually ; on tho deposits, capital, and circulation of each person, bank association, company, or corporation engaged in the business of banking, imposed by the provisions of Section 110 of an Act to provide Internal Revenue to support the Government and topayintcreston tho pub lic debt, and for other purposes approved Juno 30,18C4, as amended by subsequent acts; upon distilled spirits imposed by the first proviso of Section 14 of an Act to amend existing laws relating to internal revenue, and for other purposes, approved March 2,1864; upon tobacco, snuff, and cigars, imposed by Section 00 of an Act imposing taxes on distilled spirits, tobacco, and for other purposes, approved June 0, 1872; provided, further , that the said Commissioner shall certify such assessments, when made, to the proper Collectors, re spectively, who shall proceed to collect taxes so certi fied in the same manner as assessments on lists ore now collected. Sec. 2, And be it further enacted, that all special taxes imposed by law, including the tax on stills or worms, shall he paid by stamps denoting tho tax. Tho Commissioner of Internal Revenue is hereby author ized and required to procure appropriate stamps for the payment of such taxes; and the provisions of Sections 26 and 10X of an act imposing taxes on dis tilled spirits and tobacco, and for other purposes, ap proved July 20,1868, and oil other provisions of law relating to the preparation of stamps for distilled spirits, fermented liquors, tobacco, and cigars, so far as applicable, are hereby extended so as to include such stamps, and tho Commissioner of Internal Revenue shall have authority to make all needful rules and reg ulations relative thereto, prodded that every person engaged in any business avocation or employment, who is thereby made liable to a special tax, except to bacco pedlers, shall place and keep conspicuously in his establishment or place of business, all stamps de noting tho payment of said special tax; and any per son who shall violate this provision of law, by negli gence, or refusal, or otherwise, shall pay a penalty of one hundrachdoliare. Sec. 8. And be it further enacted, That Section 110 of an act to provide internal revenue to support tho Government, to pay interest on the public debt, and for other purposes, approved June 30,1864, as subse quently amended, that the returns therein required to be made shall be made and rendered semi-annually, on the Ist day of December and tho Ist day of June, iu duplicate, to tho Collector of tbo proper district re spectfully, one copy of which shall then be transmitted by tho Collector to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue. Beo. 4. And bo it further enacted, That the Aden* titled an Act imposing tares on distilled spirits and to bacco, and for other purposes, approved July 20,1868, as amended by subsequent acts, bo further amended as follows, to wit; That Section sbo amended so that the duplicate statement of tho 11 run” required to bo returned by the Assistant Assessor of the district shall be hereafter transmitted by the Collector to the Com missioner of Internal Revenue; that Section 19 ba amended so that one of the duplicate returns therein required to be sent by the Assistant Assessor of the district shall bo hereafter transmitted by the Col lector to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue ; that Section 28 be so amended that all of tho additional commission of one-half of I per cent on the amounts on the tax on distilled spirits therein allowed shall hereafter bo paid to the Collector receiving the tax; that Section 50 bo so amended os to ruthorize the ap pointment of sfty Revenue Agents ; that Section 50 be so amended that in case any pcdler re fuses to exhibit a proper certificate from tho Collector of his or her district, and fails to show cause why the properly seized shall not be for feited'; proceedings for its forfeiture shall be taken and had under the general provisions of the Internal Revenue laws, relating so forfeitures; that Section 103 be so amended that its provisions aro extended and made applicable to the provisions of this act. APPOINTED, The President made his words good to-day on the subject of the Philadelphia Postmastershlp, by appointing George W. Pairman, the candidate of the citizens and businessmen of Philadelphia, instead of Truman, the candidate of Cameron, Hartrauft, and the “ring.” The name will be sent to the Senate on the first day of the session. PEBSONAL, Mr. Dent, the father of Sirs. Grant, is con fined to his room, at the White House, with serious illness. He is 87 years old, ami it is feared he will not recover. He is* unable to move about without assistance. Secretary Belknap will return hero from lowa on Monday or Tuesday next, and it is probable that the now Major General to succeedTGeneral Meade will