27 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

27 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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IN THE NEWS A PARTIAL cooccMion to hu mane public Hentlment ha* been made by the motion picture producer*, who seek to create *adl*tlc thrills out of the torture of helpless animals. A resolution has been passed by the .Motion Picture Produce— As sociation, known to the general public as the Hays office, abollsh •**r or seeking: to abolish the “running wire.*’ The “running wire,** evasively end apologetically known as the running "W.” 1* a shameful device for throwing a horse headlong while at full speed. It Is an airplane wire several hundred feet long and imisible to the earners. One end of this wire Is fastened to the horse’s front feet. The other end I* anchored In the ground. When the horse, obediently and trustingly carrying his rider at highest speed, reaches the length of this wire he Is suddenly and unsuspectingly thrown heels over head to the ground as violently as it I* possible to throw the poor animal. IT IS claimed In extenuation ol this contemptible practice that If the horse falls In loose dirt or sand he will probably esca(»e seri- ous Injury. However, even when this protec tion Is provided there are con tinually Instances where horses are killed, and many more In stances where thev are lamed or maimed. Where the protection of sand Is not provided, one or two or more horse* are frequently kttted til a picture by the barbarous running ••W” at the hands of directors who would throw their own grand mothers If they could get a sadistic thrill hv doing It. The resolution of the Moving Picture Producers \ssociatlon, whk'h Is undoubtedly due to Mr. Will Hays’ good heart and sound mind. Is sufficiently definite as far as the particular atrocity of the running “W” is concerned. It runilnmn* and p device, and says: "S'or ahull uiLgutcjure wKnirn 1 , z rmr rGmmw* Code Adminlstration hr ap proved if reasonable flrounds < sist for belii vtnfj that Una similar device b;i the prttdueer of svrh pir ture resultid in apparent rrueltif to animals." That resolution should be rea sonably effective provided the Production Code Administration has any humanity and any Intelli gence and any ordinary bov office business j>cnse. Y«t R columnist obstinately and insistently reverts to the prop osition that it is not good business to drivf* |x'iipte away from the cinema theatres who like animals. Man I y men and w holesome women and their decent children are the patrons of westerns. They like the clean outdoor character of westerns, the beauty of the mountains and the waters and the open spaces. They appreciate good and skill ful riding, AND THEY LIKE KINK ANIMALS. Tom Mix's horse Tony was almost as famous as Toni was; and Silver7~lhe beautiful steed of the I.one Ranger, is almost better known than Mr. I.ee Powell or Mr. Robert Livingston. Everybody knows “HI-Vo Sil ver,” hut with embarrassment and humiliation your columnist must confess that he had to think a second before he could remember the full names of the hold rangers. Certainly Mr. Ilopalong Cas sidy’s horse is almost as much admired as the handsome Hop along himself. And the proud and pranring palomino of Roy Rogers would he (Continued on Next Page, Col. 5) In the Times Today Pape Buffer Health 14 'Bum" Baer .. . 2* .. 20. 21 rr*'M-W'»rrl Puztle 21 Haily Bh'*rt Story 14 K V (hirling .. 14 Financial 22 Hatin'* r*rl""n ». 14 ||'To*«r.pe 1.1 General Jnhn««>n 2* Mi Jean Kam 11 Letter* to F'litor *2B Mapazitje Pape /. 14 Paul M a lion . . 2* Movie Program* 21 Pattern .... •i. . 1 ■"» •'Pitfall* of I>*ve" 21 Weathrnok Pepler 2* Radio Program* ... , ■ 8 Ripley v- A-• ■ 2» Klele Robin** *n . 11 I‘amon Runyon ... ?** B<»cl**ty ,12 B porta It i v >• Stage Screen 1 » I>orothjr Thompaon Want Ad* 2' 2■ -7 WinchtH • , 2 • Wishing Well .1* What* the Answer?. . 11 Women's Pages 13 13 ISLE IN PACIFIC SHELLED Gale Lashes Florida, Area Isolated InlfrnittMial New* N#nlr« Wire DAYTONA BEACH. Fla.. Dec. 'Sl.— Highways were blocked and .communications were disrupted over a wide area today when an electrical disturbance, accompanied by heavy rain and high winds, struck the upper Florida coast. Center of the disturbance ap [K’ared to lie near Bunnell. Ef forts to reach the area by tele phone were unsuccessful. Earlier the storm struck Ha vana, Cuba, kiling 10 and injuring 150. NEY (.ALE HITS WEST lnlrrn«lt(«al Near* Hrrvlre Wire* SAN FRANCISCO. Dec 27.