29 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

29 Aralık 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

Directory I—General News, -Finance ,2 —Sports, Radio, Hobbies 3 Society, Fathions, Travel 4 Real Eftatc, Classified J —Pictorial Review, March of Events, Theaters, Autos . 6 —American Weekly • 7—Comics 41 ST YEAR,. NO. 9Q RAF Bailers French Coast; London Quiet Bomber Relays Blast Bases From Norway Down to Normandy ll> (.KOIH.K I.AIT Iml'l Hfrvkr fttaft 4 nrrmnniiJfiif LONDO N !>•<• 28 Mask'd Royal Air Force laulcr- tonight unleashed a 100 - bomb • a - minute assault on GefmanyN invasion lakeoff platform along the north ern French coast. elimaMng a sustained. British aerial offensive that smash**! night and day at Na/j bases from sotw ,y flow n to Normandy. The Na. is r< plied with a heavy bombardment of a south west English city. The new anti-invasion and anti blockade air blow' fell upon Uhl Nazi-occupied shores while London was enjoying a lull this evening following a massive luftwaile bom-. aiMHfmsni f' t I'i h y many casualties aid m h property damage Britain's gigantic oi ittatk embtaeing more than l 1""! miU of the continental const niched a high |>>int shortly alter dusk Saturday when relay after relay of RAF bom', ers hurt led ncro-- Ihe F.ngli'h Channel and rocked <>rman jmsitions from Calais to Boulogne with tons of explosive* RAF's Biggest Assault The trans-channel rani- con bined with blows across the Noith Sea. appeared to comprise the big gest British air assault ever undertaken and was reportedly aimed at (rusttatlng in .ill out flerman invasion effort lor which the Reich was massing troop and ship concentrations all along—the occupied coast. London observers, perusing ey< witness advice* from England southeast Dover area voiced the opinion that this aerial expedition probably surpassed in magnitude the attacks with which th Lntisl air force smashed Adolf Hitler - invasion army last Septcrn!>< ■ THephoned dispatch'-* ;■ o m Dover said it was estina'o*: ..a lanches” of British bomb* fell V the rate of 100 a minute on G* r man-held port' and str*>ng::oids on the French -id* of tl ■ Strait of Dover, including the Bp- Bertha emplacements around Gap Gn- Nr/. Flames Stab Shy Soon alter the first tnn'-ntia' downpour of Itombs a giant <on flagration rose up in the mo>nle»- sky from the French cliff-, nrai the German big-gun |»-.tion- The sky for miles was brightly by th* p-v i e of German searchlight batteries and the constant flashes of anti airtraft guns ce-cadiil;: «t it shells and '‘flaming onions info the an as the Nazis fought to stem the RAF attack The British flier- poured thou sands'of demolition and inecndiar. homhs u[xm German flatteries supply and naval ships rail ter minals. warehouses, rioeks and coastal airdromes. The mighty hombarrinu tit began only a few minutes after dusk and the first stage of the attack continued without letup until 8 p. m. There was a brief lull and then more swarms of British bombs came roaring across the calm channel, over which perfect ''invasion weather prevailed. The second phase was concen trated on and around Boulogne which was hammered with even greater., intensity than th. Calais area. It was reported Britain had "gotten wind" o( o.m new Ger man plan of invasion and sent her bombers out to demolish it of * 1940" V— , An A SP: i I SUPPi ' J F Next Sun dan « DETROIT TIMES PART ONE Petain Rejects Hitler s Demands, London Told News Agency Says He Balks at Use of French Navy by Germany and Italy Against Britain By JAMES K. BROWN Inl'l Nr»« Slutt 4 ormiMHNtml LONDON, Dec. 28.—Marshal Henri Philliiie Petain and his ministers in Vichy were reported tonight to have rejected flatly a demand by Adolf Hitler for surrender to the Axis of the French navy, gome of the warships and pfficers of which were said to have been quietly transferred to North Africa. This report. given out by the free French news agency, coin cided with Br+Hsh pre-s reports that Hiller had broken off Ger man-French negot lat ions. Gen Charles de Gaulle British hacked leader of the free French forces, in effect openly urged France's navy and colonies in North Africa and Syria to "draw the sword" once more and resume the war against Germany and Italy in the Mediterranean. 