1 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Gazetesi Sayfa 2

1 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Gazetesi Sayfa 2
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PAGE 2 Who Is W. R« Davis, Mysterious Peace Emissary? B) W. V. CHAPIN V fcrt'l Kra* Htnta Mad v NEW YORK. Jan. I.—The story of how W. R. Davis, former Texas Milrnad candy "butcher,'’ locomo tive engineer and oil well driller ipse to a position where he could lie considered a perfect peace emissary by the Nazi government reads like a piece of almost fan tastic Action. It ha* been carefully pieced to gether and hrouKfd up to date b> international News Service in an exhaustive inquiry both in the Americas B n<i toirope and is presented hero wit n in connection with current disclosures of Davis’ t**ace attempts. Bom 49 years ago. William Rhodes Davis was ehrly thrown on his own resources and began his. Nazi Economic Rule of Europe Proposed in Peace Plan By W ALTER FITZM AURICE Int't &*w» Srrvlrf stair t orreapoixlrnt r —i, —« WASHINGTON. Jan. 1. —The "just and honorable” peace plan brought here from Germany for President Roo-evclfs study by. William R Davis In October. 19.19. proposed German economic su premacy on the European conti nent and retention by Britain of its seapower and its empire, intact it was learned today. REUSED LETTER A source which saw a copy of the plan, left with Adolph A. Berle. assistant secretary of state, by Davis, free lance oil operator, tfeui the plan also proposed estab lishment in Germany's former African colonies of a "second Palestine" as a refuge for Euro pean Jews. Quarters close to the White House said Davis, in a conference with President Roosevelt before departing for Germany gained the piief Executive's consent to ex plore peace sentiment there hut was -refutaid^iJelleiLJlcsignatin g^ him the President s emissary Mt the affair. State department records show that Davis, on his return from talks with Field Marshal Goering,; German Economic Minister fchacht and other high Nazis, was accompanied by Joachim Herstlet,' described by Davis as one of Goer- i ing's confidential 'bides.*- f Verne Marshall, editor of the /'Cedar Rapids dla.V Gazette and chairman of the No Foreign War Committee, whose disclosure of Davis’ peace activities provoked a national controversy, said Herstlet "kvould have become German am- Vfessador to the United States" had the peace agenda been ex plored. ASSUMED NAME State department records showed, however, that Herstlet was traveling on a Swedish pass port under an assumed name and that the American consulate at Lisbon refused him a visa, pend ing Instructions from Washington The records also disclosed that the British secret service listed Herst let as the German Gestapo’s prin cipal espionage agent for South America. SENATORS' AID For these or other reasons for which officials offered no explana tion. Davis, on his return, failed to gain an audience with the Pres ident and accordingly left a copy of his memorandum with Berle. Informed quarters said the jus tice department was initiating a check of Davis’ activities and his connections here and in Mexico, particularly with John L. Lewis, former president of the Congress of Industrial Organizations, and Vincente Lombarn Toledano, for mer president of the Mexican Con federation of Labor. On July 29. 1919. these quarters recalled. Senator Bridges (R) of New Hampshire read a newspaper article on the Senate floor charg ing that Lewis, together with Senator Guffey <D) of Pennsyl vania. had given Davis their “aid and advice” in negotiating pur chases of expropriated Mexican oil. allegedly for refining at Davis', plant in Hamburg. Germany. d«s senhe'd as the largest in Europe. Davis assertedlv financed con struction of the plant by "borrow ing" from a Boston bank 510.000,- 000 of its "frozen" German invest ments. sequently kept it going through h;« negotiation vvith The Weather HOIKLV TtMPKRATI RFS 32 midnight .... 32 . 