23 Şubat 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

23 Şubat 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. Full Associated Press warmer, followed by rain tomorrow night; NeWS and WirephotOS ; gentle to moderate north and northeast Kunrlaar M~ __ j « winds. Temperatures—Highest, 30, at 5 bUnday MOHling and p.m. yesterday; lowest, 18, at 8 am. yes- Every AftemOOn. terday. Pull report on page B-5. C45) Means Associated Press. ^ _ V"_ -I filj_QQ Entered as second class matter FIVE CENTS (TEN CENTS I JNO. 1,014—ISO. 66,060. „ost offlce, Washington, D. C. Df WASHINGTON AND SUBURBS FARLEY CARRIES Challenges “Any Party ’ to “Meet Us on Our Record.” HAILS ROOSEVELT AS NATION'S SAVIOR State's Democratic Committee In dorses President, Boosting Convention Strength. Full text of Farley speech on Page A-10. By the Associated Press. TOPEKA, Kans., February 22.— Postmaster General James A. Farley, sounding the Democratic campaign battle cry in the farm belt, hailed President Roosevelt tonight as the savior of America and challenged “any political party to meet us on that record.” Speaking over a national radio net work on the same platform from which Gov. Alf M. Landon. mentioned as a possible Republican presidential nomi nee, criticized Roosevelt policies Janu ary 29, Farley made no specific men tion in his prepared address of the Kansas executive. Meanwhile, the Kansas Democrats, through their State Committee, today indorsed the administration of Roose velt and voted to hold their State con ! vention at Wichita April 28 to select 18 delegates to the Philadelphia na tional convention. Strength Seen for Roosevelt. The committee's action was In terpreted by party leaders to assure instruction of the State's 18 votes in . the convention to Roosevelt. Farley centered fire against New Deal critics, particularly former Presi dent Herbert Hoover and the American Liberty League. However, referring apparently to Kansas Republican statements regard ing State governmental economies—a point emphasized by Landon boost ers—Farley said: “I was sorry to learn that it was necessary here in Kansas to cut the salaries of school teachers and of professors in the colleges and universi ties. Perhaps it was necessary, but the policy of the Roosevelt administra tion has been to serve the schools of the Nation wherever possible.” iteviews i>cw i/ou ncvuiu. Reviewing three years of the New Deal, Farley, chairman of the Demo cratic National Committee, asserted at the Washington day banquet of the Kansas Democratic Club: “Franklin D. Roosevelt did more than save America. He vindicated democracy at a time when all over the world its enemies were ready to de clare the death of the finest system of government ever devised.” Saying “the Hoover panic was de feated because a courageous Congress used the national credit to rescue the American people from starvation and want,” Farley commented, “Kansas I got its fair share.” “It was depressing to read some j time back," he added, “of hungry men ; creating disturbances at Fort Scott, j Kans., but incidents of that kind have happened elsewhere. The comforting thing wa^ that you treated them in humane American fashion, and that the Federal Government was at hand to help you give them food and work.” Opens Fire on Hoover. The Democratic party chief assailed Hoover as “the apostle of panic,” leading "a terrific economic ‘fear cam paign,’ directed against the people of the United States." With Roosevelt, he said, the Nation has “advanced from economic confu sion and paralysis under Mr. Hoover to economic prosperity. * * * "Prosperity is a national thing, un like that of the Republican era. when finance and industry boomed at the very time agriculture was allowed to wallow in the mire of depression.” Replying to Hoover's recent Port land, Oreg., speech, in which he said the “state of the Union is a state of confusion,” Farley said: “I passed through Topeka in 1931, while Mr. Hoover was in the White House. Wheat was selling at less than 30 cents a bushel and cotton was around 5 cents a pound. There was confusion then and there was despair. Today wheat is selling above 90 cents and cotton at around 11. Let me re (See FARLEY, Page A-5J, NEW DEAL BECOMES ISSUE IN OKLAHOMA Gov. Marland Is Avowed Candi date Against Senator Thomas F. Gore. B* the Associated Press. OKLAHOMA CITY, February 22.