'ln Vichy the SI-year-old Marshal Retain held lengthy consultations with hi< cabinet ministers A high-placed Vichy source told International News Service he knew of no "ulti matum” lrom Germany to France. It was admitted, how ever. recent talks bet Ween French Naval Minister Darlan and German Ambassador Abet/ in Paris were "rather cold ' m atmos|»here. forecast Crisis An International New.- Serv • di-patch from-Berlin -aid Nazi -quarters indicated Ger man-French negotiations had b**en "suspended" and there was s[x*eulatioo, though no Concrete indications, concerning possible German intervention in French jsilitical affairs » London observers prof*--/*d t,i *ee in the welter of information and reports trickling out of trou- Greek Sub Sinks 3 Italian Vessels Troops’"’ps V 1 c*" jof Torpedo Attd''* / * —. British and (iirckv ( ontlmie \ ictorie- fti \trii a and Xl tiania I’age ’ IttlrrflitfhiMl Nrt»» vrxlcr < able A THENS. I a-c 28 Torjtedoing and -inking of three Italian triKiji -hip- in the Adriatic by the Greek submarine p,iparm< li- was announced tonight The Italian troopship- were said to total in-tween 25.000 and to 000 tons Th submarine which wa- on patrol duty, sighted an Italian cor.voy of 11 ship- escorted by destroyers. The ship* were carry ing Italian *roop reinforcements from Brindisi to the Albanian port of Valona. Ricking out the biggest troop shi[is the Greek submarine let go with all its torpedo*- Three of the ship* were seen hit. ■ The Italian destroyers imme diately attacked the submarine 1 with depth charges, but escaped undamaged and returned to port Forlorn Roman Captive Legions Shuffle Through Athens , ‘Happy That It’s Over’ Following is an eyewitness account of the march through Athens today of thousands of Italian war prisoners captured by the Creek armies in their recent drive in 'Albania. B> \ K. AN«F,LOI*orU)S Int'l l« i* t <»rrr«|H»n(l-nt ATHKNS, I>*c. .US —For mme than an hour today, I stood with the people nj Greece along the sidewalks of Athens and watched Premier Mussolini's Fascist legion® march through the streets. They came along a 10-mile stretch of road from Piraeus to Athens. But they came not as conquering Roman legions. There was no glory about them They did not hold their heads high, nor march proudly along. Instead, they formed a ragged procession of dejected, disillusioned, dirty remnants of a defeated army. They wera prisoners of war, They rcpr*-< Largest Circulation of Any Michigan Newspaper D IM E S (SUNDAY) K bled France the development of a first -class German-French crisis that might momentarily come to a head. Press dispatches from Lisbon quoted neutral travelers from un occupied France as saying they 'had heard from competent sources that Retain the French chief of state, is shifting vessels and offi cers of the French fleet from the naval base at Toulon to North Africa a Tells of Refusal ' The floe Fr< n*'h news service meanwhile was quoted by the Brit ish news agency, Reuters, a claiming to have received informa tion through its own channel- say ing the Vichy government firmly refused to hand over the fleet to the Axis. This r*\lection of an alleged German ultimative demand was declared to have been transmitted to the Reich government through French Naval Minister Vice Ad miral Jean Francois Liarlan during h.- conversations in Paris earier thrs week with German Ambassa dor Otto Ahetz. While Britain tensely awaited outcome of the crisis fa-tween Ger many an*' France, General De Gaulle, who had been condemned to death by a Vichy court-martial, addressed a radio speech to France (Continued on Rage Six) Bulgars Refuse To Fight Greece R r. c ‘ C " Axis Co!l^bo r 6*ion to Remain Neural I nt*-mat tonal Nf*»» ( able SOFIA. Dec. 28, - Indicating Bulgaria'.