9 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

9 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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IN THE NEWS ENGLAND wan disturbed by the defeat of the small force under 1 Washington It had sent against the French at Fort Duquesne. England was alarmed, too. At the reinforcement of the French troops In the Ohio, and at the prospect of a successful union of the Frtich Louisiana and Cana dian territories. So she determined to rout the French out of the Ohio country! entirely by a great and formidable expedition sent from England it self, with true British officers and genuine British regulars, and with actual British artillery and all that kind of thing—don't you know. No more of those Incompetent colonials, who could not with two hundred men. In the open, over come a thousand Frenchmen be hind the ramparts of a strong fort. England was determined to show this hlarsted colonial rabble how war was conducted In civi lized ciiiim tries anil how it ought to he made in the colonies. So General Braddock was sent to the colonies with two full regi ments of British regulars, all at tired In nice new red coats, to make the best possible targets for the enemy; and with officers who knew nothing about rough coun try and turbulent streams and rugged mountains and dense forests and treacherous Indians. Not that they were not splendid officers for service In continental 'Europe. And not, too, that they were not perfectly at home in the drawing rooms ol London or Bath BKADDOt H was a typical Brit isher of the tenacious bulldog variety, incomparable brave and unbelievably dumb. Benjamin Franklin in Ins esfi mate of Braddock said: “This fitnijfil v't’S. I think, (l brnTi win: and -Mi iff lit probably hm , niaili fauvinl tiguri in soon Kuro fiWii war. but In hail tan thurh arlf-confide net —ton high an opinion of the validity of regular troops.” Washington wrote regarding Braddock: "The flrncral, because nf frequent hrt riches r>f con tract, has lost all jtntir nee —and for urmf of that tempt r and uuul, rut ion which should in used In / a won of stun upon thrsr occasions will, I fear, r< pre sent us in a light uc little deserve. ,* “Instead of blaming the individuals, es In ought. In eh a ryes all Ins d appomt iiy nts to pilhbrlx i>n-s and look's upon tin roll nt r i, / hllu VC, a.S ' Old Onto find honest it.” Braddock had lanw for enm plaint to be sure. hut ho did not I worn to realise the didn ultles of obtaining everything ho wanted a* ortally in I hi* now count r> a* he had obtained hi* requirement* in old England. When tho division* of hi* army wore a**emhlcd at W ills t rook, Hraddook was naturally enraged at not finding thoro, ready on time, the horses and wagon* for which he had contracted. But Benjamin Franklin as post master general of tho province immediately step|M>d into tho situ ation and aecured them lor him. franklin wont among tho farm ers nf Pennsylvania and in two weeks, on his own security, ob tained 150 vehicles and the animals to draw them. Braddock grudgingly acknowl edged the servTro anil declared that this was “the only Instance nf address nr integrity which he had seen in the provinces.“ ABOI'T the time Iho army was ready to start on its march. Washington was strickrn with a severe illness. He was prostrated with high (Continued on Next Page, Col. 6) In the Times Today _ Fspf Better Health y» "Bug*" Barr 2h, 27 CrMi-W.nl Purrle v... is r>»lly flhort Htory y# V V Hurling .. .. \ y. Financial jh Hallo s Cartoon y§ ., % 21 fJeoeral John«< n M 11a Jean Kmn . . y. Magazine Page y» Paul Mai ion ;.n M <i vie Program? 12 ONtuartea j« Pattern . . y * "Pitfall* of i^ovp • 2 > t\e*throoß ppg *r ;*> R*lP* Program* It Ripley 2 7 F!«le y i Helen I* w <n-t . . j I l>am « ft ' n Bonetv / ' .. . Btage f* * Want ad? Wincheif ya_ \a"»hfng Writ 2% Women • Fagfi il. *. 2 * . Kimi BRITAIN UNDER BLITZ The Truth About Nazi Damage to England Ford and Murray to Make Parts for Big U. S. Bombers Strike Snarls Traffic in Chicago B\ HOW \R!