1 • m 32 2 » m *2 I « ra 32 '•4 » it 32 -■ Th« *un will wt t~s«j at 5.12 p m »nd ri»« tomorrow at « a m Th* moon a»t« tod«v •• *3.1 p m and ru»*« tomorrow at 10 to a m ' * Happy New Tiir" I* I business career selling candy on : Trxas trains. He later became a locomotive engineer and then drifted to the oil fields of Oklahoma, where he soon decided that greater oppor tunities lay in finance and promo tion than in labor. He began forming oil companies and was speetacuiariy successful although his progress was made through a rising tide of law suits brought by individuals and organi zations which claimed to have been damaged by his business methods. Despite these obstacles he established oil companies in Columbia and Peru as well as the Scandinavian countries and Ger many, where at Hamburg he Iwgan construction in 1931 of one of the largest petroleum cracking plants in the world. In connection with his German t the Mexican governniefltTof con tracts for slo,ooo.o'mi ajid $17,- ! 000.000 of exprofTriated crude oil. i With the major oil companies refusing the use of their tanker fleets for shipping expropriated oil, detriment records show, Davis "broke the boycott" by obtaining a fleet of 90 Danish -tankers, which shipped the crude oil to Germany until the war's outbreak brought on the British blockade. Whether Herstlet returned with Davis to the United States was in controversy here. Marshall told a press conference Herstlet re mained in Europe, but other quarters here a sorted the depart- 1 ment granted him a visa, on which he stayed briefly in this country, then went on to Mexico. DAVIS DESCRIBED Davis was described by authori tative sources here as now ‘’persona* non grata" with the administration, notwithsta n d i n g -that he ...made available $291.n0n .to the 1996 Democratic campaign J and was formerly a trustee of the President's Hyde Park Library j fund. . Davis Breaks Silence ‘Mystery Man ’ Acknowledges Peace Activities bu Fails to Disclose Details of Plan IntrrniMontl Nfw* Ninlrf Mlr# . NEW YORK, Jan 1- W. R. Davis, “mystery man" of interna tional oil deals, broke his silence today to confirm that he has acted as behind-the-scenes emissary in efforts to end the war which has halted his large-scale business; manipulations in Germany. A statement issued through an , associate acknowledged Davis' peace activities but did not dis close any details of the proposed program for peace he brought back from Germany in October, 1939. f '"For many years," read the (statement issued for him while f\e sat unseen in another room ofvliis large office suite in Rocke feller Center, “the companies In whkffNl am Interested, have had substantial Investments In many European and South American countries. FOREIGN TALKS “My business has been largely the movement of goods and services from one country to an other. This necessitated numer ous with the business and governmental leaders of those countries. "I have made it my practice, as a sincerely loyal American, to keep the executives of our government fully Informed as to such of my activities as would be, in my opinion, of Interest to those entrusted officially with the welfare of our country,” “Such information and knowl edge as I have transmitted to our government, I believe ran best be utilized by officials of Hit Week! LADIES' PLAIN SKIRTS JU CLEANED AND / FEFINISHED V CASH tad CA»*r » » o' 32 « a m 32 7 a m 32 S a. m 4 FORECAST For Detroit and vicinity: Snow or rain today; rain tomorrow. f I SANDERS ventures he became a close friend of such people as Ernst Hans fstaengl. former German foreign press chief now in a Canadjan concentration camp; General Von Kpp, now Nazi military governor of Paris; HjaJmar SchJßmt. former head of the Rrichsfcvtk: Field Marshal Goering i#>rP Joachim Herstlet, a Giering uiSsJstant LUCK TO SCHAt'IHT It was through hvg /friendship with Schacht that Drfvis aceom elishrd one of his most intricate usiness deals and “one that led directly to his Being considered a financial geniu* by the Nazf regime. When the into power] in 1933 all government commit ments with foreigners were called off. Davis' great cracking plant at Hamburg was unfinished and he CUTIES B> E. Simms Campbell V I * Pent omrt I .. ......,.. ...—* ' |H|i\ M "There they go, Mame. Nose, let’s look up some horn* reserves.” the different departments In Washington who carry responsi bility for the protection of our national security. 