23 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

23 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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IN THE NEWS It OKI) HALIFAX has been *p jL iwlntrd the new British im hauailor to the United State*. The Duke of Windsor, late King of England and Emperor of India, made clear that he would have liked the post of ambassador from England to the I’nlted tales but that It had not been offered to him. I He very definitely declared: I “I certainly would accept it if I thought it would be for the best interests of the two countries That was a very frank and very Judicious statement delivered In a patriotic but politic manner en tirely characteristic of the Duke.: It Is quite astonishing that the! English ruling classes, knowing how necessary America's Involve ment in the European war Is to their success and survival and realizing how much liked Windsor is in America, should not have offered the post of ambassador to the United States to the Rilke,' and should not have endeavored to take a reasonable advantage of his popularity and of the fact that he had taken unto himself an American wife. It is Indeed amazing that the anger and resentment of these ruling classes In England against Windsor for having married out side his class should remain so persistent and so violent. yTYBYIOUMLY this unremitting I fiJ and unreasoning antagonism Is not due to his having married outside his nationality or his race. English sovereigns have married Danes, Dutch and Germans with the full appro\al of the English ruling classes and the English people. • In fact, as everyone knows, Dutch and German royalties have been summoned by England to become sovereigns of England. Religion has been of more Im portance than race in the selec tion of English sovereigns. Rut rank and class seem to ha\e been most important of all. There ran surely be no cause for considering that this antago nism against the Duke of Windsor Is due to his having married an American. There remains only the assump tion that this bitter hatred of the Duke by the English classes Is due to their belief that he mar ried beneath his station and theirs.. That the marriage meant a weakening of the royal position and prerogathr,—and of their own. That it meant a loss of place and power and privilege for the ruling class. THE devotion of the classes in England to the crown Is great, hut their loyalty to their own W The English government, in spite of its democratic form, is the most aristocratic in Europe. And the social autocracy of England Is complete. Wherefore. Windsor, when king of England, was never likes! or ap proved by the English aristocracy. He was ton democratically minded, too Impatient of conven tion, too indifferent to the claims of his class, too sympathetic with the demands of his people. As Edward the Eighth, his in sistence that something he done to alleviate the condition of the Welsh coal miners caused a chill to run up and down the moss hacks of the English aristocracy. It meant that the king was thinking and an English king is not supposed to think. And if bv chance he does think, h« Is surely not supposed to do anything about It.—nor i« he al lowed to insist that anybody else do anything about it. TRULY Edward the Eighth might not have had the power of mind to he a great king, hut (Continued on Next Fage, C'ol. 4) !n the Times Today Paw D• < r Healtft f. 12 • a 4**" .. . ....... .. .. V, Comics ..... art. kl C r>*# Word Pu**ic ....*. 21 Dally ibort Story ... 12 K V Durllng 12 financial 23 | h i Can p liitroacopf .... .. 14 Onaral Johr.non 2* M* Jean Kaln 14 Lattara to Editor . ... ..28 Mftffaitnt Pa g« .... ... 12 Pail Mai ion 24 Movta Program 10 Obituaries 7 Pattern If '•Pltfans of Lovr ... 71 WcftblMk Peyler .... .. Panic Program .. .*.. .. * ft Ip ley I* Kl»1e ItoMnsor . » liamor. Runyan ... ... . v.. 'j# h tdft v ♦ Ppnrs |7 F*age Screen .’k Domttav ThotMp*. Wart Ana 73 24 2# 27 fVimheJ* ..... 2o WiMHrg Wfl! r . .. *2 What’s the An *r l* Women a Pages 14, lb FBI Report Frees Lonnie Jenkins |★★★★★★★ ★ ACCUSE COUNCILMAN IN COURT Suicide Note Held Genuine After 9 Yrs. Lonnie Jenkins. Ihe slight, be spectacled DSR motorman sent to Jackson Prison nine years ago on a charge of wife murder, was freed today at a dramatic Recorder's Court hearing. A federal bureau of investigation report that the handwriting on Mrs. Jenkins' suicide note was ac tually hers gave Jenkins his free dom. The FBI reported that the note could not have been written by Jenkins, reputed sweetheart to cover up a murder, as the state had contended. His sudden liberation came as a stunmng surprise to the former motorman. He stared unbelievingly for a minute, then he burst into tears when Judge Christopher E. Stein, who sentenced him almost nine years ago to the day. granted Assistant Prosecutor John A Ricca's motion for dismissal Jen kins had been foi a new trial. "This I* the most wonderful Christmas I’ll