28 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

28 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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IN THE NEWS Saturday Sympotium THE WINDS OF WAR /HEAR again the winds of war sweep fiercely through the sky, The beast is stirring in his den, the blood-lust in his eye! Ic stamps his cloven hoofs in rage . . . his roaring fills the air, c craves the blood of inno cents, too long kept from his fare. ud yet above the mad beast’B roars upon the winds so grim e boys who fell in other wars cry out in voices dim: ' H urge vs from thr path of strife and tell us it is vain. Behold!” they cry, “we fought for peace ... yet war has come again!” The voice of youth drowns out the ghosts — youth, gullible and rash, So fired by the glamour and the martial airs that crash . . . Alas! For youth, that ran- I not hear thi warnings of the dead! Alas! For youth, upon i whose heart thr uur . beast must be fed! The winds of war are loose again, and white-faced mothers pray . . . I hear their prayer upon the air as young nun march away. —Nick Kenny. California Club, Los Anuriev D*c. 12. 1940. Mr. WUliam R. Hrarat, San Simeon, California. Dear Sir: MOST »t thr l;n(loN |irop|r do not wtah to relinquish tillr or sovereignty to any of their Wrat ern. Hemisphere possessions Many of the American people do not ap prove of advancing future credit* to the British Kmpire. without oomo tom of collateral that I* more Substantial than bond*. My thought I* to lump the past 1914-1919 indebtedness of five bil lion dollar* together with a new advance credit of five billion dol lar*. thl* total trn-billion-dollar Indebtedness to he secured by a hrat mortgage on such of Eng land’a Western Hemisphere jhis *e**lon* II I* mutually agreed will equal or exceed the value of the loan. This to he a fifty-year loan with no Interest charge*. Some of the argument* In fas or of thl* deal so the English people are: —England I* not loaing title or aovereig nty to these poa seaalon*. rlf 200 million Aallar* I* an nually ear-HWked In their budget, at the of the 50-year period, or MMHf If larger appro priation* are Me. these pos session* can be redeemed. —A new generation would have the right to decide whether or not England needed these pos session* at the end of the fifty year period. If at any time dur ing the fifty-year period, the Brit ish people decided they did not wish to retain these possessions, the agreement with the United State* would be. that America, would accept possession of this territory in full payment of the ten-hillion-dollar debt. Some of the arguments in favor of this deal to the American people arc: —America would have the right, without any further coat of land or sites, to establish mtll (Continued on Next P»rr, Col. 2) In the Times Today PIRP B*ttar Health 5 "Bugs” Ra#r 7 Church News h Comic* . 12. 13 Cross-Word Puixl*- 13 Dally Short Btory . . . . ft K V. Durltng ft Financial 14 Edwin C. Hill .. . . . jft Hatlo’a Carl<*on ft Horo*cop* ft Oantral Johnaon ....... ... 16 fda Jean Katn 6 I .attar* to Edit- r Ift Magaxln* Taft* ft Movit Programs • 11 Obltuarlca ... ft Pattarn .... 7 ••Pitfall* of I .ova" i:» Waatbrook Peglrr . .16 Radio Program- Riplay .... . ..-13 M*»« Bobinaon f. Damon Runyon Ift Rodfty »» Sport* a to Stag*. Scram 11 Vital St*M*t»r- i;, Want Ad* , .. . lft Wtahing Well . t What's tpa An*war- a Woman* Pag*? ....... ... 6 7 Hundreds of Casualties in Raid on London 40 AMERICANS RESCUED IN SINKING Of OIL SHIP Vote Reforms To Face New | Legislature Faced with a cumbersome elec tion system that resulted in ap proximately 48.000 ruined ballots in Detroit last November, the 1941 Legislature will undertake to re habilitate the antiquated machin ery The Detroit Election Commis- sion. through Election Supervisor Oakley E Distin, will have an im l>ortant role in the progiam. with Secretary of State Harry F. Kelly and the Michigan Municipal League combining forces MAJOR TROrOSAf.S Distin said today that several --rruijnr such as Ihc plan to divide Detroit into legislative districts, may not be possible with out a constitutional convention. But he said there are other steps so obviously necessary that oppo sition is not expected Among immediate possibilities