bo appointed shortly afterward. Senator Sherman arrived hero to-day, and had an interview with the President. THE CHICAGO-BOSTON BELIEF FOND. The difficulties with regard to the unexpended balance of the Chicago relief fund yet due from this place, do not appear to bo settled. Yet E. I. Merrick, as Chairman of the local committee for lie disbursement of this fund, to-day ad dressed o short letter to Governor Cooke, de manding that the balance due of $25,000 bo at once turned over to him for disbursement. The reply of the Governor will be forthcoming tomor row. Mr. Merrick claims the disposition of this money under the terms of the Legislative act authorizing tho sum to be raised. What the Governor will say in response to this demand may bo inferred from an editorial on the subject, m one of tho morning papers here, which most particularly represents his views and interests. This editorial** sets forth that this balance of $25,000 has laid in tho District Treasury for some months past for, and it was supposed by 'the District authorities that it would not be asked for, inasmuch as it had been published to tho world that no more pecuniary aid was needed for Chicago, which statement was corroborated by the laefc that the Masonic Belief Association of Chicago had, after a thorough examination, satisfied itself that tho auffering’poor had been provided for, and had returned to tho Grand Lodge of the District some S9OO as its proportion of "he money contributed CHICAGO, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1872. by the Masons of the country, and which it was found was not needed in the burnt city. This article concludes as follows: “The authori ties of the District did not and do, not now re cognize Mr. Merrick’s authority to receive the money in question. The other portion of the appropriation has been disbursed on the order of the Mayor of Chicago, and, as stated in sub stance to the applicant named, the remainder will he placed to his credit whenever he makes application in the manner he has done heretofore. If the money is needed for Boston let the Mayor so signify, and it will be put to his,order as quick as a warrant can bo drawn. This much and nothing more. While on this subject a question arises, has this Dis trict authority to pay $25,000 to Chicago for the relief of Boston people, when the law making the appropriation dis tinctly says that it shall be applied exclusively to the relief of tho suffering people of Chicago ?” promise the largest and most influential attend ance in Congress this winter. There was a pow erful clashing of interests when tho Steamboat bill passed last winter, and the opposition to the present law will ho resumed as soon as Congress fairly commences work. The Western steam boat interests are prepared to support the bill as it stands. The influence of the Secretary of the Treasury will continue to bo, as it has always been, against the bill in its present shape. Senator Harlan’s Chronicle, to-day, denies that there is to bo any change in the President's Southern pdlicy. The ground is taken that such action would amount to a confession that tho policy of the President in the past towards this section was unjust and unfair. Washington, Nov. 20.—The Committee on Appropriations at their meeting to-day took up the Indian Appropriation bill, and nearly com pleted action upon it. The Hon. William Gr. Kelley, of Pennsylvania, had a long interview with tho President to-day, during which the Philadelphia Postmastership was talked over freely. Barney Woods, convicted of the murder of S. M. Cheeseman, of New York, will he hanged on tho 25th inst, the Attorney General having decided against his appli cation for a commutation of sentence. Charles Johnson, convicted of the murder of his wife, will bo hanged on tho 10th of December. A motion for a now trial for Charles H. O, Brien, a policeman recently convicted, is now pending. Should tho motion bo denied, ho will also be hangeg. Our Minister to Mexico, Nelson, had a long interview with President Grant, this afternoon, in relation to the condition of affairs in that country. Ho speaks in terms of praise of the new President of that Republic, and particularly of his intelligence and desire to preserve and strengthen the friendship now existing between his own country and the United States. There seems to be no obstacle in tbe way of concluding a no w convention oxtending the time for disposing of the remaining claims before the United States and Mexican Commission, which by limitation will expire under the present Convention in Feb ruary next. It is stated that the Mexican President is anxious for such extension, and will appoint an Agent in good faith to carry out the design of the Commission, in the place of Gozman, by whoso action tbo proceedings were for some weeks interrupted. The preliminary