13 Haziran 1900 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

13 Haziran 1900 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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No. 14,755. WASHINGTON, D. C., -WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13, 1900-TW.ELVE PAGES. TWO CENTS. THE EVENING STAR. FILISKED DAILY, EXCEPT S9)WAY iserar marens Office, 39 Peaylvasia Avenn. lbe Evening Star Newspaper Comipany. S. . KAMIFFMAMN. Pres'1. lew York lffice: 1 Trebse SMia. Chkage office: Boyce Boldifg. teedn. Office: Trafalgar Baildings. Trafalgar iSre. The Evening Star to served to stscrtbes in the eity by carrieri. cn oheir own aeneant. at 10 cents per week. or 44 cents per mnth. Cepies at the counter, 2 ec.nto each. sy mail-anywhere in the rnited 14tates or C13at-a-p-stage prepald--l0 Cents per Mnth. Saturday Qn:nturle Sheet Star, $1 per yeart with foreign 1estage ad-Wed. $3.0& (Entered at the P..st Otile at Washington. D. C.. an se-elas. malt matter.) r7AII wail anscriptio.ns must be paid in advance. Rates or ad,ertistne made kn.,wn on application. SITUATION IS ACUTE Grave Danger in China Through Attacks on Foreign Officials. I ING OF JAPAKESE CHANCELLOR Movements of Our Ships Toward Danger Points. THE EMPRESS' ADVISERS An important dispatch was received at the State Department from Minister Con ger at Pekin, dated yesterday. The min ister reports that Prince Tuan, father of the heir apparent to the Chinese throne. has been appointed president of Tsung Li Yamen. Thrve other new ministers have also been appointed. and all of them are affiliated with the party most opposed to the foreigners. On the whole, the situation is not materially improved. Guards are repairing the railway leading to Pekin, and as soon as they arrive at Pekin. it is Mr. Conger's opinion, the safety of the foreigners there will be assured. It appears that the movement of the Torktown from Shanghai to Chefoo was not directed from Washington, and It is assumed that the order was issued by Admiral Kempff. the senior officer of the United States squadron in Chinese waters. At Chefoo the Yorktown will be within a day's sail of the admiral's flagship at Taku. She should arrive at Chefoo Friday or Sat urday of this week. Meanwhile the Cas tine remains at Shanghai. Her condition is not known at the Navy Department. but it is understood that Admiral Kempff is in touch with her commander by the coast cable, and if the situation at Chinkiang becomes more acute, he will order the ship up the Yangtse to that point if she is able to move. Otherwise a marine guard will be dispatched up the river In the ship's boats. Rioting In Pekin. Official dispatches received in diplomatic quarters in Washington show that the riot ing in Pekin has reached an acute stage, with the rioters directing a number of their assaults against members of the different foreign legations there. One of these dis patches states that the secretary of the Belgian legation was attacked two succes Five times on Monday, and escaped after being badly maltreated by the mob. On the same day two officials of the British legation, serving as student interpreters,. Were attacked by a large crowd of roughs. The young Englishmen held the attacking party back, but when the mob threatened to, close In on them they drew revolvers, and by a show of f,,rce made their retreat without bodily injury. About the same time the British summer quarters, fourteen miles from Pekin. were burned down. These quarters were quite extensive and had just been completed. They belonged to the British government, and not to Sir Claud MacDonald. the British minister at Pekin. which fact gives added significance to the depredation. The killing of the chancellor of the Japanese legation at Pe kin. Sugiyama Akira, Is not referred to in the ficial dispatches received here. but full credit Is given to this report by the Japanese officials, who are personally ac quainted with Mr. Akira and with many of the circumstances detailed. Attacks on Oncials. T'he killing of a member of the diplomatic body and the assaults upon the officials of foreign countries are regarded as present ing the most serious phase of the Chinese situation that has thus far arisen. The Japanese charge d'affalres in Washington, Mr. Keiziro Nabeshima, said today: "We have no official confirmation of the killing of our chancellor at Pelin, but there appears to be no doubt of the fact, and it presents a most serious condition. The chief offense is against Japan. but aside from that it is against the entire diplomatic body at Pekin. for if any one of them is subject to such assault they all share in the same dang-r. I was personally very well ac quainted with Mr. Akira, as he served under me in the foreign office at Tokio while I was chief of the division of proto cols. He was a bright young man, about thirty-eight years old. with a wife and four children. He was one of the most expert chirographers in Japan. and this gained him the post of chancellor at Pekin, where he went about three years ago." Mr. Nabeshima said the Japanese govern rnent hat pursued the utmost reserve up to this time, liot wishing to be open to any suspicions. but he felt that if this trag;edy had &curred there would be energetlt ac tion taken. One of the most signiticant fiatures of the affair, in his judgment, was that the killing was reported to have been done by the troops of the empress dowager and not by a lawless mob. While there might be some excuse for mob depreda tier.s, Mr. Nabeshima said it would be diiii cuult to take any favorable view of an r t tack by Chintese soldiers on the officials or foreign governments, The burning of the British summer quar ters is considered another attack upon an othecial institution, which is quite different fre m an attack upon a private citizen or private property. For some time there haa been difficulty In securing the necessary