4 Ekim 1934 Tarihli Evening Star Dergisi Sayfa 1

4 Ekim 1934 Tarihli Evening Star Dergisi Sayfa 1
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WKEABTHEJL..n I "From Pre»* to Home (tT 8 Weather Bureau Forecast.) , Cloudy tonight and tomorrow, possibly Within an Hour followed by rain tomorrow night; not The Star’s Carrier system covers every much change in temperature. Tempera- .. ui-.pi. _nri *u. i-ppnlar edition is tures—Highest. 72. at 3 io p.m. yester- city diock ana me regular_ eauion is day lowest 52. at 2 a m. today. Full delivered to city and suburban homes report on page A-6. as fast as the papers are printed. wl 00 0utMtT Closing N.Y. Market*,Pages 15,16 & 17 Yesterday’s Circulation, 128,786 No. 33.028. gr&y.WASHINGTON, I), C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1934—FIFTY PAGES. »»*<*> M.,n. Abated pw, TWO CENTS. CARDINALS LEAD BENGALS, 2 T01, IN SIXTH CHAPTER OF SECONDSERIESTILI Orsatti’s Triple and Med wick's Single Drive Runs Across—Tigers Count on Doubles by Rogell, Fox. HALLAHAN EFFECTIVE IN OPENING CHAPTERS St Louis Left-Hander Fans Green berg With Manager Cochrane on Third and Gehringer on First as Crowd Clamors for Home Run. THE IJNE-l'P. ST LOUIS 1N >. DETROIT <A>. Martin. :it> White, rf Rmhrock rf Cochrane, c Frisch, "b Gehringer. 'lb Medwick if Greenberg lb Collins lb Goslin. If Delancey. c Rogell. ss Orsatti cf Owen, Durocher. ss Fox. ri Hallahan. p Rowe, p Umpires—Klem 'N' plate Geisel 'A', first ba*e Reardon * N.». second base. 0«eri5 A • third base. Game time— 1.3o pm • E S. T *. BY DENMAN THOMPSON. DETROIT. October 4—The St. Louis Cardinals were leading the Detroit Tigers here this afternoon in the second game of the world series in the sixth inning. The score was 2 to 1. first inning. ST. LOUIS—Meeting Rowe's first offering, Martin flied to center. Lyn wood's first two to Rothrock were strikes, and. after taking a ball, he went out. Gehringer to Greenberg. Frisch was a first-ball hitter. His drive down the third-base line was too hot for Owen to handle and the Cardinal boss was credited with a single. Medwick. after missing two swings, passed up a pair of wide ones and then stood like a statue as Rowe burned over a third strike. No runs. DETROIT—Hallahan hooked over two straight strikes on White, who then fouled a pair and took a ball before bounding to uoinns. wnusc toss to Hallahan. at first, retired the runner. Cochrane passed up a wide one before bounding to Collins. Pitch ing with caution, Hallahan had a count of two and two on Gehringer when the latter rolled to Collins, whose toss to first was dropped by Hallahan. It was an error for the pitcher. After taking a strike, Green berg sent a slow bounder to Martin, whose hurried throw made Collins stretch, but the putout was effected. Ho runs. SECOND INNING. ST LOUIS—A ball was sandwiched between two strikes to Collins, who then made White back up in center for his fly. Delancey missed with a swing after taking two balls, then was credited with a hit when Gehringer fumbled his roller. Meeting Rowe's first pitch. Orsatti sent a drive to the limits in left, close to the foul line, which went for a triple and scored Delancev with the first run of the game. With the Tiger infield pulled in, Rowe promptly got two strikes on Durochei and. after taking one ball, the Cardinal captain popped harm lesslv to Greenberg. With two strikes and as manv balls. Hallahan sent a curving liner to right, which Fox captured closed to the foul line. One run. DETROIT—Goslin took a strike, then sent a slow roller to Frisch back of second base which he easily beat out for a single. A called strike fol lowed two balls for Rogell. After taking another strike. Rogell hoisted to Delancey. back of the plate. Owen had only one ball called in the proc ess of fanning. Fox fouled one back and missed completely for another, then took three straight balls before fouling to Delancey. No runs. THIRD INNING. ST. LOUIS—Martin waited out the String before bounding a single over second. Rothrock cracked his bat fouling one. Bunting the next pitch, he sacrificed Martin to second. Rowe to Greenberg. Frisch fouled the first strike before lofting to White in short center, Meeting Rowe's first delivery, Medwick singled sharply to left, scor ing Martin with the Cards' second run. Medwick took second on Gos hn's futile throw to the plate. Col . m_1_1 