7 Nisan 1903 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

7 Nisan 1903 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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- 77~ 71!7--7F., 1 No. 15,636. WASINc[TONO DA 0., TUESPAY, j?~ ,103TET AGES. TOCENTS. THE EVENING STAR. rum nE DAIY, EXOIPT SUNDAY. Budesis Oafi, nb Eet and Pemlvaola AveMs., Th. Trning oua Nmsw oany. , . RAUFYANN, PrtMat, 3eV yak 98": Team Bub. chip OS: Tribes 2u1fg. Thie ventng Star Is served to subser0bers In the ity by carriers, on their own account, at 10 cents Per week, or 44 cents per month. Coples at the caunter. 2 cents each. By mal-anyvhere in the U. I. or Canada-postage prepad-ft cestS per month. Baturday star. 32 pages, $1 per year; with for. eign poStase added.$3.60. (!ntered at the Post Of2ce at Wasbtngten. D. 0., as secand-class mail matter.) g7All man subeeriptiona mast be paid In advanea, Rate or advrt.._g made 1n1wn on applicatio PRESIDENT AT FARGO Defends Government's Policy in Philinpines. EULOGIZES OOV. TAFT SAYS HE I= THE 3UMT SO=E OF XAN. Declares Natives Are Better Off by Their Dependence - He Quotes Bizal. FARGO, N. D., April 7.-Notwithstanding yesterday's severe blizzard the weather to day was clear and bracing, and the pro gram for the reception and address of President Roosevelt was carried out ac cording to plans. The special train ar rived here during the early morning, and at 8:30 o'clock the local reception commit tee waited on the President, and after a brief and Informal reception at the train 01scorted him in carriages through the business portion of the city. One of the features was the welcome accorded by the children of the city, several thousand oX whom were assembled together where the President was able to greet them. After the drive the President was escorted to a stand In front of the Waldorf Hotel, where he addressed a large and enthusiastic crowd on the Philippines. The President said: The northwest, whose sons in the civil war added such brilliant pages to the honor roll of the republic, like wise bore a full share In the struggle of which the war with Spain was the begin ning; a struggle slight indeed when com pared with the gigantic death wrestle which for four- years stamped to and fro across the southern states In the civil war; but a struggle fraught with consequences to the nation, and indeed to the world, out of all proportion to the smallness of the effort upon our part. Three and a half years ago President Mc Kinley spoke in the adjoining state of Min nesota on the occasion of the return of the 13th Minnesota Volunteers from the Philip pine Islands, where they had served with your own gallant sons of the North Dakota regiment. After heartily thanking the re turned soldiers for their valor and patriot Iis and their contemptuous refusal to be daunted or misled by the outcry raised at home by the men of little faith who wished us to abandon the islands, he spoke of the islands themselves as follows: "That Congress will provide for them a government which will bring them bless ings, which will promote their material in terests as well as advance their people In the path of civilization and intelligence, I confidently believe. They will not be gov erned as vassals or serfs or slaves. They will be given a government of liberty, regu lated by law, honestly administered, with out oppressing exactions, taxation without tyranny, justice without bribe, education without distinction of social condition, freedom of religious worship, and protec tion In 'life, liberty and the pursuit of hap piness.''" What he said then lay in the realm of promise. Now it lies in the realm of posi tive performance. Promise and Performance Compared. It is a good thing to look back upon what has been said and compare it with the record of what has actually been done. If promises are violated, if plighted word is not kept, then those who have failed in their duty should be help up to reprobation. If, on the other hand, the promises have been substan tially made good; if the achievement has kept pace and more than kept pace with the prophesy, then they who made the one and are responsible for the other are entitled of just right to claim the credit which attaches to those who serve the nation well. This credit I claim for the men who have managed so admirably the military and the civil affairs of the Phil ippine Islands, and for those other men who have so heartily backed them in Con gress, and without whose aid and support not one thing could have been accom plished. When President McKinley spoke, the first duty was tihe restoration of order; and to this end the use of the army of the United Statea.