5 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

5 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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Directory 1— General Newt, Travel 2 Sports, Finance, Hobbies )—Society, Fashions 4 —Real Estate, Classified, Radio I—Pictorial1 —Pictorial Review, March ot Events, Autos, Theaters 6 National Defense Section 7 Headlines of 1940 I—American Veelly 9 —Comics. 41 ST YEAR, NO. 97 Psychologists lo Set Fate of Boy Killer, 13 Their Report Will Put Him in Institution or Private Family IONIA. Jan. 4. Psychologists this work will delve into the mind of Robert Eherhart to see what prompted him. a 1.3-yenr-olrt who looks 11, to pick up a shotgun and kill the man for whom he was a willing, friendly chore boy. Robert's brief life is filled with unhappiness The murder of Ben Perrin. 73-.vear-old Montcalm County farmer, is its second major ti ag< ay. Been u«e thirr inttmi!' RnTinT loday is held at the Juvenile llomr here. He will he sent to the Child Guidance Institute at Ann Arbor in a few days on orders of Pro bate Judge William Rasmussen who must determine the boy s future. I'pon the psychologists’ report depends whether Holiert will lie committed to an institution ot turned over to a private family 10 resume a normal life. Disliked Town I'ntil he was 7. Robert’s life was the normal life of thou sands of Michigan farm hoys. He was one of six children who lived on a farm near Stanton. He had gone to a one-room district school and had kept up with his classes em+iUnrrert mn nf si lion I fur iwo -11 rtns by Illness When he was 7 his father died. His wifinwed- mother took her family to Stanton. Robert did not like the village He wanted to Jive on a farm The mother re man led *’l liked rny vtepfather fine.” Robert told Judge Rasmussen. "hut I didn't like to live In town.” For this and other reasons, P.ohert was sent to live with Per rin and his eldeily wife. He was 11 Shortly the Perrins’ home burned and they lunlt a tar jiajier shark. Robert attended school across the-road, hut when the other youngster" played in the school yard he had to tun home to attend to his chores Feared Vacation Loss Late last Summer Robert went to the farm near Smyrna where his mother now lives He .spent 10 happy days there and then returned 10 Perim- tarpajvr shark. He began talking about "next Summer wlen l I ive rr.y \ a eat »on Without leal nr excuses. Roh r .i explained to Judge Rasmussen “||r said I couldn't go. He said 1 couldn't have another vaca tion, that I'd have to stay and work, lie kept a Jug of li<pior in the barn and I took a drink ot that. I was kind of spinning and I wtinted to go to im mother, so I went into the house and got the shotgun and shot him.’’ Boy Scouts of Britain Asked to Spot Fires NEW YORK, Jan 4-<INS> British Rdy Scouts aged 15 will be mobilized for the dangerous work of fire spotting, the London radio said today in a broadcast picked up by CBS in New York. 2 SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTS In This Issue HEADLINES OF 1940 In Pictures Events of a dramatic year in review. Illustrated NATIONAL DEFENSE Section Shoxviqnr aw- TRr key to national prepn critics*. Sir Philip Gihbn Saya: Mussolini’s Downfall Expected This Year " <3 Italians Losing Faith in Dictator as Hitler ‘Deserts’ Him in Albania; Axis Distasteful to Populace Possibility that Mussolini will be overthrown before the end of 1941 is suggested in the following article by Sir Philip Gibbs, famous British author and war correspondent for International News Service. Mussolini's policies have failed completely. Sir Philip says, and the Axis alliance is as distasteful to the Italians as it is to the Germans. By SIR PHILIP GIBBS Inf‘l Srrvtr* Staff Cormpondfiit LONDON. Jan. 4 News from Albania and the Libvan desert, * sh'kving that the Italians are being hard-pressed hy the Greeks and -British'nn borfTWVar'Tronis, and” Rome’s announcement of the arrival of a portion of the German air force in Italy, today provide one more indication of Mussolini’s desperate plight. I met a man yesterday who is well informed on happenings in Italy, and he told me that he fully expects the downfall of Mussolini this year. His conviction is based on Italian public opinion, which is becom ing more and more