then Hlinli — rated Medwick's safety, but this time Goose's perfect throw nailed Med wick at the plate. The latter came into the platter hard and Cochrane had the wind knocked out of him, but held on to the ball. One run. DETROIT—Rowe fanned on three pitched balls, swinging viciously at the third. White bounced to Frisch, after taking one ball. Hallahan pitched only one strike in walking Cochrane. With a count of one and one. Gehringer singled to right, send ing Cochrane to third. The crowd was clamoring for a home run as Greenberg came to bat. He took two balls and as many strikes before miss ing with a swing at a pitch over hi* head. No runs. FOURTH INNING. ST LOUIS—Delancey flied to Gos lin on the first pitch. Orsatti. an other first-ball hitter, rolled to Green berg. Taking one strike, Durocher bounded to Owen, who fumbled, but recovered the ball in time to get it to first ahead of the runner. Umpire Geisel failed to note that the throw had drawn Greenberg off the bag. so the decision stood. No runs. DETROIT—Durocher made a nice play on Goslin's grounder to peg him out at first After misjudging Ro geirs high fly. Orsatti couldn't come in fast enough to catch it and the blow was registered as a two-base hit. Owen took one ball, then bounded to Frisch as Rogell went to third. Hit less in the series up to this point. Fox remedied the deficiency by drill* “ ing a double down the left-field foul * line to score the Tigers' first run. The Cardinals contended at length that the drive was foul, but got nowhere in the argument. Rowe Mf Seeks Revenge SCHOOLBOY ROWE. missed the first one with a hard swing and took three balls before missing for another strike. A third swing and Rowe was victimized on strikes again. One run. FIFTH INNING. ST. LOUIS—Hallahan was easy for Rowe, striking out on three pitched balls. Martin swung at the first pitch and grounded out to Rogell. Rothroek went to a two-and-two count, then lined to Gehringer. No runs. DETROIT—White lined to Frisch on the first ball pitched Cochrane's patience was rewarded with another walk. With a count of two and two. Gehringer flied high to Rothroek. Greenberg took a strike and fouled another. On his second called ball Greenberg started a swing which the Cardinals contended was a strike. Two more high ones gave Greenberg his base on balls. Cochrane advancing to second Goslin took a strike and a ball before lofting to Orsatti in right center. No runs. SIXTH INNING. ST. LOUIS—With a count of one and one, Frisch rolled softly to Greenberg. Medwick sprawled in lunging for one. then hoisted to White in center. Rowe had an edge on Collins when the latter bounded to Greenberg. Schoolboy took the throw at first. No runs. DETROIT—Rogell was even with Hallahan when Pepper Martin's throw sailed high over Collins and the third baseman was charged wdth an error. Rogell pulled up at second. Atiempt ing to sacrifice. Owen bunted to Hal lahan. whose throw to Martin Kiwea off Rogell at third. Fox had a ball and a strike when he popped harm lessly to Frisch Hallahan's first three pitches to Rowe were wide. School boy took two strikes and then let the next go by for the third called strike as he stood, fanning for the third time in a row. No runs. AGITATORS OUSTED BY GEORGIA TOWN Nineteen Men Escorted to Edge of Shannon and Told Never to Return. By the Associated Press. SHANNON. Ga , October 4—A Vigilance Committee of Shannon j citizens, working as the vigilantes did in days gone by. cleared this modern i mill village of 19 agitatora. with the warning that they were "very, very undesirable” and to get out and stay out. The 19 men were arrested by the Georgia National Guard for their agitation in the mill village of the Southern Brighton Co. and were taken to Atlanta. However, the men returned yesterday after being re leased and started their activities again, local citizens said. Working smoothly and with pre cision. the modern vigilantes gathered the agitators and escorted them to the city limits. There they were re leased with the warning that they must never return to Shannon. Sheriff O. L. Betts of Floyd County ! said the village was quiet this morn I ing and everything was normal. BRITISH LABOR PARLEY DEFEATS SEIZURE PLAN 2.118.000 to 149.000 Vote Against Confiscation of Property in Industrial Socialization. By the Associates Press. SOUTHPORT. England. October 4—The