1 am confident that when, in the opinion of the present administration, the best Interests of the country can be served by making public the In formation which I have from ' time to time delivered to it, it will be made public. “It Is true that 1 am tremen dously Interested in any move ment that might bring peace to the world. I hcllcvr thnt the Interests of our country and all its citizens best can be served by peace instead of war. and I have contributed from lime to time to organizations dlrerted to that end." REPLY TO MARSHALL The Davis statement*was issued in response to a declaration by- Verne Marshall. lowa editor and chairman of the n o forciap war committee, that in October* 1939 Davis nad delivered to thrast.ate department the agenda of w pro posed peace conference in \hich President Roosevelt was to act as mediator. GOOD POSITIONS AVAILABLE-NOW Calls on ‘he Institute placement bureau are more than 300% in excess of the number of graduates. Many excellent position® are included. This placement service is free to all Institute graduates permanently. The Business Institute is Michigan's largest busi ness and secretarial school. It is one of the foremost private schools of business in America. Back of this recognized leadership are thorough, modern courses; exceptional equipment; excellent training facilities, and a large staff of capable teachers. Both Day and Evening Sessions New Classes Starting January 6 Five Advantageous Locations Call at the One Most Convenient 5040 Joy Road, near Grand River Avenue 3240 Gratiot, corner of Mack 7 W. Lawrence St.. Pontiac Board of Commerce Bldg., Saginaw Downtown School. Michigan Building, 220 Baglty Phone RA. 6 5 3 4, or return this ad for prospectus Name Addreis DETROIT EVENING TIMES (PHOSK CHERRY Muoj was in need of financing. He w-enti to Schacht and sold him the fol lowing plan. Davis knew that the First National Bank of Boston had s2<j,- 000,000 of frozen assets in Ger many in blocked marks. He bor-. rowed from that supply to finance completion and initial operation of\ his plant. Then he sold, oil from the plaqt to Germany, taking in payment pi|>e and 'otjter heav/, industry item? which he exported to Scandinavia, Mexico, South America, and even the United States, taking payment in dollars or currency easily convertible into dollars. With that money he began to pay back his loan from the Boston bank in dollars and also realized a handsome profit for himself. Despite hi* vast and widely scattered business dealings, Davis 3,000 Kept Idle At Harvester _ * i Intrrnatlnnal »w» Wire FORT WAYNE. Ind., Jan. I.

Three thousand employes at the Fort Wayne plant of the Interna tional Harvester Company w-ere out of work today as federal con ciliators in Washington sought to work out a settlement in tfye CIO UAW strike. * Conciliator David 1 T Roadley went to Washington to confer with John B. Steelman, chief of the labor department’s conciliation service. He said the principal points at issue were hours of work, pay for stewards, a lunch period vvith pay, overtime, a night shift bonus, seniority rights and protec tion under military service. The company is engaged in manufacturing trucks for the war department. Picket lines were established and only maintenance employes were allowed to enter the plant. « c Woman Dies of Injuries 1 HASTINGS, Jan. I.—Miss Mary Delue, 75, died in Pennock Hos pital of injuries suffered in an automobile accident 10 days ago. I Mrs. Phillip T. Colgrove. 82, an attorney and. Miss Alberta Nash, who were riding in the car are 'recovering. i has always found time to devote part of his energies to political matters. , GAVE TO DEMH In both 1932 and 1936 he was a . heavy contributor to the Demo cratic Party’s campaign fund. At ! a in Tulsa, Okla., in 1938, where Davis was charged with fraud in having had a $275,000 judgment against him bought up for $9,000, a former associate testi fied concerning the judgment pur chase: “llavl* told me he wanted to clear his record against possible legal kickbacks If he should get a cabinet appointment.” But instead of appointing Davis to his cabinet in reward for his financial support during the cam paign, President Roosevelt simply presented him with a handsome Air Raid Alarm Ends New Year Fun in Athens By A. E. ANGELiOPOULOS Infl New* Vrvlre Stuff fnrrenpondent ATHENS, Jan. I.