permit to put up sunmmer quarters In thg hills outside of Pekin. but that was finallyP granted, anti the quarters were made large enoug'h to accommodate the entire British establishment in China, These includedi the n.inister and his staff of secretaries and at taches, also seven student interpreters, who Lad gone out from Englandi to learn Chinese and fit themselves for the post of inter preters, besides servants, The buildings would have been occupied within the next few dlays. andt duritng the summer would have constituted the Btritish legation. Owibreak at Cheefoo. Informiation has been received at the State D)epartment that trouble has occurred at (Cheefoo. and that report is accepted as an expl:anattion of the dispatch of the gun boat Yorktown from Shanghai to that port. Secretary Long said today that he hadi no word from Admiral KCempff on the subject, ad did not know why the movement was male. It was a fair inuference. however. that her presence was belIeved to be more necessary at (Cheefoo than at Chinklang. on the Yantgtse, where it was reported that the- cruiser was needed because of the threatening attittude o,f the Boxers who had appeared at thaut ptace. AROLND THE WORLD. Trip Planned by Mr. Talgny of the Preneh Embanay. If Olivier Taigny of the French embassy is about to start on a trip around the world, his objective point being Pekin. He goes from here to Vancouver, where he will take the steamer Empress of India to Japan. remaining at Yokohama for a fort night, and thtel proceeding to Shanghai. By that time it is hoped that the disorder in China will be overcome, and Mr. Taigny wili proc'eed to Pekin. where he has a num ber of diplomatic colleagues. After a stay there, depending in length on the condition of affairs, he will go by easy stages east ward until the circuit of the globe is ac complished. The trip is unofficial and for p leasure. M. Taigny being an enthusiastic tveler and a member of the French Geo graphical Society. He has already crossed Africa. penetrated India to the furthest ac eessible point, made the circuit of South America and is now anxious to see the C:hine.. capital before the break oecur.. SIGNED ON HIS DEATH BED. Sensational Story From Havana Re garding Inspector Maynard. HAVANA. June 13.-The Post this morn ing publishes a sensational story connected with the postal frauds. It says it has an attested communication from Fred Spencer. the hospital nurse who attended Inspector Maynard during his last illness, alleging that the patient was caled upon by two pc.stal officials, who persuaded him, when he was in a semi-conselous state, to sign important documents. The next day the patient died. Spencer expresses the belief that the se curing of the signature must have been a very important matter, as two men holding such positions as those held by the callers would not have risked contracting yellow fever for any light reasons. Spencer. the paper announces, gives the names of the men in question, but the Post does not publish them, simply saying that both are prominently connected with the postal frauds. REQUISITION FOR W. S. TAYLOR. Gov. Beckham Sends Sheriff Suter to Indianapolis. FRANKFORT, Ky.. June 13.-It is an nounced that Sheriff Suter has reached In dianapolis with a requisition on Governor Mount from Governor Beckham, asking for the extradition of W. S. Taylor to Ken tucky for trial on an indictment charging him with being an accessory to the morder of William Goebel. W. J. BRYAN IN CHICAGO. He Meets Several Prominent Men in Democratic Party. CHICAGO, June 13-Col. W. J. Bryan and family arrived in Chicago today. They leave today for Minoequa, Wis., where they will be the guests of Col. M. C. Wetmore of St. Louis. Among Col. Bryan's visitors today were Mayor Harrison, Senator Jones of Arkan sas, National Committeeman Johnson of Kansas. and National Secretary Charles A. Walsh of Iowa. It was said that the chief topic of convtrsation was the make up of the platform to be adopted at Kan sas City. At Minocqua Col. Bryan may meet Charles A. Towne of Minnesota. who 1- Col. Bryan's running mate on the popu list ticket. UNION MAN ASSAULTED. Outcome of Factional Fight Among Chicago Bricklayers. CHICAGO, June 13-Michael R. Grady, western organizer for the International Bricklayers' Union and former secretary of the Trades and Labor Assembly, was as saulted by three men last night in front of the bricklayers' hall and left for dead on the sidewalk, with a dozen gaping wounds in his face and throat. Grady was taken to the county hospital by the pollee, where the attending physician pronounced his wounds dangerous. Ilis assailants escaped. Grnuly was about to enter the hall, where a meeting of the union was in prdgress, when he was pounced upon by the three meni It is claimed that the assault was the result of enmity between two factions in the organization. THE HAWAIIAN LEGISLATURE. Special Session Will Probably Be Called by the Governor. Conrepondence of the Associated Press. HONOLULU, June 5, 1900. It may be taken as almost a foregone conclusion that a special session of the legislature will be called as soon as the governor of the territory of Hawaii is in stalled. If thirty days' notice is given June 14, the election will be held on July 14, and the members could assemble on Monday, July 23. This will bring the ses sIon to a close about the end of September. The transport Wyefield arrived from TU coma June 2 on her way to Manila. Ex-Queen Liliuokalani unexpectedly ar rived last night on the steamship City of Pekin. The ex-queen is quoted as utterly opposed to taking any part whatever in local politics. It was announced that as a result of a conference of the planters and employers' convention It has been recommended that labor bureaus be established on each of the different islands and the pass book system be inaugurated again; also that the planta tions should stand together for mutual pro tection. Lient. Guy T. Scott Married. SAN FRANCISCO, June 13.