British Labor Conference J overwhelmingly defeated today an ' amendment calling for partial con | fiscation of capital property in a so cialization of industry program. The amendment, submitted on be ! half of the Socialist League, was de feated on a card vote, 2,118.000 to 149.000. The scheme called for compensation to previous owners in the firm of an | income allowance for a maximum of | 25 years, but contained no provisions for capital repayment. It provided that "where trust funds | of a socially useful character are con , cerned. or in cases of individual hard i ship, the compensation may take the : form of outright purchase and not of | income allowances.” I By the Associated Press. I MAGDALENA. Sonora. Mexico, Oc tober 4.—Yaqui Indians and Mexican peons poured down from the far So nora hills today for the annual fiesta of San Francisco Xavier. But they came not in their usual festival spirit. Angry resentment smoldered in their breasts, for the j plaster statue of their patron saint has ! been destroyed. The ancient cathedral in which they had worshipped his image as long as the old men could remember wras closed to them—turned into a political meeting place—the priests in exile. The Yaqui were forbidden their pagan Pascola" dance about a rag-doll Christ and a straw Judas. The image of the saint was cre P BRITISH-JAPANESE CONFRONTING U. S. Davis and Standley to Leave for Naval Parleys Fear ing Situation. POLITICAL RELATIONS IN FUTURE AT STAKE America to Agree With Reduction of Armaments Provided Ratio* Are Maintained. BY CONSTANTINE BROWN. The prospect of a Japanese-British alignment—of sympathies, at least—at the coming naval parleys In London is confronting the American delega tion. Ambassador Norman H Davis and Admiral William H. Standiey. the highest ranking officer In the Ameri- \ ran Navy, have been selected by the President to represent the United Slates at the London “Preliminary" Naval Conference. Accompanied by a staff of technical experts, both dele gates will leave New York next Wed nesday, hoping for the best and ex pecting the worst. Statements made by high Japanese officials leave but little doubt that Ja pan will be adamant in its demand for parity with the United States and Great Britain. The London conversa tions. It is believed here, will assume a momentous importance not only In j regard to the future of the naval agreements but will Influence also the future political relations between the various governments attending the London parleys. White House Silent. While nothing has been said from the White House and the interested departments regarding the instruc tions given to Mr. Davis and Admiral Standley, it is safe to assume that the United States would rather see the existing naval agreements go overboard than agree to a parity with Japan. The United States will undoubtedly agree to any naval reduction which may be proposed in London provided that the existing ratios between the United States. Great Britain and Ja pan are maintained Admiral Yamamoto, the principal Japanese delegate at the London par leys. has lett no doubt in the minds of anybody that Japan is determined to obtain parity with the United States. His instructions are reported to be to leave London and thus per mit the Japanese government to de nounce both naval treaties rather than maintain the present inferior position of Japan The Japanese delegate will not be blunt when the conversations with the ) British and the American delegates begin. He is reported to have orders to propose an actual naval reduction. i especially concerning the offensive armaments of the navy, that is to say, I the battleships and the airplane car riers. Present Ratios. In this category the present ratios are 5—5—3. The British and the American navies possess 15 battleships each to the 10 which Japan has. By proposing a reduction of the total tonnage of the battleships the Jap ' nnese will appear to advocate an actual reduction. But they will insist that, because of the growing importance of the Japanese Empire and the increased duties of the Japanese Navy, there | shall be a drastic reduction in the i global tonnage of the British and American battleships and a substan tially smaller reduction in the Jap anese tonnage. Once this reduction is agreed upon, the Japanese intend to suggest that each country should build battleships of such