- refusal to join in any Axis move again-t Greece. Foreign Minister Ivan Rojiov today told th<- [>arliament<ary foreign affairs committee that Bulgaria intends to remain neutral in the European conflict He added Bulgaria's friendly* re lations with Greece would remain unchanged. Popov's statement was consid ered significant in view of the reported ma-sing of German troops in Rumania. Meanwhile, it was learned that. King Boris had dismissed a num ber of officers of the Bulgarian general staff oecau.se they insisted upon joining the Axi- in a move against Greece. 'There have been reports that if Hitler decided to move again-t Greece. German forces would be -. nt through Bulgaria. However, Russia is reported to have ob jected to any such move and to have assured" Bulgaria of support in this connection Turkey also has an alliance with Greece to render aid if Bulgaria permits a German move through Its terri ’n|\ i -,-ntod the latest hatch of Musso lini s would-be empire builders captured in the latest Greek drive in Albania. I watched their gloomy figures in rank after rank as they tread rather than marched along the wet, shining pavement of Athens' main thoroughfare. The sky was almost as gloomy as the faces of Mussolini's men. They were mostly young fel lows aged between 22 and 26. Many were Jfair haired and strongly built, indicating they' were natives of northern Italy. All of them lielonged to Italy’s crack regiments, including both Alpini and Blackshirt divisions. On the mud-caked, ragged uni forms of many of them I noticed the skull and crossed hones in signia of the famous Italian “Death Regiment." These men 1 were supposed to have taken an oath to fight to the last man. but that was before they met the ‘Greeks. Only Detroit Newspaper Carrying International New and Complete Sport Dispatches DETROIT, MICHIGAN. SUNDAY. DECEMBER 29. 1940 Slate Police Seize 700 in | Hamlramck Raid 3 Bookies After Warning to Police; 3 Courts Jammed In what was probably the larg est gambling raid in the history of Wayne County, state police Saturday simultaneously smashed their way into three Hamtramck handbooks and arrested between 700 and 8W persons for frequent ing gambling establishments. The raid.-, led by Capt. Don , D-onard of the state [»hco. were on bookies in the rear of cigar and grocery stores at 7727. 7700 and 7651 Jos. Campau avenue Hamtramck. Thirty-two men. suspected of be ing operators of the establish ments. were ordered held by Leon ard who said that he would a-k gambling warrants'for them Mon day morning. The prisoners were booked at the Hamtramck police -tation and later transferred to the county jail for the week-end Had Notified Police Leonard said he notified tffe Hamtramck 'police two week- ago hi- olfice had received complaints that handbooks were running at 7631 and 7709 Jos. Campau. “IX h'-n Hamtramck *H<l noth ing about it. I decided to raid them myself.” Leonard said More than '2OO persons were in each place when the raiders, ac companied by Assistant Prosecu tor Ralph Gather and Justices John Mokersky and John Am brose entered shortly after 4 p. m Each place had approximately a dozen women. Several became hysterical at the sight of the police and immediately began pleading that they had entered the bookjes only to persuade their husbands to go home. Protests Expensively A* the gamblers nulled and pushed around inside the estab lishment- Justices Mokersky and Ambrose set up court at 7631 and 7727 Jos. Campau avenue and be gan arraigning every one in each place. Thi se who pleaded guilty of frequenting were fined 55 and released. More than SO, however, said they did not have the money. Pleas of not guilty were entered for them and they were ordered held for patrol wagons to the county jail. Only vehement objector to the procedure was Harry Henigman. 35. of 5725 Woodward avenue. "This whole thing i- highway robbery,” shouted Henigman as