— The Democratic New Deal became the dominant issue tonight in the 1936 Oklahoma senatorial race, with Gov. E. W. Marland, stanch backer of the Roosevelt program, an avowed candi date against the blind veteran Sena tor, Thomas P. Gore. Gore frequently has been at odds with the Roosevelt program. He also has opposed many policies Marland has advocated in his efforts to create in Oklahoma a State administration allied with and copied after the na tional administration. Marland started his open campaign against Gore with a repetition of his accusation that Gore has failed to follow the "mandate of the people by unquestioned support of the Presi dent.” Even as Marland held the spotlight with his senatorial announcement be fore the state Convention of the League of Young Democrats at Shaw nee, there were recurrent reports that * a third contender for the senatorial nomination would be Representative Josh Lee of the fifth district. There 4 was no confirmation of these report^ Johnson Pitches Two' Dollars Across River as 10,000 Watch Above: Walter Johnson as he threw a silver dollar across the Rappahannock yesterday, covering the 375-foot span with plenty to spare. Below: Peter Yon, 31, who recov ered the dollar.—Wide World and Star Staff Photos. I BY W. H. SHIPPEN, JR., Staff Correspondent of The Star. Fredericksburg, va., Febru ary 22.—Walter Johnson added two hard silver dollars this afternoon to the legendary coin which George Washington is supposed to have-tossed across the Rappahan nock River. The former pitcher took his stand while 10,000 spectators looked on from the banks and the guns of a local home guard regiment boomed out a salute for Gov. George C. Peery of Virginia, who had arrived with his staff on a hilltop. “It looks like a mile across," grinned Johnson, divesting himself of two coats and casting about for a firm footing on the ice and mud-coated bank. The amiable "Big Train" paused to allow a score of news photographers and sound reel men to get set. "All right!” shouted the chairman of the local Chamber of Commerce Committee in charge of the event. This was the signal for Johnson to take practice shots with iron washers and a quarter supplied by a photographer. None won the opposite bank, where a crowd of several thousands had as (See JOHNSONrPage A-5.) Demands America Keep Free From “Entangling Alliances” Abroad. BY G. GOULD LINCOLN. Charging that a campaign had been inaugurated to force the United States to abandon its neutrality in the Italo Ethiopian war, Senator Borah of Idaho, candidate lor tne KepuDiic&n nomination for President, last night demanded that America loilow tne advice of George Washington to keep free of entangling alliances. Borah, speaking over a Nation-wide radio hook-up, quoted Washington’s “Farewell Address” and challenged “those who are dissatisfied with the Constitution” to suDmit a proposed amendment to the people. The Idaho Senator made no refer ence to President Roosevelt or to New Dealers, by name. He struck out, however, several times at talk “about a changed world and about obselete policies and outgrowtt lnstitutions.” His address, except for his occa sional flings at those, presumably New Dealers, who are at odds with the teachings of Wasnington, was tree of partisanship and politics. niui rureign miiucni'rs. He asailed bitterly, nowever, foreign influences and influences at Home, which seek to involve America in for eign controversies. He said the campaign to force us to abandon neutrality in the Ethiopian war was inaugurated “by those who insisted that we should take an active part in crushing one of the bellig erents.” “We are told,” he said, “with a tone of condescension that neutrality was a thing of the past; that to be neutral was in fact to be for War; that to be neutral was immoral. A statement was put out from Geneva to the effect that world war was probable and that by reason of our adhering to a policy of neutrality, the moral respon sibility for such event must rest upon the United States.” Borah said America had been told that it must cease to be neutral and “become a party to another war to end war.” “We were told,” he con (See BORAH, Page A-4.) OFFICER OF