steps have already been taken for a new Convention. It is to-day given out, upon the authority of the Administration, that ‘the interview of the Pennsylvania politicians with the President, relative to tho Philadelphia Post Office, was of tbe moat pleasant character, and that tho delegation only asked that if the Civil Ser vice rules wore to be disregarded, Truman might be appointed. To this the President replied that aa intended to bo governed by the Civil Service rules in all future appointments. The President is firm in this position. Certain politicians who have determined to attack the Civil Service machinery in Congress, have used this interview as the basis of an extravagant sensationalism. Dr. Woodworth, of the Treasury Department, starts to-day upon an inspection tour of the ■Western United States MarinbUospitais. Judge Richardson, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, is Lamed as a candidate for BoatwolTa place. Mr. Maynard, of Tennessee, is a new candidate for the Speakership. He has the snpport of Brownlow. Tisdale, Fenton’s Secretary is a candidate for tho Marahalsliip of the Supremo Court, vice Par sons, elected to Congress from tho Cleveland district. The President being engaged on his message, will receive but few visitors before the meeting of Congress. Mr. George S. Bangs, Superintendent of tho Railway Mail Service, has arrived here from Chi cago, with his family. The National Commercial Convention —Baptist Sunday School Convention —Ohio River Improvement* Cincinnati, 0., Nov. 20.—The St. Bonis Com mittee of Arrangements for the National Com mercial Convention have just notified Hon. N. R. Bishop, President of the Convention which was held in Baltimore last year, that they have changed tho time of holding the next Conven tion from the third Monday in No vember, as appointed by the last convention, and called tho convention to meet at St. Louis, on Wednesday, Dec. XI. In pursu ance of this notice, Mr. Bishop has issued a call on all bodies entitled to representation to ap point their delegates. Tho National Baptist Sunday School Conven tion and Institute met in this city to-day, and organized by electing Rev. Dr, J. L. M. Cuny, of Virginia, President; Vico Presidents, H. Tbano Miller, of Cincinnati, and Clement Leach, of Illinois; Secretaries, George M. Vanderlip, of New York, and G. Syreck, of tho District of Co lumbia. Committees have been appointed on resolu tions, but have not yet reported. The Chamber of Commerce to-day took action adverse to the city contributing a million and a ‘quarter in bonds for the proposed Chesapeake and Cincinnati Railroads. The Ohio River Improvement Commission met this morning. A voluminous paper on the plan of improving the river was read by Captain James E. Worral, civil engineer, of Harrisburg, Pa. This afternoon a proposition to invite tho States bordering on the Mississippi River to send delegates met favor in the discussion, and was referred to a committee for further action. War Department Prognostications— Scports from Various Points* War Depabtjeent, Office of the Chief Signal Officer, Division of Telegratjb and Reports fob the Benefit of Coicuebce, Washington, D. C., Nov. 20.— Probabilities— On the lower lakes and thence over the Middle and New England States, clearing cold weather, and southwesterly to northwesterly winds. In the Gulf and South Atlantic States, high bar ometers, generally clear weather, and winds veering to the northwesterly. t ln the North west, southeasterly to southwesterly winds, cloudy weather, and falling barometers, extend ing to-morrow to the lower Ohio Valley and to the Upper Lakes, with anow. Aurora, 111., Nov. 20.— Winter has fairly set in. The ice on the river, above tho dam in Au rora, has been strong enough to bear people, who have crossed over it for the past three days. Frost extends in tho ground hereabouts about ten inches. Dubuque, Nov. 20.—The weather continues extremely cold, the mercury ranging below zero. Travel on tho St. Paul & Sioux City Railroad is still obstructed for a distance of 150 miles. Clinton, lowa, Nov. 20.— The weather is In tensely cold. Madison, Wis., Nov. 20.—The Mississippi River is reported frozen over at and above Prai rie du Chien, and Dear LaCrosso. The weather is very cold here., Cleveland, 0., Nov. 20.—Fourteen inches of snow fell hero to-day. Milwaukee. Nov. 20.— Further reports have been received to-day confirming tho previ ous report of the disease among the poultry. THE STEAAEDOAT LOBBY PENIAL. To the Associated Press. INDIAN APPROPRIATIONS,