-Lieut. Guy T. Scott. 3d Artillery, U. S. A., was mar ried last night to Miss Leila Voorheis of this city. The groom is a son of United States Senator Scott of West Virginia. Lieut. Merriam, son of Gen. Merriam. acted as best man. After a tour of southern Cali fornia the couple will go to Fortress Mon roe, where Lieut. Scott has been assigned to duty. PHILADELPHIA, June 13.-Senator Scott, who is here atte.ading to his duties as a member of the republican national committee, sent a V20,000 telegraphic draft to his son, Lieut. Scott, at San Francisco, where the young man, upon returniag from volunteer service in the Philippines, was married yesterday, with his mother among those present. The ser.ator wired that he began life with 2t) cents. The Weather Made Marines Slek. Xecial Dinlatich to The Evening Star. NORFOLK, Va., June 13.-Climatic in fluence, according to the finding of a board which investigated the recent illness of eighty marines at the Norfolk navy yard. was responsible for the men's sickness. "Sudden changes of the weather," declared the board. "made the recruits iII with in testinal catarrh, and not impure food, as was alleged." Accident to the Pennsylvania Limited. LEETONIA. Ohio, June 13.-A broken flange on the tender of the locomotive drawing the eastbound Pennsylvania lim ited derailed part of the train one mile west of this city at 4 o'clock this morning. The mall clerk of one of the front cars was in jured, but not seriously. None of the pas sengers was hurt. Steamship Arrival. At Queenstown-Majestic, from New York for LiverpooL. At Southampton--St. Paul, from New York. At New York-Ems, from Genoa and Na ples. Rlef Land. Royal Hunt Cup. LONDON, June 13.--At Ascot today the royal hunt cup. a piece of plate valued at ?500, with ?1,900 in specie, was won by J. A. Drake's Royal Flush, ridden by J. Reiff. A. F. Bassot's Good Luck was second, and E. A. Migan's The Reeve, with Rigby up, wa third. Twenty horses started. Dr. Kennedy Refused NEew Trial. NEW YORK, June 13.-Justice Fursman, in the criminal terml of the supreme court, today denied the motion made by the at torneys, for Dr. Kennedy. convicted of the murder of Dollie Reynolds. for a new triaL. Dr. Kennedy's case has been appealed to the court of appeals and is on the calendar for argument. This motion for A new trial was made pending the argument in the ap pellage court. Grand Duke of Oidenburg Dead. OLDENBURG. June 18.-The Grand Duke of Oldenburg (Nichols Frederick Peter) died toayat his slumer residence at n==tma as bnrn I= 1mr. DE WET IS DEFEATED Methuen Captures His Camp and Scatters His Foroes. GEN. ROBERTS' ARI IA - FIGRT He Attacks Gen. Botha in a Very Strong Position. THE RESULT IS UNKNOWN LONDON, June 13.-After a week's si lence Lord Roberts has been heard from. his line of communications having been practically restored by means of a com plete victory gained by Gens. Methuen and Kitchener over Gen. De Wet-at the Rhenos ter river yesterday. June 12. The Boer camp was captured and the burghers, it is added, were scattered in all directions. Lord Roberts on being notified of the cutting of his line of communications sent Gin. Kitchener in all haste to join Gen. Methuen. June 11 Lord Roberts attacked Gen. Botha, who was in strong force fif teen miles southeast of Pretoria. After strenuous opposition the British forces gained considerable ground, but Gen. Botha, when Lord Roberts left the field, was still undefeated. All is quiet at Pretoria and Johannes burg, and Lord Roberts says the govern ment need have no apprehension about the security of the army in South Africa, as it will not take long to remedy the reverses and repair the railroad. A lengthy dispatch forwarded to the war office by Major General Knox from Kroon slad. presumably sent there by messenger, reads as follows: Dispatch From Gen. Roberts. "KROONSTAD, June 12.-We have been requested to forward you from Lord Rob erts the following dispatch from the Pre toria residency at 8:418 a.m. today: - -PRETORIA. June 12.-Pretoria and Johannesburg sre perfectly quiet, and sev eral of the inhabitants have expressed gratitude for the peace and order which prevail. "'After surrendering the city Botha re tired to a place about fifteen miles east on the Middleburg road. He had a small force at first. but during the last few days his numbers increased, and his being so near the town kept up the excitement in the country and prevented the burghers from laying down their arms and interfered with the collection of supplies. It therefore be came necessary to attack him. This I did yesterday. He held a very strong position, practically unassailable in front, which en abled him to place the main portion of his troops on his flanks, which he knew from former exp-rience were his vulnerable parts. I sent French, with Porter's and Dixon's cavalry brigades and Hutton's mounted infantry round by our left, and Ian Hamilton. with Broadwood and Gor don's cavalry brigade, Ridley's mounted in fantry and Bruce Hamilton's infantry bri gade round by our right. Both columns met with great opposition. At about 3 o'clock in the afternoon I saw two of Ham ilton's infantry battalions advancing to what appeared to be the key of the enemy's defense, on their left flanl. This was al most gained before dark, and I ordered the force to bivouac on the ground they had won. Center Was Impregnable. "'Pole-Carew, with his division, occupied our center. "'As I have explaned, he could not at tack, but he gradually advanced so as to support Ian Hamilton. and when I left the field he was on the lines held by the ene my's outposts in the morning. " 'I hurried back to get news of Methu en's movement. On bearing that the Free Staters had taken advantage of our cross ing the Vaal to interrupt our line of com munication, I sent Kitchener with such troops as