types as fit best Its individual needs. This means that while the United States, lacking naval bases outside its territorial waters, will have to main tain the 33.000-ton type. Japan will be able to build smaller vessels and have an equal if not a larger number W.jew ... •xvu.v. As far as the cruisers, destroyers and submarines are concerned, it is reliably reported that the Japanese government will propose that the present status quo should be main tained. That is to say that no nation should build other vessels than those (Continued on Page 2, Column 6.) GAMBLER FOUND DEAD Toledoan's Body Discovered in Alley in Midtown Detroit. DETROIT, October 4 (/P).—The body of a man who, police said, had been identified as Jimmie Hayes, well known Toledo gambler, was found this morning in an alley near the central business district. He had been killed with a shotgun. There were seven slugs in his body and police said he had been killed elsewhere. In the pockets were four dice, a *100 bill and a $50 bill. The identification was made by Inspector Henry J Garvin, who said he was ac quainted with Hayes. Enraged by Loss of Idol, Yaqui Throng Mexican Town -- mated ifi Hermcslllo, the state's cap ital. when the state took over the church and exiled the priests for leaching alleged superstitious doctrines to the peons and Indians. Distant throbbing of tom-toms has been heard in the hills, council fires have flamed in well-hidden valleys and rumors have floated in that the fierce Yaqui warriors might try to avenge their patron saint. Although Gov. Rodolfo Elias Calles denied there has been any signs of discontent among the Indians, the federal garrison here has been strengthened. In years past Magdalena, on San Francisco's day, has been like a page torn from the middle ages. On foot and on horseback, in wagons and on crude litters, have come jj»ilgTlms. /TsoldTTa BUT I NEVER. \ A DREAMED IT M WOULD GET m 17 THE HANDS OF AN* Vj \0THfR DICTATOR.* Vo SHADE OF NAPOLEON! P STREET TRACKS Utilities Body Decides New Bridge Will Not Carry Street Cars. The Public Utilities Commission to day ordered the Capital Transit Co to remove its tracks on P street west of Dupont Circle. After this Is done all street car service from Georgetown and points beyond to the downtown section will come in by way of Wisconsin avenue to M street and thence east along M street following the route of the old Capital Traction Co.'s Rosslyn line. The order also instructed the com pany to build a double-turn connection at Wisconsin avenue and M street and to extend the underground trolley sys tem along Wisconsin avenue from M street to P street. Bus Service Ordered. The decision on this phase of the rerouting was made at this time be- ! cause of construction of the new P j street bridge. This has reached a point which made it necessary to de- , cide immediately whether tracks would be built into the new bridge. In the order the commission in structed the company to replace the street-car service on P street with bus service which would seat the same Dumber of persons as the street cars now in service. The order also said that the fare to be charged on the busses must be the same as that now charged on the street cars. Ask Ban on P Street Cars. Abolition of street car tracks on P street was recommended by all of the experts who presented plans to the commission. When public hearings were held, i however, several residents of George- ; town urged that the street car tracks 1 be left in P street. Objection to their ; removal was based partly on the ground that the cars now using P street would cause intolerable con gestion at the intersection of Wiscon- ; sin avenue and M street. The order by the commission today does not become binding by itself, but must go to the Joint Board, consist ing of the District Commissioners and ] t -wombore nf he Pnhlin TTtTlitieg Bvrd Tells Mother Rolling Base Work Is Now Completed Special Dispatch to The Star. WINCHESTER. Va . October 4.—Mrs. Richard Evelyn Byrd today received a radiogram from her son. Admiral Byrd, at the Bolling advance base in the Antarctic, saying: “Am O K again, my work here now finished. Am returning to Little America soon. Told the three fellows here with me that when we get back I am going to bring them to see you for a good feed. Much love. DICK." SUE TO HALT SALE Property Owners Call Atten tion to Dry Covenant in Court Action. Calling attention to a dry covenant in the deeds to property in Takoma. D. C., a group of property owners of that section filed suit in District Supreme Court today, seeking to pre vent sale of alcoholic beverages at the one establishment to which a license was issued recently. Through Attorney George E. Sulli

