15 Eylül 1932 Tarihli The Daily Worker Gazetesi Sayfa 1

15 Eylül 1932 Tarihli The Daily Worker Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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In the Day’s News BRAZIL FEDERALS CLAIM A GAIN RIO DE JANEIRO, Sept. 14,—The capture of Cruzeiro by federal troops ■was announced yesterday by the gov ernment of Getulio Vargas. Cruzeiro is an important strategical position commanding all communication lines into the state of San Paul, Brazil. TO DIVIDE JOBS Leading capitalists of the United States, under the leadership of Wal ter Teagle, president of the Stand ard Oil Company of New Jersey, met in the latter’s office yesterday to start a campaign of wage-cuts by dividing jobs. * ♦ * HOOVER DEMANDS MORE POWER WASHINGTON, D. C„ Sept. 14 —| Hunger Hoover yesterday, instructed ; Roop, director of the budget, to be gin an investigation of the possibility of consolidating and reducing the number of federal agencies for "the sake of economy.” The plan Is to give Hoover more power. * * V WAGES OF UNORGANIZED WORKERS CUT MOST WASHINGTON, D. C„ Sept. 14 After studying reports from 1.718 dif ferent kinds of business, the National Industrial Conference Board has an nounced that unorganized workers have suffered more from wage-cuts than organized workers. The wages of the American work ing class are only one-third of what they were three years ago. # *f $ FARMERS WIN RISE IN MILK PRICE OMAHA, Nebraska, Sept. 14.—The milk price war between the farmers here and the milk trust ended today with the farmers getting an increase C(£*2B cents a hundredweight and the . retail price being increased 1 cent. *OO A MOVIE FAN. HEMPSTEAD, L. 1., Sept. 14. —' Capitalist glorification of' banditry was blamed by the police when John Rusinski, 17, was found wandering around with a fully laden cartridge belt, two loaded pistols, and a pair of handcuffs. "AMERICAN NURSE” SIGHTED NEAR AZORES LONDON, Sept. 14.—The mono plane "American Nurse,” attempting a non-stop flight from New York to Rome, was sighted yesterday 450 miles north of the Azores. Aboard the plane, in addition to the pilot, are a physician and a nurse. o*o DIDN’T DO IT RIGHT. WASHINGTON. D. C„ Sept. 14. The Capital Fur Shop was denied an injunction against the A. F. of L. International Fur Workers’ Union, because the shop did not go through the correct steps to get an injunction as outlined in the so-called “anti-in junction” act. The decision was made by Justice Daniel W. O’Dono ghue. - " • • _ • X-RAY HUNTS THUMB TACK. JAMAICA, L. I„ Sept. 14. The progress of a thumb tack through the digestive system of Patricia Clarke, 19 months old, is being followed by X-ray experts at Mary Immaculate hospital. The child swallowed the thumb tack while playing in her home 172 105th Ave. So far there are no ill effects. ANOTHER HOOVER PANACEA WASHINGTON, D.~C„ Sept. 14. The Hoover starvation government yesterday again claimed that it “solved” the desperate problem of the 15,000,000 unemployed workers in this country by announcing that 25,000 workers may receive jobs as the re sult of Hoover's “new program of public works,” connected with the war department. 0 9 9 BANKERS UNDERSTAND HOOVER WASHINGTON, D. C„ Sept. 14. Hoover’s plea for a 60-day moratori um on home mortgage foreclosures was just a grand stand gesture that lias had no effect on staying the banks from grabbing the homes of small owners, a Scripps Howard sur vey' discloses. Glassford, Whose Cops Killed Bonus Marcher, Is Praised by Thomas NEW YORK, i— Norman Thomas, Socialist Party candidate for presi dent, repeated the socialist stand ' against the payment of the veterans’ bonus, when he made a speech Tues day in Hempstead, L. I. But the Rev. Thomas has learned something in his first contacts with the workers recently. He now says, ;t might “well be made part of a com prehensive program for unemploy ment relief” if there is "payment of the bonus to unemployed veterans this year.” Then he praised Superintendent of Police Glassford of Washington, for his present criticism of Hoover’s statement that the bonus marchers were criminals and Communists. Thomas did not mention that Glassford’s police were first to kill a veteran. Sam Brown Still in Jail; Must Intensify Drive to Win His Release i I In the Daily Worker several days ago it was