hostile to war against England, and deeply anxious about the fate of Italy. Italians en masse have never had any sympathy whatever for the political union with Germany. When I was jn Italy not Tong before tin 1 war, friends of mine there deeply regretted that Mus soLim had thrown in his lot with Hitler, owing to his rage___at Britain, which was Iwgetwrespon sihle for the sanctions imposed against Italy after the Fascist iri vnsion of Abyssinia: The Trahans have a deep-rooted hatred against the Germans. The alliance was unnatural and re pugnant to them. Tins hatred, coupled with contempt ■« licartilv reciprocated by the Germans I was in Berlin the day before Hitler, with many members nf o hi" Bulgaria Creates Balkan Tension P.cpor ; King Debating Aid to Ax’s in Greek War Bv f.FORf.F. BAI.INT lnf‘l Nn»» Srrtlfe hi»ff (nrrM|Min<tfnl BI’DA PEST. Jan. 4 Balkan "tension reached new heights to night with receipt of rejxirts here indicating Bulgaria, prompt'd hv Germany, shortly may intervene in some manner to aid the Axis m the Italo-Greek war. At the same time Rumania, now in the hands of an enlarged Gerrt <n "model army suddenly susjvn'tM normal telephone eorp mumentinns with other 'countries With F’t ime Minister Bogdan FJoll in Vienna where he i" said to be conferring with Nazi offi cials. Bulgaria became the cyno sure of Balkan attention as diplomatic quarters heard report* that King Boris was being pressed for a fateful decision on the ques tion of permitting Rei force through his country to Greece. Massing on Border Turkey was reporter) ma-sing fresh army reinforcements in her northwestern /one bordering on Bulgaria and Greciat Thrace, ap parently preparing to make some move, should King Boris allow ~n attack on Greece across Bulgarian soil The Turk* were understood *n have massed 800,000 troops, of which more than 400.000 were snid to be concentrated in the region adjacent to Thrace. The Turkish conscription term was -increased from 18 months to three years. Both Russia and Turkey wire reported exerting counter-pressure on Bulgaria to induce that coun try to remain neutral. Roosevelt Calls Up 5,700 More Guards WASHINGTON. Jan. 4.—(INS> —President Roosevelt by execu tive order today ordered 5.700 ad ditional national guardsmen out for a year's tour of active duty, effective January 27. The eight units called up were from New Jersey. South Carolina. New York. Alabama and Delaware. Jane Wyman Mother Of 6’-Lb. Daughter HOLLYWOOD. Jan. 1 HNSi A G ’ --|moimrl daughter was >n today at a Hollywood hospital to film actress Jane Wyman, wife of Ronaid Reagan, also of the screen. Largest Circulation of Any Michigan Newspaper i D ETFiHJTigiPTlfcl E S (SUNDAY)^ PART ONE staff, was going to visit Musso lini on one occasion. One of Hit ler's aides, wearing the full dress uniform of the German air force pulled white gloves onto his hands. “I ho|»‘ I vtrnll nut have to shake hands with many Italian officers, unless I am wearing gloves,” he said. ”1 hate the Italian |ienple and that ridiculous fellow Mussolini. They bet rayed ns in the last war and they will betray us In the nevl.” That "'as Ike general opinion in (Continued on Page Six) Colder Forecast With Light Snow Mercury Expected to Fa!! Sunday After Rise A cold snap that will bring snow flurries and 10-degree temperature" to Detroit for the week-end was lorccast Saturday hy the weather bureau The mercury is expected to rise Sunday to the low twenties then slump Sunday night to about 10 above zero. The cold will re main until Monday afternoon when a slow rise in temperature is ex l*-(y<l Bitt<! cold gripp'd the Midwest and north central states and zero ; nd sub-zero tem|*'ratures were prevalent in Ohio, lowa. Wisconsin. Montana and Colorado. Lowest temperature Saturday I*7 below zero wa" recorded at Alamo"a Colo. In Chicago the mercury dropped 25 degrees in nine hours to 7 above zero. The cold wave was ushered in hy a wet snowfall which left streets roated with ice. Sen. Carter Glass, 83, Urges More British Aid WASHINGTON. Jan t UNS-t] Senator Carter Glass <Dt of Virginia, nicknamed the "Unre constructed Rebel” by President Roosevelt celebrated hts eighty third birthday today by urging more war aid for Great Britain. The veteran Glass, who has often opposed President Roosevelt s poli cies. said that he was in favor of Mr Roosevelt's plan to lend and lease ships, planes and munitions to England "I will that 10 times ami I say It again.” Gla-s reiterated. Manager of Bank Suicide Afi er Shortage Is Pound ÜBLY Mich . Jan. 4.