LEGION Robert M. Tolson Fatally Hurt and Wife Is in Critical Condition. Robert M. Tolson of Alexandria, Va„ secretary of the National Rehab ilitation Council of the American le gion, was fatally injured, and his wife, Nellie Lawson Tolson, critically hurt, early last night, when their car crashed into the rear of a coal truck on the Alexandria pike, south of Highway Bridge. Tolson died at Emergency Hospital shortly after 8 p.m., less than an hour after the accident, from the effects of a fracture at the base of his skull. Mrs. Tolson was reported in critical condition late last night. Extent of her injuries had not been determined. Truck Preparing to Turn. The car of the veteran Legion offi cer struck the truck as it was halted by its driver near the center line of the roadway, awaiting a break in northbound traffic to turn into the (See CRASH, Page 2.) COLD WAVE BREAK IS DUE TOMORROW Mercury Is Expected to Ascend Near 50 Degrees—Bain May Accompany Bise. A break in the cold wave here is due tomorrow, the Weather Bureau pre dicted last night. Today was expected to be fair and cold, but the following 24 hours is slated to bring a decided change in temperature. The mercury probably will rise to the high 40’s or the low 50’s before tomorrow night, the forecaster said. The rise in temperature likely will bring rain. With the temperature failing to climb above the freezing point yester day, the ice-locked Potomac continued to hold fast. Several days of high temperatures will be necessary to bring a break-up in the ice, experts claim. ONCE AGAIN Let’s Look At the Record THE EVENING & SUNDAY STAR NET PAID CIRCULATION Daily Average for Month of January i i i ii ■' i j. i "'■< *-'*•** J OUUUdjr Date Evening Average Sunday Average _ Star Gain Star Gain January, 1934 J, 16,557 127,010 January, 1935 124,954 8,397 129,184 2,174 January, 19361'1&0.046 5,092 II 137,356 8,172 Gain 2 years.. 13,489 10,346 —and from January, 1930, to January, 1936. Evening gain, 19,980. Sunday gain, 22,131. Thi* before the Neon Edition, which started February 17, ^|)6 P, w. A. FINANCING OF ELECTRIC PLANT UPHELD BY COURT $3,000,000 Project at Buz zards Roost, S. C., Held Proper Use of Funds. CHARLOTTE APPELLATE .BODY MAKES DECISION Judge Coleman Eules Against Burco Co. in Holding Com* pany Action. By the Associated Press. CHARLOTTE, N. C., February 22.— The New Deal won two major de cisions in the Fourth Circuit of Ap peals here today. The court, In a two to one decision, upheld the right of Government to provide funds for construction of a publicly owned and operated hydro electric project as part of the P. W A. program, and then overruled a District court decision that the public utility act of 1935 was unconstitutional. It did, however, hold that the act was invalid as it might be applied to a holding company which it con strued to be engaged solely in intra state business. In the power ruling, on a lower court injunction against construction with P. W. A. funds of a (3.000,000 hydroelectric project at Buzzards Roost, Greenwood County, S. C„ the court upheld the P. W. A. act of Con gress in its entirety: upheld the loan and gTant as a proper function of the Public Works Administrator, and ruled that the Duke Power Co., in its ap plication for the injunction, had failed to show the prospect of any illegal damage. Baltimore Suit Lost. The holding company decision was i in the case of Burco., Inc., of Balti more. which lost its suit before Judge William C. Coleman in Baltimore to force trustees of the American States Public Service Co., its debtor, to reg ister with the Security and Exchange i Commission. me American eiaies, m process 01 reorganization, was held by the Circuit Court to be an intrastate business knd the 1935 utilities act was held invalid as it might be Invoked against such a concern. But Judge Coleman was overruled in his decision that the reg istration need not be made because the act Itself was unconstitutional. The Circuit Court decision did not rule on the arguments of counsel, including John W. Davis, former Dem ocratic presidential nominee, that the act actually is unconstitutional, hold ing this issue was not involved. Part of National Program. The Buzzard's Roost decision spe cifically upheld such a hydro-electric