—A new storm, with unrelenting fury, lashi-d the Pacific Coast from Mexico to Canada today. It was the latest in a success vion of gales which started 10 days ago. It created high tides and mountainous waves which washed out roads, periled shipping, dam-: aged seashore projierty. as well as driving torrential rains and bji/zards inland. Latest and most dramatic inri d« nt of the storm was the rescue of 10 coast guardsmen who had been missing off the coast of northern California for more than 36 hours. The 10 took to the turbulent open sea in two small boats on an errand of mercy Christmas Eve. (Jut of fuel with two of their number slightly injured, they were found by the cutter Shawnee, at tempting in navigate under mtprm vtsed sails approximately 40 miles north of their Point Arena station. Heaviest damage to beach prop erty occurred in Southern Cali- 1 fornia where huge combers pounded cottages to pieces and (Weakened breakwaters. Off the southwest coast of Washington, a lighthouse collapsed into the sea.. Heavy rains were swelling rivers and tributaries along the Cali fornia lowlands. At Kennett the precipitation totaled 2.25 inches in 21 hours Most imminent flood threat was in the Sacramento Valley, but levees of the Sacramento River were holding and at some points pressure was relieved by diverting water into by-passes. HEAVY SNOWFALL Incessant snowfalls were re ported in the Sierra Nevada and Cascade ranges. A pack of more than eight feet accumulated at Donner Summit. Colder weather p’edicted for the Sierra dissi pated fears of runoffs which might swell valley rivers to more dan gerous levels. The crest at Colusa already «a< at 26.55 feet. 'Hie danger point i> 28 feet. Breakers were smashing high along the ocean beach of San Francisco and on both sides of the Golden Cate, drawing crowds of spectators hu* causing no damage. STORM HITS MEXICO MEXICO CITY. Dec. 27 (INS) A heavy gale ripped through the town of Cardenas in the Mate of San Luis Potosi dur ing the night, authorities reported today. Numerous thatched houses were unroofed. H e Weeo mm vn rs; “The MtH-allrd Kcuthcr I’lrni for the idim production of air plane. I. undoubtedly the moat important event of the last few day*.” A subject of especial interest to Detroiters is discussed l>y Dorothy Thompson who sees the United Automobile Workers Union taking the initiative in speeding the defense of the country. Page 11. • • • “I'm getting to he such an expert on war that I can take a wide end run around the subject and score standing up." Bugs Baer looks at the war situation. Page 28. t • • "Rather definite information has reached Ixindoners indicating Goerlng has massed 5,000 bombers near strategic spots.” Paul Mallon writes of Britain's preparations to meet Nazi invasion. Page 28. Today'* livoyraphy Lennon Triest (pronounced tree-est'), the Italian Trieste, the ancient Tergesteum, a city of 253,291 population which the London Express says has been garrisoned by three crack divisions of German Alpine troops. Capital of the department of Goritz, it is at the extreme northern tip of the Adriatic, 65 miles north and east of Venice, across the Bay of Venice. One of Italy's principal seaports, the city rises out of the water into an amphitheater formed by the approach of a nearby plateau. There is the old city—with ruins of a Roman theater and aqueduct and the modern city—commercially invo-t.'int for, its foundries, shipyards breweries, oil refineries, leather and fat works The city has many educational institutions incoidin” both German and Italian schools, not more than 75 per rent of the population being Italian. From 1388 until 1918 the city was under Austrian control. DETROIW|§PFfIVIES Only Detroit Newspaper Carrying International Newt Service and Complete Sport Dispetches 41 ST YEAR, NO. 88 GREEKS AND BRITONS FIGHTING SIDE BY SIDE Photo by Int or national Newt Photo*, Patted by Creek and Britten Centore, Cabled to America THE FIRST PICTURE OF FIGHTING IN THE GREEK-ITALIAN WAR RECEIVED IN DETROIT . . .British Tommies operating an anti-aircraft gun on Crete while Greek troops look on. . . Defense Leaders aifarQO Plan hotihm**-*. -mff „ ip *•" We*« Infernal tonal Nrw« *«mire Hlrf WASHINGTON. Dec. 27 - Presi dent Roosevelt reported today the national defense leaders are study ing the CIO plan for mass pro duction of planes through pooling facilities of the auto industry. The plan was proposed by Wal ter Reuther. director of the UAW CIO in General Motors. The President observed that the plan has the possibility of making a great contribution to the na tional defense. He added that there are technical questions in volved that ri-quire study by the defense experts. Reuther has declared that the auto industry could produce 500 planes a day within six months if production started at once. Assistant Reported For Lord Halifax LONDON. Dec. 27.