announced that Sam Brown, a young Negro worker ar- E rested at the demonstration at the Home Relief Buro in Harlem, had been released on bail. This was an error, as Brown has not been re leased on bail. It is necessary that the campaign for the release of Sam Brown be greatly intensified. All workers or ganizations are called upon to send protest resolutions to Judge Aurelio, Magistrate’s Court, sth District, at 170 E. 121st St. Workers and organizations are call ed upon to send in immediately funds to the Sam Brown Defense Commit tee, which is working in cooperation With the IL.JD. at 799 Broadway. VOTE COMMUNIST FOR: 1. Unemployment and Social Insurance . at the expense of the state and em ' ployers. 2. Against Hoover’s wage-cutting policy. S. Emergency relief for the poor farm ers without restrictions by the govern ment and banks; exemption of poor farmers from taxes, and no forced collection of rent or debts Vol. IX, No. 221 TOUR STRAIN FORCES REST ON FOSTER Heart Is Affected, Doctor’s Letters Show DUNNE COVERING DATES Travelled 17,000 Miles, Spoke to 200,000 The illness of William Z. Foster, presidential candidate of the Com munist Party, has made it necessary to cancel a large portion of the re maining part of an intensive national , , which began on [ June 1. In the ' ■ three months of June, July and August, Com r , Pffl rade Foster .X spoke at seven ty meetings from coast to coast, traveling sSi. 1 7,000 miles WBK ’ ’MWfc" and addressing FOSTER over 2 0 0,000 listeners. This trip entailed such ex cessive strain upon Comrade Foster s normally strong physique as to se riously effect his heart. A prelimi nary medical examination on August 28 already brought serious warning from the doctors, that Foster would have to reduce his exertions in the campaign. Before another week, which included such experience as Foster being physically driven from Zeigler, 111., by 50 gunmen in the employ of the coal companies and United Mine Workers, Foster suffered a more serious breakdown. For the information of the tens of thousands of workers who have been disappointed by these developments in their desire to hear Foster, and. the masses generally who'are vitally interested in Comrade Foster's health, we are printing below a com munication from Doctor Bernstein who is in charge of medical care for Comrade Foster. Urged to Rest Last Month “September 8, 1932. “Mr. R. Saltzman, “International Workers’ Order, "Dear Mr. Saltzman: ‘On August 28, 1932, Mr. William Z. Foster presented himself at my office for a complete physical examination. He complained of recurrent attacks o foppression in the left side of his chest associated with extreme effort, particularly when delivering a speech. These attacks have appeared in the last eight weeks, are of varying se verity and completely eliminated by rest and sleep. “Although the physical examina tion does not reveal any gross devia tions from normal, the history very strongly suggests the presence of a spasmodic disease of the coronary blood vessels, i.e., the blood vessels supplying the heart. The electrocar diogram reveals slight suggestive evi dence to bear out this impression. “A careful survey of Mr. Foster’s activities for the past year indicates total disregard for his realth and re serve. He is constantly working under terrific tension, has had practically no relaxation or recreation, gets a minimum of sleep and eats with great irregularity. This is the essen tial groundwork for heart strain and not infrequently leads to tragedy. I cannot too strongly emphasize the importance of his curtailing his fu ture activities to some extent. His usefulness would no doubt be greatly increased, were he to manifest great er consideration for his physical re serve.” The above is a copy of the letter that was sent to Mr. Shaffer on Au gust 29. I emphasized to Mr. Foster the importance of limiting his strain to the minimum and also) cautioned him that should the pain become worse, he was to terminate his tour at once. He promised to limit his strain, cut down his schedule and modify the duration of his speeches. The following telegram was received by me on the evening of September 7. September 7, 1932. “Dr. S. Bernstein “1125 Madison Ave. “Much worse pain unceasing also weakness stop Pain developing left arm hand stop What do you advise Address 