van. the plaintiffs ask the court to issue a rule to show cause why the licensees should not be restrained from operating under the license dur ing pendency of the suit, without waiting for final hearing of the case, or. as an alternative, why the case should not be advanced for early trial. Shortly after the suit was filed the court signed an order directing the defendant to show cause. October 10, why they should not be restrained. Injunction Applicants. Those applying for the injunction are: District of Columbia Conference Corp. of Seventh-day Adventists, 254 Carroll street; Ralph W. Reed, 300 Carroll street; Ethel H Reed. 300 Carroll street; Charles R Nor mad.v. 221 Vine street; Nellie Davis Commission sitting together. It is a foregone conclusion, however, that the Joint Board will approve the order. -• ROOSEVELT PLANS VISIT To Stop at Andrew Jackson's Old Home Next Month. Representative Byrns of Tennessee announced on leaving the White House today that President Roosevelt would visit the Hermitage, Andrew Jackson's old home near Nashville, about the middle of next month en route to Warm Springs, Ga. New Styles for This Fall Thousands of readers of The Star follow the trend of the fashion from style illustra tions in the advertisements of Washington merchants. The stores are displaying full lines of new merchandise for home furnishings and per sonal apparel. Careful buyers use The Star as their shopping guide. Yesterday’s Advertising (Local Display.) Lines The Evening Star 33,969 2nd newspaper .. 13,111 3rd newspaper ... 11,661 4th newspaper .... 10,381 5th newspaper ... 5,058 Total ( Newspapers ) 40,211 That the public is intensely interested in the news of the day is reflected in yesterday’s circulation of The Star of 127,281, an increase of 9,394 over the corresponding day last year when the world series was going on in Ne^ York. h m Normanay. zzi vine street. uawa Griffiths. 212 Carroll street; William Stuart, 210 Carroll street: Ruth Stu art, 210 Carroll street, and Marga retta Parsons, 6930 Ninth street. The defendants are Joseph B. Simp son, Laura Gertrude Simpson and A. Gilbert Simpson. The first two are described as owners of the store prop erty in the 300 block of Carroll street, for which the Alchoholic Beverage Control Board recently issued an off sale beer and light wine license. It is a grocery store conducted by Joseph B. and A. Gilbert Simpson under the business name of J. B. Simpson &. Son. After more than six months of periodical hearings before the Bever age Board and the District Commis sioners over whether Takoma should be declared a dry area or licenses granted, the Beverage Board approved one application and rejected three other applications for different kinds of licenses. The petition filed in court today de clares that the deeds of conveyance made by the original owner of the subdivision had the following covenant annexed to them; "That no malt or spiritous liquors shall be manufactured or sold on said premises.” The petition contends this was a covenant running with the land and intended for the common benefit of owners of land in the subdivision. THREE DIE IN CRASH BIRMINGHAM, Ala.. October 4 (A>). —A young farmer and his two chil dren were killed early today as the Pan-American, L. & N. passenger train, crashed Into their automobile at a grade crossing near Jemison, Ala. Louis Northcutt, 20, his son. John, 4. and his small daughter, Elnoir, 1, were the victims. A report to railroad officials hpre said the automobile drove on the tracks In front of the speeding flyer a split second before the engine struck the car broadside. Guide for Readers Page. Amusements .C-2 Comics .C-7 Features.C-4-5-6 Finance .A-16-17 Lost and Found.A-9 Radio .C-3 Service Orders.A-ll Serial Story .A-15 Short Story . B-15 Society...B-2-3 Sports.