project as a part of a great national program to relieve unemployment and bolster the durable goods industry, Judge Parker writing that the Gov ernment could not be. expected “to stand idly by” without taking such steps to ease a condition of unemploy ment “which was Nation-wide in scope and had become a menace not | merely to tlje safety, morals, health and general welfare of vast numbers of the people, but also to the stability of the Government itself.” The decision also held that there was na interference with States’ rights; Greenwood County was merely a part of the State, subject to all of its regulations; that the Duke Power Co. was not an exclusive franchise holder in Greenwood County, and that the right of a county or municipality to compete with private capital in public service had been thoroughly established. Judge Morris A. Soper dissented, contending the Government had no right to establish a project which officials had predicted would be a "yardstick” for forcing down rate schedules of the private concern. He described the county as being lured by a gift into a blindness toward its (See HYDROELECTRIC, Page A-3.) f—.— .. .1 Readers’ Guide Main News Section. General News—Pages A-l to B-6. Changing World—A-3. Washington Wayside—A-6. Lost and Pound—A-9. Death Notices—A-9. Sports Section—Pages B-7 to B-ll. Editorial Section. Editorial Articles—Pages D-l and D-3. . Editorials and Editorial Fea tures—D-2. . _ . Civic News and Comment—D-4. Veterans' Organizations, Nation al Guard and Organized Re serves—D-5, D-6, D-7. Women’s Clubs, Parent-Teacher Activities—D-6 and D-7. Cross-word Puzzle—D-7. Serial Story—D-8. Contract—D-8. Society Section. Society News and Comment— Pages E-l to E-10. Well-Known Folk—E-5. Barbara Bell Pattern—E-10. Resorts—E-9. JT V-**V«*» V MVVK*VI*« News Features—F-l, F-4. John Clagett Proctor’s Article on Oil Washington—F-2. "Those Were the Happy Days,” by Dick Mansfield—F-2. Radio News and Programs—F-3. Stage and Screen—F-5. SBeS-m Aviation—F-6. Children's Page—F-7. Highlights of History—F-7. Financial and Classified. Financial News and Comment,

Stock, Bond and Curb Sum maries—Pages E-l to E-4. Educational—E-5. Classified Advertising Pages E-5 to E-l| AM BE | ANSWER ME ) l AFTER ALL'./ Prodigal Says Transient Camps Encouraging Boys to Wander Robert L, Cohen.J Returned Home, Got Food, Shelter9 Clothing and a Salary From Relief System, BV REX COLLIER. Clearing up mysterious angles of his disappearance last May, Robert L. Cohen, Western High School stu dent, who was located by G-men in snow-swept South Dakota, was back with his family last night—glad to be home and critical of a transient relief system that "encourages" wandering boys to wander. "Hardships?” he said, in response to a question during an interview. "I j didn't have any to speak of. The transient camps made everything easy for me. They gave me food, clothing and shelter and even paid me a small salary, besides. I realize now this is bad for boys who run away from home." The "no questions asked” policy pre vails at most of these camp6, he de I dared. During all his early travels no po liceman or other official questioned •s his identity, he said, although police had broadcast a “lookout" immedi ately after his disappearance and newspapers had carried stories about the “mystery." He said he saw his picture in the papers a few days after leaving Washington. “Why at one camp in Virginia they told ns we needn’t worry about police looking for any of us—that they didn't let the police check up on any one in the camp,” he declared. “Every one used fictitious names and | the officials knew it. They didn’t care.! One boy forgot what name he had given and a clerk helped him out by telling him what name he had been using, with the remark that he better impress it on his memory.” Cohen related a veritable Odyssey of the transient camps to his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Cohen of Lyon (See COHEN, Page A-4.) House Committee Trims 27 Million From Farm Supply Bill. The House Appropriations Commit tee, it was learned yesterday, has refused to approve a budget recom mendation for *1,000,000 to continue the administration’s “shelter belt” project—a plan to reforest a strip from the Canadian to the Mexican border as