30 Temmuz 1953 Tarihli East Cleveland Leader Dergisi Sayfa 1

30 Temmuz 1953 Tarihli East Cleveland Leader Dergisi Sayfa 1
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i 3 3 i I 3 1 s i 1 3 I I A Mail Addresses Business: 814 E. 152nd St. Phone GLeoville t-4383 News: 14600 Endid Avb. Apt. 302 City Hits New High In First Six Months New Building Permits With the number and valuation of building permits issued in the Greater Cleveland area for June reaching new heights, a check of East Cleveland’s contribution to the record breaking total shows it setting the pace for the suburbs, together with Bedford, University Heights and Lakewood. East Cleveland’s June building permits represent the surprising valuation of $1,021,275 of which $1,017,175 was for new construc tion, another record for the city. During the first six months of the year 113 permits issued totaled A valuation of $2,038,203.00. The 1953 over-all total was $1,568,247. The largest single permit in June is for $900,000, representing an expansion program of Tow niotor Corporation. Earlier in the 3 ear the company was granted a $15,000 permit for foundation con struction. The 113 permits issued from January 1st through June 30th vere classified as follows: Resi dences for 31, Industrial 3, Com mercial 16, Garages 22 (exclusive of garages included In the 31 dwellings) alterations, repairs, etc. 41. Included in the 31 dwelling per­ Mrs. Bolton Goes To U.N Frances P. Bolton Congressman has been named ____ by President Eis enhower as one of the five U. S. representatives to the United Na tion General Assembly. She retains her seat in Congress as represen tative from Ohio’s 22nd district. The assembly session will open •In mid-September and is expected to remain in session until the last of December. Mrs. Bolton has for 13 years been a member of the Foreign Af fairs Committee and has been chairman of the sub-committee on Africa and the Middle East. She has been active in sponsoring legis lation for U. S. aid to war or phans and in furtherance of nurse training in this country. In a special message to consti tuents in Cleveland. Mrs. Bolton expressed her deep appreciation for the opportunity of using her know ledge gained in her years of serv let on the committee of Foreign Affairs in so broad a field as the UN. Hostel Travel Reveals Beauty Of The British Isles To Local Youths Doing the British Isles and Europe via bicycle, with their over-night stops at Youth Hostels is the thrilling summer being ex perienced by Frank Hamilton, jr., of 1836 Knowles st. and Ross Fire stone, jr., of 1870 Burnette ave. The boys were classs mates in the Shaw June 1950 class. The trip across was aboard a Student Ship from Montreal. On board were 500 boys and girls, all about 20 years of age. Some of the travelers were “on their own,” some were enroute to summer schools abroad, and some in con ducted groups. Ross and Frank were “on their own.” Mornings aboard were filled with lectures and discussions. After noons and evenings were given to recreation. Dress was always in formal. After nine days, the ship docked and the East Cleveland travelers began their tour from London. Frank likes his new bicycle, bought in London, with its hand brake, steel clips that come over the toes, four gears ard fast easy pedalling. He writes it does hills no other bike could do. Their first cycling outside of London was to Cambridge. Here a former teacher of Frank’s (Uni versity of Chicago) and his New Volume No. XJ—No. 31 mits are the 18 houses being built in Forest Hill Development by the Scholtz Construction Co., of To ledo. They are located within a square, facing Lee rd. on the east side. A new medical building, and a Sisters Home in Christ the King parish are included in the new con struction, together with four stor age tank installations. In dollars the new homes ac count for approximately $845,000 in the six-month period. Industry contributed $920,000 and commer cial firms $132,000 in construction. The alteration, repair and addition permits add up about $25,000. East Clevelanders spent about $25,000 to build much needed garages. The three suburbs which kept in step with East Cleveland in the Greater Cleveland listing show ths following June permit construction figures: 552,815, Bedford