is a law directing election officials to list all questions on the ballot in less than 100 words each, instead of ririnting them in full. *‘lt required 6.000 words on the state ballot submitting the dental law to the voters last month,” Distin said. “This is ridiculous. "Thr local ballot submitting six proposed charter amend ments by short description wa* less than 10 Inches In length.” FRAUD PETITIONS Distin and Secretary of State Kelly have combined in sponsoring a bill to permit election officials to throw out fraudulent petitions. The officials now cannot go beyond the face of petitions even though all names are obviously false and written by the same per son. The Legislature will be asked to authorize the state and local gov (Continued on Page Four) Buenos Aires Bans Chaplin's New Film BUENOS AIRES. Dec. 28. <INS)— Mayor Carlos Pueyrredon today banned the showing of Charlie Chaplin's new movie. "The Great Dictator.” in Buenos Aires theaters. It was announced that the ban was issued at the request of the I+altftn trmbnssadnr. Fears Loan of Armv %/ Senator Wheeler Predicts U. S. Troops May Be Sent it Arms Leasing Plan Goes Unchallenged By ROBERT A. Mcfill.l. Infl Nr«« Smlra Staff («irm»poodrt»t W ASHINCTON, Dec. 28 President Roosevelt's program of leasing arms to Britain may lead to the use of American soldiers abroad. Senator Wheeler (Dl of Montana, head of the congres sional non-intervention bloc, de clared today. Wheeler predicted the possibility of another American expedition ary force if the legality of the program continues unchallenged by Congress. “If under the laws of this country, the President feels he has the right to lease battle ships, airplanes, and munitions, he can loan the hoys who are In the army, or who are being drafted,” Wheeler said. “One is just as leg'll as the other." As the Ti on-intervent ion is ts laid plans for forthcoming battles in the new Congress. official Wash ington awaited with great ex pectancy President Roosevelt's DETFOTRjSPffMES Only Detroit Newspaper Carrying International News Service end Complete Sport Dispatches 41 ST YEAR, NO. 89 THE BRITISH COMMANDING GENERAL IN GREECE - - - ———— -*e - r \ «£***- 2# Ptinto by International Nem Phntb*. Panned by C entwir* SIR ARCHIBALD WAVELL (IN BOOTS) COMMANDING BRITISH TROOPS IN MIDDLE EAST The head of the British troops fighting Italian forces in Africa and Greece pictured chatting with an engineer sergeant “somewhere Prisoner Found Beaten to Death JACKSON. Dec. 28 - The body of Collins Pool. 40. Jarkson Prison inmate was found today under a pile of soiled laundry in the base ment of the prison. He apparently was beaten to death. Dr. W. B. Huntley, prison physician said. An investigation is underway. Assistant Deputy Warden D. C. Pettit and Coroner John Pulling said. Pool had been a porter in the prison hospital. He w'as sen tenced for a criminal attack. Sept. ~22. tlftl front Calhoun County. I "fireside chat” to the nation to morrow night. The President is expected to leave no doubt in the minds of the people, or his European listen ers. regarding his desires for addi tional aid to Britain, and the speeding up/of the defense pro gram. \ Some souriesnr»4i*jed that the President mrgTTt use The fireside chat to refer to demands of the non-intervention bloc that he attempt to negotiate a “just peace" between Britain and the Axis It was understood that the President will make a personal apjicarance before the new Con gress to deliver his address on the state of the Union probably about January, 6. and that it will in clude a detailed account of his plans for speeding up the defense and aid to Britain programs. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 28,1940 Dream Hut Theirs Honeymoon Isle Couple Due to Get Cottage There Because Their Baby Beat Schedule Because they are the first Honeymoon Isle couple to become parents. Mr. and Mrs. Sal Gia cinto. 4715 Baldwin avenue, today are slated to receive a life deed to the grass hut on the tropical island off Tampa. Fla. “Our son Is going to spend his first vacation there,” planned Mrs. Giacinto. the former Mary DiMaggio, distant cousin of New York's outfielder, Joe DiMaggio. The Giacintos' 6-pound son. Mark Joseph, was horn Sunday, in Providence Hospital.

