12 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

12 Ocak 1941 Tarihli Detroit Evening Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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Directory ]—General News, Travel 2 —Sports, f inance, Radio, Hobbies —Society, Theaters, Fashions 4—Real I state. Classified }—Pictorial Review, March of Lvcnts, Autos, Vt'ar Pictorial 6 American Weekly 7 Comics 41ST YEAR. NO. 104 End Sought To Confusion In Vote Here Race for Legislature in Detroit Would I’e by Districts nv i t; wk morris Tim*** staff r«rr««|M>f>drnl LANSING .lun 11 Rural l<-g --,)or« pp : t d Saturday to ask tl ■ voters <i‘ 1 can this Spring 1n split I a‘fruit into legislative tfr^+r’Cf l Till S’ propose to end the ronflt i ' -i i at -or 1 (,i I), Iroiteis i;\'h luennium when ih> voters go to the irfills and tind as many as 350 < ndldntes ittnning for the House fa' ~Repir>sentatives. - fnr a constitutional amendment- is i Mwyted to fie ininxluced next "■ ek and the machinery fs ready to send it 'I rough both hunse- WTthout de*n\ When n; - d t* re-olution will • Ft . I 11. 5i,,.;, the idee. Expdct ‘lni’ to Fi;;ht r.. •i • I fa •r.tiej of the House of 7 ■ • seitop '-s h i\jng hewn . !. .i or v-r the present system. .. : ■ >” the rit’otse-etf reform. ■ , , ii. i.hi es h'W , : !:. -j-1_ s, i Sen t ■ IT ' . • [■ "' V has < ■ ir.;n'i .i- in each branch and Tpe'si no• .i ■’i tta ni'iet s are W hole- ’ ■i. ‘ls in i.ivor of the proposal. .... . -n i—i h-iii-y f>eiroil t*it*C —•t r"; 1 thi <*. * v admini«tra • i ’ itj \vTyre t’ltunn - fVtartf p ~ ( sii.i4— -fsi- n-h rx are not ii— t.p.rm Iteeausr of ,y f,,r Jstio;t voters who are ir>’s !i d i eh primary to jack I ..I;! .srf -teg 1 ,lo from stagger- It's Partisan Idea •p r. v e in I 'rested only hc r )he\ fx la ve l> troif might nil a fi w Hi "i ihlicans to the L<-g --dtiM'v for -t change, instead of li.-nix rats t 11 • city is divided i! q, tl , ir differ the o ps-ate rr <!!.:::> finds itself : u • \ • I>. t toil fit l/cns . n Su|k Oak -1 , ' -t( ■ f d a. Sufier v: ii. , i * **- i offie:als and ■ , . , : n , leetron re ■ . .I i oiistituttonal r • . -.I si . hy the votel • 11 ~•«.!• plrt into , ij, i- iinty -uper- * * i -'las ifharly • . • : ;» ;iu!ai a n tiaM* ~ m, rs will I on gate from among n />tHT** n th4*ir own I • e Till rarch 3 '.imat;. 1 \ e uni i! * • ii 3m •, •■<-e the coo*) itutional . . tv „n the he Hot. this • • it• ■r • every indication pe V resohjtion will that tie: dime. \ nt the f petit '.nun firo . . . no r‘P h 11 f— rhv ufi d into ' 1 pre(ia led to t I :!■ : i Spring camiuiign • : I . \ S i dh < nunneer • t , ■ Way n County }>.,,;(• ,i r whom they ho;x’ < < er,time d on Page I'D Stnrt TODAY to Read * "DEADMAN'S PASSPORT" by Max Btand in the AMKPsICAN WKKKI.Y \ See the WAR P/.G r '' v/D'-, ACT'GM ! C""’ -r » in PsCVi'iV/ Mrtrbj.iHt t Ht-y u ne • Wn‘c' for l.x'e-t War P' • -H V/ce^ SULOAY TIMES PART ONE Curb on Mr. Roosevelt Seen in Aid Bill Battle Stubborn Struggle Forecast as Foes Form Non-Partisan Anti-War Bloc; Ultimate Victory Predicted Hy CKCIL B. IJK KSO.V lot l S*wu Hrrvlrr staff < onripoadMit WASHINGTON, Jan. 11—Con gress will approve the all out aid to Britain program after drasti t aI f y curtailing unprecedented [towers conferred on President Roosevelt in the original hill *n» idieck-reins probat I. will in i lude a two-year limitation on his authority and a requirement tl.„: the British furnish some security for American warships, jtlanes and munitions leased or loaned to them. This was the concensus tonight among both ojtponents and pro fxtnents of the plan, a survey—of! International News Service dis closed. Stubborn Battle Seen But final approval wj 11 not come until after a stuftlKirn liattle. which will fie centered largely in the S< nate where anti-interventionists marshaled their militant forces to take the issues of dictatorship, un derlined war, and the end of de moeracy to the country ui a ra^io + retrpmgnr Ihe fight will \te along non-, fiaitisan lines Bastern seealxiurtl lb-publicans, with few exceptions. favor utmost effort to aid the “British. Chinese and Greeks in their wars against Axis powers white The anTi-mtervenribn hkv i> <omixwed largely nf ml(t,invlnrn liemocrnis and Republicans. Between 30 and 35 members of the Senate can fx* counted as [xisitive" votes for a declaration nf wat against Germany if Presi <ii nt Rixisevidt requested rt Sen ator Gerald !’