-an army composed of regulars antd volunteers alike-was necessary. To put down the insurrection and restore peace to the islands was a duty not only to ourselves but to the islanders also. We could not have abandoned the conflict without shirk ing this duty, without proving ourselves recreants to the memory of our forefathers. Moreover, if we had abandoned it we would have inflicted upon the Filipinos the most cru.el wrong and would have doomed them to a bloody jumble of anarchy and tyranny. It seems strange, looking back, that any of our people should have failed to recognize a duty so obvious; but there was such fail ure, and the government at home, the civil authorities in the Philippines, and above all our gallant army, had to do their work amid a storm of detraction. The army in especial was attacked in a way which final ly did good, for In the end it aroused the hearty resentment of the great body of the American people, not against the army, but against the army's traducers. Offenses Were the Exception. But these offenses were the exception, and not the rule. As a whole our troops showed not only signal courage and eti ciency, but great humanity and the most sineare desire to promote the welfare and libertie, of the islanders. In a series oif exceedingly harasing and dfflikult camn paigna they completely overthrew the enemy, reducing them finalny to a condi tion of mere brig=ndage; and wherever they conquered, they conquered only to make way for the rule of the civil govern ment, for the introduction of law and of liberty under the law. When, by last July, the last vestige of or=anised Insurrection had disappeare4, peace and- amesty were proclmed. As rapidly as the military rule was ex tended over the Islands by the defeat of the insurgents, just so rapidly was It re placed by the civii government. At the present time the civil government is a e,and the army in the Philippines benreduced until It is sufficient mere ly to provide against the recurrence of trouble. In Governor Taft and his associates we gent to the Filipinos as upright, as con scientious, and as able a group of adminis. trators as ever any country has been blessed with having. With them and under them we have associated the best men among the Filipinos, so that the great ma jority of the officials, including many of the highest rank, are themselves natives of the islands, The administration is incor ruptibuly heent; jnneso is s banmmiy eel. gearded as here at hoe-. The gewenmen secondueted pusrel is the tasesteof the people of the bslends; they se --ia 4a their relgous and dii rigit they have been iven- en esm et an Ua& taerdsehnel anemg ofiae AM to theD~tts Moream, congress approp,ste seaer. -45 foflowing the precedent it et whtam tihe ~eeof Porto maia uere asses. kg s. Philippine government In order to meet the distress occasioned primarily by the ter rible cattle disease which almost annibilat ed the carabao or water buffalo,'the Oble[ and most important domestic animal in the Islands. Coming as this disaster did upon the heels of the havoc wrought by the In surrectionary war great suffering has been caused; and this misery for which this government is in no way responsible will doubtless In turn Increase the dificulties of the Philippine government for the next year or so. In consequence there will doubtless here and there occAr spora I* creams of the armed brigandoW to whieb the Islaxids have been haenate Ien time hmmemor.al, and here and there for their own Purposes the banMt. may eboofe to style - temiselves. patrioto or. todurre tionists; but these loal die'ultles wW be of little ensequeneme save as they give 06 casion to a few men here at home agatf to try to mislead our people. Nbt only has the ry problem In the Philippines been worked out quicker and better than we had dared to expect, but the progress socially and In civil govern ment has likewise exceLeded our fondest hopes. The best thing that can be done In han dling such a problem as that In the Phftip pines, so peculiar, so delicate, so difficult and so remote, is to put the best man pos sible in charge and then give him the heartiest possible support and the freest possible hand. This Is what has been done with Governor Taft. There is not In this nation a higher or finer type of public ser vant than Governor Taft. He has rendered literally inestimable service, not only to the people of the Philippines, but also to the people of the United States, by what he has done In those Islands. He has been able to dQ it because from the beginning he has been given absolute support by the War Department under Secretary Root. With the cessation of organized resistance the civil government assumed its proper position of headship. The army In the Philippines is now one of the Instruments through which Governor Taft does his ad mirable work. The civil government, of which Governor Taft Is the head, is su preme, and it will do well in the future as it has in the past, because It will be backed up In the future as, it has been in the past. Remember always that in the Philippines the American government has tried and is trying to carry out exactly what the great est genius and most revered patriot ever known In the Philippine Islands-Jose Rizal-steadfastly advocated. This man, shortly before his death, in a message to his countrymen, under date of December 16, 1896, condemned unsparingly the insur rection of Aguinaldo, terminated just be fore our navy appeared upon the scene, and pointed out the path his people should follow to liberty and enlightenment. Speaking of the insurrection and of the pretense that Filipino independence of a wholesome character could thereby be ob tained, he wrote: The Words of RA1 "When, in spite of my advice, a move ment was begun. I offered of my own ac cord, not only my