—(INS)—In formed sources today stated that the British government would name a minister to Washington as an assistant to Viscount Halifax, newly appointee! ambassador. —While some rumors had Sir Gerald Campbell, British high commissioner to Canada, slati-d for the post, these informed sources believe that Nevile But ler. present counsellor in Wash ington. will be elevated to the ministry post. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27. 1940 Nazis Face Red Army Oft Bonier Bv GEORGE BALI NT liH’l New* Service Staff Cerrctpond^nt - / BUDAPEST. Dec. 27. Some sudden New Year's move by the German army in the Balkans ap peared in prospect today with the movement of thousands of Reich troops across Hungary into Ru mania. where they apparently were spreading out fanwise in several directions. At the same time huge Soviet mechanized reinforcements were reported deploying along the left bank of the Pruth River—evidently in the expectation that whatever acticti Germany plans to take might affect the strategic position of the Soviets as well as Bulgaria. Yugoslavia. Greece and Turkey. GERMANS SILENT (German official quarters in Berlin declared they had no in formation regarding reports that German troops are moving into Rumania and Italy. These sources stated that, in any event, they were unable to com ment on military matters. iAt the same time. Budapest reports of the troop movements were given a peculiar twist by a dispatch from Geneva asserting that all rail and air traffic in Rumania had been interrupted during the last few days by violent snowstorms.) Meanwhile, the Soviet legation in Bucharest issued an official de nial of rumors that M. LavrentiefT, Soviet minister, plans to leave Rumania. NEAR HALF MILLION Germany’s "model army" sent to Rumania some weeks ago was being extended rapidly to numbers estimated variously between 200,- 000 and 500.000. Other Balkan reports claimed as many as 300.000 Red army troops, supported by tanks, heavy guns and other mechanized equipment, were stationed along the Pruth River which forms the Soviet- Rumanian boundary line. The German troops entering Ru mania brought with them all mechanical equipment needed for a major field action. Apparently

they were taking over complete military control of Rumania, par ticularly districts adjoining the Bulgarian and Yugoslavian fron tiers. Clipper Takes Serum ' To England, Spain NEW YORK. Dec. 27—(INS)— Carrying 61 pounds of diphtheria anti-toxin for the children of Eng land and Spain, the Dixie Clipper today was roaring toward Lisbon. Fifty pounds of the anti-toxin were consigned to United States Ambas sador Alexander W. Waddell in Sjwin and 11 pounds to the British Rea "Cross. 5 More Drivers Sent to Jail i**•*”"" j* i Continuing their program of stiff jail sentences, traffic judges sent • five more motorists to cells today, bringing to 31 the total of motor ists given jail terms in two days. ! Sentenced today were: Robeit Pleasant. 38. of 8825 Benson ave-’ nue, nine months to a year for drunk driving, his second convic tion on this charge. (Early story. Page S) Oil Plant Blast ' Kills Youth An explosion in the warehouse of the C. F. Battenfeld Oil Com pany of 1340 Oakman boulevard tnday killed Clements R. Hill. 19. of 14211 Bender, an employe, and burned several others. Hill, who began to work for the company only two days ago. was burped to death when covered with flaming oil. Rushton Picks Dunn For Deputy Jan. 1 Tln>**» MafT < orrfHptindfnl LANSING. Dec. 27 —Atty. Gen. Elect Herbert J. Rushton an nounced the appointment of R. Glenn Dunn today as his deputy executive when he takes office January 1. Dunn was legal advisor to the late Gov. Frank D. Fitzgerald during his first administration. For the past two years he has been legal consultant for the sales tax department. Pope's Peace Steps Ridiculed by Berlin BERLIN. Dec. 27—(INS)—The five points advanced by Pope Pius XII in his Christmastide radio ad dress as prerequisites for estab lishment of a new order in Europe drew this sharp comment from nuthoriiative German quarters today: “This is a political and not a Christian war. Therefore we see no platform In the Pope’s speerh ns the basis of discus sion. ’’ Mattern Reaches Montreal MONTREAL. Dec. 27.