the court fined him 55. "For that 1 find you guilty of contempt of court ami fine you another $25 or five days in jail.” promptly replied the court. Henigman said he did not have the money and was given oppor tunity to try to borrow it from friends in the room. Taylor Undergoes Operation BOSTON, Dec. 28.- 'INSi M v ton C. Taylor. President Roose velt's .-[>*olßl envoy to the Vatican, was described a- "resting comfort ably" tonight at New England Bapti-t Hospital, where he under went a gall-tone operation earlier today. Norma Shearer Better SUN VALLEY. Ida.. Dec 28 ' INSi- Movie star Norma Shearer was still under a physician's care today, recovering from influenza. Shi- was stricken shortly after her arrival at this Winter resort for a Christmas visit with her two children. Now, bitterly cold and with rain dripping from their ragged clothes, most of them, without coats or caps which they had abandoned in the rapid retreat, the prisoners moved slowly along. I spoke a few’ words with two Blackshirts, to whom 1 offered a few cigarets They were Emanueie Farini of Florence and Vittorio Mascua of Trieste. They were members of the "Death Regiment." "We never thought it would end like this," Farini said. “But we nre glad It's over and the Greeks are kind to u«. "We all wish this war was over. Our officers feel the same way. It is useless to continue it. None of us really wanted to fight, hut we were ordered to do so, and we could not do other wise.” Unlike Caesar's armies, Musso lini's troops marched under the Acropolis, not like a pack of wolves, but rather like a flock of ►shvep. NLRB Stirs Labor Strife, Perils U.S. Defense, Helps Reds, House Group Finds Reds Reported Mobilizing in Odessa Area Link State of Siege to Xazi Massing in Rumania IU CiKOfU.K BALI NT Int’l ,\m»» vrxlfr '•taft BUDAPEST. Dec. 28 The bar ring of «tKJor<*ign .-hips from Nazi-controlled Rumanian Black Sea ports coincident with a Soviet declaration of a slate of siege in Russia's Orie-sa region were re ported in advices teaching Buda pest late tonight. The Rumanian government not only forbade foreign vessels to_ enter Rumanian [torts but also banned all foreigners from the country - Black Sea coastal areas and otdeied serious curtailment of passenger railway service to make way for greater military movements, it was reported. Simultaneously, the Soviet gov ernment was said to bo concen trating large reinforcements of Red army Hoops along and neai the BlaCk Sea sixties, including districts bordering on Rumania, while placing the vital Odessa area under emergency military regulations. Nervousness Rises It. was understood at the same time that I\an Sobelev Russian delegate to the International Dan ube Conference, suddenly, left Bu charest lor Berlin following the breakdown of the Bucharest talks in which Germany and Italy re portedly opposed a Soviet demand for control ol all the mouths o the Danube. Nervousness swept Balkan cir cles concerning the intentions of Germany, which is greatly in creasing its "model army" in Ru mania. According to Sofia diplomatic circles, as quoted in reports to Budapest, the German attack on the Salonika district, if launched wriuld be made through the air from Rumanian bases with Ger man trans|x>rt planes dropping parachute troops on and around the strategic Greek naval txirt. This method would seek to avoid violation of Bulgarian or Yugoslav ’"neutrality, it was said. The German and Italian min isters in Sofia were reported to have assured the Bulgarian gov ernment that the Reich does not intend to move troops through Bulgaria Gloria Vanderbilt's Allowance $26 000 NEW YORK. Ix*c. 28.—(INS) - Gloria Laura Vanderbilt, charm ing 17-year-old heiress, w ill have to get along on $26,000 annually for the next three years This was the amount author ized as an allowance for Gloria out of her total property valued at $4,280,394. Glorias guardian Thomas B. Gilchrist, also was di rected to pay her mother $21,000 a year and $3,000 to Mr-. Laura K. Morgan, her grandmother. The Weather HO| Kl V TKHrFRITI Rl> IQ p. Si . . .. II I*, m . . :H --111 mirttiith! ... ..*> A r< ah 7 »• .AH A P m w i>. m .j* Will it be a Fireside chat or a Fireworks chat? (■tk,. a FOREf AST For Detroit and vicinity: Cloudy w ith occasional light rain tonight. «v changing hi light snow Sunday; lowest temperatut e tonight aboutN freezing. (Wrallies Ch»H on Tag* Six) ISSUED EVERY SUNDAY Ruins Employers, Final Report Charges in Harsh, Indictment By CECIL B. DIC KSON 0 , ' International Neus Smier Stall rorrespondent WASHINGTON, Dec. 2:S.