I could then spare to Vredefort. with orders to push south and communicate with Methuen, who, I knew, had a very compact force in the vicinity of Hellbron. I also dispatched a special messenger to Methuen, instructing him to push on at all speed to the main line of railway. These two officers met at Vredefort road station in the evening of June 10. They marched yesterday to Rhenoster river, where Me thuen gained a complete victory over De Wet and took possession of his cdmp and scattered his troops in all directions. He and Kitchener marched today toward Kroonstad. "'Uer majesty's government need have no apprehension as to the security of the army In South Africa. The enemy gained a slight success, which was unfortunate. but which will be remedied very shortly. and it will not take long to repair the dam age done to the railway. As these diver sions are all in existence I am now able to hold the line between this and Rhenoster in strength. Methuen will arrange to guard it onward as he advancea Hunter at Poteheftrooms. "'Hunter should be at Potchefstroom to day. He will then move on Johannesburg. "'We have communicated with Butler, who will, no doubt, soon make the presence of his force in the field felt. "'Our losses yesterday were not, I trust, serious, but I deplore the death of that gal lant soldier, the Earl of Airlie. The only other casualties reported as yet are: " 'Seventeenth Lancerb-Major the Hon. Lionel Fortesque and Lieutenant the Hon. C. Cavendish, both killed.' " General Knox adds that Kroonstad is qukite safe. Another Dispatch From Roberts. The following dispatch has been received at the war office from Lord Roberts: "KATZBOSCH, June 12.-In yesterday's engagement Methuen had one killed and eighteen wounded. Among the latter is Lieut. Cearle of the 12th Battaliori of Yeo manry. "On June 7 the Derbyshtire militia lost thirty-six killed and 104 wounded, all of whom were in the Yeomanry hospital which was captured by the Boers and retaken by Methuen."' At the cape the ministerial crisis con tinues. The Times correspondent cables that, though the announcement of the res ignation of Messrs. Tewater.' Sauer and Mderriman was premature, it seems certain that they will resign. It is not likely the whole- ministry will resign, a solution of the difficulty being possibly found by the progressives lending Premier Schrelner two members to fill vacant seats in the cabinet. Haus Sauer, a brother of the dissentient minister, J. W. Bauer, has just arrived in England from the cape. In an inter view today he said he believed Mr. Rose Innes would consent to join Mr. Schreiner and was sure Sir John Glordon Sprigg would also do so if asked. 'With such a combination, he added. -Mr. Behreiner was assured of a majority, though a slim one. The Earl of Airlie (David William Stanley Ogilvy) was the eighth earl of his line. The title was created in 1689. The earl, who was born in 185i6, and whto succeeded tio the title ia 1881, was lieutenant colonel commanding the Twelfth (Prince of Wales) Royal Lancers. -He married in 1888 Lady Mabel Inrances Elisabeth Go,le, eldest daughter of the fifth Earl of Arran. Their eldest son. Lord Ogilvy, horn in 1808 suc ceeds to the itie. The deceased leaves two other sons and five da.ughters.' The earl served in the Afghan campaign of 1878, in the esast Soudan expedition in 1884 and in the Nile expedition in 1885, when he was twice wounded. Major the Hon. IAonel Henry Dudfley Fo ta..... wes ~e ista . te t.ha.a- Ea Fortescue. He was born in 1857, and was assistant military secretary in Canada froni 198 to 1900. The Hon. Charles William Hugh Caven dish was the eldest son of the Baron Ches ham. He was born-aa 1878. His mother was a daughter of the. 1rot Duke of West minster.. Lord Roberts' dispatch is regarded as eminently satisfactory. It'ends a period of suspense caused by the cutting of his line of communications and indicates what a strong grip he has on tb9 situation. The result of the batle between Lord Roberts' forces and those of Gen. Botha is eagerly awaited here, but it is believed the Beer commander will only complete his re tirement, which he seems to have already commenced, though there, is some hope in London that Lord Roberts will be able to surround hi. Methuen's Decisive Victory. The decisive victory scored by Gens. Me thuen and Kithener is regarded as likely to have a more far-reaching effeat than any recent, action-in the Orange River Colony. Gen. Kitchener's progress south, it is be lieved, must have -almost equaled the rec ords of all forced marches. His detach ment from headquarters wan a merelir routine procedure, as the chief of staff is responsible for the line of communications. Gen. Buller is rapidly fulfilling Lord Rob erts' hope that he will make his forces felt. A dispatch from Joubert's Farm under to day's date announces thle continuation of Buller's successful march, the occupation of Volksrust without opposition and the capture of a number at prisoners, while the Boer casualties yesterday are reported to have been very heavy. THE VICE PRESIDENCY THE SITUATION AN OPEN FIGHT, WITH SEVERAL POSSIBILITIES. The Dolliver Workers Are Energetic for the Western Congressman Senator Allison's Position. So far as indicated by the expressions thus far given, in a guarded manner, to be sure, as might be expected, the subject be ing a delicate one, the administration would be equally satisfied, with Se;ator Allison, Secretary Long, Representative Hitt or Representative Dolliver as candidate for Vice President. 't'he matter is to be left largely with the delegations. The best information which can be ob tained as to Senator Allisori's sfttus is this: The senator has declined to be a candidate, and is hjmself working for Mr. Dolliver. But if the sentiment of the convention should be overwhelmingly .for Senator Alli son, and an expression of that feeling given in a manner to leave no doubt of the real choice of the aelegates. the belief is strong in many quarters that Senator Allison could not refuse to accept the task laid upon him. Secretary Long's Poi*tipn. Secretary Long's New England friends will present his naxpe. and a 42gnified claim will be put before the cuvention in his be half, but it is not thought that there will