INTERVIEWED. TO RE HANGED, OUB RELATIONS WITH MEXICO. THE CIVIL SEE VICE. •WESTERN MARINE HOSPITALS. CANDIDATES. THE MESSAGE. PERSONAL. CINCINNATI. THE WEATHER. The Poultry Disease* SNOWED UP. Fears Entertained of a Terrible Calamity in Minnesota. Eight Hundred Track-Layers Snowed Tip on the Winona & St. Peter Eailroad. Their Supply of Provisions Limited, and Communication Cut Off. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune. St. Paul, Nov. 20.—Gloomy news may bo an ticipated from Minnesota, The tracklayers on the extension of the Winona & St. Peter Bail road were approaching the western State lino at the rate of two miles daily when the terrible storm of last Thursday night enveloped them and cut them oft from communication with the civilized world. The working force numbers over 800 men; and, so sanguine wore the expec tations that the favorable weather would outlast November, that no preparation was made to avort tho calamity which, it is fcard, has befal len thorn. Only a limited supply of provisions was kept in store; for, although 100 miles dis tant from tho telegraph, construction trains maintained regular communication with Sleepy Eye, the nearest white settlement. When intel ligence of the storm reached Winona, Mr. J. H. Stewart, the General Superintendent, started out with two locomotives and a train of cars; but, so heavy and deep were the snowdrifts, and so intense the cold, that, up to Sat urday morning, they had not passed New TJlnu There two additional locomotives wore attached to tho train. Then, taking on board rations for thirty days, and 150 men, besides materials with which to fit up boarding accommodations in tho cars for the storm-besoiged party, tho train was again started. Slowly a passage way was forced through drifts eight and ten feet deep, and, even where the snow did not exceed one foot in depth, so hard was it packed that recourse was had to shovels before an advance could be made. On Sunday the train had penetrated 25 miles. Meantime tho storm raged with a violence un precedented, and, when last heard from, on Tuesday night, tho relief train was stuck fast in tho ever-accumulating enow, 40 miles west of Sleepy Eye, and 80 miles short of the suffering track-men. Yesterday morning the telegraph wires were down west of St. Peter; and latest reports from Winona, in tho afternoon, state that the wind had increased into a furious gale. For six days tho storm has continued with una bated fury. Tho painful impression created is, that tho men at the end of the track will actual ly starve before relief can reach them. No sup plies are known to be accessible, for, in order to secure a valuable land grant, the line is being constructed by tho Chicago & Northwestern Bailroad Company, in advance of the Govern ment surveys, far into a country inhabited only by a few adventurous squatters and sickly Indi ans. The men have with them a largo number of horses and mules; and, if compelled by the necessity whose only law is self-preservation, they may bo forced to the same famishing straits as were Napoleon’s decimated army in the retreat from Bussia. WALL STREET. Review of tho money, Hoad, Stock, ... Gold, and Produce markets. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune . New Yopk, Nov. 20.—1n the- money market to-day a marked change occurred. During tho morning money was very stringent, and ad -26 per cent per diem for call loans, but after the announcement was made that tho Treasury had accepted $2,000,000 bonds offered, and would pay for tho same in legal tender notes, there was an easier feeling, and call loans declined, to 7 per cent gold. Afterwards the market hard ened again, and some business was done at 1-32 per diem, but towards the close of bank hours, rates were sto 7 per ccut. Tho dis count market continues close. The Tnfnimnm rate for prime paper is 12 per cent. Tho Express says this evening, “Tho 1,800 National Banks begin to be a little restive as to tho purpose of Secretary Boutwoll to force au exchange of their securities. Tho banks insist upon a reduction of tax on circulation and de posits, which tax supports the Bureau of the Comptroller of tho Currency, and rolls np a surplus of about $17,000,000, There is some talk at tho Treasury of increasing the deposits of security for banking to 100 per cent instead of 90, and requiring an elastic specie reserve, email at first, but gradually increasing when banking business rests on a specie basis. The circulating notes to bo issued are to bo legal tenders and tho bank notes to ho called in. This scheme is to bring about specie payments by gradually locking up a large portion of gold, and distributing tho notes in away that tho banks will loso their identity, so far as their currency is concerned, and the United States become the redeeming agency.” The report that Thiers had resigned and MacMahon had been appointed President of tho French Republic was much discussed among the foreign bankers. The report at one time had a slight influence on gold and foreign exchanges. FOREIGN EXCHANGE was firmer, with an improved demand and a decreased supply of bills. GOLD opened weak, and declined to but after wards advanced to 113 W, and finally reacted to 113>£. STOCKS, The stock market wa'i more active, and ad vanced with some excitement in Northwestern, Pacific Mail, and Erie. The market closed firm. GOVERNMENT BONDS were doll and heavy. PRODUCE. Flour opened steady, but quiet. Tho demand for shipping brands is limited for present deliv ery, but good for next month. Family grades were dull and heavy. 