1413 West 18th St Chicago “Foster” I promptly answered as follows: “Mr. William Z. Foster “1413 West 18th St “Chicago “Insist immediate cessation of all activities. Bed' rest and use of ni troglycerin for pain. Await letter.” The following letter was written at the same time. “Suicidal to Continue Tour” “Mr. William Z. Foster “1413 West, 18th St. “Chicago, 111. ‘Dear Mr. Foster: “The character and distribution of the pain confirm the original impres sion of coronary artery disease (an gina pectoris). It would be absolutely suicidal to continue tour. Complete bedrest, the use of the nitroglycerin and the recording of the temperature are essential.” Foster Is now resting in Chicago in compliance with the doctor’s in structions. Daily. Central Party U.S.A. Entered as second-class matter at the Post Office at New York, N.Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. ■^^>36: WORKING? WOMEN GIVE SIOO TO KEEP FOURTAQE ‘DAILY’ Call on Mass Organizations to Draw Entire Membership Into Drive One hundred dollars was contributed to the Daily Worker Emer gency Fund last night by Councils 9,1 1, 22, 23 and 37 of the United Councils of Working class Women. Realizing the extreme peril of the Daily’s position and the need of keeping their own paper alive, they ar ranged a movie party for the benefit of the Daily. For days they gave what little time they had toward making the event a success. It was no easy task. For these women bear the brunt of the struggle in rent strikes, in demonstrations before Home Relief Buros to demand jobless relief from the bosses and the city government. They know how indispensable the Daily Worker is in these struggles, as it is in all the struggles of the workers They found time enough to make this affair a success. And yesterday, when they brought their contribution to the Daily Worker office, they urged all other other councils and all mass anil fraternal organizations to follow their example, to draw the ENTIRE organization into the fight to save the Daily! But .... even with this SIOO, yesterday's donations only totalled $494.97, less than half of the sum we need daily. Since the drive began, only $12,236.50 of our $40,000 objective has been received. We need $1,200 daily. You must get it if your Daily is to live! AIX FUNDS to the DAILY WORKER, 50 E. 13th St., N. Y. C. Legion Leaders in Open Attack on Veterans Bonus 200 DELEGATES HEAR JOHN PACE Elect Delegates to Cleveland Conference MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., Sept. 14. Over 200 delegates from various vet erans’ organizations attended a lo cal conference here Sunday under the auspices of the Workers Ex- Servicemen’s League and the Bonus Marchers Rank and File Committee and elected a delegation to attend the National Rank and File Veter ans’ Conference to be held in Cleve land, Sept. 23. The conference was addressed by John T. Pace, who led the Detroit contingent of the bonus marchers to Washirtgton. PICKETS JAILED . IN PAINT STRIKE ! Defended Themselves Against Thugs NEW YORK. —For fighting against starvation wages eight pickets at the Skaler Construction Cp. job were ar rested yesterday. The workers on ! this job are Striking under the lead- i trship of the Alteration Painters 1 Union. ; Yesterday the boss attempted to continue the work with scab labor. 1 He brought a group of painters to : the job, but when the workers learned ( that there was a strike on they re- • fused to work and joined with the 1 pickets. The boss thereupon brought * two professional gunmen to the scene of activity. The gunmen threatened * the pickets, but the pickets drove the 1 gurimen off. Later the gunmen returned with a f heavy mobilization of police and de- I tectives. They pointed out several t of the pickets. The police swooped ( down upon several of the strikers i and rushed them to jail where they t were chargfed with assaulting the : gunmen. The strike is continuing at full 1 swing. The jailed pickets are being l defended by the International Labor Defense. l The strike committee urges all i painters to ’come to 167th St. and 1 Anderson Ave. and assist in picket- : ing. 1 DEMAND RIGHT TO MEET Demonstrate at Providence City Hall PROVIDENCE, R. 1., Sept. H.