services, but my life and even my good name to be used in any way they might believe effective In stiling the rebellion. I thought of the disaster which would follow the success of the revolution, and I deemed myself fortunate if by any sacrifice I could block the prog ress of such a useless calamity. "My countrymen, I have given proof that I was one who sought liberty for our country and I still seek it. But as a first step I Insisted upon the development of the people In order that. by means of edu cation and of labor, they might acquire the proper individual character and force which would make them worthy of it. In my writings I have commended to you study and civic virtue, without which our' redemption does not exist. * * *I can not do less than condemn, and I do coa demn, this absurd and savage Insurrection planned behind my back, which dishonors us before the Filipinos and discredits us with those who otherwise would argue In our behalf. I abominate Its cruelties and disavow any kind of connection with it, regretting with all the sorrow of my soul that these reckless men have . allowed themselves to be deceived. Let them re turn, then, to their homes, and may God pardon those who have acted In bad faith." This message embodied precisely and ex actly the avowed policy upon which the American government has acted in the Philippines. What the patriot Rizal said with such force in speaking of the insur rection before we came to the Islands ap plies with tenfold greater force to the who foolishly or wickedly opposed the mild and beneficent government we were Insti tuting in the islands. The judgment of the martyred public servant, Rizal, whose birthday the Philippine people celebrate, and whom they worship as their hero and ideal, sets forth the duty of American -sov ereignty, a duty from which the American people will never flinch. EconOMical Admlkitration. While we have been doing these great and beneficent works In the islands we bave yet been steadily reducing the cost at which they are done. The last Congress repealed the law for the war taxes, and the War Department has reduced the army from the maximum number of 100,000 al lowed under the law to very nearly the minimum of 0.000. Moreover, the last Congress enacted some admirable legislation affecting the army, passing first of all the militia bill, and then the bill to create a general staff. The mili tia bill regresents the realsation of a. re form which had been championed ineffeet Ively by Washington, and had been fruit lessly agitated ever since. At last we have taken from the statute books the obsolete militia law of the revolutionary day. and have provided for effBcient aid to the N4a tional Guard of the states. I believe that no other great cogstry has such fine natu ral mnaterial for volunteer soldiers as we have, and It Is the obvious duty of the na tion and of the states to make such pro vision as will enable this volunteer sol diery to be organized with all possible rapidity and efficiency in time of war; and, furthermore, to help In every way the National Guard In time of peace. The mi litia law enacted by the Congress marks the first long step ever taken in this direc tion by the national government. The general staff law Is of immense im portance and benefit to the regular army. Individually I would not admit that the American regular, either officer or enlisted man. is lnferlor to- any other regular sat dier in the world. In fact, If it were- wortir while to beast. I shua be tempted to sa that he was the best. But ther, mst be prm . t==aias proper neganm=aon and .ameanitatlton In order to get'The best ser-, Ice out of even the beet troops. *1%is is particulardy the case with mucha umall army as or at eed over s vast- a a=mary. We do not need. a lae regin pmatant==ty the case w#th 4Ual. a .mani regular army the very beet that can pos sibly be produced. Under the worn-out and Ineffective organtsation which ha. hitherto existed a sudden s Jaini abso lutely certain to produce thE diclocation' and confusion we saw at the outbreak of the war with Spain; and when such dbEo cation and confusion occurs it Is eansd natural,' but entirely improper; tobianne the men who happen to be In office, instead of the system which is really reobe Under the law just enacted by aogress this system will be cetanged immeaeltfor the better, and every patutlo asiie ought to ;~e for whien we come to the army and navy we deal with the.hooner and interests of aN our people; and whnen such as the cm.e party ines srema nothing, and we all stand shoulder to shuleras Amtedcans, moved only by pride In and love for ow onmm country. the chorts seeda ere j m hiD the - 3umImeuh nte -~ ALL XPRESS REGRTS Friends of Ambassador Porter Send Condolences OVER WIFE'S DEATH OAML ePPICIM.ILY. Her Demise Resulted Prom Inluense Gen. Porter MHmself in Poor Health. PARIS, April 7.