-Fred H. Brown, 06 manager of the Übly branch of the Hubbard State Bank of Bad Axe. died today in Bad Axe Hospital of self-inflicted w’ounds after an apparent 575,000 shortage had t>ocn discovered in Joseph K. Rankin, president of the hank, and .lames I, Burgtwr a \ ice president, said they went m Brown's home Thin <da\ night to onset ion him regarding the ac counts. Waiting in the doorway they heard a shot and later found Brown in the basement. Only Detroit Newspaper Carrying International News and Complete Sport Dispatches DETROIT, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 5. 1941 Fate of 8,900 Waits Rule on Civil Service New Commission in Detrcfit Session to Decide on Ousters By FRANK MORRIS Tim*« Staff ( nrrMi|Kindfnt ! LANSING. Jan. 4-TaFo oT 8.900 state employes—Republican holdovers who come under direct or indirect control of Gov. Murray D. Van Wagoner—will be decided this week when the new civil service commisison will meet in Detroit to rule whether the gov "ernoFTTas power to oust them for his own party workers. | With tremendous pressure being applied on V'an Wagoner to. hunt jobs, he is attempting to concen trate on the major problem of a sweeping program of governmen tal reform which he outlined to the Legislature. 1 He insists that Michigan can have well equipped hospitals, old age pensions for every qualified applicant, ample funds for crip pled children, and better unem ployment insurance without im posing new’ taxes or increasing those already being collected. Sales Tax Aides Van Wagoner was ready to ap • point Lotus .M. NTrhs.Tleputy state highway commissioner, as sales tax director in charge of collect ing the state’s key source of revenue- The deputy director mrght he James E. Mogan of Es eanaha who was thp first boss of the sales lax department when it was created in ItklA. | Van Wagoner is also expected to appoint Ered G. Palliaer, De troit atttorney and for eight years the ■ president of the Bricklayers’ Union, as the A FI, representative on the state commi.yion of labor and industry.. Earlier in the week the governor appointed four new members of the commission. All were CIO en dorsed and the AFL is understood to have immediately raised a howl of protest. The governor i« re ported to have asked the AFL to submit the names of two candi dates for the fifth post and the union recommended P'alliaer and George A. Krogstad. former chair man of the commission The law provides that three members of the commission must be attorneys and as only two of the CIO endorsed are lawyers. Palliaer is the obvious choice' for the vacant post Showdown on Jobs In addition to the legislative task ahead of him. the new gov ernor must start to work on: I—The1 —The finding of Jobs for thoii * sands of Democrats who nre besieging his office and who may he frustrated due to the sfriet provisions of the new civil scr\- ice setup. ' houMc leaning of the state’s liquor control com mission personnel and renova tion of; its policies. O —A showdown next Wednes day with the Republican Senate on the question of (Continued on Page 10) Willkie Mentioned To Succeed White NKW YORK. Jan 4.—fINS)-- The Committee to Defend America by Aiding iho Allies faces con siderable activity next Tuesday when, among other things, q new chairman will he named to suc ceed William Allen White, who resigned the chairmanship yester day Among those being mentioned as a likely successor to White is Wendell Willkie. Republican presi dential nominee, who, at the mo ment. is “unemployed." Rankin said the shortages ex tended over four years and had been hidden by keeping two sets of hooks. He said the bank is protected against loss by a bond of 550,000 and other sureties and by federal depositors insurance. De|iosltors (inf! stockholders oT the 1 Hibbard State Bank,_ Rankm said. ivlir~suffer no loss and the branch at Übly will continue to be operated. , Brown wais a prominent mem ber of ihe community and was treasurer of the school district. He is survived by his widow. British in Bardia; Surrender Near; Bremen Set Afire Entire City Alight In Record Attack By Bombers i By CHARLES A. SMITH Int'l S*r\tre Staff CorrrM M, n<lFnt LONDON, Jan. 4 Germany' • great port of Bremen was turned Tnto a ‘‘swirling mass-Xis. flame"., which sent clouds of smokeDOOO feet into the air in the war’s greatest air raid on German soil, pilots who returned from the third of a three-day series of as saults said today. The whole city, with a normal

population of 342.000, was lighted up in the record assault, and its industrial area was turned into a "sea of flames,’’ according to the air ministry. Friday night's attack was greater even than the first raid of the series on Bremen, when more than 20.000 incendiary bombs and lons of high explosives were showered on the city, the Reich's second-largest port. Plant Destroyed One of the largest factory build ings in Bremen was set ablaze "from end to end” according to airmen who took part in the at tack. - Violent explosions Took'place in the city's freight yard, and fires spread rapidly along the mam railroad line to the Weser River. In the industrial districts - where the big Fockc-Wulf airplane factory is located—the general conflagration grew’ to a point where all details were obscured, and nothing could be seen but the vast mass as flame and mountain of smoke. Pilots and their observers said that when they first arrived over Bremen fires still were burning from the previous raids. They mentioned "red fires" and “white fires”—the former refer ring to blazes which had been burning for some time, and the "white fires” ,o newly-started con flagrations. Pilots Depict Raid Stories of how the fires spread over iho old Hanseatic city of Bremen were told by the pilots who soared over its spires in Ri gan tie waxes. The first fires started Friday night "showed up the shape of the whole city." they said. The first planes arrived oxer Bremen shortly after 7 p. m., and the last left just before 10 p. m Fliers said they experienced bad weather up to the Dutch coast, but it cleared up over Germany and was "perfect at Bremen." According to the air ministry, "only when dense black smoke began to roll over the toxvri and the spreading fires began to blur the outline of factories and dock yards did the RAF pilots have anx difficulty in recognizing their ob jectives." Following up previous assaults, said the ministry, the RAF made fresh attacks on "factories, ware houses. railroads and freight yards. “The high explosive homhs were of such a destructive type that the rrexxs of the bombers could see the debris flying up xx ards.” Italian King Prisoner, Says Leader in U. S. BURLINGTONV V .1. Jan. A. fINS) Remo Campana, Italian- Ameriean leader, today charged that King Victor Fmmanuol of Italy is virtually a "prisoner" after a xvtre demanding the arrest of Premier Mussolini was barred from that country. Campana got this notice hack from the telegraph company: “In reference to cablegram to his majesty King Victor Km manor lat Rome: Rome advises message cancelled. Italian ad ministration will not pass.” Steam-Driven Auto Inventor Dies at 100 POUGHKEEPSIE. N Y . Jan 4. ' INS I William J. Lane. IQfL retired inventor and manufacturer -of the I.afte MCaTner. an automo bile introduced to the public in 1901. was dead today The Lane steamer, in a much publicized Nexv York to Buffalo rare against a Penyard racer from Paris, aver aged 12'/* miles per hour and hit a top speed of 22 m. p h. ISSUED EVERY SUNDAY Shock Troops Smash Main Defenses [— ' j !Italians Cannot Hold Out 1 Much Longer Under Blows, Invaders Say i By \V. I\ BAPHIRE lnt*l Ne’w* vnlre Miff < orre*pon<l»*nt Copyright. 1941. American Newspapers. Inc. CARIO, Jan. S—SUNDAY) Britain's blitzkrieging legions thrust a wedge formation of Australian shock troops into be-' sieged Bardia where they were reported smashing at the main inner defensor-early today after capturing more than 8,000 Italians and. about, half the defenses around. the East Libyan coastal base. With an estimated 40 or 50 per cent ot the town's Italian garri "on taken prisoners or killed, the Fascist resistance, though desper ate, was rapidly weakening, ac cording to advices fiOm the front. Australian vanguard contingents, leading New Zealand and other imperial army units into the ac tion, were reported to have actu ally entered Bardia last night after a mighty British naval bom bardment, coupled with aerial barrages, destroyed all chance of Italian escape from the trap. They Enter Bardia from Sydney and Canberra said Australian Army Minister Percy C. Spender, now with the British troops, reported in an official telegram: (“Maj. Gen. I. V. M. Mac Kay, commanding the Australian Im lierial force in the British army I of the Nile, has entered Bardia with his men and 8.000 prisoners have been taken. Our force sus tained comparatively few cas ualties.”) Pounded more than 48 hours hy incessant British air. naval and land bombardment, Bardia's fall was expected momentarily. The town was reported dotted with numerous tires, most of them »et hy heavy air bombs and huge naval projectiles. A big squadron of British battleships and smaller war vessels Friday hammered Bardia with the greatest naval bombardment in the Mediter-, rancan since the war began. Fiftcen-inch shells pulverized large sections of the port's con crete fortifications and silenced the Italian coastal batteries, it was reported. Report Climax Near Indicating the climax to the greatest battle yet launched in the North African war is near at hand, the British middle east com mand in Cairo issued a special midnight communique, declaring: “The Hardin operations are proceeding satisfactorily. Over B.(Mitt prisoners are now In our hands.” It whs considered possible that the mighty British assault, launched Friday at dawn by (Continued on Page Six) U. S. Draft Calls American Serving in Canadian Army Time* Naff Cnrrr«|M»nd*nt CHATHAM, Ont., Jan 4 —What xvould you do if you were a sol dier in the Canadian army and had been ordered to report for duty in the American army, with the thrpat of being jailed as a draft evader | if you didn't? That the Private Dirk Daly of Elyria. who i' JKI 1 Kent en t of the army. lint he has also v been est to n u ar> 20. I RIX ATE DALY Blitz Tactics Used To Stagger Italy, Nazi Port Rv ln»*rna»lnn»l -Nrw* Service The Axis powers tonight wore watching the British turn their own aerial and ground methods of warfare against them and adding up the results of three days in which Britain has dealt staggering blows to both Germany and Italy. In North Africa the 12 000—or less—ltalians trapped in the Lib yan coastal stronghold of Bardia were under incessant attacks by victorious Australian troops w'ho cracked the outer ring of defenses and were reported entering yie city itself. As pledged more than a week ago by the British Middle East command, these Fascist troops face death or surrender. Tonight, the British were scanning the Ital ian parapets for the white flag in dicating the surrender of “Bardia. Reports from the front stated 8,000 Italians had been captured and that the remaining forces faced annihilation or surrender. Fires Sweep Bremen Germany counted the effects of a third successive night of furious British fire-bombing of the Nazi seaport of Bremen. In normal times Germany’s second largest port. Bremen, had replaced bomb ravaged Hamburg as the most im jportant avenue of entry. Bremen's great shipyards, the huge Focke-Wulfe Aircraft Works, great food storehouses and indus trial plants vital to Germany's war effort have been left fire blackened shells, the British air ministry claimed. Even in Albania, where the Italians were hurling furious coun ter-attacks against the Greeks, no comfort could be found for the Axis powers. Athens said these counter-attacks were beaten off with heavy losses to the Italians and the Greeks reported gaining new positions in counter-attacks of their own. Bristol Damaged Germany struck back at Britain with a "fire blitz” upon the south western English seaport of Bristol which caused great damage. The British air ministry admitted this. Berlin claimed the defeat of a British naval squadron which at tempted to attack the Norwegian coast. Meanwhile, Dublin remained the center of interest. Magnetic mines dropped by parachute from warplanes were positively identified as of German origin, as were bomb fragments found in tlfe vicinity ot Dublin. Berlin indicated that Erie's note of protest had not yet been re ceived but authoritative sources said Berlin’s answer was ready, and that it would be "clear and unmistakable " In Rome. Premier Mussolini re vealed that the Italian army is to be enlarged by special recruit ing drives. Daly joined the Canadian army last August, but on a visit home during his Christmas furlough registered under the draft act. Today his draft board ordered him to “be immediately discharged from the Canadian army and hold yourself in readiness for induction into the United States forces January 20." Daly was informed Saturday by his commanding officer that the I Canadian army would not give him .a. discharge and that efforts of the •United Staffs to return home its nationals in the Canadian Army would be ignored. Daly is now in the position of being a deserter from the Cana dian army if he returns to Elyria and a draft evader suhject to jail and possible loss of citizenship if he remains in Canada. FINAL Features ELINOR GLYN, F,mou« En*lUh No»«l»t. Vote, Pi*« Story on LIFE IN LON DON; IME FIGHT FOR LIBYA.— Both m tht PICTORIAL REVIEW. PRICE TEN CENTS In Canada) Start Wilcox, MCrea Graft Trial Monday 32 Others Indicted by Judge Ferguson Also to Be Tried Duncan C. McCrea and Thomas C. Wilcox, formerly the two top Wavne County law enforcing of ficers, go on trial Monday in Cir cuit Court with 32 others on charges of conspiracy to protect and operate gambling and vic« resorts. The trial is the first of the grand Jury rases arising from Judge Homer Ferguson's one-man grand jury investigation to be put to a jury, Because of the importanegenr the case and the fact that *4ich side will have 170 juryfchallenge*. a special panel of 35Qr veniremen has been summoned. I Head 128 Witnesses Two men who confessed that they were the go-betweens in the collection of almost $400,000 in graft, for the two offices, prosecu tor and sheriff, head a list of 128 state witnesses. They are Gustave Pines, who testified at examination that he handled $129,000 for the sheriff's office a* protection money for gambling, slot machines and dis orderly houses, and Sam Block, who told of collecting $270,000 for the prosecutor’s offfice. Special Prosecutor Chester P. O'Hara expects the trials to take <ix weeks. He hoped to complete drawing of the jury within tw© days. Judge Earl C. Pugsley, railed to Detroit to conduct all the grand jury trials, will question jurors himself to expedite their selection. Jury to Be Locked The jury—probably 14, of whom two will be excused by lot when testimony is completed will be locked up during the trial. This precaution usually is taken in major criminal cases. In addition to McCrea and Wil cox. the defendants are: Carl Staebler, Bernard McGrath, Harry Colburn, Michael Figurski, Sam Gross, Joseph Birach, Sam Solomon. Jacob Rubin, Lyle Hart rick. James Marano, William (Slicker) Paige, Lucille Kahler. Harry Kivlin, Eddie Way, George (Lefty) Quiniff, Angelo Scaduto, James DeFalco, Ben Landsberg. Mike Kahn, Charles Moceri, Alfred J. Garska, Victor Otto. Separate Trial Frank Chism, Charles W. Gor man, George Wallace, Patrick ('onion, Joseph Semetko, Thomas Woedhams, Leo Federman, Jack Federman, Bertha Johnson. Clyde Stambaugh and Lewis Elliott. Mrs. Kahler is expected to be granted a separate trial because she underwent an operation and is in the hospital. Judge Pugsley, who already has denied a series of motions to dis misss, will rule Monday before selection of the jury starts on sim ilar motions by McCrea and two other defendants. Mrs. Helen Vanderbilt Weds Air Line Head PHOENIX. Ariz., Jan. 4.—(INS) —Justice of the Peace Paul V. McCaw today disclosed the New Year s Day marriage of Jack Frye, president of Transcontinental and Western Air, Inc., and .Helen Van derbilt former wife of Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr. The ceremony was performed at sunrise at Echo Can yon 10 miles east of Phoenix. Im mediately after the ceremony the pair left for a honeymoon at Palm Springs, Calif The Weather HOI RLV TEMI EUTHIM d p is to p. m 14 7 P m i? n p m J* » P m ’•* 12 midnight ll 9 p. m 15 FORECAST For Detroit and vicinity: Mostly cloudy Sunday with snow flurries and colder tempenrmrTT; colder Sunday night with lowest temr>Craturc about 10 dpgree* above zero. (Weather Chart oa Faga Eight) . “Haw Irishman art dating bambs."

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