December 30, 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

December 30, 1940 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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IN THE NEWS THERE are fundamental differ ence* between the ruling classes and the mturi In Europe. These difference* exist In Eng land a* well a* In the nation* of the continent. Perhaps they exist In our American democracy, to a degree, hut to an undiscernable and un determinable extent. In America, If there are masses and classes, it is difficult to decide where the masses “leave off” and the classes begin. « The classes In America the srtf-stytrd better rtwwea- —«-are really neither better nor classes. The masses are the whole citi zenry among whom no one has morn rank or position than an other, unless by selection of these rame masses at the {Mills. ENGLAND is very largely an aristocracy,—or if you prefer, an iin|ierial democracy. It has Its im|ierial dominions. It has its king and emperor. It has its nobility and Its House of thirds. It has its slate church and Its lords of the church. It has. In fact. Its ruling classes and its so-called better classes— which may not he any more defi nitely better than those In America, lint are certainly more definitely classes. These ruling classes have their privileges to protect and their Im perial purposes to pursue. Those imperial purposes are not so different from the purposes of similar classes on the European continent. They are merely more success fully pursued. And the privileges of the ruling classes are merely more firmly gras|>ed and more powerfully de fended. It was these ruling classes, a* we know, that forced Edward the Eighth to abdicate. It was the Archbishop of Canter bury who led the church assault upon him. and Prime Minister Baldwin, Karl of Kewdley, Knight of the Carter, who led the forces of the state. It was the combinatUm of the church and the state and the lord* :tnd the nobility generally which compelled the abdication, prin cipally we believe because they did not approve of Edward the Eighth's democratic view* and of his |M-rsonal efforts to benefit the “masses.” The present king is a worthy king, and he represent* satisfac torily the views and traditions of the ruling classes. So all is harmony and satisfac tion—among the classes. THE fundamental difference he tween the two factions in Eng land cannot be better expressed and explained than hy the *|tre<-he* of the two kings delivered at < hristmas time—of King George the Sixth, the ruling monarch— and of ex-King Edward the Eighth, the deposed monarch. King George the Sixth made a fine inspiring patriotic siM-ech from his viewpoint. He praised Ills {teople for the unity which comes from “COM MON PERILS and COMMON SUFFERINGS.” and urged them all to "play their part In helping the fighting services to win the war.” He declared that In the First World War "the FLOWER OF «>t K VOI’TH was DESTROYED," but “this time we are ALL IN DANGER TOGETHER.” He said: "Time and again during these lust few months I have seen for myself THE i:.\ TT Ell El) TO WNS \ \7) CITIES OF ESO LAS’f), and I harr srrn the (Continued on Next Page, Col. 2) In the Times Today Better Health • “Buffa" Ban ... .24 Comic* . IS. 19 Cfop»-W«trd PuE/Jf .19 l>ail> Short gtory 6 t V. I'urllnK 6 * t ,If Hfttlo'n f’arto»>n a Horoscope .. „ 11 f.cneral Johnson .24 Ida Jean Knln 11 Letter* to Edit*»r . . .24 Marazine Pane 6 Paul Stallon .24 Movie Programs .16 ratteen ..... 11 Pitfall* of Love 19 W#*tbrook Teller .... 24 Ratfi • Program* . 1 Ripley .19 Klair Robinson b Parrvm Runyon 24 Ninety . .10 Sport* »•' *4 15. 10 J*:a»;e, Screen S. 9 Dorothy Th >rr ■» “ . 12 Vita! Statistic* ■ . 20 Want A.ta 20 21. 22. 28 Wtnchell 1* Wiehlng Well . 17 What’* the An* wet .10 Vtotnrrv • P»ge* |o. 11 Hitler to Answer Roosevelt Flames Level Noted London Landmarks By CHARLES A. SMITH Inn Nrw* Hrrvli-r Staff C«rmpn«f'»l LONDON Dec. 30. -Some of the most famous and historic building: in London, including at least six churches and the beautiful old Guildhall, were bombed and blasted in last night's mammoth air attack on the capital, authorities revealed today as they surveyed the damage. The air ministry officially charged that the biitz attack, which lasted slightly more than three hours but proved the heaviest the capital has suffered, was a deliberate effort to set the entire city on fire. (In New York today RCA Communications. Inc., reported that at 10 a. m. its communica tions with London were com pletely disrupted. Commercial Cable Company and Western Union cables previously had been cut off for four hours during the night raids I MILE SQUARE ( ITY’ (The actual “city” of London i* the approximately mile-square area beginning with the lower Strand and extending eastward to embrace the Guildhall, the Rank of England and Thread needle street among others. These are the great arteries of finance and trade which com prise London's hig business dis trict. Metropolitan London itself sprawls over an area almost 14 miles long,) A check of the