. Nye <R) of North Dakota declared today. Predicts Changes Strategy of the administration in calling for virtual dictatorial l<owers for ihe President to handle ts < jirogram. and estimated to com lx-tween $5,000,000,000 and X 10.000.000.000, meantime was learned to he that the President will accept and sign any arsenal lor democracies legislation, Con- Girl Golf Star Taken by Death Cc''een Cunninqhar !6. *o Be Buried Tuesdav S rvice-* will hi- held Tuesday ftu Coll' -I’ <'unningham. 16. for two years women'- junior gofl champion, who died unexpectedly at her home. 11140 Rutland ave nue. Sat- fm . ~ | ui day . I- . JhHKN . - of pm ut jJ HR i - l.it'T AafC* ,-r < d «h)U jJk ''' •or J^H i . V S jk, Jl : h _ ■ k % ew cun nine ham mix* i i vmm.h v m ,s|x-nalized in music and would have graduated in June. She was the daughter of George M. Cun ningham, cad d y chairman at Western Golf and Country Club and manager of the Detroit Tag and Salesbnnk Company. Willie Hoppe Improves CHICAGO. Jan. 11— (INS) Willie Hoppe, famous world threr eushion billiard champion, was pronounced "much improved” to night at St. Luke's Hospital where he was taken seriously ill from an attack of inlluen/a Firearms Bearing Swastika Discovered in Costa Rica Iv«t» rnuttonal %ph« Sfnlff I ■»»!* SAN JOSE. Costa Rica, Jan li. Discovery of a cache of light arms, stamped with the Nazi swa stika. at a point 45 miles south of San Jose was announced tonight hy Costa Rican authorities. Largest Circulation of Any Michigan Newspaper □ E S gross sends to him, whether it limits his authority or not. 4» Sigmficfmt-vvasThr-predict ion by Senator George (Dl of Georgia, chairman of the Senate foreign relations eomrmttec. that the sweeping measure would be amended. Affirming hi> approval of the bill’s general objectives. George refused, however, to gjvg blanket support. He >.aid there wa« considerable opposition to de tails. He said: “I lielieve the Ameriean peo ple will demaiKl that the Hritlsli provide •ecurity.” He stressed that Republicans and Democrats were sponsoring a two-year limit on the vast powers given the President. Senators" Austin iRVof Vermont, acting minority leader and Bridges •Rt of New Hampshire, both en fiorsing the British aid program, however, proposed the two-year limit on presidential authority which is approved be ihe- anti: inlcrv tnt lomsi —bkx* header* hv Senator Wfieeler 1 D) of Montana A group of anti-intrrventionis+Sr meeting secretly with Wheeler, de cided to fight for the two-year limit proposal, if they fail to de feat the measure, if the two-year limit fails, they firoposc to advo cate ending the extraordinary f»iWel : wTlefi Fl e-efent Rofervclt ends fii<* third term on Jan. JO. 1915. Meeting Wednesday Chairman George called a meet mj- of his committee for Wedrn-s --da; and predicted that adequate hearings would ho held to give Imth administration and opfxisition witnesses a chance to testify. Joining House Sfx-aker Rayburn and Senate Majority Leader Bark ley in predicting final passage of the British aid program, George said: “Probably the real debate will center around the extraordinary (Continued on Page Four) Turks Smyrna District Swcpl By Earthquake Inlrrnjifi«»n»l Nr«t ( nhl«* ISTANBUL. Jan. 11 Heavy damage was reported in the Smyrna district tonight as the re sult of earthquake shock- -weep ing that section of Turkey. No casualties were reported al though many home- were -aid to have lx-en shaken to the ground and walls of ot her building cracked by the temblors At the first sfax-k. which wa accompanied by loud underground rumblings, mo.-t of .the populace fled to- the fields and nearby open spaces it was reported- This slight warning saved thousands of liv • - it wa- believed. Deer Killed Running Info Car on Woodward Tlwf» C*orr*-«|Min»|rnt PONTIAC. Jan 11 -A yearling deer was killed tonight at Wixxl ward avenue and Square Lake road when it bounded against the side ot the car of John F Craig. 