-Many letters and cable grams of condolence on the sudden death yesterday of Mrs. Porter, wife of Ambas sador Porter, have been received at the United States embassy. Representatives qf the French government took an early occa sion to express the sense of grief they felt. Foreign Minister Delcasse wrote a personal letter to General Porter. Throughout the morning members of the diplomatic corps and members of the Amer ican colony called at the embassy to in scribe their names on the register. Among the callers were the British ambassador, Sir Edmund Monson, and -Lady Monson, M. Justin de Selves, prefect of the Seine; the Duke and Duchess of Bassano, Rear Admiral and Mrs. Kauts, the governor of the Bank of France, M. Georges Pallain, and Madame Pallain, the German ambas sador, Prince von Radolin, and Princess von Raiolin, and representatives of prac tically all the embassies and legations. Ow ing to the earnest request of the German ambassador, Prince von Radolin saw Gen eral Porter personally, and expressed the profound regrets of himself and the prin cess, who had been much attached to Mrs. Porter. Miss Elsie Porter will arrive this after noon. The funeral will occur Thursday morning at 11 o'clock in the American Church. Dr. Thurber will officiate. The body will then be placed in a vault, pending the final plans for its disposition. Died of Pneuinonia. An Associated Press.dispatch from Paris last night gives the following additional de tails regArding the death of Mrs.. 11orace Porter: The death of Mrs. Porter came with very great suddenness, making the shock to the ambassador doubly severe. She returned from Switzerland only a few days ago, after a stay of some weeks there for her health. Mrs. Porter appeared much im proved in health. but was still suffering from influenza, which finally brought on a chill. This, in -turn,. developed into inflam mation of the lungs, but it was not until today that her condition was regarded as really serious. She gradually failed, how ever. until the end came. Gen. Porter, Mrs. Porter's brother. Gen. Winslow, and at tending physicians were at the bedside. The ambassador is completely prostrated. Mrs. Porter died at the'United States em bassy. Her death -caused great sur prise and sorrow throughout the Ameri can colony. The officials of the em bassy are doing everything possible under the circumstances to be of service to the ambassador. Secretary Vignaux has taken active charge of the funeral arrangemouts, but no definite plans have yet been made. The ambassador has just recovered from a severe attack of the grip, which leads to some solicitude conerning the effect the blow may have upon him. Mrs. Horace Porter's maiden name was Sophie McHarg. She was a daughter of John McHarg, a prominent resident of Al bany. and was born in Albany. General Porter was an army officer on 'duty at the WatervIlet'arsenal when he first met her, and they were shortly afterward mar ried. She was about sixty-two years old, at the time of her death. Two of her brothers are John W. McHarg of Albany, who is at present in Omaha, and Henry K. McHarg of New York. The President's Sympathy. A telegram received by Secretary Hay from the President on hie train in Dakota requests him to cable hie sincere condo lence to Ambassador Porter in Paris be cause of the death of his wife. CONGRATULATES THE ErIXN. M1innSMta Couple Who Have Pifty Nine Descendants. ST. PAUL, Minn., April 7.-While in this city Saturday President Roosevelt was presented by Mayor R. A. Smith with a picture of the family of J. P. Rhein of Washington county, Minn., the picture in cluding Mr. and Mrs. Rhein, their- nine children, forty-eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. -'All reside with in fifty. miles of the Rhein homestead. Mayor Smith received the following let ter from President Roosevelt: "SIOUX FALLS, S. D., April 6. "My Dear Mr. Smith: Will you congratu late Mr. and Mrs. Rhein for me? I am proud of them and was as pleased as possible with the two pictures of their children and grandchildren. That is the stuff out of which we make good Ameri can citizens. "Thankingr you for your courtesy during my recent visit in St. Paul, I am, "SIncerely yotus "THUODORN OSVL. PUNUALs 01 MRS, YAN WElLE. "emins= Intered in. Re stem 7ai L,gt i. 'RaWmen.s Speeial Dispth to Tils Ewemiag 5iar. DMJMMEORU, 3M., Apuan-.Yhe xammsa of Mr. Louise Ames Van Welk, who killed herself at the Hotel Washington in Jersey City .last Sunday, were interred in the Boyston family lot at Greenmount ceme tery at noon today. The funeral services, which were strictly private, were conducted in the chapel of U. Madison MitclVil's undertaking eatab lUshment. North avenue and Oak street. The remains of Mrs. Van Welk wers ao companied frm New York to thissty by' 3er. C. 3. Rloyston,. 2515 North Charles street. and reached here late last night. Mr. ioeston, who is an adopted brother of the unfortunate woman, will adopt the daughter of Mrs. Van Weik. MUNICIPAL[ ELETIONG Being Held 1i.Western Xx -M-Mik WommE JdVB A In Nebraska the I"Aing Isue is the Question ot LiqUor Idense. CHICAGO, April 7.-Munlpal elections are being held today iiIffincif Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, Netmaka and Colorado. Reports generally sho good weather and a heavy vote. In Kanaw woman are vot Ing in large numberm In Nebresa, voters are. chiefly interested- i th'e' "no license" issue. As the day progresse&thLeygeetatons of the party leaders begant*e .saled. The labor vote is estimated 't h4.ve -be in a large measure polled betweeii 0 elook and 8 o'clock, and was un4falUy 'heavy. In many wards fully 50 per cent. of the regis tered vote was said to bala .b0en cast by 11 o'clock. The ward Workers were astir early and the 250,000 cards wich are said to - have been attached to. door knobs throughout the city urging voters to go to the polle, appear to htve had the desired effect. Neither side seeaptohave lost a'ny of the confidence disp 4d testerday and both republican and emocratic leaders claim a plurality of oyet 30,000 for their respective candidates. ' No disorder has been reported from aly 04 the polling