—Widespread Italian air attacks on Greek cities were announced officially in At liens today-after the -Grecian high command claimed that an Italian tank counter-attack had been defeated and much war ma terial and some prisoners captured Early this morning Italian bombers flew over Athens, caus ing a 4@-minute air raid alarm which sent New Year’s ceiebrators to shelters. No bombs were reported dropped on the capital, but a few hours earlier Fascist airmen bombed Salonika. Corfu Island, Preveza. Jannina and Knzant. DatTtage was termed insignificant and casualties were relatively slight, according to Official re ports. The public security ministry announced that Greek civilian casualties resulting from Italian air raids between November 29 and December 28 totalled 88 killed and 296 wounded. The fatalities included 12 women and 25 chil dren. ... j Italy Alps International New* >er*lre Cable ROME. Jan. 1. ltaly today moved to revive and speed up 'fortifications on her Alpine fron tier facing France and simul taneously fastened iron-clad government control on all her raw materials andsfactory products. A royal decree created a new commission charged with the task of fortifying the Alpine border. Financial allotments were made by the government to defray the cost of labor and material. Another decree authorized the Fascist ministry of corporations to assume complete control over the production, distribution and ; consumption of all raw materials and the products finished from them both for Italy’s armed forces and the civilian population. Wishing You a Very j Happy and Prosperous NEW YEAR ▲' UriMr HW<,\ jj Wf *• '-yv =. i«»y isb^i§|. ti X*-i n I |p| : Hlf- ■y:.-" KsL *mmij!mw^ THE STROH BREWERY COMPANY DETROIT, MICHIGAN - -■ . . - ----- - ' ~ . .. ~ ~~ ~~ ' "" autogrophed photograph of him-j self, inscribed: “For Major W. R. Dav Is, from Ills friend, Franklin D. Roose velt." Davis was a major in the army engineer corps during the war. WORLD WIDE NOTICE When Mexico expropriated American and other foreign oil properties several years ago Davis came into world wide notice by ar ranging a contract by which he furnished vast amounts of the oil to tlermany. He was by that time in the very good graces of the Nazi govern ment. both for his financial wiz ardy in connection with the Hamburg plant and also for having fulfilled a plan conceived by Gen eral von Epp to store a tjremen (Continued from Page One) of course, but they had progressed beyond the most vlelous form* of cannibalism. They did not kill live people and eook and eat them. They only ate their parents out of re*|iect for them. i We have progressed even beyond those races. We are to be congratulated. We are on. nur way towards chiliza tlon. A couple of hundred years ago we were ravishing bfclpless herds of Africans away from their homes and carrying them chained and crowded and bruised and beaten In the atenrh holds of slave ships. Y’es, and throwing them over hoard by hundreds with their rhalns upon them, to sink to the depths of the ocean In raae we were chased and In danger of capture. ONLY four or five generations ago did this occur. And to think of it less than three generations ago we were breaking up families and separat ing mothers from their children and selling all down the river very 1 much xs- we do dogs trr x trrnwft nowadays. / . - 'gJ'‘ These humanJMMngsvrrrejslavesr. our slaves. Our PBOrSRtY. There togs bo doubt about their being ours. S* • v Wo ourseha* them, from their homes. Possession Is mtne-puinlw of the law—TEN point* of the law in a Slave. We have not yet outlived the curse of that cruelty, but we have abandoned the practice of human slavery, ?Ve are on our way to civiliza tion V-not very far on our way— only two generations—but making a commendable start. Y’et we make no start to aban don war. How can we claim to he civil ized. or even seml-civlllzed, when we make wholesale murder one of our most honorable occupations, and when In almost every genera tion we select the flower of our youth and sacrifice them by the dous oil reserve underground for [future military purposes. Just about the- time in 1939 'when Davis was returning from [Germany with the peace proposal which has tirred such interest to day, two of his oil ships from [Texas were seized by the British on route to Germany and since then his direct shipments to Ger many have been halted and can only be resumed after peace is de-[ dared and the blockade lifted. With the German market blocked he continued to do business with Italy, before that country entered the war. and with Japan. Only o few months ago he made a large shqanent to a Japanese purchas ing