His arrival two months ahead of schedule assured his parents of winning one of the Honeymoon Isle cottages a gift from Clinton M. Washburn. New York broker and self-styled aid to Cupid, who owns the island. THIRD C'OI'IM.E FROM CITY The Giacintos were the third Detroit couple to honeymoon on Honeymoon Isle as the guests of the romance-loving Washburn. Recently. Washburn announced the first 20 Honeymoon Isle cou ples to have children would be given life deeds to their honey moon huts. “Mr. Washburn wrote all the Honeymoon Isle couples a short time ago, asking If they had any vital news to report," Mrs. Gia cinto laughed. “We told him we were expect ing a child and when the hah.v arrived we wired him.” Washburn opened his island to accredited honeymooners last March free of charge for a stay of a fortnight or less. CH XRACTF.R REFERENCES Would-be Honeymoon Islers were required to furnish character references, photographs and. par ticularly. a wedding day photo. “Mr. Washburn explained he in Greece” relative to the construction of em placements for British guns such as is seen in the background. Many British fliers are in Greece. spent his own honeymoon on the Island years ago at a cost of only $20,” Mrs. Giacinto said. Ask the Giacintos what Honey moon Isle is like, and they answer: “Paradise with tropical skies, white beaches and palm trees.” Their honeymoon cottage which they expect will become theirs any day now is a 9x12 cabin of wood with a grass exterior. “The grass is just to give it at mosphere,” Mrs. Giacinto ex plained. Giacinto is a plasterer and be fore her marriage his wife worked for the Michigan Employment Service. Push Ship Building, Urges Rep. Fish WASHINGTO N. Dee. 28 (INS) —A “huge” program to build merchant vessels was advo cated today by Representative Fish (R) of New York, ranking minoity member of the House for eign affairs committee. "There are many available Idle shipyards throughout the nation. Including one at New burgh and another at Pough keepsie in my district,” Fish said. “Whether the war lasts for more than another year or not the demand for merchant vessels will be universal.” Skating Champion Killed SAGINAW. Dec. 28.—Sixteen year-old Thomas Doyle, southeast ern Michigan junior skating cham pion. was killed here when he was thrown from his bicycle uhder the wheels of a truck. The driver was absolved when companions told police Thomas had been hanging on the rear of the truck. 16 PAGES No Traffic Deafh For 119 Hours Detroit passed its one hundred nineteenth hour without a traffic death at 8 a. m. today after a night marred by one serious crash which left three persons in Receiv ing Hospital in critical condition. The injured: PAUL HEILER of 1257 York shire road, Grosse Pointe Park. IRMA HEILER, 43. his wife. ALVIN ALDER. 23, of 4774 Hamilton avenue. Two other persons. R. G. Lan ders. 19. of 94 Watson street, and George Boucher. 27, of the Central Y. M. C. A., were released from the hospital after first aid treat ment. Police said the crash occurred when Heiler drove through a red light on Twelfth street, running in front of the car driven by Landers with Alder, Boucher and three other men as passengers. Heiler is a police prisoner charged with reckless driving. Lan ders was exonerated by witnesses and released. Justice Hughes Makes Appeal for Tolerance WASHINGTON. Dec. 28. (INS) Chief Justice Evans Hughes in an appeal for national unity warned that in order to pre serve this democracy the majority must be free from “rancor and bigotry, racial animosities and in tolerance. ’’ The chief justice s were made in resjionse to a citation for his aid in bettering human rela tions. tendered him hy the Na tional Conference of Christians and Jews. THREE CENTS PUBLIC BLAMED The papers claimed the public, after the safety of the Christmas truce, was tardy in taking shelter and that many who were caught in the street by explosions, would have been safely underground if they had not been lulled into a sense of false security by three blitzless nights. Meanwhile, it was announced that the British air force had carried out another strong night (Continued on Page Four) John D. Jr.'s 5 Sons Form Charity Fund ALBANY, N. Y„ Dec. 28 • INS) —Incorporation papers were filed here today for organization of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Inc., which will carry on "philan thropic activities” of the five sons of John D. Rockefeller Jr.—John D. 111, Nelson A.. Laurance S.. Winthrop and David Rockefeller. Announcement was made that the new organization is merely designed to consolidate some of the gifts which the sons otherwise would make individually. Nazis Rain Death in Blitz Raid By JAMES E. BROWN' Inl’l .»r» Hervlre Stair Correspondent LONDON, Dec. 28.