be log-rolling or any attempt to stampede the convention. If he snrld be nominated no one would be more delighted than the President, and, in fact. everybody who has come in contact with Mr. Long, officially or socially. Mr. Dolliver's boom is formidable-from its backing. The younger element of the party is enlisted in his behalf, and some of the most energetic political "hustlers" of t he House are carrying on a good, old ashioned campaign for hin. In the ab sence of a direct intimation from the ad ministration in the interest of some one elso the work for Mr. Doliver may prove effective. Senator Allison has taken occasion to say a timely word for his young colleague. When they were discussing the qualifica tions of the several candidates, from the standpoint of their availability to fill the presidential chair if the emergency should arise, Senator Allison told them not to fear for Dolliver; that he was competent to rise to any emergency. . Mr. Dolliver!# B"eking. The republicans of t1pe House who were prominently identified with the movement demanding a western man for Speaker, and which centered upon Mr. Henderson. are backing Mr. Dolliver. They will urge upon the delegates the necessity, from their view point, of going Into the middle west for strength for the ticket, and they may be successful with their arguments. It is known here that Senator Hanna thinks that Mr. Dolliver is by no means an impossible candidate, although he has not gone to the extent of indorsing him any more than any other candidate Mr. Hitt of Illinois is entirely acceptable to the administration. The only trouble in his case Is that he has not put himself for ward as a candidate, and as far as is known there is no organized movement in his behalf. If his Illinois friends should start a vigorous campaign for him no ob stacles would be thrown In the way from administration sources, it is thought. No Cholee Yet. Up to the time Chairman Hanna of the national committee left Washington no de cision had been reache4 as to the person to present the name of Mr. McKinley to the convention. The indications were, however, that Senator Fairbanks of Indiana would be the man. There will be several speeches seconding the nomination. Senator Foraker's to be the principal one, SAMPSON AND CURVERA. Court of Claims Deeldes the Former's Suit fer Bounty. The Court of Claims has determined, In passing upon the claims of Rear Admiral W. T. Sampson and the men under his com mand for bounty for thedestruction of Ad miml Cerver's feot, that the Span ish force was inferior to that of the Americans. A bounty awourling in all to $166,700 was allowed, being_S0 for every officer and man under oervenis command, of which Rear Admird Sangson will' re ceive 38,385 and Rear A*ntraLSchley about 33,000.1 The action of the cout h Sirther later eating regarding the MipomSley con troversy, inasmuch as it jnninliy deter mines that question. It4eclamo specidecally as follows: "Rear,Admiral W. 7. Uajson, United States n'avy, was the smmoiderIn-chief of the said naval forcesrog- dejt, and Com modore W. S. Schiey, Uiteditates navy. was the commanding oficrof a division' or squadron thereof, ider *e orders of said commander-in-chig" The court further declires that the New York was among the vessels engaged in the Santiago battle, and alaio. finds that the Harvard, Resolute aid Frsrn -flormed a part of the fleet under Sampson. Neither of these, the decision says,- was eng'aged in the destruction of the Spanish vessels, but they were within signal distance of the American fleet, or tliie fagship of the comn mending oficer, and ine able to render effective aid if they- hi been required to do so, and' are entisied to share in the bounty, Congress of Rpubies. At a meeting of the ministers of coun tries party to the bureau of American re publics today it was decided that the de termination of a date for the meeting of the second internatioal congress of Amer' lean republics should be left to- the govern ments of the United States and MaoThe meeting was hqld at the State Department HEARING CONTESTS Republican National Committee Holds Its First Session Today. SEVENTY-FOUR SEATS IN DISPUTE Many Members of the Committee Represented by Proxy. H. C. PAYNE PRESIDES PHILADELPHIA, June 13-The repub lican national committee held its first ses sion in the convention city at 12 o'clock to day. Chairman Hanna was not present. but was expected about 1 o'clock. Secre tary Dick of the committee promptly call ed the committee to order on the stroke of 12 and Vice Chairman Henry C. Payne was designated to preside temporarily. After the usual preliminary photograph was taken the roll was called. A large picture of President McKinley was the only deco ration in the room at the Hotel Waltop2 when the committee met, but while the roll was being called some flags were tack ed up back of the officers' desk. It was noticed that there was a number of ab sentees. especially from the western states, while the number of proxies was much larger than usual. Mr. Dick Announces Contest. Secretary Dick then announced the states and districts in which there were contests. There were thirty-three contests, involving the seats of seventy-five delegates. This is about one-eleventh of the entire conven tion, a remarkably large proportion in a convention where there is no question as to the main issues. Local differences in the states and districts are responsible for the contests. The involved seats are: Alabama-Seven contests involving six teen delegates. , Georgia-One contest involving