*-(INS) Jimmy Mattern. one-time ’round the-world flier, has reached Mont real with a huge camouflaged homlier. gift of workers at the Burbank. Cal., plant of the Lock hocd-Vrga Aircraft Company to Great Britain. 28 PAGES Police Fire Urquhart Alter Drunken Spree Thirty seconds after a police trial board today completed hear ing charges against him, Thomas Urquhart was fired as a policeman and returned to a cell to face criminal charges, arising from his shooting a citizen in a drunken Christmas morning spree. Urquhart had pleaded not guilty to the charges of the trial board. He had acted—nervosuly and at times incoherently—as his own at torney. He gave—without deny ing his actions a stumbling excuse. I RQ! HART’S PLEA When the testimony of wit nesses had been heard and the story told of how he halted pedes trians at Vernor highway and Woodward avgpue at 6:30 a. m. Christmas iYay to abuse and threaten them nd how he had. n firing at one. seriously wounded another. Urquhart made this plea: "I ain taking the hard way in coming here. It would be much easier to re ign. I don’t remem ber what happened that morn ing. I have been working very hard —harder than a probation ary officer—trying to make good my last mistake.” (Urquhart was fired hut rein stated early tfiu year for driving his car while drunk.) “I had two drinks of wine in a restaurant kitchen," he contin ued. “After that I don’t know what happened." What happened, according to the testimony at the hearing, was that Urquhart stopped John Ritchie, 129 Charlotte street, and tried to make him dance, at pistol point. He stopped Martin Hoopler. Old Injury Sends Gable to Hospital HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 27.—(INS) —Suffering from a 1933 shoulder injury. Clark Gable was en route today for Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore to undergo a physical check-up. Gable suffered the injury while making a picture, and when it began to bother him lately studio officials insisted that he make the check-up. Gable and his wife, Oftole Lombard, are making the trip by train. Falls 100 Feet; Near Death DENVER, Dec. 27.—(INS i Harold Morton, 13. member of a Denver Boy Scout troop, was re ported near death in a Denver hospital today following a 100-foot plunge from a cliff yesterday. The lad. on a hiking expedition with the troop, had ascended the cliff with his companions when'-he suddenly lost his footing while pushing a large boulder. acco r ding lo Scoutmaster 1L B. Gentry. THREE CENTS Germans Warn 11. S. On War By PIERRE 4. HLSxS lnt’l New* Strike Staff CorrMpoiident | BERLIN, Dec. 27.—American, ships will be sunk and the United States may find herself in war if Congress amends the neutrality act to enable vessels to Ik? sent to | Irish ports, the German press warned today. Reports from undisclosed sources ;in New York indicating that Presi dent Roosevelt, at Britain's sug gestion, is planning a proposal whereby Irish ports would be des ignated as neutral and therefore open to American shipping led Nazi newspapers to deliver the :second sharp remonstrance to the United States within a week. DANGERS INVOLVED The dangers involved in any such step, it was said, cannot be meas ured in terms of ship sinkings alone—a clear warning that Ger many will regard as a warlike move any violation of the blockade '*one undertaken as a means of aid to Britain. Any ship, including American vessels, that enters the blockade zone around England proclaimed months ago by Reichsfuehrer Hit ler. will be subjected to all the dangers of war "in all forms," the German press declared. Ireland is an integral part of ; this blockade zone and cannot be made an exception, it was said. 2259 Chestnut street, and slapped him. TW O DON ATE BLOOD When Hoopler fled, Urquhart shot at him. One of the bullets struck Alexander Rudy, seriously wounding him. Rudy is near death in Receiving Hospital. Two ot Urguhart’s brother officers have donated blood in an effort to save Rudy’s life. Three others have volunteered their bloor and