prevention against dust storms. The item, which was intended to duplicate the amount of P. W. A. funds already spent, will not appear in the Department of Agriculture ap propriation bill, which is to be report ed to the House tomorrow, reduced I to a total of *102,730,145 from a budget estimate of *130,338,600. It was learned that the committee found the “shelter belt” scheme would benefit little if anything beyond the land reforested or planted in buffalo grass. Members agreed it amounted to the improvement of private lands at tremendous cost. Some 22,000 acres out of the proposed 2,000,000 acres already have been planted in trees with the *1,000,000 thus far advanced. As lar as it goes the decision of the committee to reduce the grand total of the farm supply bill by ap proximately *27,000,000 is in line with the congressional idea of trimmng the budget estimate. However, the amount is some *11,000,000 in excess of the agricultural appropriation act for the current fiscal year. (Copyright, IBSfl. by the New York Herald-Tribune.) - ..- ■■■ ■ • RESCUE ATTEMPT FAILS Tender Unable to Get Line Aboard Disabled Liner. HAMILTON, Bermuda, February 22 CP).—The tender Castle Harbor today was unable to make transfer of the 188 passengers of the disabled Furness liner Nova Scotia, which remained at anchor 8 miles off St. Georges, Ber muda. The first attempt to get a tow rope fastened to the liner was unsuccessful owing to the heavy seas and high winds. With the weather gradually moderating, It was expected that it would be possible to get the Nova Scotia to Murrays anchorage where the Queen of Bermuda, another Fur ness liner, will wait until tomorrow morning if necessary. GUILD BACKED IN STRIKE ——i—i ■ i i Picket Lines at Wisconsin News Augmented by Sympathizers. MILWAUKEE. February 22 CP).— Picket lines around the Wisconsin News, where members of the Mil waukee Newspaper Guild are on strike, were augmented today by sympa thizers. Approximately 100 men and a few women paraded around the news paper buildlac. ^ TOP ROW ON TOP AT SANTA ANITA Time Supply, Rosemont in Money—Discovery, Heavy Choice, Far Back. BF CHARLES M. EGAN, Stall Correspondent of The Star. SANTA ANITA RACK TRACK, Los Angeles, Calif., February 22.—In a race that will be argued over nearly as long as the Dempsey-Tunney fight in Chicago, A. A. Baroni's gallant little Top Row proved himself a giant killer again this afternoon by dashing away with the second running of the rich Santa Anita Handicap before a gath ering of close to 60,000 race-mad fol lowers of the thoroughbreds. His margin over F. A. Carreaud's speedy Time Supply was half a length in a stretch battle that looked more like a wrestling bout or a polo match than a horse race. Another half a length back was the Fox Catcher Farm’s rejuvenaetd Rosemont, with last year’s winner, the Irish-bred Azu car, still another half a length away. Far back in the eighth hole was the great Discovery, overwhelming favor ite, who was unable to find himself (Continued on Page B-7, Column L) “OVER-BANKING” HIT Crowley Says Excessive Charter ing Weakened Finance System. MINNEAPOLIS, February 22 (#)■— Leo T. Crowley, chairman of the board of the Federal Deposit Insur ance Corp., today warned against re vival of "over-banked” conditions in America. Excessive chartering of banks, Crowley said, contributed a few years ago to the weaknesses in the Nation's financing structure. The F. D. I. C.’s policy, he told a Wisconsin Bankers Association group meeting was to pre vent "indiscriminate licensing” HOFFMAN IMPUGNS STORYJYJIRITED Speculates on Influence of Reward on Bruno’s Identification. BACKGROUND— Bruno Hauptmann now is sched uled to die during week of March 30 for kidnaping and killing first son of Charles A. Lindbergh. Con victed one year ago this month, he contested verdict through all legal recourses with no success. Sen tenced to die on January 17, he received 30-day reprieve from Gov. Hoffman, but no new evidence to justify reopening of case has been revealed in recent weeks. New sen tence was pronounced this week. Meanwhile, investigation con tinues. Bt the Associated Press. TRENTON, N. J„ February 22.