31. of 24 Midland avenue. Highland Park hur several days reports have reached police of Pontiac and sur rounding villages nf a doer roam ing at large Conservation officers believe the deer drifted down from the north woods. Rush Serum to Athens NEW YORK. Jan. 11 (INS! At the urgent request of Athens, 25,000 anti-gangrene serum and an equal amount of anti-tetanus serum will leave Wednesday by Clipfx-r. The serum, which will be sent by the Red Cross, will he rushed from Lisbon to Athens, it was announced today. The police said tlk-y were ques tioning a group of Nicaraguans susjx-cted of being the owners >f the firearms, hut that this intern, gation was proving unsatisfactory as all remained silent. Only Detroit Newmaper Carrying International News and Complete Sport Dispatches DETROIT, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY. JANUARY 12, 1941 Survey Paints City as Rich But Shabby Urges 5-Year Finance Plan for Repairs and Replacements Picturing Detroit a 5300.000.- 000 plant shabby for lack of paint and ci caking for fnrrg postponed repairs, the Detroit Bureau of Governmental Research Saturday ii i city officials to inaugurate a long range financial program to include needed construction and i eplacement. The recommendation came as Mayor Edward J. Jeffries was as signing the city plan commission the task of—studying future civic requirements. Think of Today Only The bureau concedes that long range financing .1* -politically un’ - jxipular. Job holders, it admits, are prone to think more—of today's problems and tomorrow's election than of the city's condition five years from now. "But," tHe recommendation stati “it i» populmr with the taxpayers because it means an orderly development without -se rious disturbances to the usual services rendered by the city and without a hurdensdVne tax rate." Looking backward, the bureau tiruts that previous methods of capital improvement failed to work -out: —Bond i-S-sUeS to postpone pay-' ments of improvements failed bo- Clft.-se “the anticipated added imputation and increase in wealth n:d not rffaTei laltre Construction, i« such, w-as thereafter practically eliminated from the budget,” Bureau’s Recommendations As a solution of the repair and replacement needs of Detroit’s streets, sewers - , sidewalks, public buildings and other physical assets, the bureau recommends: —Definite five year financial program on a virtual budget basis. —Establishment of priorities, scheduling most needed im provements for early construc tion. With the present budget of aie proximately $67,600,000 a> a gun,.'. Common Council and the may.a next month will fx-gin budgeuin i-xpt nditures for 1941-JJ If they follow the bureaus recommends tion they project their financial Funking to 1946 Act to Extradite Lipman in Bribe Ho Vc vCot'' r 3C ; or He’d - Atter Chicago Arrest j T-vo Tietioit detectives will go i" Lansing Monday to tx-gin extra dition proceedings against William S Lipman contractor and fugitive witness m the Herman Gardens housing [uoject probe.- who was arrested Saturday in Chicago. Lipman v ice president and gen > ral manager of the Lipman Con struction Company which, with the C A. Smith Construction Com pany. was successful bidder for the '.58,300,000 project, is wanted hcri- on a perjury warrant The warrant was issued last Tuesday by Circuit Judge Homer Ferguson, who conducted a one man grand jury investigation into the contract award Lipman .iumix>d his bond here and the bond was declared foi - leited Arrested early Saturday morning in Chicago ai the requ«si of Detroit police, he prompily announced he would tight txira dii ion here. After his arrest Saturday he was released on a new bond of St.TinO px-nding arraignment in Chicago Felony Court Monday The decision to send the two detectives. Sergt. Leo Maciosek and Mason Hirst, to Lansing tc begin extradition proceedings was made by Prosecutor William E. ffowling after a conference with the two officers The perjury charge against the Chieago contractor allegisi that he rhade false statements before the grand jury. He refused to' discuss the accusation after he was ar rested. «