— The Communist Election Campaign Committee here Is leading the work ers in a militant struggle for the right to hold street meetings. All have been attacked and broken up by police during the last two weeks. Monday evening a big mass meeting in front of the City Hall sent in a delegation of 150 with Ann Burlak as spokesman to demand the right to the streets. The common Council, then in session refused to hear Bur lak; had her arrested for "disorderly conduct” when she demanded the floor, and clubbed and drove the del egation out. Burlak was balled out for SIOO. Jf * 7 NEW YORK, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1932 >— —— Mine Leader Appeals For Scottsboro Boys Vincent Kemenovich, speaking to striking miners. The National min ers’ Union and two of its leaders, F. Borich and Kemenovich have issued an appeal to all miners to support Scottsboro and Anti-De portation Day on Oct. Bth. N. M. U. ENDORSES SCOTTSBORO DAY World Demonstrations October 8 PITTSBURGH, Sept. 14.—The Na tional Miners Union, busy fighting against the deportations of two of its leaders, F. Borich, national secretary, and V. Kemenovich, secretary of the Western Pennsylvania District, and many other militant miners, and also fighting to organize the thousands of Negro miners energetically en dorses the Scottsboro and Anti-De portation Day on Oct. 8, initiated by the International Labor Defense. In a statement issued yesterday, the National Committee of the N. M. U. points out; “The coal operators and their local state and national governments are trying to make use of the Deporta tion weapon to further cut the wages of the miners and starve them into accepting semi-slave condtions. At the same time, and as a part of this fight, the operators are trying to prevent the growing unity of the Negro and white miners through ter ror. “The National Miners’ Union calls upon all its members, upon all the miners and their families and upon the entire working class to demon strate on Oct. 8 for the freedom of the nine Scottsboro boys. The workers in front of the hall formed a picket line, and a crowd of them followed Burlak and picketed the jail. The Socialist Labor Party is work, ing with the city government to sup press Communist meetings, the SLP candidate for governor having com

plained to the police that the Com munist meetings crowded the SLP meetings off the City Hall Plaza. The mayor now rules that the Communist speakers must give way to the SLP speakers at 9:15 every night they meet in front of the City Hall. The Communists refuse to ac cept any such arrangement *. £ (Section of the Communist International) V RANK AND FILE PUSH FORBONUS Hoover Censure Moves Balked by Officials PORTLAND, Ore., Sept. 14.—Fol lowing the parade here yesterday, the American Legion Convention took on the aspect of the usual annual brawl. The rank and file are putting up a hard battle to force through the bo nus resolution and the pressure is so strong that the leadership will un doubtedly be forced to allow it to go through. Even the leaders from all sections of the country are saying they will vote for the bonus, though they are personally opposed to it. They are attempting to head the bonus move ment in order to behead it. Would Halt Censure. The resolutions censuring Hoover for his armed attack on the bonus army have been “toned down" by the legion heads. Only mild and mean ingless resolutions “regretting the fact that it was necessary to evict the bonus army” wifi be presented for a vote, according to Roy Brown, legion leader from Pennsylvania. Oiling Up In a "dug-out” yesterday where high state Legion officials were get ting “oiled up’’ as a preliminary to the steam-roller maneuver to prevent protest resolutions and militant de mands for the bonus one of the offi cials revealed the truth. Membership Declines “We are doing our best to oil up the machinery, but we are not sure of success,” blurted out one of the leaders. The capitalist press announced the membership of the American Legion as 950,000 strong. The chairman of the national convention, however, sorrowfully admitted that the paid up membership was only 470,000 at the present time. Anti-War Resolution Pushed Through UTW Mass sentiment among American Federation of Labor rank and file workers towards a united front of all workers against imperialist war yes terday forced the convention of the United Textile Workers, now being held at the Hotel Woodstock