— Gov. Harold G. Hoffman, who tem porarily saved Bruno Richard Haupt mann from the electric chair a month ago, cast doubt today on the testimony that placed Hauptmann near Hope* well about the time of the Lindbergh kidnaping, March 1, 1932. At the conclusion of two hours of questioning, Millard Whited, Sour lands lumberjack, the Governor said it was "highly significant” that Whited once told police he had seen no one near the Lindbergh home, and then apparently reversed himself when Hauptmann was arrested, two and a half years later, and identified him. The Govenror said Whited told him he had been promised a part of the $25,000 reward offered by the State for the arrest and conviction of the kidnaper, had received about $160 for appearing as a witness, and thought more was due him. Wonders About Reward Influence. "It would be very interesting,” the Governor said, “to know whether the promise of the reward played some part in his identification of Haupt mann in the Bronx.” Whited’s identification of Haupt mann at the extradition proceedings in the Bronx in October, 1934, was one reason New York authorities de cided to grant New Jersey’s request for the prisoner. Hauptmann is under sentence to die the week of March 30. Asked today if the results of (See HAUPTMANN, Page~A-L) SLIDE RESCUERS SAFE — Horse Carries News From Scene Where Five Were Buried. MANOS, Colo., February 22 OP).—A riderless horse brought first word to iay of the safety of 15 men attempting to break through deep snow and re rover bodies of five snowslide victims. An avalanche last Sunday roared jff a mountainside and struck the nine buildings, 16 miles north of here, jurying six employes. The body of jne, Mrs. Janie Rees, camp cook, was recovered soon afterward. China Clipper Leaves. ALAMEDA, Calif., February 22 '&).—The China Clipper left here at 5:18 p.m., Eastern Standard Time to iay for Honolulu, first stop on its Transpacific flight to Manila. In rlement weather, had held the giant plane at its base here for weeks. Girl Abducted Via Trap Door, Sister Fears After Week’s Hunt l Suspicion arose last night that Ella Diltz, 27-year-old private secretary, missing mysteriously since * week ago yesterday, may ha* been ab ducted and taken away through a trap door in the roof Of the house at 1713 Eighteenth street in which the lived. The Treasury Department intelli gence service became interested in the case as the woman’s sister, loela Diltz, Internal Revenue Bureau em ploye, of 1627 Massachusetts avenue, searched hospitals and sought with police aid to run down the meager clues which might reveal her where abouts. "I want a thorough Investigation,” Loela Diltz said. "There is a trap door in the back of the house leading to the roof. Through this a person could easily leave the building un noticed, travel considerable distance across adjoining^ houses and come down Into the street without attract ing suspicion.” The missing woman, employed at the National Radio Institute, was last seen at S:15 p.m. Saturday, when she left the house wearing a henna colored coat. Discovery of this coat and an early edition of a Sunday newspaper in her room after the dis appearance led to the belief she re turned unseen to the house later in the evening. Loela Diltz said her sister had lived in Washington about 10 years, had no close friends among men, and was regaining her health, which had been poor during the last year. A policewoman and two detectives searched the room yesterday but found nothing on which to base a further hunt. Loela Diltz and Em manuel Haas, vice president of the National Radio Institute, plan an other eonferent® with police today. H.L President Cuts Harvard Visit Short to Attend Cousin’s Funeral. ASSISTANT SECRETARY 21 YEARS IN MARINES News of Death Withheld From Swanson, Who Is Seriously 111. Kites to Be Tuesday. Col. Henry Latrobe Roosevelt. As sistant Secretary of the Navy and act ing head of the department during the present serious illness of Secretary Swanson, died suddenly late yesterday afternoon at the Naval Hospital here. He had been confined to the hos pital for several days with an attack of intestinal influenza. A heart attack brought unexpected death yesterday. He was 56 years old. Col. Roosevelt was a distant cousin of President Roosevelt, and news of j his death was transmitted at once to the Chief Executive, attending a din ner at Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. President Roosevelt boarded his special train, cutting short his stay, I to join Mrs. Roosevelt at his Hyde Park, N. Y., home, and they plan to be in Washington Tuesday to at tend funeral services. Ti& President expressed himself as •'inexpressibly shocked.” | Swanson Not Told of Death. Word of Col. Roosevelt's death was being withheld, however, from Sec re- f tary Swanson, himself a patient at | the Naval Hospital. Recovering from S an attack of pleurisy which followed the breaking of a rib, Secretary Swan son was believed not strong enough '.i to withstand the shock. ?: Arrangements are being made for funeral services at St. John's Epis- $ copal Church, Sixteenth and H streets, on Tuesday. He will be buried in % Arlington National Cemetery, with full military honors. With him at the end was his physi cian, Comdr. C. A. Brcaddus of the Navy's Medical Corps, and Rear Admiral Perceval S. Rossiter. surgeon general of the Navy. Col. Roosevelt died at 5:15 p.m. Members of hi* family had visited him earlier in the afternoon when his condition was be lieved to be improving. His aide. MaJ, John W. Thomason, jr.. United State* Marine Corps, told high ranking offi cials late in the afternoon that the Assistant Secretary was apparently gaining strength. f Entered Hospital Thursday, Dr. Charles F. Mitchell of Phila delphia and Drs. James W. Esler and Walter A. Bloedorn of this city had been called into consultation. The Assistant Secretary was admitted to the Naval Hospital for treatment of intestinal influenza or, Thursday I afternoon. iiic ucaLii ui v/ui. nui»even ico»co Rear Admiral Adolphus Andrews, chief of the Bureau of Navigation, Navy Department, as Acting Secretary of the Navy, by virtue of seniority. Admiral William H. Standley, chief of naval operations—the highest rank ing officer in the American Navy—is in London, participating in the Lon don naval arms conference. One of the first official acts of Admiral Andrews last night was to dispatch this "Alnav"—a message to the entire naval establishment: "It is with the deepest regret that I announce to the Naval Service the death of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Henry Latrobe Roosevelt, which occurred at the Naval Hospital, Washington, D. C„ at 17:15 (5:15 p.m. Eastern Standard Time) on February 22. The Navy has suffered a great loss. Col. Roosevelt began his service career at the Naval Academy at the age of 17; was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps in 1899 and served with distinction as a commissioned officer for a period of 21 years. "Since 1933, he has served as the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Throughout his entire career he de voted himself unremittingly and with out reserve to the best interests of his country and of the Naval Service. “Funeral ceremonies will be held at Arlington during the forenoon of Tues day, February 25. It is directed that colors be displayed at half mast on all ships and at all navy yards and stations until sunset on the date of interment; _ (See COL. ROOSEVELT, Page !.) FOUR OF CREW MISSING AFTER BLAST ON SHIP Oil Tanker, 200 Miles East of Charleston, Awaits Tow, List ing Badly and Charred. By tbs Associated Press. JACKSONVILLE, Fta„ February 22. —Four members of the crew of 32 men on the oil tanker Albert Hill were missing today after an explosion and fire swept the forward part of the vessel, at sea about 200 miles east of Charleston, S. C. The tanker, owned by the Atlantic Refining Co., was ripped open forward by the blast and the fire that fol lowed raged for two hours as rescue craft raced to her aid. Tonight the disabled ship awaited a tow into port, its bow down, its for ward decks blasted apart and burned, its steel hull listing to starboard. The Atlantic Refining Co. an nounced the four missing were Boat swain John Dybaa of Philadelphia and Seamen Hersell Norris and John Gali amos of Philadelphia and John Crab tree of Detroit Another tanker, the W. F. Burdell of the Pure Oil Co., stood by, aiding in the search for the missing seamen and awaiting the arrival of two Coast Guard cutters, the Modoc out of Nor folk, Va„ and the Yamacraw out of Savannah, Gf. . /

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