> HANDLKWW Infl Sr*» vnlrr Muff ( orrts|mni|rnl CHICAGO, Jan. ft Chicago V v ithl municipal facilities, were dis rupted today by a strike of more 2,000 m ion employe* of tijt city against ;i proposed 10 pci cent wage rut. Traffic lights throughout the city were turned olf by city elec tricians causing a major traffic problem in the nation's second, largest city There were no lights in City Hall or other municipal building'. Most municipal building elevators were unmanned. Less than 200 of the city's 1.700 truck drivers and garbage men reported to work Dejiartment of sewers crews were not working. POI.ICK DIRECT TRAFFIC Emergency details of police were rushed to key intersections in an effort to direct traffic through the congested loop district, but there "'•re many corners with ncitiior lights nor traffic officers at which the re were serious traffic tangles All of the city s 6.400 police of ficers were put on 24-houf duty Seventy-two officers were detailed Of'the IK draw bridges that link the loop with the populous north and west side* The officers were under strict orders to present the inking hridgetendeis from raising ihe -[gins over the Chieago River I’olicc officials feared that if tiic bridge, vs ere raised they w ould not lie lowered, and traffic ar teries between the heart of thf fits and a good fiortion of its t e s id e n t i a 1 section would be -< ven d. FEDERAL \ lOLATIOS Tender Joseph Bnrnhofen of the Randolph street bridge, pointed out a ticklish problem in th;* con nection. however, by saying We dare not ignore anv boat's signal to raise the bridge. To do so would he a violation of the federal navigation law." The ‘-'like was authorized last night by memliers of 13 AFL unions whose member* work for •he city. The strike vote culmi nated a drawn-out series of con ferences m which the unions attempted to fsTsuado the cits council to drop its plan* for the Id per cent wage cut. which. under the plan i* to be effected through a reduction nf hours. * ’nly emergency crews were left working to man police and fire alarms. Light Snow Expected; Cooler Weather Due With a 1.8 inch fall of snow upon the ground, the weather bureau predicts an additional light snow (all during the day. It will be accompanied by cooler weather Caribbean Defense Secretary Stimson Unifies United States Army Forces Guarding Panama Canal and Hemisphere Infernattnniil Sfr»lff Wlrr W ASHINGTON Jan 9 Mov ing to strengthen this country's Western hemispheric defenses. Secretary of VWat Henry L. Stim •or, today announced formation of c unified army Garibbeah defense '■oo-rmnd. The new command Will include tho present Puerto Rico depart ment. the Panama Canal depart ment, and the new base command 0 ETRQIT# S TTM E S Only Detroit Newtpaper Carrying International Newt Service and Complete Sport Diepatehee 141 ST YEAR, NO. 101 Encircled Tobruk's Fall Near B\ DESMOND TIGHE Infl Nmm Vn Ira staff (nrrfft[Mtndfn( WITH THE BRITISH ARMY BEFORE TOBRUK. Jan. ft With Tobruk now fully' encircled and preparations for its speedy capture proceeding rapidly . Anzar mechan ized forces are operating far to the west of the Libyan port, the Th ins]) command announced today. At the same time it was re vealed that Tribesmen in Ethiopia are in rebellion against their Fas cist conquerors, “Encouraged by KAF sup port,” said an official announce ment, “Abyssinian patriots have compelled the Italians to leave their post at Guhha (near the Kenva frontier) and now are closing around the fleeing Italian garrison.’’ Farther north, the announce- ment added. British troops strik ing from the Sudan raptured an Italian |>ost in Eritrea northeast of Kas*ala As the British investment of Tobruk continued, some observers expressed belief that the Italians might let this stronghold go to the British with slight opposition, and that Marshal Rodolfo Grazi ani might make his final, des perate stand at Benghazi. British authorities said it would l>e practically impossible for the Italians to obtain reinforcements from the west, since British me chanized units—speedy tanks ami armored cars—control the area di rectly west of the beleaguered Libyan port and fortress Meanwhile, search continued for Gen Annibale < Electric Whiskers) Berganzoli. the Italian general who commanded the defense of Bardin At first he was reported captured by the British, hut yes terday it was revealed that he and some of his staff of officers had slipped aw ay— possibly before Bar dia finally *urrendered. HE W V FIGHTING—ROME