places. Interest at 3t. LUuis. ST. LOUIS, Mo., ApA4l 7.-Owing to the recent boodle convictionsi-uPre than ordi nary interest is shown in the election to day for members of the city councl and house of delegates. Member.Oef the board of education are also bei*K voted for. A bright, clear day promim ebring out a fuller vote than is usua*y d at off-year city elections in St. LOtia >There are five tickets in the field. WEALTHY RACm a X1LrTT1 Jos. L Meehan's Dea*k Pebably Be sult of Oldena AKRON, Col., April 7.-The bullet-riddled body of Jos. L Meehan, a ps.lthy stock ma. who lived alone on rsneI has been found , lying Qn the. pr.Aie within a short distance of his Jiose., 3 is believe~d that he was shot frdn Sambnh while re turning home from a 'o terts brother, another cattleman, and- that the killing was the result of a ftud. - For some tirne trouble has broken out at intervals among the rangemen over- 'the esdi, f the right to use the range, a; in Pecember last Meehn- and a ranch9 nameed John Irwin engaged 1i4 a pistol Muel, Irwin be ing fatally shot. Meehan, was seriously wounded. It is said that following this encounter threats wqre mae against Mee han's life. NDIANS ILES TO. ILA Desire to Avoid Evjc#on!rm Warner Bench in Caglifornia. SAN BERNARDINOj Cal., April 7.-The Warner Ranch Indian* ro fleeing to the hills to escape evictiot. lAlbert Juan, an Indian interpreter, who has just returned from the ranch, state* that there is very little hope of the Indiaps submitting quietly to being carried off from AgMa Caliente, and that they are now leavig the reservation, and the commissioners-will find -no one to move when they arrive, .uan intimates that before the Indiano leave they will' de mand the payment of 450,000 for improve ments made on the ranah. XULN DRIVEm S BT rrM. T1ie-Up at Maple HiMl *Wery of Bead ing Clro. Y. MAHANOY CITY, Pa, Ajil 7.-The driv era employed at the mov Hill colliery of the Philadelphia and .RbAdng Coal and Iron Company went on At3ake today because the officials of the opapeny refused to allow them fifteen minUtep at quitting time to stable the mules, and'a ? result I,400 mine workers, men and boys, are idle. The mine has a daily output of Lii00 tons. This is the largest and beat produelag colliery of the Reading Company, apd was the only one in this locality visi%d by the anthracte3 strike commission whpn they toured the region. -DR AIN1AGE 4NAL SUIT. Great Mass of Testhmewny Submitted in Pamous~a ST. LOUIS, April 7.-What is said to be the largest quantity of testimony ever sub mitted to a court in this Country will be Presented, to the Unie States Supreme Court next Oct9ber by Oommnsioner Frank B. Bright as a result- et tus hearing in -the Chicago drainagecag 4 - - This- volmuaa rllor far from being - eg is t eutof even months of a1mn. un ~ isd hearing of evideniee, ~ all mtimony .Is in It wltemaithnj O0,00wd. An aAiom'emt of tw in tbe tear' Z gis e^xpeated h onsuissed in bi 4 mtaki ATLNTECriT, A ,4April 7.-The Norwegian steaabip R t*n'rom Port Antonio for Neo ord went sahore aff this city on the aflarch 80, was Goated at high th8e tIw g. -Her eargo of autt wn~str~ over board before tha meb ted. Ne ROME, Alg ?.. threogaboet the ui4 wrt eNseentatbe s au miga genra#stTe - I ABRECH IS WIDENED Twenty-Two Bed Cross Mem bers Suspended. ALL ARE WELL KNOWN MCUTIVE GEITTEB TAX=S ACTION IN NEW YOEE. Thosm Affected by Suspension Deny Legality of the Probeeding Xr. Phillips' Letter. NEW YORK, April 7.-The American Na tional Red Cross at a meeting of the ex ecutive committee held in this city yes terday suspended from membership in the organization the twenty-two signer's of a memorial which was recently presented to Congress, the attitude taken Wf these md bers being hostile to the interests of the organization. Among those against whom this action was .taken are:-, John W. Floster, Brig. Gen. John M. Wilson, Hilary Herbert, Simon Wolf, Sara Spencer and Ellen S. Mussey. The members at this meeting claim that this aggressive policy has been adopted In order to end the persistent attempt to dis credit- Miss Barton and disrupt the Red Cross. The efforts of the minority to force the retirement of Miss Barton, they assert, have proved absolutely' futile and have not met with the support of the public, and add that the society has the unqualified support of the majority, composed of the oldest Red Cross workers, living in differ ent parts of the country, who have person ally contributed several hundred thousand dollars to its work. Among Miss Barton's supporters are, they say, such men as Mr. Wm. T. Wardwell, for merly treasurer of the Standard Oil Com pany, who was chairman of the New York Red Cross Society during the Spanish-Amede Ican