ever have," he said brokenly. GIRL CONVICTS HIM Jenkins, then 28, was sent to jail on a charge of having shot hi* wife. Edith, in Iheir home. The state held that 17-year-old Betty Zimmerman, employed in the Jen kins home, had accepted the a< terT lions of Jenkins and that he bad In her to fake the suicide note to conceal a murder. Jenkins declared that his vvife. often melancholy, had taken her own life and was the author of the note. But Betty Zimmerman tes tified at the trial that she had written the suicide note. That clinched the case against Jenkins. However, today Mrs Helen Jenkins Drake, Jenkins' pretty 20-year-old daughter who has fought unceasingly for the.free dom of her lathsr again took the Stand at the on Jenkins' motion for a new trial and tes tified “I have talked to Betty Zimmerman on various me*- »|ons in the last lew year* and she has told me: “'1 was very «‘onfused—ter ribly ennftised—at the time of the trial, but after all these years. I am certain I didn't write those n<Acs.' ” CALLED NOTE DEM ISE Ricca then told of a trip to Washington he made last week during which he submitted sam ples of Mrs. Jenkins’ handwriting and of Betty Zimmerman's hand writing. and the disputed suicide note itself to D. M. Coffey, FBI handwriting ace. “Coffey reported that the more he studied the note, Hu more he was convinced that it was a genuine suicide note, writ ten hy Mr*. Jenkin* herself," Ricca declared. He also produced a letter from J. Edgar Hoover, officially an nouncing Coffey's verdict. Ricca then announced he would consent to a new trial which was merely a legal move to pave the way for a dismissal. Jenkins, un aware of what was coming smiled happily. Ricca then moved for a dis missal. citing the FBI opinion and declaring that "to continue fur ther with this case would amount to persecution rather than prose cution." “There is not enough evidence against Jenkins left to place before a Jury," he declared. Churchill to Speak From London Today LONDON. Dec 23. 'INS* Prime Minister Churchill will de liver a radio address a» 9 p, m <3 p. m. Detroit timer today. | After Today Only l HAY to Shop for CHRISTMAS □ ETRtDfftyflWfM E S Only Detroit Newspaper Carrying International New a Service and Complete Sport Dispatches 41 ST YEAR, NO. 84 500 Warplanes a Day Outlined in CIO Plan To Speed Defense r A plan for the auto industry to 'manufacture 500 fighting planes per day using present facilities was given to the national defense advisory board and President Roosevelt today by Waiter P. Reu ther. General Motors director for the UAW-CIO. The plan was drafted at the request of CIO of ficials. Reuther's chief thesis is that the auto industry operates at only 50 per cent of its potential capacity. The other 50 per cent could be utilized to manufacture planes, he said. TO TAKE 6 MONTHS If this plan is put into effect, production of planes at the 500-day rate would be underway within six months. Reuther said, or six months to a year quicker rtian under any other plan. The Reuther plan would inter fere with the production of cars only in the lieginning. he declared. He recommended a six month delay in the issuing of 1942 auto models Bombs Damage Wings in House ■ Of Commons bitmiflMMl \*m* Vrriff i aM* LONDON. Dec. 23. Newspaper correspondents today were per mitted to view damage done to the House of Commons during recent German air raids, which ha\ ? e spared few sections of Britain's capital from some vestige of at tack. While there was little or no damage visible in any public parts of the building, the memlcers' cloak room. The public hills office and the room used bv lobby corre spondents were worst hit. Effects of bnmh damage also were seen in the historic cloisters and the crypt The famous debat ing chamber of the house was not touched. The private bills, office was hit by a high explosive and an oil iKimh 10 minutes after custodians had completed their nightly pa tiol recently. SMALL DAMAGE NOTED Officials explained that while fallen masonry and debris from the cloister had temporarily closed the entrance to the crypt, no structural damage was done to the latter itself. The falling bomb- caused two separate fires. Both were ex tinguished within half an hour and damage from them Was small Beautiful St Stephen's Chape! a lew yards away from the scene of the damage, escaped unscathed but a tew Stained glass windows were broken in historical Central Hall with its world-famous murals and three small |>anes were broken in St. Stephen's lower At the outset of the attacks the famous statue of Richard the Lion-Hearted in front of the Com mon' entrance narrowly, A bomb explosion bent l of the equestrian figure. Auto Dealer Employes Get 53, 000 Yule Bonus A S 3 000 Christmas bonus today was paid the 22 employes of the Colville-Moore Company 10200 Grand River avenue. Dodge and Plymouth dealers' in line with the company's policy for 10 years. Ar thur M Colville, president, an nounced today Free .Wear Watch Guarantee Smash it, bash it, crash it break the crystal, run a truck over it. We'll repair and clean free for 5 years any watch you buy of $22.50 or more no questions asked. No delays Simmon* & Clark Jewelers, 1535 Rmadway - .tpen evening — Ariv. THE IDE M, GIFT FOR FRIENDS A case o| DETROIT Premium Pale Twer. Phone your dealer or call CAdtllac 1600. Detroit. D. R Co. i —Adv. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23,1940 to jiermit a switchover of section® of certain auto plants to plane manufacture. But after this switchover was completed. Reuther said produc tion of new models would go on as usual. The plan set forth by Reuther would: —Establish a hoard of nine members to control plane production in the auto plants. Three member* would come from the federal government, three from auto plant manage-* ment and three from labor union*. O—The hoard would organize “ staff of tooling and produc tion engineers to make plant by plant survey of industry to determine how much of each plant can he used for plane manufacture. —The hoard would break down blue print* of plane* to be produced and allocate (Continued on Page 10) itritilth Mtecreate Ynlc Spirit LONDON, Dec. 23.—With a little enterprise and a lot of deter mination. bomb-harried Britain is managing to conjure up a Christ mas spirit out of the debris of ruined homes and, for a time at least, forget ,the banshee wail of air raid sirens by mustering as much yuletide gayety as circum stances will permit. There isn't much of material things with which to Work this miracle of Christmas, now that every family is in the battle line, and much of the success of the ef fort will depend upon whether Hitler's luftwaffe observes the day •of Christ's nativity But unless the Nazi sculptor of the "new order'' in Europe's life decides to ielcct Christmas for the occasion of a worse "hbtz” than has yet struck England, some Art of festivity will mark the day. Behind broken windows and upder leaky, bomb-pocked roofs, the majority of Londoners and other urban dwellers who do not livp communally in air raids shfl ters will make Christmas a day light celebration in their own homes The tables will be cleared and the parties over before dusk, to enable the cclebrators to make a (Continued on Page Six)

Halifax Envoy to I .S. Named to Succeed Late Lord Lothian as Eden Gets Old Post as British Foreign Secretary By JAMES E. BROWN Int’l Nfwi staff r«rrr»fMin<J*nt LONDON. Doc. 23.—After a final round of conferences pre paratory to an early departure lor Washington, where he will j , ( % pt. Eden, who was switched from the war secretaryship hack to his' old post as foreign chief when Hah lax was selected for the important joo a- envoy ‘o America. L(.< n immediately took charge of the foreign office It was an nounced that Lord Halifax would pass a brief holiday in the north of England and then depart for Bombers Rip Manchester in Worst Raid By ROBERT G. NIXON Ini 'I New* Service Htaff Correspondent LONDON, Dec. 23.—A great pall of smoke hung over the sprawling northwestern manufacturing city of Manchester today after it suf fered its longest and most severe German aerial bombardment of the war. Casualties were heavy. Two air raid shelters were hit. In one of these 500 persons had taken refuge and many were killed or injured. A motion picture house and two hospitals also were hit and in each of these buildings more casualties resulted. Many commercial buildings were' destroyed and huge fires sprang up as the raiders bombed the city during the night. This afternoon rescue workers were still struggling to extricate the dead and injured from tons of debris. Many workers' homes, decorated with Christmas wreaths, were laid flat and it was feared many children and mothers were buried in the wreckage. ATTACK IN WAVES The raid began shortly after dusk with waves of attacking Nazi planes roaring fan-wise across the city. First they unloaded hundreds of flames and incendiary bombs, causing many fires that cast a deep red glow on the sky. Then they jettisoned their heavi est bombs on Manchester’s shop ping district and commercial sec tion. spreading destruction over wide areas. A large number of casualties resulted. The fires are under con trol. Early this afternoon, two Ger man planes streaked low over an East Anglia district, dropped four high explosive bombs and fled to sea. There was no damage. Two German raiders were shot down during the attack. CAROLS IN SHELTERS Numerous sections of Britain, aside from the Liverpool district j were pounded by the Nazis during | the night, hut in underground: shelters millions of Britons defied the bombs by singing Christmas Carols and holding yuletide cele brations Bombs were dropped on the Merseyside area < around Liver pool) and the eastern Midlands, the communique added, and also on southern England. London experienced two air raid (Continued on Next Page, Col. 8) the United State,® early in the new year. Important shifts