in New York City, to pass a resolution point ing out the danger of a new world war, and urging workers to fight im perialist war, and to defend the Sov iet Union and the Chinese people. A resolution demanding the recog nition of the Soviet Union by the United States was passed, 30 to 18, after a bitter debate lasting ' two hours. Gov’t Moves to Prevent Ghandi’s Hunger Strike LONDON, Sept. 14. The British government may set Mahatma Ghen di at liberty before he starts his threatened hunger strike, it was hinted in political circles here. George Lansbury, leader of the “Labor Opposition” in parliament, said yesterday: "There can be no peace without Ghandi and the Con gress Party”, meaning that Gandhi must be preserved as an instrument to stem the revolutionary struggle iof the Indian workers and peasants. GERMAN C.P. CALLS FOR MASS FIGHT To Defeat Wage-Cuts, Defend Workers Standards EXPOSES SOCIALISTS Says Communism Is Only Way Out for the Workers (Cable By Inprccorr) BERLIN, Sept. 14.—An appeal en titled “Down With Von Papen” was issued by the Communist Party of Germany, The appeal declared that Von Papen is ignoring the over whelming vote of the Reichstag and is remaining in office supported by the bayonets of the Reichswehr and the services of all capitalist parties, from the fascist to the socialist party. Only the united revolutionary struggle of the masses can overthrow the government of fascist dictator ship, defeat the wage-cuts and de fend the workers’ living standards, the appeal declared. For Wo-k, Bread and Freedom Von Papen’s economic program means the enrichment of a small clique at the expense of the workers on whose shoulders new burdens are placed. The only way out is commu nism and the workers must rally around the Communists in the strug gle for work, bread and freedom. The appeal exposes the empty demagogy of the fascists comparing it with the fascists’ actions, murder ing workers, supporting Papen, etc. It also exposes the cowardice, the treachery of the socialists, whose tol eration of Bruening prepared the way for Papen. In retreating when the Junker Chancellor attacked Prussia, in sabotaging the communist strike proposal, against this attack, etc. Centre Landed In Hitler’s Arms. The Centre Party is attacked in the appeal which shows how this party which promised a stern struggle against fascism ended up in Hitler’s arms and worked for a coalition giv ing the fascists control over the pre sidiums of the Reichstag and the Prussian Diet. The appeal calls upon fascist, Catholic, socialist workers to join with the Communists in a united struggle against Papen and declares: “Whoever wants to defeat Papen and Schleicher must fight against Hitler, Bruening and Severing.” It ends by repeating the former offer of the Communist Party to co-operate with all workers’ organizations prepared to struggle against fascism, wage cuts, exceptional courts, militarism, imperialist war, the Versailles and Lausanne treaties and for socialism, Cops Fail to Disperse Pickets at Rex Shops; Steinman Strike Won NEW YORK. The boss of the Rex Products Corp. has had addi tional police assigned to his shop to terrorize his workers who are on strike under the leadership of the Metal Workers’ 'lndustrial Union. All day yesterday the cops molested the pickets, and tried to break up the picket lines. In spite of this the workers carried through their usual noon mass picketing and refused to disperse at the order of the cops. Committees of workers visited a number of shops which, according to information received by the strike committee, were doing work for Rex. In many of these shops the strikers were assured that the workers would do everything possible to prevent the production of materials for Rex, even to the extent of going on a sym pathy strike. The strike at the Steinman Co. was settled yesterday when the boss signed a contract with the Metal Workers Industrial Union. The work ers won union recognition and pay for legal holidays. FORD LEADS PROTEST Convention Demands Jobless Be Freed SEATTLE, Wash., Sept. 14.