war, raising 3360,000 for Red Crosswork in Cuba, and who has since established the Red Cross Hospital in this city at a large expenditure from his private fortune. It is alleged that there has not at any time been any merit in the opposition, and that It has been maintained solely for the pur pose of driving Clara Barton from the presidency and handing the control of the organization over to a rhinority clique. This, it Is said, is especially emphasized by the fact that the opposition Is largely composed of new members located In Washington who have contributed to the work of the society a mere pittance-less than $200. It is now proposed that the society shall take up the work of extending the organi zation throughout the entire country, as contemplated some months ago by Miss Barton and outlined In her report at the last apnual meeting. Those Suspended. The twenty-two members suspended by the executive committee at yesterday's meeting in New YQrk are: Gen. John M. Wilson, Miss Mabel 'Boandman, Mrs. J. Ellen roster, Mrs. Sarah Spencer, Miss Bessie 10bbey, Mr. A. C. Kauffmann, Mr. Wililam H.. Michael, Mr. Brainard H. War ner;. Simon' Wolf-the above cohstitut ing the executive committee of last year; Gen. $iohn W. Foster, former Secretary of the.Navy Hila-y A. Herbert, Mr. Thomas F. Walsh, Rear Admiral W. K. Van Rey pen; Rear Admiral F. M. Ramsey, Mrs. Anna Roosevelt Cowles, Mrs. Harriet Blaine Beale, Mrs. 'HettTe Harrison, Mrs. Mary Bruce Hague, Miss Elizabeth Pierce, Mrs. Ellin Spencer Mussey, Mrs. Mero L. Tan ner Mrs Henrietta N. Rose and Mrs. Amy L Wolf. The Washington members of the Ameri an National Red Cross who signed the nemorial to Congress each received today t typewritten letter announcing the action :f the excutive committee in New York resterday. The letter reads as follows; The Letter of Suspension. "You are hereby notified that at a meet ing of the executive committee of the American National Red Cross .held in the :ity of New York on the 6th day of April, A. D. 1908, you were, by vote of said ex )cutive committee, suspended from mem bership and from all privileges of member ihip in said American National Red Cross, the charges against you being: "First. That you have attempted to dig rupt the t organization of the Ameriqah qational Red Cross. "Second. .That in a certain memorial .to :ongress, now *nown as document 340 [L R., Fiftyseventh Congres, second.ses7. ion, you have assumed an attitude unbe .oming a, member of the Natjonal Ameri :an Red Cross and hostile tothe interests >f thiat' organisation. "You are hereby required, at a meeting af said exeeutive committee to be held In ,ity of New York In the near future, at a ;ine and place agreed on between you and sa.id executive committee, to show cause why said supenslon should not be made permnanent. --"Very respectfully yours, "'WALTER P. PHTT.TIPS, 'Chairman Executive Committee, American National Red Cross." Deny Right of Action. Just what action will be taken by the sus pended members of the Red Cross Is not lefinitely known. Mrs. Ellen Spencer Mus iey. when seen at her offBce this afternoon, idmitted she 'had received a letter from Ifr. Phillips apprising her of the executive ~ommittee's action. She declined to sa what action she would take. Miss Boardman said she had been In rmed that othen~ members of the Red !ross who had signed a memorial to Con press bad received letters from Mr. Phil 1pm. - It Is generally believed that the suspend ,d members will take no notice of their sus pension other than to deny the authority yt the executive committee to aet -in the The members of the Red Cross. who are Iworking toward a reorganization of the ody, do not recognise the present execu Wve committee as a legally elected body. Th Xmmarlal to Cog.in. General Johun M. Wilson, vice president of he National Red CFess, on- Janusiry 20 iremented to Congress a memiorial regard ng that orynitio especially with rei snde to gestain dtftmrences . thich had wisatodt esp z~ wbethe Ing, COrrespondence with President Roose velt and Miss Barton and a general state ment in criticism of the n#w by-laws adooted. The communication was signed by (ea. John M. Wilson as irst vice president of the organhation from December 11, 190, to December 9, 1902, and also by the follow ing members of the executive committee dtring the se period: Mabel T. Bod man, J. Ellen Foster, Bensie J. KIbbey, Sarah -A. Spencer, A. C. Kauftan - W. K Michael, B. H. Warner, Simon Wolf, John W. Foster, Hilary A. Herbert, Thomas F. Walsh, Mero L. Tanner, Henrietta M. Rose, Amy L. Wolf, Anna Roosevelt Cowles and Ellen Spencer Mussey. IAX FOR 2AGELY LAXIm Senator Frye Calls to See About the Annna1 Arrangement. Senator Frye of Maine paid his annual visit to the office of the fourth assistant postmaster general this morning to arrange for the establishment of summer post of fices at Rangely Lake. There are a num ber of hunting and fishing camps on the lake, which, while not greatly distant from one another, are not easily approached. The result is that during the sumumr, when there Is a large number of campers and sportsmen in the vicinity of the lake. fourth-class post offices are established to apcoMmodate thepe persons. Senator Frye, who Is solhething of