'At the close, the market was Irregular; shipping brands steady, and fam ily active; medium extras heavy and irregular. In wheat, there was little doing; higher prices for spring checked the shipping and milling de mand. Choice white winter is much wanted. The market closes steady and fairly active, the demand chiefly for export. Winter is held with much confidence. Fork was weak; mess nominal in a wholesale wav. Cut meats generally quiet. Sales 250 very light pickled hams at 12££c. Ba con moderately active; long clear quoted at on spot; sales 100 boxes city short clear for December at B>£c; 25 boxes short clear on spot at oc. Lard steady. !Pho Morse Disease* Janesville, Wis., Nov. 20.—The epizootic has at last made its appearance here, and all the liv ery stables have suspended business. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, Beloit, Wis., Nov. 20.—There must be nearly or quite 100 horses sick here to-day. Tho livery stables are closed. There are few severe cases. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune ; Madison, Wis., Nov. 20. —N0 well authenticat ed case of epizootic has yet appeared here. Some horse reported sick with it proves to have something else the matter. It is all around us, however. Aurora, HI., Nov. 20.—The epizootic is in full blast in Aurora and vicinity, nearly all the horses having retired from use and gone into bran-maahes. The express matter is convoyed from tho office in Aurora to the depot in a wheel barrow, and strangers’ baggage at tho hotels is principally delivered in the same manner. One enterprising milkman has come down to a hand cart in delivering his milk, and is accompanied about the city by his wife and two small boys. A perceptible rise is already shown in wood and other articles brought from the country, and the prospects are that very serious pecuniary loss will he experienced before the disease abates. LaSalle, 111., Nov. 20.—The horso distemper has spread to such an extent that there aro now Hr but few horses in the city that have escaped the contagion, and all branches of business are suf fering in consequence. The price of team work has advanced 100 per cent within the last few days, and is likely to advance still further. Eliot & Co., brewers, are using oxen for the de livery of their beer, and it seems not improbable that the demand for oxen, to take the place of horses, will become gquite general; but, as the number of working cattle in LaSalle County is extremely limited, and farmers’ horses aro suf fering equally with others, the question how to supply such a demand becomes a perplexing one. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, Sr, Paul, 3Finn., Not, 20.—The epizootic is not spreading, and street-cars resumed their trips to-day. Snow is falling to-night, and tho dampness may cause an increase of the malady. Milwaukee, Nov. 20.—The epizootic to-day shows quite favorable signs of abatement,, although a large number of severe, an ‘ r SACMJ]g instances fatal, cases are reported. Pi* : Cnnmj are reported to-day, one of* the numb valued at 81,300. The majority of tho horses first attacked are reported recovering slowly. Quite a number of horses appeared on the streets to-day. One or two omnibuses commenced the regular transfer of passengers to and from tbo trains. The hackmen have obtained a number of teams from tho country not yet attacked by the disease, and resumed business, charging only ordinary prices. Largo numbers of oxen are offered for sale daily, and the city is already overstocked. One yoke sold to-day as low as $45. Up to yesterday prices reached 8150 to 8200 a yoke. Bock Island, Nov. 20.—The epizootic is ex tending very slowly. A livery stable in Moline has been attacked by it. Cleveland, Nov. 20.—The horse disease is on the decline, though as yet the street-cars run only occasionally. NEW YORK. Comments oS tho Press on t!io Fre- quency of Murder—Summary Justice Advocated—lllness of Horace Greeley —Father Burke on Froudc—Water Works—Aid for th.e Danes-Xhe Son manians—O’Neill’s Funeral—Carri age Builders’ Association—No Chick en Disease in New It ork—Arrival of Stanley—Brcacli of Promise. Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, New Youk, Nov. 20.