are awaiting call for transfusions. Patrolman Lloyd Donigan and Frank J. Laßelle told how they went to Vernor and Woodward when they heard shots as they patroled the neighborhood in a po lice car. Their testimony indi cated that Hooper, fleeing Urqu hart’s bullets, was doubly fortu nate that they did not also take after him. “We saw the man running down the street,” Donigan said. “We also saw the policeman down. Instead of going after the running man we went to our brother officer's aid. , We found him drunk." TELL OF THREAT TO KILL En route to the station, Urqu hart threatened to kill Laßelle, it was testified. The hearing was before Suut. Louis Berg. Chief of Detectives Paul Wencel and Chief Inspector Alfred Siska. When they had heard the wit nesses and Urquhart’s plea they ordered him from the room. With in 30 seconds he was recalled to the room. “You have been found guilty on all five charge* and ordered discharged,” Berg told Urqu hart. r. S. Enters Music* Row * Government Moves to Prosecute ASCAP, Chain» in Battle Over Broadcasting Rights International >e*» Vrvk# Hlra WASHINGTON, Dec. 27.—The federal government in a surprise move today entered the nationwide controversy over control of music for broadcasting by declaring its intention to prosecute all of the four major contestants in the battle: the American Society of Composers. Authors and Pub lishers (ASCAP), Broadcast Music Inc. (BMI), the National Broad casting Company and the Colum bia Broadcasting System. Atty. Gen. Robert Jackson au thorized his assistant, Thurman Arnold, head of the antitrust di vision. to institute "criminal pro ceedings” under the antitrust law's. Charging that In the present struggle over rights to broadcast various musical compositions "the [NIGHT! EDITION Raider Flying Japanese Flag Called Nazi (Christman true* end* a* Nazi* and British resume raid*. Page 18.) (tireek-Brltish drive* In Al bania and Africa continue. Page 7.) International Newt Serrto* Cable MELBOURNE, Australia, Dec. 27.—Accusing Germany of respon sibility, Prime Minister R. G. Men zies today announced a heavy at tack by an enemy raider disguised as a Japanese vessel upon the island of Nauru in the Southern Pacific. - The raider used a Japanese flag and a Japanese name as a war ruse, Menzies said. Considerable damage was done when the ship’* guns opened on the island at dawn, but there were no casualties. The island has no defenses against attack under terms of the league mandate by which it is ad ministered, Menzies said. "Therefore our well-known enemy had no justipcattpn fer hi* action,” the Rryne minister said. "The crime is all the more inexcusable because of the fact CAROLINE - * . . ••/••V MARSHALL W-ANOf . J APANIJI PUmhBT v BPITHH BS 31 ' H % HEBRIDES \$ \ O AUJTRAUAV the raider attacked under the name and colors of Japan, with which we are at peace.” USING JAP PORTS Reports have recently reached Australia that German raiders are using Japanese ports, but this was the first recorded instance of an attack by a ship operating under the Japanese emblem. The island of Nauru is admin* istered under a joint mandate of Britain, Australia and New Zea* land. It covers about eight and one-half square miles and is situ ated in the South Pacific Ocean about 1,500 miles northeast of Australia and 600 miles northeast of the Solomon Islands. Famed for its phosphate de posits, it was annexed by Ger many in 1888 and surrendered to the Australian warship Melbourne in 1914 at the start of the World War. (The fact the raider carried Japanese colors does not neces sarily mean it was a Japanese ship. Durii g he World War the famous German raider Em den and other raiders frequently sought to co ceal their identity , by flying the flags of other na tions. ) public is in the position of a neu tra caught between two aggres sive belligerents,” the justice department announced the pro ceedings will he brought in Mil waukee, Wis., within 10 days and will be based on the following charges: —lllegal pooling of most of the desirable copyright music available for radio broad casting to eliminate competition and to monopolize the supply. -e* . —lllegal discrimination against users of copyright music. 3— Illegal discrimination against composers who are not members of ASCAP or BML —Withholding music from publication in order to n« (Continued on Next Page, Col, S)

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