I lesherman hitn6blf, always makes the arrangements for the establishment of these offices and invarla bly cis on the:fourth assistant postmaster general in person about this time of the year to see that :his constituents and their visitors Will not be disappointed in regard to the delivery of mail. As the fourth as sistant postmaster general is a keen fisher man and spends his summers in the forests of Maine It is, evident that no great obstacles are encountered in effecting the annual arrangement PROGiESS OF EDUCATION. Exhibit Being Prepared for the St. Louis Exhibition. A unique exhibition is being arranged by the bureau of education for the St. Louis exposition. The plans for the exhibit as developed provide for a series of photo graphs of schools situated in various parts of the country which will accurately repre resent the, condition of the schools. It is desired that the school rooms, scholars and teachers shall be shown in the photographs, so that an idea may be gained as to the features and dress of the children and their Instructors. The exhibit will also include photographs of the exterior of the schools that are-included in the exhibit and statis tical statements of the various states in which they are situated. It is not pro posed to take these pictures in regular or der, but at random throughout the coun try. The pictures will be made from schools In New York, Pennsylvania, Mary land, Virginia, North Carolina, Nebraska, Kansas, Texas, California and other states. It is the intention of the bureau of educa tion to secure for the exhibit also charts of the courses of study pursue In the col leges and other schools of the country In prerevolullonary times, which will be placed skOe. by side with the statistical tables of. the last census, so t1at an ac curate idea may e given of tle develop ment of the educational facilities of the country. FILTRATION PLAMT CONTRACTS. Agreemrat ftit,Exavating nd Build ing Embankmnt NoYet fdompleted. The final letting of contricts for work on the fitratloh plant on list-treet south of the Soldiers' Home grpunds has been completed by Colonel Miller with L. E. Smoot and with the Brennan Construction Company, both of this city. The letting qf the contract to Cowardin, Bradley, Clay & Co. of Richmond, Va., for excavating and building embankments, constituting the bulk of the work, has not been completed, but it Is eKpected It will be in a day or two. The contract is now in the hands of the Richmond firm, ready for their signatures. After twenty days from the date of their signing the instrument, it is expected, they will begin the work of excavation. Army Orders. First Lieut. David M. King, ordnance department, has been ordered to Fort H. G. Wright, New York, to destroy certain unserviceable shells. Major Thomas Cruse, quartermaster, at Oinaha, Neb., has been ordered to this city for temporary duty in the office of the ituartermaster general. Contract Dettal Surgeon 8. W. Hussey has- been relieved from duty in, the Phil Ippines and ordered to duty in the depart nent of California. Capt.. Robert G. Paxton, 10th Cavalry, has been granted forty-five .days' leave of %bsence. Contract Dental Surgeon Alden Carpenter has been relieved from duty In the Philip pines and ordered to take station at Van couver barracks. Leaves of absence have been granted as l'ollows: First Lieut. Albert B. Henderson, assistant surgeon, one month and twelve lays; SecondsLieut. Rowland B. Ellis, 13th Cavalry, four months on account of sick sess, and Chaplain William T. Anderson, LOth Cavalry, four months. Capt. Edwin Landon, Artillery Corps, has been' ordered-to this city for assigarment to luty as an assistant In the ofie of thie thief of artillery at the headquarters of tLie army. Capt. W. C. Short, 18th Cavalry, has been yrdered to temphorary duty at Crawford, RTeb.. First Lieut. William S. C. Sinclair, 5th [nfantry, has been asgned to duty at Gal veston, Tex. Naval Ordera. Commander K. Rohrer to the navy yard, New York, N. Y., for duty as- inspector of wrdnance. -ULeut. Commander 3. L. Pureeli from the Wabash navy. yard, Boston, -Mass., antJ granted three months' sick leave. Assistant Surgeon J.' H. Holloaray from he Museum of Hygiene and Medical. ehool, Washington,: D. C., to the F'ranklln. Assistant Surgeon E. M. Brown from the WIaval Museum of Hygiene and Medical lehool, to the Naval Hospital, Norfolk, V'a. Acting Assistant Surgeon D). P. Mcord, ippeintament dated January 7, 200S, is here y revoked; take oesot April 4, 190Og. Chief Gunner Mf. W., Omartin to the nvy yard, New York, N. Y., foi duty In ,onnection with ftigout the Bahaer' ad duty cii board thtvessel wfaen scm Chief (mimer 5 ~~W)~ to the navy When a prospective pu bees the advertisea ent of a business concern in a reputable pubfication like The Evening Star, it fixes that concern's identity, gives it a standing. With such introduction the transaction of business is an open booLs THE OHIO SITUATION Result of Yesterday's Mu nicipal Elections, INOINNATI OUTCOME xnmECT or N'AZ 0P CONTEM PLATED BLUR LAwV, Gives Republicans in Southern Part of the State Naming of Guberna torial Candidate, "The result of yesterday's municipal elec tions In Cincinnati and Cleveland will have bearing on state