in Prime Mini ster Winston Churchill's war cab inet accompanied appointment of Lord Halifax. Eden was replaced ■ as war secretary by Capt. David’ Margesson, the cabinet* chief whip in thp House of Commons. The shift brought Eden back to the cabinet role—foreign secretary Halifax railed an f ap*easer Page 5 —from which he resigned in 1938 in protest against the Munich agreement and the late Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain's ap peasement policies. A barony was conferred simul taneously upon Viscount Cran borne. In addition to his duties as Dominion's secretary, he will act as spokesman for the foreign office in the House of Lords, a function Lord Halifax has been performing. It was anticipated in London that President Roosevelt would act quickly to appoint a new American ambassador to London succeeding Joseph P. Kennedy, who resigned following his return to the United .States. I succeed the Lord Lothian i« ambassador t o the United States Vis count Halifax todayr e 1 i n quished his [lost eign secretary. In a tradi tional ceremony at Buckingham Palace, Lord Halifax surren d< it'd *he tor eign to Anthony THREE CENTS 28 PAGES Shaw to Step Out As M. S. C. President; Hannah to Get Job Tim.. Staff Correspondent EAST LANSING. Dec. 23. ;President Robert S. Shaw of Mich- 1 igan State College will retire July T, 1941. and be succeeded as presi dent by John Alfred Hannah, secretary of the since 1928 Sld<nt xdfPk ’ “P r esident DIRy * j Shaw in board some time ago that '\jTi he wishes to W. RBerkey, DB SHAW chairman of the board, said. “and recently he reminded me of hi* desire and mslced that the board take the proper action." CAME TO STATE IN 1902 The retiring president was born July 24, 1871, in Woodbum: Ont. He was educated at the Collegiate Institute in St. Catharines, Ont.. the high school at Guelph. Ont., and the Ontario A g r i c u I tliral College at Guelph He to State, which W was then known Wt *• as the Michigan ... Cf® Agricultural J W College in 1902 || ! a s a professor, Kj of agriculture* and s u e r n the ■ m. mt- M agn- M culture in 1908 and later was HA>> ' AH made director of the college ex perimental station. He held these President Plans Fireside Chat For Sunday By JACK VINCENT Int'l Nr»» s»r*lrr staff ( .>rr.«poßd.n( WASHINGTON. Dec. 23.—Pres ident Roosevelt expects to make a fireside chat” next Sunday eve ning to report to the nation on the status of defense and the present emergency. White House Secretary [Stephen Early announced today. Early said the decision to speak via nationwide radio hookup is more or less definite and the exact time on December 29 will be an nounced later. Early said it mdy he around 9:30 or 10 o'clock with the President to speak about half an hour The President is expected to make additional remarks on his policy of aid to Britain. REPEAL UNNECESSARY His address will come in the midst of a search by American of ficials for moans to get war sup plies to England as fast as pos sible. In line with this the administra tion is considering the possibility iof a partial restoration of Amer ican shipping to the transatlantic trade, it was learned. This could be accomplished by an executive order by Mr. Roosevelt without i repeal of the Neutrality Act. FREE— 3O-Pleoe Set of DISHES With any purchase amounting V> sls 00 or over—diamonds, watches, jewelry, radios, electrical goods, etc. Fair trade merchandise ex cluded. Lowest prices easier term® Simmons & Clark, Jewel ers. 1535 Broadway. Open eve nings.—Adv. PETER PAN STUFFIN' BREM) For your Holiday Fowl! Delicious! Ready Seasoned! No work required. Per loaf. 10c. ( —Adv. ’positions until made head of the ; school. i He is the author of numerous' booklets on animal nutrition and [livestock production and his re searches in these fields are out standing. He received the honorary [degree of doctor of agriculture in June, 1922, from State and an honorary degree of bachelor of science in agriculture from his alma mater, Ontario Agricultural j College. State College has gone through [its period of greatest growth, both 'in physical size and equipment and ■in student enrollment, during the presidency of Doctor Shaw. GRADUATED IN 1923 The man who will replace him, John A. Hannah, was bom in 1902 in Grand Rapids and thus will be one of the nation's youngest college [presidents. He was graduated from State in 1923 and joined the faculty as an extension specialist in poul try. He held the position until 1933 when he was appointed fed eral co-ordinator for ( tbp poultry code under the NRA. He is a member of several" national and international poultry organizations and was president of the Inter national Baby Chick Association. .Since 1935 he has been secretary to the state board of agriculture.! <a body which acts for State as does the University of Michigan board of regents. Hannah is Doctor Shaw's son-in law. He was declared by the board to be "a natural selection for pro motion" because of his training and experience. Hannah was instrumental In arranging for the $6,000,000 ex pansion and building program at State which has covered the | campus with new buildings. Injured in Crash FLINT, Dec. 23.