the seats of two delegates. Louisiana-Six contests involving the seats of'fourteen delegates. Mississippi-One contest involving the seats of two delegates. New York-One contest involving the seats of two delegates. Pennsylvania-One contest involving one delegate. Ohio-One contest involving the seats of two delegates. Tennessee-Five contests involving the seats of twelve delegates. Texas-Seven contests involving the seats of sixteen delegates.' Delaware-Two contests involving the seats of six delegates. District of Columbia-One contest involv ing the seats of two delegates. In considering the contests one-half hour was allowed each side for state contests and fifteen minutes on a side for district contests. The temporary roll made up by Secretary Dick where were no contests was confirm ed as the temporary roll of the convention. It was decided to consider the contests in executive session. This is usually the course, although it was devIated from four years ago, at which time representatives of the press associations were admitted. At that time, however, there was consider able interest in the contests, as the fac tions fighting for seats represented differ ent presidential candidates. Now it is a contest for seats alone, with the incidental control of the state or district organiza tion, which goes with the successful men." . Interest in the Delaware Case. There was more than a passing Interest in the Delaware contest. Here was the same fight which the national committee settled four years ago. "The Regular" re publicans are headed by Colonel Henry A. Dupont and the "Union" republicans by J. Edward Addicks. Four years ago the na tional committee, under the leadership of Senator Thurston, decided against the Ad dicks delegates. There was also some interest in the Ten nessee contests, where the "Evans" and "Brownlow" factions are struggling for supremacy. Representative Brownlow is a member of the committee. Commission er of Pensions Evans Is not taking a per sonal interest in the contests, but his friends are in evidence. The contests were considered by states in alphabetical order, Alabama being first on the list. DELEGATES FROM HAWAII. New Territory Sends Four Represen ' tatives to Philadelphia. CHICAGO, Juno 13.-A special to the Record from San Francisco mays: Hawaii is sending a. delegation to the re publican convention, but the two delegates and the*alternates who came on the China today, are in doubt as to the reception awaiting them at Philadelphia. Hawaii was not included in the call for the conven tion, as it was not c. territory at that time. Four delegates and as many alter nates were chosen, while a territory is en titled to only two delegates. The delegates selected were Samuel Par ker, A. N. Kepoikal, B. F. Dilltngham and W. R. Castle. The alternates'were C. B. Wilson, C. P. Lukea, Henry Waterhouse and R. Rycroft. Of these. Messrs. Parker, Kepolkal and Wilson arrived today. Messrs. Dillingham, Castle, Waterhouse and Ry croft are now in the United States. If only two delegates are seated, which seems probable, these two will be Samuol Parker and Judge Kepotkai, both of whom are na tives and ex-royalists. Sam Parker is one of the best known men in the Islands. His grandfather was an American from Boston, but both his grandmother and mother were natives, so he is three-quarters Hawalian. He was a member of the cabinet under Queen Liliuo kalani. BOY BADLY BURNED. Was Trying to Destroy Caterpillars' Neat With Coal Oil. Special Dispatch to The Evening Star, FR15DERICK, Md., June 18.-Chester Young, twelve years old, son of Mr. C. B. Young of Myersville, Frederick county, nar rowly escaped death while attempting to burn a caterpillars' nest with coil oil yes terday. Chester and his younger brother, Alvey, went into the house and secretly got a can of coal oil, which they poured on the nest, and lighted It while the oil was still running from the can. The can ex -ploded, throwing burnirw oil over the boy Chester. Workmen attracted by the lad's screams extinguished the flames after the boy had been dangerously burned about the face and body. JEWISH CH&aRrTIES CONWEBENCE. Papers Road Today by Dr. Caliseh ad Mrs. Piske. CHICAGO, June 1.-The "Problem, of Jewish Charities in Small Cities," by Rev. Dr. I. Caiecb of Richmond, Va., iwas the first paper read at .today's session of the national conference of Jewish charities. Among other papers read was one by Mrs. B. Piake, Denver, Col, en "Progress in Jewish' Charity."' The report of the com mittee on uniform records was then taken up and discussed. The conference will con Iolude this eveningr with the election of offB Icers and the report of the nasittee on restOnm DEATH OF LIEUT. CILLEY. Washington Oficer Passes Away at Manila. Adjutant General Corbin received a cable message this morning from General Mac Arthur, at Manila, saying that First Lieu tenant Jonathan CilTey, 43d Volunteer In fantry. died in the hospital at Manila this morning from typhoid fever. Although his family originally came here from Ohio. Lieutenant Cilley may be properly classed as a resident of the District of Columbia, as he passed most of his life and was edu cated in this city. He was the son of Mr. Henry C. Cilley, a clerk in the Depart ment of the Interior, who resides at 219 .3d street southeast. Young Cliley entered the army as a private soldier in August. 