politics of Ohio hereafter," said an Ohio politician to a Star reporter today. "In my opinion, the first result will be to give to -the repUblicans of southern Ohio, Foraker, Fleischman and Cox, full swing in the naming of the gubernatorial end date, and they are not likely to choose Senator Hanna's friend. Myron T. Herrick. It is the restoration of the southern Ohio republican faction to a position they for merly held In the party. It does not mili tate against Senator Hanna's chances for re-election to the Senate, as Foraker and his friends are working for Hanna. The Defeat of Ingalls. "The result in Cincinnati is the outcome of conditions that have been fermenting for some time. The defeat of M. E. Ingalls for mayor is a revolt of the populace against contemplated blue laws. In order to better understand the feeling it will be necessary to go back a few years. "Cincinnati got good just about the tinib it got poor. Hard times and dry times have gone together. After .the depression of 1803 Cincinnati failed to recuperate as other cities did. Cleveland, under the Im petus of the great boom in iron, forged rapidly ahead. . Cincinnati seemed to lose its business grip. "Coincidently a wave of reform swept over the town. Theretofore Cincinnati had been the playground for a wide territory. The people of Cincinnati were inclined to be liberal and loved good things them selves. Consequently money was freely spent. The small merchants came in from nearby counties In .Ohio, Indiana, Ken tucky and West Virginia and from 4oWn the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to.lay to their stocks of goods and have a good timiC Hard Times- and Reform. "When hard times struck the town and reform followed it was too much. The peo ple did not have much money and could not have much fun with what modey they did have~ S the iform element wanted to further ten th# lines. "Then along comes -Fieachan. He is a liberal spirited fellow. advocates giving the boys a little swing, and, moreover, t inter ested in industrial propositions that prom ise to ease up the times a little bit. The crowd takes him up and he w again and they arti V 0a* earnest. Mrs Ingallu4 42celleat *sa pialsed by all, is put up by the democrats and supoorted by theft& fofi* -elb ment of the republica. WJm_# 14 ap rent that Mr. Ingalls Isb(IMby tae pulpit and the sllksteekbngs4 rennhunnans a lot of democrats get scared for fear that there Is to be.a reign of blue laws, and they slough off to support the Fleischman ticket and Fleischman wins again. Situation in ClevelanL "Now up in Cleveland the situation was this: Mr. Myron T. Herrick of Cleveland Is Senator Hanna's choice for gubernatorial nomination. That selection is not unani mously approved by Ohio republicans. Those who were against him said that un less Mr. Herrick was strong enough to car ry Cuyahoga county in the spring .election, and reinstate the republicans, he ought not to expect to. get the nomnation for gov ernor. He was not strong enough, with his friends, to elect a republican mayor, and. in my opinion, Mr. Herrick is out of it henceforth, "Since the republicans of the northern section of the state cannot awing a big mu nicipal election, and the republicans of Cin cinnati can, It certainly will follow tha the southern faction will take the lead." TIES REUTa5 m OHIO. Mr. Ingalls' Defeat in. Cinnat+ Was - a SurprMe. Bpecial Dispateh to The Ewesing Star. COLUMBUS, Ohio, April 7.--The five large cities of Ohio went Ja yesterday's election exactly as outlined in dispatches to The Star. Tom Johnson is re-elected mayor of Cleveland by nearly 10,000. "Golden Rule" Jones becomes mayor of Toledo for the fourth time by 2,500 plural ity. H. R. Jeffrey, republican, is elected mayor of Columbus by over 3,000. Julius Fleischmnan is re-elected mayor of Cincin nati over President M. Ei. Ingalls by 15,000 plurality, and Chas. Snyder, democrat, Is re-elected mayor of Dayton by 1,000. No surprise is caused by these results, except that it was expected that Mr. In galls would cut down Fleiscbhnann's plu rality to about 8,000. Ingalls failed to unite the democrats and anti-Cox republicans. George B. Cox thus redhews his grasp on republican affairs in Cincinnati. It is a singular fact that every city in which a,. republican, candidate for governor lives went democratic. Cleveland. the home of Myron T. Herrick;- Akron, the, home of General Dick; Chillicothe, the home of Al bert Douglass; Madison,- the-home of War den G. Harding, and Dayton, the home of RepresentativeR. M. Nevin, al elected dem ocrat mayors. For this reason it is believea that the democratic victory- in Cleveland will not be disastrous to Myron T. Herrick as a candidate for the nomnation,tor- gov ernor. Out of twenty-four "chief cities of OMio, the democrats carry twelve and the republicans eleven, The other being Toledo, where an independent mnovement succeeded, so that no general politiesal tread can be found in the election results. It Is BeHaved Tht-Cuabe's 'Ue..Will tmanh the aegotnu ase sun in rgrmbetween the Thdtes Sle.m and CubaUWtbei Ma efrtse these k ~ W sehoteiv b s iatyt toub itawn, a waeiache-e-- cae - ui dnmm the. title Waba to the

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