—The apparent impossi bility of punishing any murderer by legal pro cess in New York is a text treated in all tho journals, and a peremptory demand la made for reform. It is probable that tho murderer King would have been lynched by an excited crowd in the street the day before yesterday if the police had not evaded them. The Fast says; “Wo are not sure that a few doses of lamp-post jus Lice, administered by in dignant citizens, would not have had a good effect during decado through which wehave just passed.’* Even the Tribune goes in for hemp, remark ing; “ "While hanging is the penalty for mur der, murderers should ho hung when blood is not avenged at all. We are very near social disorganization. Of the nearly thirty murderers now in the Tombs, some have been locked up for nearly two years. Many witnesses have been bribed to leave the city. The slip-shod method of prosecution was exemplified to-day in the trial of the Frenchman, Andre, for kill ing his alleged unfaithful wife. The prosecutor asked for an adjournment, because a certain woman has left the city, and there appears to be a difficulty in finding anybody else to prove that the person killed was 'Mrs. Andre. Two of the moat hard ened assassins in the “Tombs,” Foster and Murphy, were sentenced to death, but have been granted new trials. In the cases of Stokes and Heggi, the alleged poisoner, the juries dis agreed. The others nave not been tried, but, relying on the insanity dodge, are ready for the farce.” The Society for the Suppression of Obscene Literature has nearly stamped out the publish ing of obscene books in this city, some of the dealers having been sentenced to the Peniten tiary, and others removing their dens to adja cent States. The Society have turned their at tention to physicians and druggists who sell merchandise regarded as immoral. Dr. Julian was arrested and brought before Commissioner Osbom t&day oh {fie charge of depositing in the United States mail a circular advertising for salo objectionable rubber goods. Bail was first fixed at $5,000, but after argument reduced to $2,000, this being the first case of the kind brought before tho Federal authorities. It is claimed by the prosecution that these circulars are obscene publications within tho meaning of the statute. The Assistant Aldermauic Committee on Kail roads held a meeting this afternoon to hear tho views of tho public in regard to the resolution authorizing the use of steam dummies on city railroads. A large number of intelligent citi zens were present, and the drift of opinion was strongly in favor of discarding horses for steam, Mr. Peck stud he represented a Steam Street Car Company, and described tho working of tho car. He said it ran smoothly and was more economical than a horse car; that steam could be utilized to heat the car, and the car could bo stopped within a distance of six feet. Tho Committee has the subject under ad visement. f To the Associated Press.] New Yobs, Nov. 20.—Tho Tribune says, this morning, of Hr. Greeley that ho has been seri ously unwell since bis wife’s death, from nerv ous prostration, resulting mainly from tho se vere strain upon his nervous system through a want of rest and sleep during the lost month of her illness. Nothing but his remarkable strength of constitution has enabled him to give atten tion to his recent duties, hut it may be safely trusted to restore him speedily to his usual vigorous health, Every part of the Academy of Music was crowded last night to hear Father Burke on “ Oliver Cromwell,” in reply to Hr. Froude. He spobo two hours aud a half. Hr. Van Nort, Commissioner of Public "Works, says it will take $3,500,000 to give tho city an adequate supply of water, and ho recommends an immediate appropriation of that amount. War is making on the system of opening streets that has prevailed* whereby political favorites were made rich at the expense of property-owners and the city. The funeral of Anthony F. O’Neill, who was shot by James C. King, on Monday, took place to-day from St. Stephen’s Church.' Tho wife and mother of the deceased and a few friends were present. At a meeting of the Carriage Builders’ Na tional Association to-day, A. A. Wheeler, of Kentucky, aud A. Woeberj of lowa, were made Vice Presidents. A committee was appointed to report at tho next meeting the propriety of hav ing a uniform track of road wagons throughout the United States. The Banish Consul in this city mates a public appeal for immediate aid for his countrymen who lost their property by the recent severe storms in Europe, and who are now in positive want. Stanley arrived by the Cuba, and was escorted up the bay by a delegation from tho Geographi cal societies and the Herald Club. Scannel and King will ho tried in December. Br. Nathan Newton has received a verdict of $7,000 from the Brooklyn City Railroad Com pany, for injuries received in falling from one of the open cars, his ground of snit being that the guard of the car was loose, and not properly attached. . . _ „ , Julius E. Julian