^..D-l-to-5 10 KIDNAP GIRL U. S. Agents Balk Abduction of Capital Man’s Fiancee on Wedding Eve. By th* Associated Pr^ss. WHEELING, W. Va . October 4 — Frustration of a plot to kidnap Betty Bloch, 24-vear-old daughter of a wealthy Wheeling tobacco manu facturer, and arrest of two men for the conspiracy was announced today by Department of Justice agents. The men under arrest are Harry Thornton, clerk in a haberdashery, i and Thurman Bowen, a semi-profes sional foot ball player. 1 J. J. Waters, chief agent for the De partment of Justice in the Pittsburgh district, announced both men had ad i mitted they conspired to kidnap Miss Bloch and hold her for $25,000 ran som. Arraigned before United States Commissioner John Kindleberger. the men were held in $50,000 bail each and remanded to jail on charges of conspiracy to kidnap. Wedding to Be Saturday. Miss Bloch, whose father heads the Bloch Bros. Tobacco Co., is to be mar ried Saturday. She ts prominent in West Vlgginia society and is promi | nentlv identified as an Eastern golfer Waters said the two men confessed they intended to 'snatch'' the young woman last night from the home of Miss Esther Leddy. a friend of Miss Bloch, where she was being enter tained on the eve of her wedding, i They abandoned the attempt at the last minute, fearing it was "too dan- , gerous,” said Waters. Federal officers took the men into custody shortly afterward and the two were lodged in the Ohio County Jail after questioning at the United States district attorney's office. Chloroform Found in Car. Waters said a bottle of chloroform and several rags were found in the automobile of the two men. which thev allegedly intended to use to whisk the girl out of West Virginia. 'T'l_nn/4 Dmvnn liv« in RriiiffP. port. Ohio. Thornton is 37 years old and Bowen 35. j Waters announced he "is filing” charges of conspiracy to kidnap against the two. The agents had been working on ! the case secretly for several weeks, it was learned, but they declined to dis | close the details of their investigation l leading to the detention of Thornton 1 and Bowen. The plot, as disclosed by Waters. | was to take the young woman across the State line into Ohio and hold her captive until the ransom money was i paid. Although declining to say how the Federal agents learned of the plot. I Waters said the men had been under I surveillance since shortly after it was hatched. Miss Bloch, a pretty brunet, will be married Saturday to Wilmot L. Harris of Washington, D. C., who has been living recently in Wheeling. WAS BANK EXAMINER Harris Resigned Post to Enter Business in Wheelipg. Wilmott L. Harris formerly was a : national bank examiner, attached to ! the office of the controller of the cur rency. Treasury Department. He served in that capacity for about five years, resigning to enter private business in Wheeling. W. V&. BY REX COLLIER. Giving a share of the credit for the i capture of John Dillinger to two East | Chicago. Ind., police officers, the Department of Justice has awarded *5.000 of the *15.000 offered last June for capture of the notorious gangster or for information leading to his ar rest. The officers who have received checks from Attorney General Cum mings for their aid in the sensational trapping and fatal shooting of Dill inger on July 22 last in Chicago are Capt. Timothy A. O'Neill and Sergt. Martin Zarkovitch. No mention was made of any award to the "woman in red,” Mrs. Anna Saage, who has been publicized widely as the girl who “put the finger" on the outlaw and led him to his death in front of a neighborhood movie theater. Capt. O'Neil and Sergt. Zarkovitch each received $2,500 of the Federal reward. Underlie original terms of EXECUTIVES SEEK TO AVOID BATTLE INA.F1DISPUTE Council to Take Up Issue to i Prevent Showdown in Convention. COMPROMISE TERMED UNLIKELY BY LEADERS Workers of World Must Unite to Promote International Peace, Says Green. By the Associated Press. SAN FRANCISCO, October 4.