—James W. Ford. Communist candidate for vice-president was a main speaker at the Washington state nominating Convention of the Communist Party here yesterday. Ford led the 197 delegates, 80 per cent of them non-Party workers, and a procession of Seattle workers and Jobless down the street to Skaggs Grocery Company’s main office here in a demonstration of protest against the arresting of militant Anacortes, Washington, workers. The arrested workers are charged with grand lar ceny and incitement to riot during a demonstration in Anacortes against the Red Cross starvation system and discrimination against militant work ers. The demonstrators took posses sion of the Anacortes branch of Skaggs Grocery and the starving helped themselves to food. 1,200 Hear Ford. Ford led the demonstration against CITY EDITION Call Weavers of Paterson Strike to Unite All Crafts Silk Workers Fighting Low Wages and 14 Hr, Day; U.T.W. for ‘Stoppage’ of Weavers Only National Textile Workers Union Calls for Strike of All Silk and Dye Workers PATERSON, N. I„ Sept. 14.—Paterson textile workers are on strike against intolerable low wages and very bad conditions on the job. Estimates of the capitalist press says 6,000 are out. The National Textile Workers Union is checking on the numbers. m The United Textile Workers called the strike for: “a basic eight-hour day, 44-hour week and 4 cents per yard of 60 picks,” for weavers. Splitting Tactics The U.T.W. at first talked of a general strike, but now calls for a “stoppage” of weavers only. The U. T. leaders have helped the mill owners cut wages 50 per cent in the last year, and right now are trying to split the silk workers by making this a struggle of weavers only. They are also holding constant conferences with the Chamber of Commerce and the employers, to sell out the strug gle. Muste, Budenz and Gitlow, of the U. held a meeting last night, and only a couple hundred respond ed. The Musteites are opposed to mass picketing or strike meetings. Make It A Real Strike The National Textile Workers Un ion distributed leaflets today “urging all Paterson strikers to turn this “stoppage” into a real strike, and a united strike of all silk and dye house workers. The N.T.W. has for some time been urging the building of united front strike committees in all departments of all Paterson mills, for a united struggle to win demands for all the workers. The N.T.W. leaflets today point out the desperate need of haste to pre vent this present strike from being sold out by the U.T.W. United Front Committees “Get togetHer in each department” says the N.T.W., "and work out your demands!” The N.T.W. pledges its full support to a real strike. Morris M. Brown, Paterson organ izer of the N.T.W. and Martin Rus sak, its national organizer, will speak at a mass meeting of strikers tonight. The meeting is called by the N.T.W. Less Than 3 Cents A Yard Conditions in the Paterson mills against which the workers are strik ing are outlined in a recent N.T.W. leaflets as follows: “Weavers are getting from 2V4c to 2-’4c a yard for 76 picks, working 10 to 14 hours, averaging about $lO a week. In one shop, weavers have to enter new warps without pay for it. It is nothing unusual for bosses to steal yards. Weavers are fired for any little flaws. Poor drinking water, unsanitary conditions, poor lights and insufficient equipment are com mon in the shops. In one shop, a loomfixer is hired and gets a nickel for adjusting a picking stick and while doing this, he sees another loomfixer fixing a filling motion and this loomfixer gets a quarter. One loomfixer is taking care of 92 looms —l2 hours for S3O a week. Warpers are getting 4c average. Winders and quill winders earn about $lO a week.” • • • In the dye houses the wage Is 15 to 45 cents an hour and unemployed are asked to go to work for one year for food only, with a promise of a bonus, at the end of the year. Demand Release of Guatemalan Worker RETALHUELO, Guatemala, Sept. 6 <By Mail). —Juan Bucovich, worker and leader of the Guatemalan mas ses, has been arrested and is held by the military authorities here. It is believed the Yankee colonial agents here plan to murder him as they have many other working class lead ers. NEW YORK. The International Labor Defense today issued a call to the workers of the United States to join in the protest against the de tention and threatened murder of Juan Bucovich. Skaggs during an afternoon recess of the convention. That night, the hall was thrown open to the masses of Seattle workers, and 1,200 of them, packing two hails connected with loud speakers, heard