—Many per sons today were found to have been killed and injured and a large number of houses destroyed in last night’s raid on London, which was one of the most terrific night at tacks ever launched on the capital. Censorship prevented disclosure of the number of persons killed and injured, but the casualties were believed to run into the hun dreds. It appeared to have been the heaviest raid since the Sunday night blitz attack of December 8. SHOWER OF DEATH Incendiaries, oil bombs and high explosives were dropped over Lon don in veritable showers during the raid. Resorting to new tac tics after the Christmas truce, the German air force carried out a concentrated attack of compara tively short duration instead of an all-night raid. The raid was over by 11 p. m., but prior to that hour the attack was carried out with terrific in tensity. Many casualties were feared to have occurred in an underground shelter beneath a large block of workmens apartment houses in one district of London. Only 11 people had been brought out of the ruins alive up to an early hour this morning. Newspapers today were blaming the slackness of the public for the fact casualties were so heavy last night. Mi* KmiHiniPiii/; “Our rearmament program simply Isn’t moving. Every mis take and blunder of the World War’s early staggering step* is being repeated, with what result In lost time and squandered millions ws have yet to learn.” General Johnson says it’s a matter of leader ship. Page 16. * • • “I am working in an office. I hate office*.” Elsie Robinson say* people must see over walls out into the streets. Page 5. • • • “Do I love my enemies* I am crazy about them,” writes Peg ler, mentioning Hitler and Ickes in two breaths. Page 16. Today's Geography Lesson Pruth River (pronounced Prooth) now forms part of the boundary between Russia and Rumania and Soviet forces are reported massing along the eastern bank of the river, apparently ready to circumvent any furthe- German move* in the Balkan*. The river rises in the Carpathian Mountains near the former Czecho-Slovakian frontier, flows East, then South-Southeast, form ing the boundary between Moldavia and Bessarabia, and eventually flows into the Danube. It is navigable for about 200 miles from this intersection. The strategic country surrounding the river has been the scone of several battles and in 1711 the army of Peter the Great of Russia was surrounded by the Turks near Huai an 4 Peter was captured. ~ WIGHT EDITION Tanker Lost Off Africa; 2 Perish lalrrnatlOMl N*w» Rente* Wkr* NEW YORK, Dec. 28.—Forty members of the 42-man American crew aboard the tanker Charles Pratt, sunk mysteriously Decem ber 21 in the Atlantic off the west African coast, have been rescued, according to a radio message early today from the ship's captain to the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. The vessel, owned by the Pan ama Transport Company, a sub sidiary of Standard, was bound for Freetown, Sierre Leone, Brit ish West Africa, from Aruba, in the Dutch West Indies, when it "was sunk in an "undisclosed man ner,” presumably by a submarine or surface raider. OIL FOR BRITISH It carried a cargo of 5,000,000 gallons of fuel oil consigned to the British-Mexican Petroleum Com pany at Freetown. A terse message from Capt. Erie R. Blomquist of Severn. Md., master of the Charles Pratt, stated that all crew members except two had been picked up. Sent from Sierra Leone, the message failed to state how they were picked up or what caused sinking of the Charles Pratt. Those missing, according to Cap tain 5 Blomquist’s message, are ; Patrick Dougherty, a seaman, of Philadelphia, Pa., and Arthur A. DufTy, engine wiper, of Bayonne, N. J. The Charles Pratt was built in 1919 at Newport News. A vessel of 8,982 tons, it was 500 feet long and had a beam of 68 feet. UNDER PANAMA FLAG The tanker was one of the \ Standard Oil Company ships placed under Panama registry to permit entry into combat waters barred to American ships under the neu trality proclamations of President Roosevelt. The vessel was the third tanker i lost by the Panama Transport Company since the European hos tilities broke out, but was the first carrying an American crew. Among those on board was Charles 3. Ahern, oiler, of Sault Ste. Marie. Prior to receipt of Captain Bloni quist’s cable, the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey had re ceived word from London that 22 of the crew had been lost, but this was cleared up by the later message. Speculation continued as to the cause of the sinking—whether the Charles Pratt was struck by a tor pedo. shelled by a surface raider or struck a mine.

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