University Heights $1, Lakewood $1,039,370 and $1,919,920. it cannot be predicted to While what figure construction permits may go for the last six months of the year, it should be fairly good in comparison. For instance, the new $10,500,000 apartment proj ect for the east side of Superior rd. in Forest Hill Park is expected to get half of its proposed build ings under way this year. The construction boom, in addi tion to adding new homes and im proving many others, adding new industrial operations and improv ing others, will also have its ef fect on the city’s tax duplicate and consequently, on the tax return. G. T. Apthorp, Finance Director for East Cleveland points out that whatever portion of new building construction is finished by April 1st goes on the duplicate for that year. Tax returns come in the fol lowing year. Since the far larger portion of the more than two million dollars in. construction valuation reached here the first six months is listed after April 1st, no perceptible tax return from this 6-month period of construction can be anticipated here until 1955. Miniature Traffic Signals Are Gifts Traffic safety instruction in the eity schools will be speeded up this fall, thanks to the East Cleve land Kiwanis Club. The club has given the Police Department three miniature traffic signal sets for use by its Traffic Safety Divi sion in teaching safe crossing of streets to Kindergarten and First and Second Graders. A new procedure in safety In struction will be introduced with the fall term of school. Hereto fore all instruction has been given by the officers of the traffic divi sion under the new plan the of ficers will brief the teachers who, in turn will set up their own sched ule and teach their own class. The Traffic Safety Division, under Lieut. Charles Vyse and Sgt. Wil liam Hartford will see to it that the miniature traffic signal dem onstrators are on deck for each class- boys England wife, showed the beautiful Trinity and King’s Col leges. Frank went “punting” on the river Cam to get the lovely views of Cambridge’s lawns and buildings. “From Cambridge,” writes Frank, “we cycled the 35 miles to Peterborough in 3% hours to see the Cathedral which dates back to the 12th century. We took a train the 100 miles to Wakefield, a hilly, coal mining district and cycled and walked to Haworth, home of the Brontes. “We made a short bus trip into Bradford were Ross had engaged to buy a loud speaker. The owner of the business which produces about 300 very expensive speak ers a week, probably was surprised to meet two college boys instead of two American business men. He said he had noted that some Fire stones were spending their holiday in Britain and had thought it might be one of them. We listened to various speakers and were served tea by his secretary. Mr. Briggs has written several books on sound amplification. “On the Fourth of July we start ed for the Lake District. Since we arrived early in the afternoon and could not book the hostel until 5 (Continued on page 12) Guest Pastors Preach In Four Pulpits It’s vacation time. Busy pastors join parishioners in getting away for a while, for rest and relaxa tion before the busy fall, winter and spring calendars demand their constant attention. This week four East Cleveland pastors are off on their respective vacations. Dr. Howard M. Wells and Mrs. Wells go to their farmhouse at Limington, Me. Dr. William Mac Leod of Baldwin Wallace College will occupy the pulpit for the Sun day morning worship services at 10:00, starting August 2nd and continuing through September 6th. Rev. John W. Grohne, pastor at Calvary Lutheran Church, with Mrs. Grohne, daughter Judy and son John, will vacation for a fort night at Glen Lake, Michigan. Seniors from Hamma Divinity School, Springfield, will preach on the three Sundays. They are Charles Strausser and Charles Anders of Springfield who will preach on August 2nd and 9th, respectively and Richard Heeter of Columbus, who will'preach on August 16th. The service ie at 10:45 a. m. Rev. Earl C. Hochwald, minister at East Cleveland Congregational Church, will join Mrs. Hochwald and their two daughters at Cape Cod. In the meanwhile his congre gation will continue to participate in the summer union Sunday 11:00 services with the members from