—Gustan Lund, 1 55, of 722 Margaret street, is in Hurley Hospital today with brain, concussion caused in an Industrial avenue traffic crash early today Yule Train Wrecked; 12 Injured By HAROLD HEROUX *"t’l !S»w» vrvlrt staff Cormpoedrnl JULESBURG. Col., Dec. 23. : With the Union Pacific Railroad’s luxury train, The City of Los! Angeles, strewn over torn-up l tracks four miles west of Jules burg. authorities today opened an : investigation to determine whether derailment late last night was the work of a saboteur. Twelve of the 200 persons aboard the train, including pas- j sengers and crew members,! suffered serious injuries, mostly fractured legs and arms, but there were no fatalities. Jammed with passengers home bound for Christmas, the train was derailed as it roared along at a (Continned on Page 10) We Reeonunend: *'l nilfr the stress ot Britain’* trrrlllc orilnl. slum hoy* are being herded into the private school*—public school* a* they call them there.” Edwin Hill sees a great cultural shakeup in England since the war began. Page 28. • • • “Mentally, we are the nosiest people In the world. Wr want to know what makes things work. We are always tearing open the clock to find the tick.” An analysis of the American people by Benjamin DeCasseres. Page 28. • • • “Our greatest lack right now is Will Rogers, who *ald: ‘America never lost a war or won a conference.’” wTites Gen. Hugh" Johnson. Page 28. Today'n Geography Lennon Fiume (pronounced Fy-oom-a), Italian city on the Adriatic which has been bombed by the RAF. is at the head of the Bay of Quarnero. 40 miles southeast of Trieste. The old town, with crooked and narrow streets, is built upon a hill while the new city stretches albng the shores. The harbor, constructed in 1872. wiil hold 150 large vessels. During and after the Peace Conference ot 1919, Italy and Jugoslavia contested hotly for possession of the city. The deadlock ended when it was seized by a force headed by the late Italian poet. Gabriele D'Annunzio, on Jan. 2. 1921. In 1924 the city was awarded to Italy with certain rights reserved for Jugoslavia. The population of the city in 1928 wa» 49,199. [NIGHT! EDITION Tells $25,000 Demand for Housing Vote A Detroit councilman Asked $25,000 for his vote in favor of |steel construction of the S'. Her man Gardens housing project, it was testified today in a Circuit Court hearing for an injunction to halt work on the project, now the subject of a grand jury In vestigation. The charge was made by Theo dore J. Horwitz, general manager of the Jbelsan Plastering Com pany of Chicago, the firm report edly promised a plastering sub contract by the Lipman-Smith Companies of Chicago, defend ants in the injunction hearing. Horwitz. questioned by William Henry Gallagher, attorney for the Maurice L. Bein Company of Chi cago. plaintiff in the suit, said Abe Smith, head of the Smith Com pany, told him in a conversation relative to awarding of the con tract : “I am working on the thing now. I have four councilman lined up and another on the fence who is asking $25,000 for his vote.” SMITH BARED OFFER In an earlier conversation Smith told him the housing contract was to be awarded to the Bein Com pany "but I’m going before the Common Council to see what I can do to get it.” Horwitz said. John L. Smith, president of the Council, revealed a short time ago he had been offered $25,000 by a person unknown to him, to switch his vote on the project from steel to contract construction. Clarence E. Page, assistant cor-, poration counsel, ozjected to intro duction of the testimony, charging the bill for the injunction would have to be amended to include fraud. Gallagher replied: “Obvtonaljr the Beta Company has ben the victim of fraud, but I don’t think charges against public officials should be bandied about until the facts can be es tablished so I didn’t include It in the bill because I’m not certain I ran produce the evidence. “However, the repreesntatlve of the city should be the last to object to this coming out so that the people of Detroit can learn the real facts.” Horwitz. a surprise witness, was i the first to appear today in the suit being heard by Circuit Judge j Harry B. Keidan. The Bein com pany bases the suit on the charge their bid, calling for steel con | struction, was the lowest sub mitted on the project. ■ ■■■ ' ■ British Pour Troops, Arms Into Malaya j SINGAPORE. Dec. 23—(INS) j —Heavy British reinforcements, both in troops and war equipment, have reached Malaya, an official communique announced today. It stated that “substantial re inforcements in arms, including aircraft, airforce personnel, num bers of Indian infantry, and ar tillery. engineers and auxiliary Units have arrived in Malaya.”

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