—Blanket indictment of the National Labor Relations Board as a Com munist influenced agency that defies Congress, har bors enemies of constitutional government, oppresses labor, ruins employers and jeopardizes the national defense program was made today by the Smith House committee in its final report to Congress. President Roosevelt's recent appointments of Dr. Harry A. Millis and Dr. William S. Lieserson to the board were hailed as a step in the right direction by the committee, which, by implication, called lor the dismissal of board member Edwin S. Smith. It accused Smith of being affili ated with Communist “front” organizations and associated with Harry Bridges, West Coast labor leader. Employers ‘Tormented’~ Ending 17 months of investigation, the committee con cluded: "When an administrative agency of the govern ment so far forgets its proper funttion as to defy the will of Congress, harboi and protect avowed enemies of constitutional government, invent and devise extra legal (and even unlawful) methods of tormenting and ruining employers, foment and oerpetuate industrial strife and oppress and penalize certain labor groups to favor others—then the time has come when the people of this country must raise their voices in insistent pro test lest industrial peace, and with >f, the entire program i of national defense, be jeopardized, and the funda mental concepts upon which this government is based, be ultimately and utterly destroyed.” The committee, headed by Rep. Howard W. Smith fD> of Virginia, recommended: \ house-cleaning of personnel, including “prompt dis missal of all members of the erstwhile League for Peace and Democracy and the League Against War and Fascism, together with all employes of the hoard who may be, or have been at any time, members of similar Communist front or other radical organizations.” —Sweeping revision of the Wagner Labor Relations Act to include the Smith hill, passed hy the House in this Con gress hut which was blocked in the Senate. —lnstitution by Congress of “a study of the entire field of labor relations." Leftist Influence Seen The committee presented in its lengthy report examples from the record which assertedly showed how board members, including Edwin S. Smith and former Chairman J. Warren Madden, and employes “were profoundly influenced by the doc (Continued on Page Six) Stettinius Denies Meta! Shortage » luternatiuiiitl N»*w% »wr\lrf Wlree WASHINGTON. I>c. 28. • Ed ward R. Steftinius Jr., national defense commissioner in charge of industrial material-, tonight an nounced t hiit. W’hile temporary delays in delivery of aluminum undoubtedly will occur in the im mediate future, there is no serious shortage for the rapidly expanding warplane construction program. “It is unfortunate,” he said, "that filllklie anxiety over our national defense preparations should la- bused U|m>ii reports of shortages which do not exist. < real ion ol such anxiety, which has no basis in laid, serves no patriotic purpose." Calling - attention to a recent statement by the Northrop Air craft'Corporation of Hawthorne. Cal that it was obliged to curtail production due to inadequacy of aluminum parts. Stettinius said the company made ho complaint to the defense advisory commis -ion, but that the needs of the linn are ik^ - being supplied. Bandit in Ninth Holdup With a gun in each hand, the "two-gun bandit” staged his ninth holdup Saturday when he robbed a loan office at 28<M Hastings street of S2O and escaped after police lued two shots at hxn. Switzerland? Country's Rails Aiding Nazis, Vichy Hears VICHY. Dec. 28 —Rumors were heard in Vichy diplomatic circles tonight that Switzerland was per mitting German ammunition trains to cross Swiss territory and enter Italy. The recent British bombing raids of Zurich and Basel were believed caused by British sus picions that the Swiss railroads were being used by Germans. Vivian