Foster speak. James Maurer, socialist vice-presi dential candidate spoke here last week to 100 people. The Communist candidate called on the Seattle waterfront workers to repeat the 1919 strike action by stopping munition shipments in tended for attack on the Chinese workers and the Soviet Union. Nominate Ticket. The Convention nominated Alec Neral, Communist Party district or ganizer for U. S. Senator from Wash ington. William Elbee was nomi nated for congress from the second Washington district. The delegates loudly cheered the news that the Communist candidates were on the ballot In Oregon. VOTE COMMUNIST FOR: t Equal rights for the Negroes and self* determination for the Black Belt. S Against capitalist terror; against all forms of suppression of the poliltcal rights of workers. f Against Imperialist war; for the de* sense of the Chinese people and of the Soviet Union. Price 3 Cents UNITED FRONT IN GARY WINS 1,100 Hear Dunne, Pledge Support CHICAGO, Sept. 14.—Eleven hun dred workers in Gary, gathered at Turner Hall in an overflow meeting, heard Bill Dunne, who is fulfilling the speaking duties of William Z. j Foster, who has been taken ill. Tht> I workers pledged to support Foster and Ford, the Communist election struggle and the call to action is sued by Presidential candidate Fos ter at his September 10 meeting in Chicago. The meeting repudiated the lying story under a Gary dateline on page ‘one of the New York Timei of July 31, which stated that the Gary unemployed had solved the problem of the crisis with 44,00 gar - dens grown under the auspices of the steel company welfare department. An enthusiastic welcome was ac corded the report of the Warren steel strike victory. A message of sym pathy and support was sent to Com rade Foster by the meeting. Dave Mates, section organizer of the Communist Party, was the chair man. The other speakers were Wil liam Agnew, a Negro steel worker who is the Communist candidate for state representative; Wenzel Stocker, metal worker, candidate for Lieuten ant Governor; Lydia Oken, candi date for State Representative. The mass meeting was preceded by a 15-minute radio talk by Wenzel [ Stocker over station WJKS. The speech of Bill Dunne, emphasizing the practical measures necessary for a wide united front struggle against hunger and imperialist war, was continually interrupted with ap j plause and cheering. Dunne will speak in Youngstowr on Thursday. REPORT ILLINOIS MINERS MARCHING Rank and File Demand To Picket Franklin WEST FRANKFORT. 111.. Sept. 14. —The Rank and File Opposition de mand for mass marching and mass j picketing of the strategic Franklin ! County coal mines now running, I»s resulted in a movement of groups of , marchers of unknown size toward the county line. The 10,000 Franklin County miners are ready to join the strike of 35.000 other miners of Illinois against the 18 per cent wage-cut agreed on by . the operators and the United Mine ■ Workers' officials, but are held down ; now by a brutal reign of terror. GET 68 BODIES FROM DEATH SHIP Communist Calls for Compensation [ NEW YORK. —On Tuesday night and Wednesday morning 23 more bodies came to the surface of the East River where the steamer Ob servation blew up Friday and sank, with a load of 126 building workers forced by the J. P. Carlin contract ing Co. to ride, and even pay their way on her. This brings the number of bodies recovered so far to 68. At least four more are known to be missing, and perhaps the number is greater thaa that. The federal inspectors had par sed the ship as “safe”. Yesterday G. F. Keogh, president of the Welding Company that the owners of the boat hired to repair the boiler recently testified, and admitted that his firm had no authorization to repair marine boilers, and that the particular man who did the work had no previous experience with these boilers. It is obvious that the ship's owner hired this firm because it was cheap. A boiler explosion sank the boat, after a number of firemen had quit when they found the boiler unsafe. William L. Patterson. Communist candidate for mayor of New York recently voiced his party’s demand for full compensation for the fami lies of the murdered men, and for Communists in office to force real in spection of the death traps in the harbor,

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