ROME Jan 9 tl.NSi—Heavy fighting is *till raging between Bardia and Tobruk in the western Libyan desert, the Italian high command said today w hile Premier Mussolini * press spokesman. Vir gmm G iyda. claimed that Britain * imjierial forces lost thousands of men, killed and wounded, in the battle of Bardia. The Italian high command ad mitted further heavy British raids on the great harbor of Trijioli Four persons were killed and at least 10 in lured, it was said. Spain Declares Carol Is Still in Seville Hotel SEVILLE, Spain. Jan 9—(INS) —Report* that former King Carol of Rumania and Magda Lupescu had left Spam for the United States were denied today. Carol and his entourage, it was stated, still are in residence at the Andal sian Palace Hotel. W recently set up on Trinidad, one of the Caribbean bases obtained from Great Britain. It was the second major defense move by America * fighting forces within the last 21 hours. The navy yesterday announced a *wc ping n rgani ton W.,,ch included or dei* t< man every vessel afloat at full war strength and to elevate the Atlantic patrol force into the status of a full fleet. (Sec Page 10.) DETROIT, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 9,1941 THIS IS WHAT ITALIAN TROOPS FACE IN AFRICA '****&: ;■*«* r<4 ■ */ > < ... Photo by International New Photo*, Patted by Britith Center MECHANIZED AUSTRALIAN CAVALRY ROLLING OVER THE SAND TOWARD LIBYA A motorized regiment rolling over the sand hills through the dust and heat of the I ■|l| 9 ||| || Shipyards Pounded By .IAMES E. BROW N Int i Nrm Senlrt Stan Cnrrr«|K>n<frnt LONDON. Jan 9.—Braving bad weather which grounded Nazi raiders. RAF bombers last night attacked Germany's naval ship yards at Emden and Wilhelms haven. it was announced officially today. The air ministry said explosions aid huge furs flared a' Wilhelms haven and that more than 20 fires broke out in Emdcn's docks. Other British bombers attacked a German airdrome at , Borkum Islands, where a barracks was hit by bombs and tires were caused. All the planes returned safely. While these attacks were in progress, not a Nazi raider ap peared over Britain. It was the third successive night the Nazis have failed to carry out bombing assaults on the British Isles. NAPLES, PALERMO BOMBED ROME. Jan. 9.—(lNS) —Enemy bombing attacks on the ports of Naples and Palermo were an nounced by the Italian high com mand today. The war bulletin also stated that an enemy sub marine had been sunk. BRITISH FACTORV BOMBED BERLIN. Jan 9. HNS)—A German bomber yesterday pierced the balloon barrage and anti aircraft defenses surrounding jyi important motor plant near Coven try and scored two direct hits on the factory, it was announced today. Italy Calls 250,000 ROME. Jan 9.--(INS)—A quar ter of a million more Italian youths, aged 19 and 20 years, today reported for military duty. Hrilain f tuivv itlitz 25,000 Die, Billion Loss Suffered by England Merrill Mueller, International News Service staff correspondent in London who has covered the battle of Britain from its ince-jtion and whose colorful personal experiences have ranged from being bombed out of his London apartment, narrowly escaping death, to flying with the RAF, returned to New York for a brief breath ing spell and brought with him seven uncensored eye witness articles on the war In these articles he tells how four months of almost incessant bombings have affected Britain; what the British army is preoaring in the way of a counter offensive; how Nazi-occupied countries are being honeycombed with Fifth Columns working for the British, etc. The first article follows: By MERRILL MUELLER International N>ns Service London ( orres|H>ndcnt | Despite at least several billion dollars worth of blitzkrieg damage inflicted upon England in four months of bombing, the work of the vaunted Nazi luftwaffe has been less than 10 per pent ef fective in crippling Britain's war effort. The bombs have killed roughly 25,000 people—virtually all civil ians—and injured a similar num ‘ber, less than naif of whom are maimed perhap. porimnontly. but the proo. they have done litt’e damage of military value lips " the scores of churches, embassies, paiaces. commercial buildings, and the 100.000 homes iat least! which have been dam aged or wrecked. Miraculously, factories have es caped damage and their war pro duction gone on—but such pro- 36 PAGES THREE CENTSI African desert to join the smashing British offensive that humiliated the Italian armv. duction has been saved not by the Nazi's bad aiming but by the will of the English workmen to carry on despite the fact that their homes are in ruins, their trans portation systems snarled, their public services temporarily out of action, their security and comfort rudely hlasted and. in too many cases, members of their families dead. The largest military objective Hitler has aimed at. and the one he has least damaged, is English labor. Bombs do strange things—not the least of which is to show the cpiiet bravery of little men. One 2.200-pound bomb will absolutely destroy a de|>artment store the v ize of Saks. Thirty-fourth street. in fl New York, while another will only break a few panes of glass. A 100-pound liomb will gut a block of homes; another will only knock (Continued on Page 15) 5-Year Term for Hopson Intsrnstlnnal N>»« gerslrc Wire NEW YORK. Jan. 9.