18. and served successively as private, corporal and sergeant of Company K of the 7th In fantry until August 17, 1899. On that date he was appointed first lieutenant of the 43d Volunteer Infantry, which was organ ized by Colonel Murray at Fort Ethan Al len, Vt., and accompanied that company to the Philippines In December of that year. TREASURE SHIP. Transport Burnside Carrying Money to Porto Rico. The transport Burnside, which will leave New York this afternoon for San Juan de Porto Rico, will be a veritable treasure ship. She carries numerous strong boxes in her hold securely guarded by armed sol diers. These boxes contain $1,000,000 in vir gin American currency, gold, silver and pa per, which is to be put into circulation in Porto Rico as rapidly as it can be exchang ed for the Spanish money which has here tofore been the sole medium of exchange in that country. After discharging her precious cargo at the capital of Porto Rico the Burnside will proceed to. Santiago and other eastern ports of Cuba for the pur pose of bringing Cuban teachers to Boston. APPOINTED SOLICITOR. Promotion of Mr. E. P. Hanna of the Navy Department. Congress at its last session made pro vision by a clause contained in the execu tive, legislative and judicial appropriation bill for the appointment of a "solicitor to be an assistant to the judge advocate gen eral of the navy," who Is to act In case of the death, resignation or absence of the judge advocate general. Mr. E. P. Hanna. at present chief clerk of the judge advocate general's office, has been appointed solici tor. In making this appointment Secre tary Long has paid a tribute to a most de serving official. Mr. Hanna was graduated with the high est honors of his class In 188 at the Co lumbian Law School in this city, and was admitted to the bar In 184. During the past ten years he has filled in a most effi cient manner the office of chief clerk of the judge advocate general's office, and has made a special study of naval law. He will be succeeded as chief clerk by Mr. Pickens Neagle, who for many years has served most acceptably as law and con tract clerk in the judge advocate general's office. Army Assignments. The following assignments to regiments of officers recently promoted are announced: Lieut. Col. John H. Calef, to the 3d Ar tillery, vice Field, retired; Maj. James O'Hara, to the 1st Artillery, vice Calef. promoted; Capt. Elisha S. Benton, to the 3d Artillery, Battery H, vice O'Hara, pro moted. Maj. James W. Pope, quartermaster, has been relieved from duty at Savannah, Ga., and at Charlestown, S. C.. and ordered to Denver, Col., for duty as chief quarter master with the department of Coldrado. He relieves Lieut. Col. Edwin B. Atwood. deputy quartermaster general, who is or dered to Chicago for duty as chief quarter master of the department of the lakes, re lieving Col. James G. C. .Lee, assistant quartermaster general, who will settle his accounts and then proceed to Chickamuga, Georgia. Capt. Henry A. Peed, 82d Infantry, hav ing reported to the adjutant general in this city, has been ordered to San Francis co for duty. Maj. John T. French, Jr., quartermaster volunteers, has been ordered from Chicago to Milwaukee under instructions of the quartermaster general. Second Lieut. T. H. R. McIntyre, Gth Artillery, now at San Francisco, has been ordered to the Artillery School at Fort Monroe, Va., for instruction. Personal Mention. The following Washingtonians sailed for Europe on the St. Louis, whioh left New York today: Dr. E. A. De Schweinetz. Miss Cornelia Ridgely Hunt, Major C. A. Lauch heimer and Mrs. S. H. Lauchhelmer. The following sailed on the Friesland. which also left New York today: Capt. and Mrs. N. M. Brooks Miss Marian Brooks, Mr. and Mrs. eank E. Buckland, Mr. and Mrs. L. Noot. Mr. John B. Powell, chief electrician of the supervising architect's office. Treasury Department, has been ill at his residence, Rose Croft. Prince George's county. Md., for several weeks. His condition was said this morning to be improved. Naval Movements. The North 'Atlantic squadron-the New York, Texas, Kearsarge, Indiana and Mas sachuisetts-sailed today from Newport for Boston. The Potomac has sailed from Tor tugas for Key West. The Mayflower has been ordered 'commissioned, the date to be determined later. The Rodgers will be launched today at the New .York navy yard and Will be put in commission three or four days later. The Yorktown sailed yesterday from Shanghai for Chee Foo. Death on the Grant. General Shafter has informed the War Department of the death of Private John. B. Carey. Company C. 19th Infantry,aboard the transport Grant. in San Franciso har bor, on the 11th instant, of chronic dsen tery. Mr. Perry Appointed. The President has appointed John W. Perry as agent for the United States befor'e the Chilean claims commission, in plac-e of Mr. R. D. Kennedy of Ohio. whose nomina tion failed of approval by the Senate at the last session. Mr. Perry reported at the State Department today to Solicitor Pen field, who explained to him the nature of the duties devolving upon him. Vie Consul at Havana. The State Department has been notified by the British embassy that Mr. H. A. Bamsden igli be appointed vice British con sul at Havana. It is understood Gliat Mr. Rainaden is the son of the late British con sul at Santiago. who remained at lila~post and sacrificed his life thereby during the inveatanent of that place. in order to pro teet American citisens therein. Birth of a Prinee. The State Department has been notified by Queen Viotoria of the birth of a prince son of his royal highness the Duke of Ybek. Suitable acknowtedgment will be made by the State Department, and the President will send his congratulations in accor'danoe with the rules of international etiquette. Mals, foa the Kienike. A notice has been issued by the Poet Of floe Department that no mail for points te yond Dawson City shall be forwarded via Lake Bennett, and the distch in the Yukon district will be limited to points be twrae. Lake Bennett and Dawaim. A DEMONSTRATED FACT6 There is no business that cannot be benefited by ju dicious advertising, and there is none that may not waste money by poor use of space. JAPAN IS INDIGNANT Killing of an Official in China May Provoke War. RUMOR TO TH&T EFFECT IN LONDON Talk at Embassy, However, is More Reassuring. WILL ACT WITH POWERS LONDON, June 13.