Windermere Presbyteriaa and East ’Cleveland Baptist churches. Rev. William E. Towner of the latter church is preaching in Rev. Hoch wald’s church through August 9th. Guest preachers will occupy the pulpit at St. James Lutheran Church during August while Rev. Robert Barkley is on vacation. The schedule for the month is as fol lows: August 2nd Mr. Paul Korn theuer, resident of Cleveland, now a senior at Hamma Divinity School and a ministerial son of Bethany Lutheran Church. August 9th The Rev. Dr. J. Amos Traver, Professor of Practi cal Theology at Hamma Divinity and father of Mrs. Barkley. August 16th—The Rev. Dr. Ben jamin H. Pershing, Professor at Wittenberg College. August 23—Mr. William Lining, er, student at Hamma Divinity, resident of Van Wert, Ohio. The parsonage family will spend two weeks at Inverness Lodge in the Canadian Muskoka region and two weeks with relatives in Penn. Sunday morning Pastor, Donald B. Woodby will be speaking from the book of Philippians. Title of the message—Jesus Christ, “God in the Flesh”. At Hayden ave. Bab tist Church. Sunday evening August 2nd Rev. R. Humberd of Flora, Indiana will start a four night series of Bible lectures. The titles of his messages are: Sunday Night—“How I can be absolutely sure of Going to Heav en”. Monday Night—“The Person and Work of Christ.” Tuesday Night—“The Resurrec tion Body.” Wednesday Night “Spiritual Blessings in Christ.” Bom to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph^D. Zavorek, 1269 East 144th st, a girl, Susan Lee Zavorek, July 14th. Bom to Mr. and Mrs. Albert C. Then, jr., 13304 First ave., a boy, Timothy Albert Then. July 15th. i Operation Safety 1953 137 Deathless Days Be sure your number isn't here “Who will East Cleveland Leader Published In Conjunction with The SCOOP in Northeast Cleveland and The News-Journal in Euclid Thursday, July 30, 1953 East Chrsland, Ohio she be—Miss Euclid Vets of 1953”???? That’s one big question that will be answered Saturday evening starting at 8 p. m., when 29 con testants parade onto the main stage at the Euclid Vets Seventh Annual Festival, East ,260th st., north of Euclid ave. Some of the girls are shown after being entertained by the Vets at a banquet last Thursday. This year’s contest is the biggest ever with entries coming frqpi East Cleveland, Northeast Cleveland, Euclid, Wickliffe and Richmond Heights. The Festival opened Tuesday and will end on Sunday night with a special Kiddies Day on Saturday from 11 a. m. to 5 p. m. Music in the StarLite Night Club tonight w^l be by Frankie Yanko vic and Kenny Bass. Johnny Vad nal plays tomorrow night, Georgie Cook and Pete Sokach on Satur day, Al Strukel and John Zolakar on Sunday. Nine big rides and four side shows by Good Amusements dress up the biggest show in these parts. the Free parking is available in Chase Brass Parking lot. If He Bluffed Police Pulled It po- Picked up by East Cleveland lice at 4:00 a. m. on July 23rd, Robert Engle, 27, of Denver, Colo., is being turned over to Plymouth, Ind., authorities charge. on a burglary up he he with the law— was trying to asked Patrolman Engle met from which escape—when Harold Bode cruising along Hayden ave., how to get to Route 20. He claimed to be hitch-hiking to Buffalo, N. Y. and Thomas Byers, In reality Engle was trying to locate a stolen car parked while he searched for an Ohio plate to put on it. He had the desired plate tucked away under his coat. Police later traced it to an auto belonging to an Elm ave., resident. During questioning at police headquarters, Engle confessed to the burglary in Plymouth and to stealing the car in Colorado. He is wanted by California on a charge of rape. Police picked up several items from the Plymouth burglary in a room which Engle had rented. Did you happen to find a pair of glasses in a case in Forest Hill Park? Joe Billington, 10, of 1923 Rosemont rd. lost his glasses somewhere in the park, probably in the No. vicinity of baseball diamond On Seminary Staff The Rev. Robert E. Bornemann, formerly a member of St. James Lutheran church, has been made assistant professor in Old Testa ment at Mount Airy Lutheran Sem inary in Philadelphia. For the past three years Rev. Bornemann has been the pastor of the Lutheran Church of the Atonement of Ash bury Park, N. J.

20 FREE Tickets You can get a pair of compli mentary tickets to the Shaw Hayden Theatre by reading the ads in this paper. There are ten names in ten ads scattered through the paper. If you find your name, just clip the ad and take it to the Shaw Hayden Theatre and you’ll get two free tickets. Tonight, Fri. and Sat.: THREE DIMENSION: “IT CAME FROM OUTER SPACE.” Sun., Mon., Tues.: Burt Lan caster, Virginia Mayo in “South Sea Woman.” Next Wed.: Van Johnson in “Remains To Be Seen.” Check all the ads and maybo you’ll find your name. If not this week, be sure to look next week. There’ll be ten names each week good for 20 tickets at the Shaw-Hayden Theatre. Col. Heinlen In On U.S. Salute To Thailand Freedom Among the 57 airmen from Clark Air Force base, the Philip pines, who attended the Independ ence Day ceremonies of the Thai land government was Lt. Col. Clayton H. Heinlen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Heinlen, 14508 Alder ave. Completely encircling the coun try, the flight was America’s salute to the Thai people on their 21st anniversary of freedom. During the visit each airman was presented with a scroll making him an honorary member of the Thai Air Force and, as such, en titled to wear Thai wings whenever he visits that country. A replica of the royal crown was presented to the 13th Air Force, marking the first time such an award has been given to foreigners. “American hold no monopoly on democracy and good will” wrote Capt. Damon E. Eckles, Public In formation Officer who accompanied the squadron. “Fifty seven Ameri cans were learning good will from a people who were giving from their...hearts.” Col. Heinlen Is Director of Oper ations of the Thirteenth Air Force. Local Auxiliaiy Members Active In Convention The American Legion Auxliliary, East Cleveland Unit No. 163, took an active part in the 33rd Depart ment Convention of the American Legion Auxiliary held in the Public Auditorium July 24th, 25th, 26th. Mrs. Fred Jackson was chairman of Housing and Seating Committee. Mrs. Wm. Stewart, Unit Junior Past President, was chairman of Blue Book Committee. Miss Fran ces Frey, a junior member, served as the personal Page to Mrs. C. J. Ailstock, Department Treasurer. Mrs. Frederick Frey, currently President of the ”E. C. Unit, was a member of Registration Commit tee and a Floor Page. Delegates from East Cleveland Unit No. 163 were: Mrs. Elmer Schmitz, Mrs. Chas. Leonard and Mrs. Fred Frey. They also served as hostesses at the Convention banquet held at Hotel Cleveland Saturday evening, and at the Cuy ahoga County Council reception which followed. Fifteen Past Presidents of the Auxiliary attended the Department Past Presidents’ Luncheon Saturday, July 25th, in the room of Hotel Cleveland. No held ball- Case Names Davies Scholarship Secretary A 1951 graduate of Miami Uni versity, Oxford, O., with a B.S. degree in business administration, he replaces Mrs. Clara Horowitz. Mr. Davies, who is married, served 19 months in Europe during 1951-52 in the Adjutant General’s Department of the U. S. Army. He is a graduate of Fairview High School. Suffers Head Injury In Refresher Try While brushing up on driving a motorcycle, Norman E. Shyler, 1728 Colamere st. was thrown from the vehicle to the ground, sustain ing a possible r1 11 fracture. He is a patient in H_._»n Road Hospital. Shyler was trying out the motor cycle in the yard when the machine suddenly scooted into the drive, across the street and over the curb, skidding to a stop which threw him. haiafc. .. f- 13,750 Circulation Guaranteed Foreign Parcel Post Rate Up Saturday Postmaster Joseph F. Prosser announced today that in accord ance with instructions issued by the postmaster general an increase in rates of postage on internation al surface parcel post mail will go into effect on Saturday, August 1st, 1953. Higher rates will be placed on foreign parcel post mail only. The rates on letters, post cards and other articles mailed to foreign countries are not changed by order. Hospital Addition when when way. is George S. Ryder. this Approved Plans submitted by Huron Road Hospital for a wing to be added to its building at Terrace and Bel more rds., were approved by the East Cleveland Board of Zoning Appeals Tuesday morning. announcement is made as to the contract is to be let or construction will get under* Architect for the building In charge of the hospital ex pansion program is R. G. Bodwell who holds a unique place in hos pital history. Mr. Bodwell, was a representative of the contractor for the original structure, super vising that construction. When the building was finished he was sur prised with an offer to remain as hospital superintendent. Now he has been relieved of these duties to devote all of his attention to the expansion construction. The new wing will cover the area between the North and West wing of the main building, adding a sec tion similar to the section between the North and East wings in which is located the kitchen and cafeteria. The new wing will comprise a below ground basement housing a central supply area and laundry. On the rear ground level of the atoping terrain will be located an entirely new and enlarged Emer gency Department to meet the constantly increasing number of such cases coming to hospitals to day. The first floor Terrace rd. level will be given over to the surgery department. The maternity ward will occupy the front level second floor. The type of construction will be in keeping with the main building. Commissioner Rockwell Suffers Heart Attack Improvement is reported in the condition of Guy T. Rockwell, City Commissioner, who is a patient in University Hospital. Mr. Rockwell suffered a heart attack at his home on Farmington rd. Friday, July 24. Promotions For Two Educators In the list of promotions an nounced by the Cleveland Board of Education and effective with the fall term beginning in September, are the names of two East Cleve landers, Georgia F. Alexander and Gladys M. Reichert. Mrs. Alexander is promoted from the position of supervisory assist ant at Tremont School to principal at Clark Elementary. She suc ceeds Jeannette Meehan who is being transferred to Marion Ele mentary School. Mrs. Reichert who held the posi tion of advisory assistant at Case Woodland has been named prin cipal at Memorial Elementary School in the Collinwood section. Ida Dennis, the principal there, is transferred to Beehive School. of President T. Keith Glennan Case Institute of Technology today announced the appoinment of Rich ard R. Davies, 24, of 1214 Carlyon rd., as scholarship secretary. Both Mrs. Alexander and Mrs. Reichert reside in the Rosemont Apartment. Child Darts Into Automobile Path Dashing from a parked milk truck into the path of an approach ing automobile, Mary Elizabeth Waiwood, 7, of 1864 Stanwood rd., is a patient in Babies & Children’s Hospital, with injuries received Monday when struck down by an automobile. ?he driver was not held. Police report that the child and her brother had stepped into a parked milk truck in search of ice. The motorist, driving south, noticed Raymond step from the truck and run across the street. Just as the car neared the truck, Mary Eliza beth suddf dashed out, din 'y into the p--a of the slow mo.iug car. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Waiwood. I This is the concensus of opinion among the five-man board ap pointed by City Manager C. A. Carran as they met in an organi- Re-Election Sought By Commissioners Three present members of the East Cleveland City Commission, whose terms expire with this year, will be candidates at the Novem ber general election to succeed themselves. Filing their petitions by be M. the August 5th deadline will Richard S. Horan, Richmond Rice and Walter H. Sutter. Richard S. Horan With the exception of a two year period Mr. Horan a practic ing attorney has been on the Com mission since he was first elected in 1933. He is a World War I over seas veteran and resides in his own home at 1866 Marloes ave. He has been a local resident for 41 years. Richmond M. Rice '■.* -"A”' Amicable Adjustment Is First Concern Of Rent Committee Out-of-line rent increases which come to the attention of the East Cleveland Citizens Rent Commit tee with the expiration of federal rent control July 31st, will be ad justed between the landlord, the tenant, and a committee member. Failing to reach an amicable ad justment, the case will be referred for public hearing before a com mittee meeting. of Mr. Ric, owner and operator the Rice Dental Laboratory, was appointed to the Commission- in 1948 to fill the unexpired term of Will D. Pew, resigned. He has owned his home at 13317 Garden rd. for 31 years. A** Walter H. Sutter Mr. Sutter has been a member of the Commission since April, 1944, when he ‘icceeded Fi—k Ander son, res-.^ed. For t__ past 32 years he has been manager of the St. Clair-1( a st. branch of the Cleveland Trust Co. Ee has re sided k,*~e for 30 years “id r’-n owns__ own __jae at 13’. _. Si___ i ave. CALL NEWS to PO. 1-3378 zational session Tuesday evening. Named president is John F. Platz. The secretary will be Stan ley Webster. Other members of the committee are Karl Duldner, Phelps V. Cunningham, Harry K. Ambler and A. E. Griffith. Facing an entirely new com munity responsibility and with no precedence to guide them the com mittee decided on a few policies and will work out additional procedures as new instances come before them. That the city’s new rent com mittee means business is indi cated in the report that of the six cases received before their first session Tuesday, three cases have already been adjusted. In one of the communications received no address or telephone number was given for either tenant or landlord, making it impossible to trace for checking. The purpose of the committee, explained City Manager Carran, is to consider complaints, study them, and advise and recommend the ac tion desired. It was decided that the secre tary would parcel out to the indi vidual members the complaints as they are received. Each member will then undertake to reach an amicable adjustment in each in stance. Failing to do so, the case will be referred back to the com mittee for a public hearing on the case. Each complainant is requested to present his case in writing and mail it to Citizens Rent Committee East Cleveland City Hall East Cleveland 12, Ohio or leave the letter at the police desk. No letters or phone calls are to be directed to individual members of the board. To expediate matters, each letter should contain the following in formation: 1—Name and address of landlord and tenant. 2—Rent raised from_____to_____ effective___ 3—No. suites in building. 4—No. of rooms in suite or house. 5—Type of unit: House, 2-or-3 family, etc., or apartment. 6—Suite number. 7—Services: Heat, Stove, Refriger ator, Furniture, Hot Water, Cold Water, Gas, Light and any other information which the tenant would like to in clude. Fight Polio With Your Own Blood What is the No. 1 health con cern of thousands of people during the hot weather season—POLIO. Is the fight again polio your fight? The Red Cross says it is and explains it this way: If you have ever had measles, for ex ample, you know you usually don’t get it again. Why? Because your body produces fighters that guard it against a second attack. These fighters, called antibodies, are car ried by the gamma globulin in your blood. Many people have had polio in some form (Y’ou may have thought it was just a cold) and thus have antibodies to fight that disease.. What protects you can protect others. Right here is where you can become part of a crusade— because gamma globulin is made from the pooled blood of many in dividuals. East Cleveland needs 180 pints of blood on Thursday, August 27th. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 15S37 Euclid ave., is host to the Red Cross Mobile unit from 1:00 to 7:00 p. m. The demands are. up, the supply down. YOUR DONATION IS URGENTLY NEEDED. CALL ER. 1-0178 OR PO. 1-3378 AND GET YOUR APPOINTMENT TO DONATE. During the past two years tests have been carried out in three polio epidemic areas. Over 50,000 children participated. What was learned is big news: that gamma globulin gives significant protec tion against the crippling that is polio's worst feature. It doesn’t prevent polio it doesn’t cure. But it does ensure that a polio victim, if given the right amount of gam ma globulin at the right time, will have only a mild case and may walk again. This summer over 5 million cubic centimeters of gamma globulin will be available. That’s a lot. But not enr"-k Po,:~ victims will re quire in ^.jbulin from the (i otinued on page 19) K*' ... A.

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