-Thc j storm brewing in the building trades ) department came to a head today, j casting a shadow over the American j Federation of Labor Convention. The Executive Council of the A. F, of L. decided to take up the contro versy late today in a last-minute ef fort to keep it from the floor of the convention. Leaders of both factions j said they saw iittle likelihood of a j compromise. The dispute involved refusal of the building trades department—reversing the recommendation of its own ex- ; ecutive council—to seat delegates from the Carpenters. Bricklayers and Elec- . trical Workers' International Unions. llrren Urges Union. While the delegates watched an xiously the developments in this in- j ternal dispute, the words of President | William Green were still fresh in their j minds that workers of the world must \ unite in the interests of international 1 peace. Asserting it is the "purpose- and spirit of the workers of the world to ! see that war never occurs again.” j Green said labor must move solidly "to prevent what seems to be an ap proaching war." "We cannot allow those with a mad i lust for power to have their wav.’’, the federation president warned , "They must not be allowed to com mand the masses of the people to> march out on the field of battle and I destroy each other." Green s remarks were made in in troducing John Stokes of London, fraternal delegate to the convention from the British Trade Unions Con gress. who responded: "I re-echo all that President Green has said. We workers must not allow a repetition of the great world catas trophe.” Both were cheered wildly by the 325 j delegates. No Frontier With Canada. In introducing William Dunn of ! Toronto, fraternal delegate from the , Canadian Trade Union Congress, j Green pointed out no frontier "in the j usual sense of the word"; separates! the Dominion from the United States, and the border has "no evidence of warfare or instruments of warfare.” The friendly relationship of labor organizations of the three countries. Green commented, is a forward step in international amity. The Canadian delegate said laborers in his country are watching with in- ! terest the development of the N. R A i in the United States and see in it : an attempt by the Government to aid all classes of its citizens. In its study of the building trades department dispute, the A. F. of L. Executive Council is expected to con sider the warning President Green gave the department, that its action in refusing to seat the delegates of the three "outside" unions was illegal. The department's Executive Coun cil recommended unanimously last (Continued on Page 5, Column 5.) MIDWEST FARMERS FAVOR A.A.A. IN VOTE Early Returns From Two States! Give Program Heavy Majority. By the Associated Press. DES MOINES. October 4—An "election" in agricultural circles was rolling up a heavy majority in the Midwest today for the leading candi- j date—the A. A. A —early returns from j two States indicated. The "election" is an informal refer- • endum sponsored by Secretary of! Agriculture Wallace and the A. A. A. j to give a million corn belt farmers a chance to air their views on contin- j uance of an agricultural adjustment | program. t “Election day” is from now to Oc- , tober 13. when the results will be com- I piled. The election judges are county! farm bureaus and county agents, who are in direct supervision of the ref erendum. The voters exercise not the i franchise of citizenship, but merely! the franchise of “being a farmer.” $5,000 of Dillinger Reward Given Two Indiana Policemen ___ i the reward, $10,000 was offered for, the capture of Dillinger and $5,000 ! for "information leading to his arrest.” ' Apparently O’Neil and Zarkovitch divided the $5,000 offered for informa tion that enabled the division of in-. vestigation agents to lay a fatal trap for the machine-gunning desperado 1 outside the Biograph Theater, near! Chicago's "gold coast.” Since the actual capture was made 1 by Federal agents, who are not per- j mitted to accept rewards, the Justice Department evidently intends to hold onto the remaining $10,000. Recommendations for the awards j to O’Neil and Zarkovitch were made by J. Edgar Hoover, director of the division of investigation. The Government still has outstand ing an offer of $5,000 for the capture and $2,500 for information leading to the arrest of Lester M. Gillis, alias George “Baby Face" Nelson, identified as the slayer in Wisconsin of Federal Agent W. Carter Baum of this city. ri LINDY HOME AREA Hauptmann Able to Repro duce Section From Mem ory, Foley Declares. ALIENIST’S TEST FAILS TO DISTURB SUSPECT Enigma of Man Remains After Quiz—Special Jury Panel Is Selected. By th* Associated Press. NEW YORK. October 4—District Attorney Samuel J. Foley announced odat that investigators had found in Bruno Hauptmann's trunk road maps if the Sourland Mountain section of Mew Jersey, where the estate of Col. Jharles A. Lindbergh is located. Foley also stated that Hauptmann is able to reproduce certain sections if