Leigh, Olivier Start For Isles, He to Join Forces liii« > rnati<Hial Kervlr* Wtr* j NEW YORK. Dec. 28— Head lines announced new' and devas tating air raids ony London Laurence Olivier and Vivian Leigh read them today on a rain-washed Jersey City pier and said quietly “We’re sailing for England to day. You «*ee. that's our home." The romantic screen couple: boarded the American Export Liner Excambion two hours after, the state department had granted 'passport visas, with Olivier an nouncing that he would enlist in the fighting forces "for the du ration/’ Miss Leigh said her own plan s were indefinite —"except that I ijust have to be in Lopdoo now,'* FINAL I'palum Pcicr lx Woman’* Job, bv I a unit: Hunt; Mow it feel* to He Shot Down 10,000 9 Icct in Hattie; The Cm of General Vcygaod. —Alt in the Pt> torigl Rtiutv. PRICE TEN CENTS Roosevelt Chat Seen as Plea For Britain More Aid Best Help for America, Text of Sunday Talk By W ALTER FITZ MAURICE lull New, Service sun < urmpon4enl WASHINGTON, Dec. 28.—Pres ident Roosevelt will ‘ell the American people tomorrow night that the aid they and the Con gress authorize this government to give Britain in the coming year may shape the fate of themselves and all mankind for decades or centuries to come. Usually reliable sources, in pre dicting the tenor of the Execu tive's “fireside chat.” said tonight it will set down in terms “a* simple as A-B-C' the elements un derlying the administration's con viction that unsparing help to Britain is this nation's strongest defense. His advisers expected Mr. Roosevelt to underscore the point that more American ships, planes, tanks, guns and munitions are vital to Britain's survival, without which she may go down before a German invasion, increasing the menace to this government’s in terest by the Axis powers. Visited by Knudsen The President devoted most of today to revising the half-hour address, which he will deliver over the three major radio networks, beginning at 9:30 p. m. (EST). Powerful short-wave stations will broadcast excerpts overseas in English, German, French, Italian. Polish and Portuguese. His only callers today were William Phillips, the ambassador he is sending back to his post in Rome a few weeks hence, and William S. Knudsen, direttor of the bffice of production manage ment, supreme defense agency, who, in a statement a week ago tonight, declared appeasement im possible and the war issues “ir reconcilable.” Tomorrow night was selected for the President's crucial appeal, informed quarters indicated, to gain a five-day interval during which his defense thesis can sink into the public mind before Con gress reassembles January 3. Ash More Destroyers ' The ravages of German undei seas warfare have driven the British to plead for 50 more United States destroyers, this gov ernment's requisition and transfer to Britain of Axis-controlled mer chant ships in American ports and revision of the North Atlantto combat zone to exclude Ireland, thus letting American vessels into Irish ports once more. The President, observers thought, might deal with any or all of these proposals or take the bolder course of urging revision or repeal of the neutrality act. His advisers were certain he will discuss the warnings in the German and Italian press that the Axis will consider "warlike" the revision of combat zones or the requisition of Italian. German, French or Danish merchant ships. ! Her 7-year-old daughter, Su zanee, child of her former mar riage to Capt Leigh Holman, i* now in Canada, and she indicated she may later return to be with her. She and Olivier Just have com pleted a picture, as yet untitled, dealing with the lives and k>ve» of Lord Nelson and Lady Hamil ton, to which their own off-stage attachment lends a piquant accent. Among 40 other itftxsengfT*. all debarking at Lisbon. Portugal, were Dr. R. G. Dawson, St. LouM psychiatrist, who said he was go ing to London "on official busi ness.” and two Red Croat physi cians, Doctors Paul Beeson and John E. Gordon, also bound leg

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler