8 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

8 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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IN THE NEWS WHEN young Georg* Washing ton was fourteen hU school days came to an end, and he had seriously to consider what profes sion he would follow to make his way In the world. His mother dissuaded him from the sea aa a career, and he finally decided to become a surveyor. A surveyor’s lot was anything' but a bed of roses In those early days and In that wild country. But George probably made a good selection of the line of activ ity for his youthful years. It gave exercise to this mathe matical talent and certainly devel oped his powers of physical en durance. —- Some,ldea of the difficulties and Inconveniences of his work can be gathered from bis letters written at the time. In one instance he writes: “/ seeni tn hr in a place where nor* a I satisfaction is tn hr hud. Sinrr you re erired my letter in October Inst, 1 hare vot slerp'd above thrrr nights or four in a bed. but, after walking all the dag. I lay down be fore the. fire, upon a little hay, straw, fodder, or bear skin, which ever is to be had, with man, wife, and ; children, like a parrel at \ dogs and eats: and happy is he. who gets the berth near est the fire x / have never _ had my clothes off, but lay and sleep in them, except the few nights I hare lay'n in Frederic Town.” »po PARAPHRASE Gilbert:’ “Taking one eonsideration with another A surveyor's life was not a happy one.” Rut Washington did well at his work. He was like Lincoln. raw boned, very tall, very strong, and “could take it.” As Irving has told us: "Nothing was left half dour or done in a slovenly manner." And “to this day,” says Rldellng, "the surveys he made for Lord Fairfax and others are considered good and valid.” Thus at the age of sixteen Washington became public sur veyor of Culpepper County. Moreover, his life was not all hardship. He spent some time on his elder brother’s estate of Mount Vernon, and he was frequently a guest at the estate of Lord Fairfax, where he was not only employed as a surveyor hut welcomed as a friend. At Mount \ernon and at Lord Fairfax's home young Washington met not only the beaux and belles of Virginia, but had opportunity tn talk with military men and to develop a natural taste for soldier ing. It was. Indeed, but natural that he should have that taste. He had Inherited it from his an cestors who for generations had fought for England. Moreover, his brother Lawrence had served In the West Indies under Admiral Vernon. Because of that service the name Mount Vernon had been given to the Washington estate. APART from tho 4« matter*. George like many another military genius from the time of Cyrus the Great down, had dis played his masterful qualities at an early age. Even when a boy, Irving says: “All hts amusements took on o militant torn. “7/ r made toldiere of his schoolmates. “They had their mimic parades, reviews and sham fights. “A hoy named William Hustle was sometimes his (Continued on Next Page. Col. .5) In the Times Today R#tttr Health l'» Bug* ' B*#r 24 Comic* . 18. IV nnaanrom Puzil* 6 Dally Bh'»rt Story 10 F V. Durltnf in Financial 20. 21 Harlot Cartoon in H •roacnp* lit (Central Jnhnton a. 26 14a Jtan Kaln 13 L*tt#r* to Fditor 26 Macazin* P»r I" Paul Million 24 Movi* Program* 21 Obituaries “ Pattern .. . 12 "Pitfall* of l»vc * •••••••••.. IV Westbrook Pegler •••••• ••••••. 24 Radio Program* M Ripley IV Fltle Robinson in Damon Runvon St Aoctety . ••••••• 12 Sport* 15. 16 Stag* Screen . I? Dorothv rhom»*nn ....... it Vital Slat latte* / I’l Want Ad* 21 22. 2T 21 2'* W in* hell . 18 Wi*hmg Well 1“ What‘* the A nearer? 6 Women • Tage* .. .. 12. 13 Spend a Minute 11 BILLION FOR ARMS IN IT BILLION BUDGET RAID RUINS UNDER ST. PAUL'S DOME ill J-T gr . jflKjt mm, ■ wmmWmipS. v its BV U mwm mKOBKat ' BM m B I• • WgKr* *• . • - '■SnH sK v JH ...v %’ , ~ '^^BEL .!A -,%k4’ -N*‘ 9 ' y BBBBHIBI JftßHV 1 S I’ht'lo b) Inlrrtulltiftal >rm ruud h> RrllKh OlMir, Kind lord frtmt l.niidun tn \mfrlc* WRECKAGE. I.EIT BY NAZI BOMBERS IN THE WAR’S MOST SEVERE AIR RAID Bomb-wrecked buildings in the vicinity of St. Paul’s Cathedral. London, being dynamited to protect \RI’ workers and firemen from falling walls. This was the Tobruk Encircled B London Reports Defenses Reached, City Subjected to Bombing and Mechanized Forces Advancing International Neua *rr\lre (able I. O N I) O N , .lan. B.—British forces have virtually surrounded the Italian stronghold at Tobruk In Libya, authorlta 11 vr British quarters said today. British forces ha\e made con fact with the outer defenses of Tohruk while RAF planes bombed the town, and other mechanized detachments have swept around and In*wind Tobruk to rut it otf Just as ItardiH was isolated before it fell. By DESMOND TIGHE Infl Net** Hfrtlff staff ( orrrapondenf WITH THE BRITISH ARMY BEFORE TOBRI’K. Libya. Jan, B.—While advance ground con tingents and bombers hammered al the defenses of Tobruk. 70 miles west of fallen Bardia. British forces in Libya today rushed work on fortifications de signed to end the possibility of any Axis'drive against Sue/. Bertram nt air. army end naval bese* were being constructed in Libya hv RAE tiniis. army crews and naval engineers while Ihe DETRWPI#Prffi/IES Only Detroit Newspaper Carrying International —3* A'rw* Servict and Complett Sport Dispatches 41STYEAR, NO. 100 'icgc of Tobruk was pressed wiih increasing ferocity in a struggle to take it Itefore effective German aid ran conic to the Fascist de fenders. As the “decisive battle of the African war" swung into a new stage, two British columns launched frontal attacks on Tohruk while fast mechanized units sped further to the west in a drive to isolate Tohruk in the way Bardia was cut off before it fell. DEVELOP BARDIA HARBOR At Bardia, captured by the British three days ago. naval engineers were hard at work pre paring anchorages* to eliminate the reed for an extra day’s steaming from the British naval base at Alexandria for attacks on Tobruk. The RAE moved up its ground crews anti went to wotk restoring blasted Italian airdromes so that British planes can save an hour’s fl.ving time in fortheoming'assaults The nrniv advanced its divisional battalion headquarters to lorti (Continued on Page SixJ I DETROIT, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1941 section of the city practically wiped out in the “blitz.” raids following the Christ mas “truce.” Damage to radio transmis sion facilities delayed dispatch of photos. Balkan Seething Nears Crisis By GEORGE BALI NT- Int'l .»%»’• Srßiff bttaff ( nrrr*pttn'lfn( BUDAPEST, Jan. 8.- Fears of spreading warfare gripped the Balkans today as Bulgarian Pre mier Bogdan Filoff w«< reported planning to resign after returning to Sofia last night from a visit to Vienna. At the same time the situation in Rumania was reported critical as a result of raging civil strife in that country. Still further complicating the situation. Germany was reported taking measures to counteract any sudden Russian move in the Bal kan s , particularly against Ru mania. FIGHT AXTONESCI’ Increasing numbers of German and Soviet troop* were rejiorted facing each other across the Ru manian-Russian border. , In Rumania, it was reported, extremist elements of the Fascist Iron Guard organization have “declared war" against the regime of Premier Inn Antonescu. Local clashes and outbreaks of (Continued on Page Six) Entire Graft Panel to Be Challenged Charging thorp had boon a sys tematic exclusion of Hamtramck citizens from the special panel oi 223 veniremen from which a jury of 14 will be selected to try tin county vice and gambling graft case. Defense Atty. Arthur Wil lard said today that he would chal lenge the entire list. Willard, attorney for Bertha Johnson, alleged Hamtramck dis orderly house operator, will voice his complaint in a written motion to Circuit Judge Earl C. Pugsley’ | Willard's complaint came as tlv trial of 34 defendants, including former Prosecutor Duncan C, Mc- Crea and former Sheriff Thorns.* C. Wilcox, was slated to begin in the supervisors’ room of the County Building. ACTS TO SPEED TRIAL First step in the trial is to win now a jury of 14 'two alternates l from a large panel. To expedite

selection of the jury. Judge Pugs - ley will conduct the questioning Contending exclusion of Ham tramck citizens from the panel was prejudicial to the defense ol his client, Willard pointed out that such small communities as Belle ville. were represented on the panel, while Hamtramck had no representation. I First three jurors to ho excused for cause wore Mrs. Vera Ma rianuc, 1475 Frederick avenue: Charles Forbes. 368 Liberty street. Belleville, and Mrs. Alice Allcock. 2942 Cass avenue, j All said they had formed an opinion. ‘‘There must" be a reason for them (f he defendants) being here.” Mrs. Allcock declared. DEFENDANTS STAND Judge Pugsley required each de fendant to stand up and then asked earh prospective juror whether or not he knew the de fendants. | Opening of the trial, first of I the Ferguson grand jury cases, was delayed temporarily because of the tardiness of defendants William • Slicker) Page and Thomas C. Woodhams. McCrea. during the delay, asked the court for a ruling on a motion he filed yesterday , requesting a bili .of particulars. "The court docs not propose to delay thfs hearing any fur ther.” Judge Pugsley declared. “I'll consider your motion later.” M’fiRATH KEV WITNESS As the trial opened today, at tention centered on ruddv-faced "Barney” McGiath until 48 hours ago a defendant in the case, and now a key witness. McGrath, who had been Wilcox's right hand man, agreed to turn state's evidence on Monday. His decision caused a two-day delay in the trial's opening as the accuseds' attorneys scurried to perfect a new defense. However, when McGrath will testify is uncertain Special Prose cutor Chester P. O Hara refusing to indicate when he will call the former under-sheriff, now report edly an auto salesman. O'Hara had indicated earlier, however, that McGrath would not go on the stand until near the close of the prosecution's case. Actress Asks Divorce ' HOLLYWOOD. Jan. 8 »INS> -Chaining cruelty and desertion Poise llohart, film actress, today sought a divorce from William Mason Grosvenor Jr . whom she married in New York eight years i ago. 26 PAGES Roosevelt Budget For 1942 in Brief WASHINGTON, Jan. B.—Here's the 1942 budget in a nutshell: Total expenditures proposed $17,485,528,049 Total estimated revenues 8,963,773,830 Estimated deficit 9.210,093,049 Defense spending estimate 10,811,314,000 Non-defense estimate 0,074,213,449 Agriculture aid estimate 1,001,501,700 MAJOR REVENUES Income tax estimate 84,509,500,000 Total internal revenue 8,500,135,000 Customs 295,000,000 Miscellaneous revenue 101,438,830 This is liow it compares with the peak spending years of the nation's history—l9lß and 1919—World War years: 1942 SI 7.485,528.049 1918 18.881,940,243 1919 27.005,148.933 Every I .S. Ship Put At Full War Strength By GRIFFING BANCROFT JR. Inf *1 .Nmi Service Staff Cor respondent W ASHINGTO N, Jan. B—A sweeping reorganization of Amer ica's sea forces. laving the ground work for a two-ocean navy at full war strength, was announced to day by Secretary of the Navy Knox. Changes included: —Appointment of a new com mander-in -chief of the United States fleet, Hear Ad miral Hushand E. Kimmel. com mander of the battle force, to succeed Vice Admiral dames O. Richardson. O —l n creasing the active “ strength of the navy from 192,00 ft to 232,000 to man every vessel in commission “at full war strength.” —Elevation of the Atlantic patrol force to the status of a full fleet. Secreary Knox said that the changes outlined will become es-, fective February 1. Under the reorganization plans all three of America's sea torce units will have the status of fleets the u Paficic, Atlantic and Asiatic. Admiral Kimmel. as commonder in-chief of the Pacific fleet, will also be commander-in-chief of the United States fleet, Which now will include all three comimnents British Warship's Sinking Reported International .Nrwa Vrtlrr ( a hi* ROME. Jan. 8. Sinking of a British destroyer off the Egyptian port of Solium was announced by the Italian high command today. Nazis View Message Leading U. S. to War BERLIN, Jan. B.—(INS) Through its controlled press, the government today replied to Presi dent Roosevelt's congressional message pleding all-out aid to England by accusing him of seek ing to plunge the I'nited States into war. All Nazi newspapers attacked the President's speech as pure war projiaganda ' hut took the line that Germany will not allow her self to be provoked into drastic retaliation. THREE CENTS Previously the United States fleet included only the units in the Pacific. “This is a rearrangement to fit the facts,” Knox told his press conference “We have been gradually building up the At lantic force, which now numbers 125 ships of various classes, and we feel it should have the sta tus of a fleet.” No immediate change in the strength of either the Atlantic or Asiatic fleets are planned at the moment. Knox said. Rear Admiral Ernest J. King, at present commander of the At lantic patrol force, will become commender-m-chief of the Atlan tic fleet. Boy Scout Head Dies in Kenya International New* Service Cable NAIROBI, Kenya Colony, Jan. — Lord Baden-Powell, famous British military commander and founder of the ==- ■ i a Hero the defense of Mal e k ing in j&ii Bn. r War. ' 1 ’ ■' "■ - ; ■' ; - i' ' -A ' ' - \ - Mjgj- ll '-' Inm ’’S? the titles of Jk B P the Chief are S.-out and the That Neve Sleeps" latter • • m r result of his military serv- " AnlN ' r " Hlt '' ices in Zululand and M itaheleland. 11V* Hvcommvnil: “There Is a day ahead In whieh the flag of the United States will wave highest In this world—the symbol of unity with diversity, organization with freedom, science for humanity, peace and reason. * This will happen. Dorothy Thompson says, if we will it, plan it, and pay w*ith joy for it. Page 18. • • • “By too much sloganeering and too little debate we are ‘mumbling, fumbling, and stumbling,* Into war." General Johnson says Mr. Roosevelt’s "policy"' laid down in his annual message MUST he debated. Page 2t>. ft • • “We’re rolling the snowballs for Ihe other hoys to throw.* Bugs Baer sees the over-age destroyers already in the bargaia basement. Page 26. NIGHT EDITION Extra 3 Billion To Be Asked For Britain Ttxl of Mettago. ~. . Pag* 4 By EDWARD B. LOCKETT Int'l N>w» Smka Staff CumpMtai WASHINGTON, Jan. B.—Presi dent Roosevelt today submitted to Congress a record-breaking $17,- 500.000,000 budget which devoted nearly $11,000,000,000 to thi* democracy's "utmost efforts” for total defense. . Even this staggering t0ta1533,267 $33,267 a minute for the year omitted huge sum* proposed to ba spent on the President's lend-leaae plan for aid to Great Britain, Greece and China in their fight against totalitarian forces. Supplemental proposals for the latter purpose, unofficially esti mated at around $3,000,000,000, will be submitted later, the Presi dent said. 58 BILLION DEBT The budget message forecast a deficit of more than $9,200,000,000 next year, and a public debt of more than 558.000.000,000 by June 30. 1942, end of the fiscal period. Mr. Roosevelt suggested that Congress wipe out the statutory debt limit of the government, dis missing it as only a guide rule anyway, and not legally binding against additional borrowing. To help finance the spending, Mr. Roosevelt said revenue from taxation and other sources would reach an all time high— nearly $9,000,000,000. At the same time he urged Con gress to seek new revenues during the coming year, recommending "progressive taxes out of a higher level of natioinal income” which, he pointed out, is bound to result from the defense program. In fact, he predicted the national in come will reach record-breaking heights in the coming months. CUTS RELIEF So far as the fiscal year is con cerned, however, the budget and extra-budgetary spending antici pateed under the lease-lend plan undoubtedly will require a borrow ing program in excess of $10,000,- 000,000 in the next 12 months. As promised, the President took a considerable slice out of non -1 defense spending. Although fixed charges- txuch ax interest on the public debt) will amount to $3,200,- -*OOO.OOO, a slight increase over the current year, the so-called regular expenditures of government were slashed to $3,400,000,000. a reduc tion of $621,000,000, or 15 per cent. To accomplish this reduction, the President rut relief nearly one third to $995,000,000 and laid the economy ax on public works, agri culture. the CCC. national youth administration and numerous other activities. Available figures can give only a partial story of next year’s budget, the President explained in a press conference Actual spending, he emphasized, will be (Continued on Page Six)

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