was held to bail in $2,000, for mailing obscene circulars to boarding-schools, and elsewhere, „ _ Ex-Mayor Kalhfleisch, of Brooklyn, has filed his answer to tho complaint of Mrs. Wade, in which she seeks SIOO,OOO damages for breach of promise of marriage; The reply attacks the plaintiff’s character, and promises proof of the allegation npon trial. The family of Wm. M. Tweed has returned home in the ** Cuba, 1 ’ Mr. Stanley will have his first reception in America at the Lotos Club, on Friday even ing. A distinguished assemblage met at the St. James Hotel, to-night, to further the objects of an Industrial Exhibition in New York. General Bivenpreaided in the absence of General Bix, the head of the organization, and stated the ground had been purchased for the proposed edi fice, in the best location in New York at a cost of $1,700,000, Among other speeches were Chaun coykl. Bepew, Augustus Maverick, and Hon. Eraatus Brooks. Steamboat disaster. Smutia, Ont., Nov. 20.—Tho steamer Manito ban, arrived from Lake Superior, reports that the steamer Chicora struck a rock in tho lake and sank, Steampumps were procured and she was run to Sanlt St. Marie, where her cargo is being discharged in a damaged condition NUMBER 94. THE FIRE DEMON. Another Serious Conflagration in Boston. Destructive Fire in Jersey City—Loss About $1,000,000. Fires Elsewhere. *: ■ ’ ; • .to The Chicago Tribune, to*) no-ir 1 though alann, mada ihuxo jjfemmw uyretent events, has just called out the Fire Department of this city and ad joining cities to meet what promised to be a serious conflagration. The scene of disaster was the great printing house of Band & Avery, on Comhill, at tho hood of Washington street, a large five-story building, filled with printing and publishing machinery, and one of tho largest establishments of the class in Now England. The engines from Charlestown, South Boston, Somerville, and Chelsea were summoned by tho second general fire alarm. Tho adjoining build ings on Comhill running through to Brattle street were for a time in great danger, bat by strenuous exertions the fire was confined to the Band & Avery premises, where a very thorough destruction took place. You in Chica go can imagine the sensation caused by these closely recurring alarms, and stories that tho Mormons were trying to bumßoston were freely afloat among the more timorous. Bat 4heso only a return of usual city experiences, and tho firemen were equal to the occasion. By a singular coincidence, this latest fire is exactly in tho direction of a long talked-of im provement,—the extension of Washington street, —and the great printing house would, at no dis tant day, have been removed. It will probably hasten, and make more available, tho extensive system of street improvements now eamesriy begun, and to be carried out, though it may call for some legislation. The propositions are taking shape for a thor ough reform in the street system of the burned district. Tho main features of the plan are the widening of Washington street, on tho easterly side, to eighty feet, between Milk and Summer streets; of Summer street on the northerly side to fifty-five feet; of Broad street on the water side one hundred feet from Summer street to Atlantic avenue; of Milk on the southerly side to fifty feet; of Water to fifty feet; of Federal on the easterly side to seventy feet; of Con gress on the easterly side to sixty feet, from Broad to Milk streets, and to eighty feet from Milk to State streets ; of Devonshire on the easterly side to sixty feet, between Milk and Franklin; the straightening of Devonshire and Otis, betweenFranklinandSnmmcr; the widening of Purchase street on the southerly side to fifty feet, between Federal and Pearl; tho widening of High street to fifty feet between Congress and Pearl; the widening of Franklin street at its foot to fifty, and its extension to Pearl, oppo site Sturgis; the extension of Pearl and Milk to Congress; the extension of Oliver straight from Milk to Kilby; the extension and widening of Hawley street to forty feet; the widening of Arch, on the westerly aide, to forty feet. It is thought desirable to have a broad avenue through the city as a fire barrier, and on which largo public buildings could be erected. This may bo done by the extension of Federal street to State street, eighty feet wide, and opening School street the same width from Federal street, thus making a fire barrier in that direc tion. Boston, Nov. 20.