the Hopewell (N. J.) territory from memory, even down to the smallest ntersecting forks of road" Dictionary Is Found. "We also found in this trunk." Foley said, "an English-German dictionary of the 1 000 most commonly used words The more difficult words ap pearing in the ransom note were in the dictionary and this, to some ex tent, confirms the theory that Haupt mann misspelled a number of the smaller words, while the more difficult words were written correctly, an indi cation that he looked up the spelling of the harder words in the dictionary." saiu uiiu naupuuiiim \*a.s able to draw maps of the Jersey sec* tion with remarkable accuracy." "We now know” the prosecutor said, ‘‘that he fished in those sec tions. He also had road maps cov ering the entire territory around Day Head. Buzzards Bay, Elizabeth Island and Marthas Vineyard. We are also able to show that Haupt mann fished there also.’’ Baby Not in New England. The Bronx district attorney has consistently refused to discuss a pos sible New Jersey kidnaping or murder case. However, he did say today that We have never contended that the baby was ever in New England. In fact, we are now going to prove that it was not." Foley said Hauptmann's road maps covered whole sections of interest in the kidnaping and ransom investi gation. The prosecutor said he knews of no witnesses to be brought to his office today for questioning. "We are concemrating all our energies on preparation for trial." he said. Foley also said he had received no official notice of the calling of a Hunterdon County. N. J.. grand jun to meet a week from today to con sider charges agaiast Hauptmann. The extortion trial in the Bronx is scheduled to start the same day. Test Is Incomplete. Hauptmann presented the same enigma to science today that he has posed to the law. Five psyc atrists, after subjecting him to a sanity test for more than two hours, left him with the an nouncement that the examination had not been completed and that it would be resumed tomorrow. A witness to the examination In a windowless room of the Bronx County court house said Hauptmann main tained his sullen silence and inscruta ble expression, answering questions in a monotone and rarely looking at the physicians. A special panel of 150 talesmen was drawn today, from which a jury’ will be chosen for the trial of the former German soldier in Bronx County on charges of extorting $50,000 in ransom from Lindbergh. Foley, however, qualified his re quest. which Judge James M. Barrett granted over the protests of defense counsel, that the trial be set for Octo ber 11. He asked that trial begin on that day. "unless some special rights of the people of the State of New Jersey interfere." Those right—to try Hauptmann on a charge of murder—apparently weri being insisted upon by New Jersey. Evidenee Gaps Filled. With the case crystallizing rapidly toward a trial, either for extortion or murder, investigators filled in the gap in their evidence. District Attorney Foley also made public today Hauptmann's ciiminal record in Germany, his native land, as cabled to the New York Police Depart ment by Detective Arthur Johnson of the department. Johnson, who was in Vienna at the time of Hauptmann's arrest, was ordered to Germany to in vestigate angles of the case there. 'TV,/, (Continued on Page 3, Column 2.) AODREY COATS FIELD REPORTED IN RENO Marital Rift With Marshall Field. 3d. Held Indicated by Plane Trip. By the Associated Press. CHICAGO. October 4.—The Chicago Herald and Examiner said in a copy right story today it had been informed that Mrs. Marshall Field. 3d, the for mer Mrs. Dudley Coats of London and the wife of the grandson of Chicago's first great merchant prince, was in Reno. Her reported arrival in the Nevada city, the newspaper added, followed rumors of a marital rift recurrent in fashionable circles for several months, but denied by Marshall Field. 3d. The newspaper said that Mrs. Field, who was Audrey James before her first marriage to Dudley Coats, flew through Chicago Tuesday night, traveling under an assumed name, leaving the plane at Reno for a resi dence nearby which she was reported to have engaged. Marshall Field. 3d. and Mrs. Coats were married in London August 19. 1930. They spent their honeymoon in Africa shooting lions for the Field Museum of Chicago.

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