-In regard to the re ports that Japan Is about to declare war on China, it was learned by a repreoenia tive of the Associated Press at the Japan ese embassy today that the attitude of Ja pan in the Chinese crisis is to co-operate loyally with the European powers. In the existing situation Japan would not be will ing to see any single power take the lead. The killing of the chancellor of the Japan ese legation at Pekin is regarded as likely to lead to serious complicatiorh but no decision has been reached by Japan as to what political measures will be necessary to meet the situation. Relative to the reports that the Japanese minister at Pekin is pressing for the rec ognition of a Japanese sphere of influence to include the provinces of Che Kiang, Fo Kien and Kiang-SI, it Is pointed out that Japan has already obtained a promise that the province of Fo-Kien should not be alienated, while Kiang-SI, situated at the mouth of the Yang-Tse river, is In the British sphere. Japan is not likely to take a step which might be distasteful to Great Britain, whose interests in China are sim ilar to those of Japan. A dispatch from Pekin dated June 12 says: M. Suglyama. chancellor of the Jap ancse legation. while proceeding alone and unprotected on official duty, was brutally murdered by the soldiers of Gen. Tungfuh slang, the favorite bodyguard of the em press dowager, yesterday at the Manigate Rood railway station. Bt-ltlsh Troops From Hong Kong. HONG KONG, June 13.-Orders have been issued to the contingent cf British troops arsembled here for service in the north to sail for Tien Tsin June 14. Major Mor ris of the artillery will he in command. The steamer Hatten has been chartered ta convey 60) troops to Tien Tsin. She Is being fitted by the artificers of the Ter r1ble. The troops today drew their field equip ment. United States Marines Off to Tien Tain MANILA. June 13.-The United States hospital ship Solace sailel at midnight last night, having on board 100 marines and 5 officers, Major Waller commanding, in re sponse to the telegraphic request sent from Tong-ku June 11 by Rear Admiral Kempff. Thirty other marines left last week on the United States gunboat Nashville, bound for Tien TsIn. The marines on the Solace had been destined for Guam. It is believed that others will be sent there later .on. A sup ply ship will leave this week, and possibly the cruiser New Orleans will sail later. Curious Rumor in Shanghai. SHANGHAI, June 13.-Extraordinary rumors are current here to the effect that the powers have settled the Chinese question by agreeing to forgive the dowager em press and her Manchu advises, provided they promise to amend thedr future con duct. RUSSIA'S WARLIKE PREPARATIONS. Pouring Troops and War Material . Into Eastern Garrisons. CHICAGO, June I.-A special to the Reccrd from San Francisco says: Yokohama newspapers received here re port that enormous details of munitions of war, arms and men have been sent by the Russian government to its possessions in the far east. A Japanese who publishes a newspaper at Port Arthur recently inter viewed the captain of the big Norwegian steamer Normannia, which had I%nded arms at that port. The captain raid the Nor mnnnia was only one of the many ships engaged by Russia to bring over arms and men. His vessel had landed at Port Ar thur ten big guns'and an enormous quan tity of iron materials for fortifications. At -Viadivostock the steamer had also dis charged stores and provisions. Port Arthur is now completely fortiled, but many other places along the coast are being put in condition for an emergency. Russian troops are being poured into Rus sian China at a rate of 1.100 weekly. The captain of the Normannia also said a Russian volenteer fleet of cruisers and ships, chartered by the Russian war office, was carrying troops and war stores to Per sia. RUSSIA WILL CONTROL CHINA. Prof. Starr's Views Regardlng the Situation in the East. CHICAGO, June 18.-Prof. Fredericic Starr, head of the department of anthro pology at the University of Chicago, ad reised the students on the Chinese ques tion, in which he asserted that the dowager empress was justified in her action, and that a protectorate established by the pow ers would be a failure. Dr. Starr has made a special study of the Chinese, and soon will malke a visit to China for research work. He said in part: "The dowager empress should not be e-iticised for her attitude toward the mis sionaries. The Boxers are a new organi ration, formed to do away with conditions which have become intolerable. The party o,f the empress will succeed eventually, because any scheme to deter her by a ralitioni of the powers, such as is proposed at present, will be a failure. If control passes from China's hands It will drift nto Russia's. A joint protectorate of the powers would come to the same end aa the protectorate in Egypt. "The control and finally the possessioal if the country would pass to the strongeit power. In Egypt England triumphed. There are jour possibilities of the out iome of affairs in China. First, the dow ager empress may come out victorious; seer ad, the so-esled emaper-or may be restored lnder a coaltion of the foreign powers; hird, China may be divided among the.na Lons; fotpth Russia may seine China. The inly probailties are the first and fourth. rhe partition of China amnong t nations would lead to the development a wr ike spirit in the Chinese themselves,wih would unite China and give her a strong sway as a world, power." Death of Timothy MeCarthy. LARNED, 1Ken.. June 18.-Timothy gg , Carthy, who served two terms as state aie Stor and was afterward elected dsertmi4 aommandpr of the Kanss G. A. 11., aUh%I at his hoame h*e yesterdsay, Parguhar Sails for Bestea. NEWPORT, R. . June 1I.-The Nort atlantic squadron, Rear Admiral Farquhat sommanding, left here todag for Bsoj where the ships will arrive tomorrow.. Isxece tha the W atti ship Krae

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