The investigation into the Her man Gardens contract began after Council President John W. Smith he had hern offered a $25,000 bribe to vote for concrete con struction ms .-ad of steel. British Dash to Cut Libya; Fireblitz on London Foiled; Bombs Ravish Portsmouth Civilians in Capital Help Extinguish Incendiaries By (.FORGE LA IT ■ nil Nom vnlff *»aff Corrr»|Hm4iiH LONDON. Jan. ll.—Waves oi German fire and dive bombers to night hammered London with ore of the worst bombardments yri staged, hut thousands of civilian and uniformed men and women fought valiantly and successful;; to prevent the capital from being enveloped in flames. The assault, which followed a devastating raid last night on Brit-, am’s chief naval seaport of Ports mouth. killed or wounded numer ous Londoners and trapped many others beneath tons of debris that littered at least one public square, several thoroughfares and residential districts. Churches, Shops Hit Among buildings smashed o; severely damaged in the blitzraid, which struck virtually all parts of the metropolis, were church, commercial structures, strops and many private homes. A sudden change in weather and i*-pnt ted simultan or> u- Royal—A+e Force counter-attacks on German air bases in northwest France to night were gjygn. a large share of credit for halting the fierce bom bardment less than four hours after it began. Despite the widespread casual ties and damage caused, British sources said the raid “flopped badly.” inasmuch as it failed to kindle uncontrolled fires. The bombardment was carried out in two stages—first, thousands of incendiary bombs including a new "fire scattering" type; and secondly, planeloads of huge demo lition missiles. The raid ended more than two hours before mid night. Briti-h night eomhat planes helped the thundering anti-aircraft guns in the fight against the raiders. The "all clear” sirens signaled the departure of the raiders within four hours after the luftwaffe launched its large-scale attempt to exceed the destruction wrought in the fireblitz attack on London December 29. London appeared To have had the full "benefit" of the Germans' night- work. No raids were reported elsewhere in Britain. Six Churches Hit The esjiecially equipped RAF night fighters—Britain's new arm of defense against night raids were credited also with having limited the damage done in the night-long bombardment of Ports mouth which ended early Sat urday. They -hot down one and were n-[x>rted to have fatally disabled five of the raiders. Portsmouth’s anti-aircraft guns felled another. Nevertheless, scores of huildings and homes in the southern English port were wrecked or damaged, including six churches, hotels, schools, theaters, movie houses, hospitals and "model tenement” house- Numerous fires were set and several persons were killed or injured. i The Germans claimed to have started at least 58 fires in Ports mouth, including two giant con flagrations.! The* lord mayor of Portsmouth. O. L. Dailey, in a statement to its citizens, said: “At last the blow has (alien. Our proud city has been hit, and hit very hard, by the enemy.” British Industry Crippled By Bombs, Goering Says Inlrmatlonal Nfiu Sprvlrp ( »hU BERLIN, Jan 11.—Reich Mar shal Goering claimed today the German air force had virtually paralyzed British war industries and said that Britain's strategy of cutting off Germany's metal sup ply had failed —because "German ore ... is just as good when it is raining down in the form of bombs and shells." Speaking before a group of s©) miners and armament workers whom he. decorated for valorous service. Goering claimed vast strides in German production and said Britain's wartime armament production has been reduced by 60 to 70 f>er cent. Other British industries. Goer ing said, have been reduced by 50 per cent. But German aimamrnts, he stated, 'have tremendously in- ISSUED EVERY SUNDAY Report 5 British Ships Hit in Mediterranean Nazi Bombers Join Italians in Attack on Fleet; Rome Claims Damage to 3 Aircraft Carriers Bv Ml< HAM < HOflflO Int i »*» flfrvlir Stuff CarnspMdmt ROME. Jan. 11. Four air at tacks on the British Mediterranean Fleet, in one' of which German planes joined with the Italians for the first time, were— announced ! tonight in a special Rome commun nique theft claimed three British aircraft carriers, a cruiser and a destroyer were damaged. Bombs weighing 2.200 pounds "and huge aerial torpedoes were hurled against British naval squad rons in the onslaughts, executed -ovm:—four— tn the Sicilian Channel yesterday. These multiple air blows were acclaimed in Fascist having inaugurated a combined . Italo-German aerial offensive de signed to smash the British Motii terranean fleet and keep open Italy’s sea communications with the British-invaded North African colony of Libya. Carrier Hit Twice The special bulletin, issued sev eral hours after the regular Italian high command communi que had announced Germany’s entry inio the Mediterranean struggle, .-aid Friday's series of Italians in Flight Strafed by RAF Thousands Held in Trap Stampede to Hills By \ F. ANGFXOPOLLOS Int'l Nrm Vr\lff MiHM orrfMMtndml ATHENS. Jan. 11. ltalian columns fleeing northw-ard from the abandoned central Albanian base at Klisura were bombed and subjected to machine gun fire by- British plane:., it was officially an nounced tonight. Hordes of the 20.000 routed Fascists were trapped in the nar row Berati road when shattered tanks and motor transports at the head of the column blocked escape. The British bombers swooped down upon the milling thousands with machine guns blazing and turned what had been a rout into an hysterical stampede to the hill .. according to informed Athens sources. These sources hinted that this follow-up attack might have been even more effective than that which resulted in the capture ol strategically vital Klisura yester day. creased” since the outbreak of the war. "German armament plants,” he said, “huve not had their pro duction touched by the air war. “British bombs sometimes have temporarily disturbed work but they have failed to halt pro duction jn a single factory. “But there’s a tremendous difference over there . . . “Compare the damage 20 or SO British bombers have raused in Germany with the havoc wrought hy 300 or 400 German bombers loaded with three times as ninny bombs as the British planes. “Not a few attic flres have been caused. Blit attle fires will not change the course of the war when Germany Is wip ing nut whole plants In Eng land.” attacks was started with a raid on British warships south of Sicily by German high-level and Stuka dive-bombers, escorted by Reich fighters. TV British aireraft carrier was hit twice in the stern and once in the bow with 2.200-pound bombs, and a British destroyer was simi larly struck, the announcement claimed. 15 Ships in Squadron (The German high command In "Berlin aimounml lliar Reich planes "for the first time took battle action in the Mediterra- ! nean area” and “succeeded in-j obtaining several hits on' Two j • enemy naval units, including an aircraft carrier.” (Participating Stuka pilots in their reports to German air headquarters claimed even , greater success, saying that, in addition to the carrier, "one j battleship and other warships, including a destroyer, were dam aged by direct hits, despite the fiercest anti-aircraft fire.” They -;iirl the British squadron they (Continued on Page Four) Brest and Havre Attacked by RAFi Nazi Ship Bases Thumped in Moonlight Raid By -JAMES E. BROWN' Inf I News Service Staff Cnrrcvpmidml LONDON, Jan. 11. Smashing' British night raids on the Ger-i man-occupied French ports of; Brest and Le Havre, where Nazi shipping was heavily attacked, i were announced in London today. The RAP" assault on the German naval base at Brest was the fourth j carried out this week. German naval establishments there were plastered with tons of bombs. An air ministry announcement issued Saturday afternoon stated: "In bright moonlight the RAF bombed the dockyard at Brest last night. "Two direct hits were ob tained on the bows of a large vessel and fires were started in the dockyard. Smashing Blow Seen “Shipping at Le Havre also was bombed. “No British planes are missing." The British attack on Brest Friday night followed up a series of assaults on that base which is believed to have caused widespread destruction. This raid was the latest of a series of British air blows that pulverized Axis targets from Nor way through Europe to the Red Sea and which included Friday's tremendous "full dress" daylight assault on the Pas de Calais dis trict of occupied France. i A German radio brbadcast claimed at least six and per haps eight British planes were shot down when the British. Friday, i aided the Channel |x>rts. I Australian Radios Silenced MELBOURNE. Jan. 11. (INS> The Australian navy minister. W. M. Hughes, today ordered clos ing of four commercial radio sta tions on the grounds that they were broadcasting shipping infor mation potentially valuable to Germany. FINAL Foaturei U/ \ U:« Hut S/gy Out of Wsr, sn li»uf view U’nh Robert E. Woods Four ?»§*• of Furttpe’t Conflict; How Dttroit Ift* <Ju»try Helps Defense —Putotud PRICE TEN CENTS Cairo Puts Italy’s Loss at 80,000 Shot, Captured By W. P. SAPHIRF. 10l l Nr»i Ser*lre staff Corre»|«mdr»t CAIRO. Jan. 11.—While rein forced British artillery poured a hail of shells into the besieged Italian coastal base of Tobruk, Cairo general headquarters tp night revealed that nearly 80.000 Italian troops have been lulled, wounded or captured since the western desert offensive began. Meanwhile. British Empire forces launched an offensive to cut off all Cyrenaica in one great 250- mile thrust. Simultaneously a four-pronged drive against Italian East Africa from the Sudan and Kenya Colony was accelerated. Encircling Movement A strong imperial mechanized column was reported striking southwest of Tobruk in an en circling movement which, if suc cessful. will cut off the whole hump of Cyrenaica. Such an offensive would mean -the isolation and eventual capture of Bomba. Derna. Benina and Ben ghazi in a single coup. Prisoners taken, the high com mand stated, included a much larger force in the recently cap tured base at Bardia than was originally supposed. A total of 44.808 prisoners, including 2,041 officers, was taken in Bardia alone, it was claimed. (Authoritative London sources estimated total Italian troop losses at 108,000.) (The German Hamburger Fremdenblatt hinted that the Italians might have to abandon all of Libya and make a stand on the far western borders of the colony.) ' Clarifies Estimates Announcement of the official figures clarified what had been a widely divergent set of estimates for the British captures in Libya, estimates which ranged from 50.000 to 108,000 prisoners, with even wider ranges in war ma terials. It is now revealed officially, however, that 3.500 Fascist offi cers are numbered among the prisoners, and that 41 medium I tanks, 162 light tanks. 589 field guns, with more than 300,000 rounds of ammunition: more than 600 machine guns and 700 light machine guns or automatic rifles with 11.000.000 rounds of machine gun and small arms ammunition, and 1,700 motor trucks were among the war materials seized. Much of this material was in a woeful state, it was announced, due to British bombardment and lack of care. General Captured It was also revealed tonight that one of the Italian generals who had fled from Bardia as British and Australian troops launched their final victorious assault, had been captured while trying to make his way to Tobruk on foot, i There was no indication as t n this Fascist general's identity, al though Cairo sources said there was a possibility it might have been the commander-in-chief, Gen. Annibale Bergonzoli, who was missing when the great Libyan .fortress surrendered. In Bardia alone, it was said. 368 medium heavy field guns and smaller sizes were taken, as well as 26 heavy anti-aircraft guns. 68 light anti-aircraft guns. 13 medium tanks. 117 light tanks and 708 motor transport vehicles. , The Weather hoi ri v TKMruunu* * P m 2K to p. ,2* " p m 21 It p. m .2* » P m 10 12 midnight ... 7» » p m JO - I ♦ FORECAST For Detroit anti vicinity; Cloudy: somewha t warmer^ northerly winds becoming southerly. ♦ I l (Weather ( hart on Page Ml) "WMMl’t • saw Tra |a a kiriii Mp (Hat Italian ratraat?" |

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