damage showed that even centuries-oid building in the center of London, some of which dated back to the great fire of 1666. did not escape the wrath of the Nazi airmen. OLD BAILEY BLASTED The historic central Criminal Court building—Old Bailey—was the blasted structures. Flames left the Guildhall a gutted ruin. The Guildhall's ancient banqueting hall, where the late President Woodrow Wilson and other noted Americans have been feted in bygone years, was wrecked, as was its splendid coun cil rhamlier. But most of the hall's historic treasures were safe, having been removed from London at out break of the w'ar. An intricate network of alleys behind Fleet street and just oppo site the building it) which Interna national News Service's London bureau is situated suffered se verely from incendiary tires. Structures damaged in this area included a famous old Moravian church and ancient houses at Neville's court and Chapel place. The Guildhall School of Music also was damaged as well as sev eral well-known buklings in Fleet street. Ludgate Hall. Banhill Row and Queen Victoria street. INSPECTS DAMAGE The vicar of St. Bride's Church permitted this reporter to inspect the damage there The gallery, the organ and most of the pews were a mass of chaired woodwork and the vVindows all were gone, in cluding the most valuable the church has possessed. The church spire was still smouldering and fears were ex pressed lest its 12 hells, one ol which weighs nearly 3.000 pounds, might come crashing dow n. Gresham street was among other famous London thoroughfares that were tremendously damaged hy the raid. Hpre bombs blashed the churches of St. Anne and St. Agnes. •t One of London s swankiest and most noted clubs, the Carlton Club, a meeting place for politi cians, was directly hit and badly damaged. Other bombs shattered valuable windows of the Church of St. (Continued on Next Page, Col. 4) City Treasurer's Aide, Williams, in Hospital Deputy City Treasurer Charles N. Williams today is in Harper Hospital where he is under treat ment for pneumonia. Williams was taken suddenly ill Saturday at his home at 3064 Lakewood avenue. Williams' 13-year-old son. Charles R.. has been home only a week from Harper Hospital where he recovered from an acute case of pneumonia. D ETROffiWpTTfrl E S Only Detroit Newspaper Carrying International News Service end Complete Sport Dispatches 41ST YEAR, NO. 91 * States Labor’s Case Thomas Says Workers Will Aid Defense to Utmost, but Will Not Surrender Right to Strike Although labor will not tem porarily surrender its right to strike, it will make every effort to co-operate with management and the federal government in speeding work in defense indus tries, said R. J. Thomas, herfd of the UAW and a vice j>resident_of the CIO, today. Frank X. Martel, president of the I>etroit and Wayne County Federation of Labor, pointed our that “trade unionists are Ameri can citizens first.” and promised all necessary concessions for the duration of the emergency. He added, however, that industry should not take advantage of la bor's patriotism to Increase its own profits. _ Thomas made his statement in reply to the declaration of Presi dent Roosevelt in his fireside chat that “the nation expects our de fense industries to continue opera tion without interruption by strikes or lockouts.” RECONCILE DIFFERENCES “It expects and insists,” con tinued the President, “that management and workers will r era nolle their difference* by voluntary or legal means, to con tinue to produce the *upplies that are sorely needed.” Said Thomas in reply: "\4e most certainly will do everything in our power to co operate with management and the government In the speeding work for national defense, but it is impossible for us to give up the right to strike. “I believe that labor has al ready proven by its record that It is willing to ro-operate with management, hut It will not be exploited. DEFENSE EXCUSE “The strike Is labor's weapon against exploitation and unfor tunately there are a few em ployer* who will plead the need for arms and munitions as an exruse tu attempt to exploit labor. “Speaking not only for the UAW. hut for labor as a whole, this cannot be {lermltted. Labor cannot gix-e up its right to strike against a management which Bars to Run All New Year s Day Liquor licensees w ill not have to close their bar* at all on New Year's Eve or New Year's Day the Detroit office of the state liquor control commission announced to day. A previous announcement made in Lansing moved the closing up from 2 a. m. to 5 a. m. on New- Year's Day. Saloon keepers would thus have had to close at 5 a. m. and could then have reopened two hours later for the day's trade. .Under the latest announcement the bars will open tomorrow morning and may operate without closing from then until 2 a. m. Thursday. More Snow Here Predicted More snow today and tonight was the word from the weather bureau. The fall will be light, the forecast states, and will be accom panied by little change in tem perature. The lowest thermometer read ing tonight is