—Howard C. Hopson, one-time robust utili ties magnate, now’ wan and skrunken, today was sentenced to a five-year term in a federal peni tentiary as the convicted looter of his billion dollar Associated Gas and Electric System. Hopson received with silence the pail term, imposed by Federal Jufflge Alfred C. Coxe. Hopson, who mushroomed a $48,000 invest ment into the far-flung utilities empire, only to see it fall liito bankruptcy under New Deal utility laws, was charged with mulcting the Associated System of more tiutp $20,000,000. Industry Employment Up 1.000 Since Dec. 15 Industrial employment in De troit remains at peak levels, with approximately 415.000 employed, an increase of 1.000 since Decem ber 15 and 3.1.000 since January last year, the Board of Commerce rejiortrd today. The employment index stood at 121 9 December 31 compared to 121.5 two weeks earler. 11V* llecomnipmi: "If you are determined and accurate, you can take from half an inch to an inch off you waistline In a week.” Ida Jean Haul gives tips on waistline slimming. Page 22. • • • ay "That Stalin is a dictator who denies religious, intellectual and political freedom to his subjects Is a proposition that doesn't even require discussion.” Stalin is worse than Hitler, says West brook Pegler. Page 36. • • • "Yes. sir, 20 years or so ago. I wrote the world’s only aarcaatla love song, entitled, ‘When I'm With You, I’m Lonesome."* Rugg Baer is thinking of getting into the songwriters' fight Page A EDITION Rouge Plant Expansion - Planned Ford Motor Company will manu facture parts for giant four motored army and navy patrol bombers and enlarge the plane building facilities of its Rouge plant. Edsel B. Ford, president of the company, announced today. That Detroit is rapidly becom ing tne key city for aircraft pro duction was further emphasized by the revelation that negotiations : for the Murray Corporation to build $30,000,000 worth of bomber parts for the Douglas Aircraft ' Company, one of the largest sub contracts yet planned under the national defense program, have been nearly completed. MAKE WING SECTIONS The corporation will make inner wing sections for bombers, and production is expected to start this Spring. When peak produc tion is reached, all of Murray'* present idle plant will be in use. Most of the tooling necessary for the plane part production will be done in Murray's own shops. In making his announcement. Ford said the parts made in the company plants would be assem bled by Consolidated Aircraft of San Diego, Cal., in a new plant to be built at Fort Worth, Tex. In an interview with Interna tional News Service at San Diego after an inspection of the great Consolidated plant, Ford said that he was amazed at the_complexity of the processing of the long-range bombers, known as B-245, and stated that an entirely new type of plant would have to be con structed in River Rouge to manu facture them. NEED SPECIAL TOOLS His company will also contract to furnish parts for the Douglas Aircraft Company which turns out planes for the war department Ford said. "Although we can use many of the tools already on hand in our plant for the machining of some parts,” Ford said. “It will he necessary to Install special dies. Jigs, and forms adapted to airrraft production. Thla tooling period will be a matter of months.-. Our company Is ready ing Itself as rapidly as possible and the flow of parts to the assembly plant can possibly start within the year.” The B-24 Is one of the plane types selected by the war depart ment and the national defense (Continued on Page Six) U. S. Aircraft Carrier On a Secret Voyage NORFOLK, Va„ Jan. 9 —HNS) —The aircraft carrier Ranger slipped out of the naval base here Tuesday, bound for an unan nounced destination, believed to be the Caribbean, It was learned to day. All valuable property of the officers and crew, as well as photographs and other personal mementoes, were taken ashore for safe keeping, it was reported.

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