agency in Osaki. His general counsel in virtually all Miis oil deals is James Lee Kauffman, who has taught law at the Imperial University at IN THE NEWS thousands and even by the tnll- Uon» to the Moloch* of war? HUMAN sacrifice la supposed to have belonged to the darkest ages and to the moat aavage state of man,—but has there ever been greater human sacrifice of a finer and better portion of our race than there Is today? Has there ever been a more devastating destruction of our youth,—a more nearly complete annihilation of the factors to wliich we must look for the eleva-> t lon and |>er|>ettiatlon of the human raee, —than there Is in the wars of the present era? Has there ever been anything \ller even in cannibalism than the useless consuming of the selected best of the human race In the insatiable .maw ’of the war machine ? f s , Is It not better to eat dead parents than to sacrifice livr sons ? * We admit It was cruel to drag children away from slave mothers to be sold upon the auction block and-'transported to distant places to labor under the lash like bul- Imks Jki thf fields. It wot Just as cruel to drag ttff noblest youth of the nations »y ajjav fgom their homes and their famflles and their useful work..ln life and make them not to tin the 'fields but to fertilize them with their blood and bones? WAR is not merely suggestive of savagery,—reminiscent of savagery. It IS savagery. It Is the foulest expression of savagery—the vilest exploitation of the basest passions. There can be no genuine de velopment of higher civilization for the human race until we hate suppressed these savage passions and banned and abandoned war. We certainly will not have true civilization In the world until we want civilization more than we want war, and until we realize that the essential conditions for the development of any higher civilization are peace and order. PB '?" M j*gg& Sk ill «L3il Wednesday, January 1; 1941 Tokio and who Is a member of tha law firm of Mdvor, Kauffman. ; Smith and Yamamoto of New York and Tokio. Kauffman has re ceived the Order of the Sacred Treasury, fourth class, from the Japanese government. Associates of Davis’ offices In Rockefeller Center said today that with beginning of the European war supervision of the Hamburg plant was taken over by the Nazi I government for war purposes. They did not know whether it had been destroyed in the RAF raids on Hamburg but supposed It was one of the objectives. At the present time, they said, Davis is devoting most of his time to his wells in Texas, the state where he began his metepric ca reer peddling nickel candies to day coach travelers. - *_ War Is not only vile but unavailing. The decrees of force are always subjfct to review and reversal by a higher and greater force. The world will have no final and satisfied acceptance of Inter national decisions until Justice la substituted for force and peaceful arbitrament for war. WHY cannot America take tha lead in this truly "new order" of |>eacc and justice Instead ,of reverting to olff dlseredlted |M>lieies of war? Why eannot America with her bright toreh of liberty lead tha way out of the darkness of savagery Info the light of the new and true civilization ? So your columnist wishes for ypu and for all America and for all the world a happy nnd C’IVIU -17.F.D New 1 ear. And your columnist sincerely ho|>es that ambitious and greedy financiers will net In volve the nation and you and yours In war to dissipate the hap piness that, fellow Americans, is properly yours and ours In this great and naturally peaceful country. We, cannot rightly strive or wish to rule the wiglil and to impose our will upon the world by fore* of arms. It Is not best that we should have that power, or ts we had It, that we should exercise It. But we can hope amt properly strive to give the world an illuminating example of a nohla nation proceeding serenely In tha paths of peace and happiness and progress and prosperity toward a higher civilization. And we can believe that other nations. Inspired by our exampla and proceeding along that path, may find thetr way to |>earr and happiness and progress and pros perity surh as ours. Does not Isaiah sav: “H otv beautiful ii|ion the moun tains are the feet of him who hringeth good tidings that ptih lisheth peace.”

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