expected to be about 30 degrees, approximately the same temperature that was main tained during last night's snow fall While Detroit's streets were slippery this morning, traffic soon melted the snow and ice from the main thoroughfares. The roads leading into the city were all open. Roads in the northern part of the state are open but a heavier fall of snow there made them more hazardous. The recreation department re ports no skating-or tobogganing at any of the city's rinks or slides. Eighteen inches of snow has fallen at Vanderbilt, where the Vanderbilt Ski Club is located, and at Gaylord, locale of the Ot sego Ski Club, insuring good skiing conditions through the w’eek-end. Thome Murphy, clubs’ secretary, reported today. DETROIT, MICHIGAN, MONDAY, DECEMBER 30,1940 refuse* to co-operate with it* employes. “It should be remembered that labor nexer want* to strike. If labor and management co-oper ate there will be no cause to strike, and labor can be counted u|K>n to do its part.” AGREES WITH PRESIDENT Martel spid: “I absolutely agree with the President. He is eternally cor rect In his premise that labor and industry should settle any controversy that might arise without recourse to strikes or lockouts during this emergency. “Trade unionists are Ameri can citizens first and they recognize that In America workers are in much better po sition than in any other nation. Experience has taught us that the march of the dictators re sults in destruction of trade unions and the enslavement of their members. “The public can rest assured that organized labor will lie willing to make any adjustments necessary for successful execu tion of the rearmament pro gram. It will want to know, however, that such concessions

are for the emergency only and that they are absolutely neces sary to carry out the program. FAIRNESS ASKED “We sincerely ho|»e industry will be as fair, itself, and not take advantage of labor's pa triotism to skyrocket profits. I.ahor also wishes a voice in the management of the defense pro gram and accurate knowledge hf the results being obtained. We want to see tanks, plane* aud guns—not just optimistic re{K>rts of contract* on order.” August SchoUc. president of the state CIO council, said: “We have always been more than willing to co-operate in the defense program. We are the ones who lose in battle even more than employers. “Strikes are always the last resort. It Is much more desir able to settle differences with out strike*. Hr will c«-o|>erate KM) per cent and all we want Is for employer* to do the same.” Drinking Drivers Fare Jail Jailing of all drinking motorists over the New- Year holiday was asked today by Traffic Judge Thomas F. Maher. In a letter to Commissioner Frank D. Eaman. Judge Maher asked that a deadline on drinking drivers—even if the driver shows no effects except for his breath— be set at 3 p m. tomorrow and continued until midnight Thursday. “Any driver who smells of alcohol should go to jail until after the holiday, no matter how minor his offense, for his own and others' protection," Judge Maher said. Drivers arrested tomorrow after noon and night would have to remain in jail until Thursday morning. Cigar Fires Blankets, Man Dies of Burns Burns suffered when a rigar ignited his bed clothing Christmas : Eve resulted in the death today of Rudy Papsik, 63. of 3545 Dane street, in Receiving Hospital. B v Revom mvn tl: “There was so nmrh hig news in 1940 that a man could hite a dog and not even he Invited to address a breakfast club.” Arthur (Bugs) Baer surveys the world scene on Page 24. • • • "The rnnteniplation of what is happening to us should reveal how mighty a uea|*on is the assault upon the human mind—pro vided It I* an assault with positive Ideas.” Miss Dorothy Thompson castigates the “peace" party. Page 12. * * * / "William Z. Foster, whose standing in the revolutionary mob I* to the left of Earl Browder, look* like a Toledo tly-rop and Browder himself might he a suburban dentist and a past president of his local Klwani* or Lions." Westbrook Pegler takes the car toonists to task for faulty typing of characters. Page 24. O • • • I r "In America, it there are masses and elasses. It is difficult to decide where the masses ‘leave off' and the classes begin.” Read “In the News" on Page 1. Roosevelt Hits Axis, Pleads. British Aid Text of Roosevelt speech Page 4 By ERIC FRIEDHEI.M lul l .Nrw* srr\irr Miff Correspondent WASHINGTON, Dec. 30 —Con fident of overwhelming public sup port. President Roosevelt looked to Congress today for speedy endorsement of his promise to help Britain defeat the Axis powers through every American resource short of manpower. In measured tones, Mr. Roose velt last night expressed to a world-wide radio audience of 80,- 000,000 Americans and additional millions abroad, his conviction that the defeat of Great Britain would leave the United States at the mercy of a loaded gun. DEMOCRACY’S ARSENAL To help England, the President asserted, the United States must serve as "the great arsenal of democracy” from which those nations resisting aggressors or fighting for liberty and freedom can draw huge stocks of guns, air planes. tanks and other weapons of war. There is no demand for sending an American expeditionary force "outside our own borders,” Mr. Roosevelt assured, and ro one m the government has any such idea. Any talk about sending armies to Europe is deliberate untruth, according to the President. Although voicing his belief that the Axis powers will not win the war, the Chief Executive warned that “every ounce and every ton ol munitions and supplies that we can possibly spare" must be sent to the British. AT POINT OF GUN “If Great Britain goes down, the Axis powers will control the continents of Europe, Asia, Africa, Australasia and the high seas—and they will he in a position to bring enormous mili tary and naval resources against (Continued on Page Five) C. Harold Wills, Engineer, Dies C Harold Wills, pioneer auto mobile designer and engineer *ied today in the Henry Ford Hospit 1. He entered the hospital yesterday morning following a stroke. Mr. Wills was formerly chief engineer of the Ford Motor Com pany. At the time of his death he was associated with the Chrys ler Corporation. C amera §hv w Rathbone’s Son Training at Windsor Air Field Radion Rathbone. 23. who.-c ■father's face has been seen on motion picture screens all over the world, doesn't want to be photo graphed until he has shot down 20 German planes. That was what the son of Basil Rathbone. British screen “villain.” told photographers who wanted to take his picture at the Windsor elementary flying school, where he is training to be a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force. 24 PAGES THREE CENTS Points in Speech Bt§ President International »*• Servlro Wlra WASHINGTON. Pec. 30. — Highlights from President Roosevelt's address last night follow; I believe that the Axis powers are not going to win this war. I base that belief on the latest and best information. There in no dr mnnd for sending «# expeditionary force outside our nu n borders. There is no intention by any member of your government to send such a force. We must be the great arsenal of democracy. For us this is‘ an emergency as serious as war itself. Never before since Jamestown and Plymouth Rock has our American civilization been in such danger as now. The, United States has no right or reason to encour age talk of peace, until the duy shall come when there is a clear intention on the part of the aggressor nations to abandon all thoughts of domination or conguering the world. Some nations in Europe were bound by solemn non-interven tion pacts with Germany . . . the fate of these nations tells us what it means to live at the point of a Nazi gun. The Nazis have justified such (aggressive) actions by various pious frauds. - Any South American country, in Nazi hands, would always constitute a jumping-off place for German attack on any one of the other republics of fliis hemisphere. Let vs no longer blind ourselves to the undeniable I fact that the evil forces which have crushed and under mined and corrupted so many others arc already within our own gates. Your government ... is ferreting them out. No nation can appease the Nazis. No man can tame a tiger into a kitten by stroking it. There can be no appeasement with ruthlessness. There can be no reasoning with an incendiary bomb. | Even the people of Italy have been forced to become ac complices of the Nazis; but at this moment they do not know how soon they will be embraced to death by their allies. We must admit there is a risk in any course we may take. But I deeply believe that the great majority of our people agree that the course that I advocate involves the least risk now and the greatest hope for world peace in the future. Our national policy is not directed toward war. Its : sole purpose is to keep war away from our country and our people. All our present efforts are not enough. We must have more ships, more guns, more planes —more of everything. The nation expects our defense industries to continue operation without interruption by strikes or lockouts. I appeal to the owners of plants—to the managers, to the workers, to our own government employes—to put every ounce of effort into producing these munitions swiftly and without stint. There will be no “bottle-necks ” in our determination to aid Great Britain. So dictator, no combination of dic tators, will weaken that determination by threats. Foid to Produce Magnesium Production of magnesium—half the weight of aluminum and al most the strength of cast iron— will begin in the $21,000,000 plant of the Ford Motor Company by next March, it has been announced by a company spokesman. Output of the magnesium foun dry. now under construction, is ex pected to amount to 110,000 pounds, approximately 40.000 pounds more than the com|>any will require for its own use in its airplane production program. The new foundry - is being closely guarded. It will be enclosed by a wall and will consist of two floors with 100.000 square feet of floor space at the southwest corner of the existing foundry plant. Detroit Dentist Killed When Car Overturns Dr. Peter E. Steinback. 55. of 13500 Woodrow Wilson avenue, who was fatally injured" Saturday when his automobile overturned near West Branch, will buried today in Hancock. Mich., follow ing services there. Doctor Stein back.' a dentist, came to Detroit four years ago from Hancock. He leaves four daughters and a son. Save Guns Judge Jayne Gives Seized Weapons to British i All guns seized by Presiding Judge Ira W. Jayne of Circuit Court will be turned over to the Committee for the Defense of British Homes instead of being destroyed as is usually done, the judge announced today. He will also call a meeting of , the bench to see if the other judges w-ill also turn guns seized over, j The committee, whose local chair man is Ledyard Mitchell, vice president of Chrysler Corporation, has been collecting guns and other weapons all over the country and sending them to British house holders. to be used in the event of invasion. “It seems a pity to me that gun* should be destroyed when both this country’ and Britain are working so hard to make them,” Judge Jayne said. “I think it Is far better to put them to a good use.” ~ „ | Baby Swallows Pin Do\ofes Moore, JO-month-old daughter of Mrs. Tolema Moore, of 702 Leland avenue, is in Re ceiving Hospital today after swallowing a straight pin last night. The child is under ob servation. ' NIGHT EDITION Nazis Picture President as Warmonger Bv PIERRE J. Ht’SS Inl l Nm Service staff Correspondent BERLIN. Doc. 30. The Axis P s will reply “ia kind” to President Roosevelt' radio ad dress attacking the dictatorships and promising increased aid ta Great Britain, it was forecast au« thoritatively today. Although an icy silence pre vailed in the Wilhelmstrasse in the hours following the speech, authentic quarters clearly indi cated that Reichsfuehrer Hitler— at the proper time and place— will deliver a "blitz” reply to what German spokesmen characterized as unbridled war-mongering on the part of the President. (A dispatch from Rome said that official consultations are under way between Germany and Italy on the nature of the reply. A joint response may be made for the Axis by either Hitler or Premier Mussolini, it i was reported.) A JOB FOR HITLER Wilhelmstrasse circles made clear that the Roosevelt speech was a matter for Hitler to deal with personally. No attempt was made to disguise the fact that a new and serious situation has re sulted from his forthright declare , tion. But, it was said, word must first come from the mountain top— Berchtesgaden—before the world can know just how Nazi Germany feels and just what Nazi Germany intends to do. The German press and radio re mained discreetly silent while the ! full text of Mr. Roosevelt’s speech was read, reread and disgested— presumably with the indignation that was anticipated. The present silence, it was said, could easily be | construed as the “lull before the ; storm.” On the basis of past experience, it was assumed that Hitler would choose the proper moment to strike back at the President with equally forceful words, but that he would stand pat on his policy of refusing to allow himself to be provoked into any move severing the last thin thread of German* American relationships. Any such action, it was said in responsible quarters, would merely be doing President Roosevelt a favor and playing directly into the hands of "war-whoopers.” WARMONGERING CHARGED The tense and frigid at mospher# in the Wilhelmstrasse was a dear indication of the deep chasm which the President's speech created jn German-American relations. Many quarters felt no restraint in char* acterizing Mr. Roosevelt as “the greatest war agitator of themalL" Some commentators said he was deliberately leading a peaceful na tion into war for the sake of a foreign empire and had sabotaged the last chance of any future American contribution to a con structive European settlement in the still far distant future. “Mr. Roosevelt has throw* down the gauntlet in the hope Herr Hitler will pick It up,” OOe observer said. "Roosevelt then would have an opportunity to tell the American people war had been forced upon them.” Some quarters believed that for the immediate present Hitler might choose to answer Mr. Roosevelt by the simple expedient of intensifying the war on all fronts. Snite Reported Better After Stomach Attack MIAMI. Dec. 30.—(INS)—Fred Snite Jr. of Chicago, famous aa the "Boiler Kid." who traveled tb* world in an “iron lung.” today waa declared by his father to be out of danger after suffering from a severe stomach ailment. A spe cialist was flown from Chicago to the Snite Winter home at Miami Beach when the new illneaa was recognized. Thailand Routs French BANGKOK. Thailand. Dec. 30. —Defeat of an entire French division in heavy fighting on the Thailand-French Indo-China fron ■ t ier was claimed by the Thai high command today in a communique 'which added that large quantitiea lof French arms and ammunition 'were captured.

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