—Shortly before 7 o’clock this evening, flames burst forth from the uppeSr win dows and roof of Band & Avery’s extensive printing house, No. 3 Comhill, near the foot of Washington street. The flames shot furiously up to a great height, and a strong northerly wind carried showers of burning cinders over the buildings on the easterly side of Washington street and across to State street. In response to the general fire alarm sounded, the firemen were promptly on the spot, and the steamers at once opened play from Statu and Washington streets, Comhill, and other points ad jacent to the fire,. and in thirty minutes the flames, which threatened another great con flagration,were subdued andconfinedto the limits in which they first broke out. The general fire alarm and the grand illumination caused by the shooting flames caused a great commotion, and immense crowds of excited people gathered from all parts of the city to the scene of the conflagration. The military which has been kept up since the great fire were of important service, forming a cordon across the streets, keeping back the crowd, and giving the firemen ample room for the most efficient service. Band <fc Avery were almost entirely burned out. They had one of the largest and best appointed book ajd job printing establishments in New England, employing some 200 hands. Milwaukee, Wis., Nov. 20.—A fire at Port Washington, Wis,, this afternoon, destroyed the large grain warehouse owned by J. Goldsmith & Co., and several bams and dwelling houses. The loss is SIO,OOO, which is fully insured. Janesville, Wis., Nov. 20.—The dwelling house of Mrs. Margaret McGee, in the Third Ward ot this city, was totally destroyed by firo yesterday afternoon, with a part of her furni ture. The loss is about $3,000; insurance, $2,100. Baud & Avery employed some 300 persons, 50 of whom were girls. There was a large number of power ureases of different kinds in the build ing and a large amount of books and pamphlets partly finished, which will be a total loss. Band & Avery estimate their loss at $250,000, insured mostly in Boston offices. The following is a list of the other losses, which were more or less insured—mostly in Boston offices; Abbot's bindery, $3,000; Adams & Baker’s bind ery, $3.000; Congregational Publishing Society, $40.000; Henry Hoyt, book publisher, $20,000; the” Congregationalist newspaper, $2,000, and the building, which was owned by the fifty asso ciates, about $30,000. The fire originated in the press room of Band & Avery. Glevelaitd, 0., Nov. 20.—The Serald pub lishes an account of a destructive conflagration, on Sunday last, in the village of New London, Huron County, which consumed a row of frame building in tho heart of the business portion of the town. An entire block was burned over. The total loss is about $50,000. Among the losers are Gregory & Van Horn’s dry goods store, Bolvillo’a clothing store, McClellan’s drug and hardware store, Banyan’s boot, shoe, and leather store, McCreary’s grocery store, Thomp son’s cigar and nows store, Kimball’s confection ery, Emalie’s fancy goods store, Briggs & Day’s grocery, the Post Office, a livery stable, two billiard saloons, a photograph gallery, two dentists’ offices, and several families. New Yobs, Nov. .20.—Schmidt & Co’s malt house, in Brooklyn, and 50,000 bushels of malt, were burned this morning. The loss is $50,000. New Yoke, Nov. 20.—Abont 6 o’clock this evening afire broke out in Perrin & Hance’s steam saw-mill, on Fourteenth street, near Hen derson street, Jersey City, destroying the build ing and surrounding lumber yards. Loss, $15,- 000. The flames extended to Jarvis & Hen wood’s tobacco inspection warehouse, bounded by Thirteenth and Fourteenth, Provost and Henderson streets, containing about 5,000 hogsheads of tobacco. Loss on tobacco about $1,200,000. Loss on building about SIB,OOO, which was insured principally in New York companies. The store house destroy ed was abuildlng 400x200 feet, one story and attic high, and filled with tobacco recently re ceived over the Erie Road, and belonging to a largo number of firms, who are sup posed to be insured, though it is un certain. In close proximity was an immense six-story building containing fully five thousand hogsheads of tobacco, which for tunately escaped injury, though the wooden shutters to tho windows, painted to represent iron, were somewhat charred. The newly erected shops of the Erie Railroad, also close at band, were not injured. though for a time in great danger. The dwellings in the vicinity, which were a great many, built of wood and occupied by laborers, were soon emptied of tho contents, hut were saved by the firemen. The loss on the tobacco is variously estimated, though the most intelligent statement we have been able to procure places the quantity burned at 3,000 hogsheads, which would bring the loss in the vicinity of $600,000 to SBOO,OOO. The burned aaw-mill was insured for SII,OOO. Detboit, Mich., Nov. 20.—News has just reached here of the destruction of two woolen mills in this State by fire, viz; mill at Auburn, Oakland County. Loss, $17,000; insured for SIO,OOO. Also the Constantine mills ; loss over insurance. $12,000.

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