11 Mayıs 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 2

11 Mayıs 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 2
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

Wife Disappears After Hus* band Quarrels With Her ! Sister From Midwest. Police were asked today to search for Mr*. Ruth Syverion, 35, of the Westchester Apartments, missing since Saturday. Thomas S. Syverson, her husband, a P. W. A. accountant, said she van ished after he had quarreled with her sister, who had been visiting them. Mrs. Syverson may be with her sister, who lives In Minneapolis, he said. When last seen, Mra Syverson, who Is small, was wearing a brown straw hat and carried a brown patent leather bag. Two boys and an 18-year-old wait ress were among other missing per sons sought today. Mrs. Mamie Jewett, 1317 I street northeast, told police her sons, Tommy, 18, and Frank, 16, disappeared last night and may be on their way to South Carolina, accompanied by Billy Mayfield, 17, of 609 Florence street northeast. Miss Laferne Maddox. 18, has been missing for three weeks from her Takoma Park, Md.. home, according to her sister, Mrs. Jerry Kemey, 3220 Fortieth street. JURY TRIAL RIGHTS UPHELD BY COURT Option Approved in Police Court ( Cases With Possible Sen tences of 90 Days. The United States Court of Ap peals held today that jury trials may not be denied Police Court defendants charged with offenses which carry possible jail sentences of 90 days or more. a saw. turnip t* cue uuitcicu ill IWU | rases. One was that of Ethel Clawans. charged with engaging in the busi ness of dealer In the return portions of railroad excursion tickets, con trary to provisions of a statute passed in 1932. The maximum sentence here is a $300 fine or 90 days in jail or both. On arraignment in Police Court, Miss Clawans demanded a jury trial which was refused. On conviction •he was ordered to pay a $300 fine or serve 60 days in jail. The other case involved Pearl Blackburn, who was convicted of so liciting* and was sentenced to pay a fine of <100 or serve 90 days. Palmer i _ (Continued Prom First Page.) him to take up a secret residence In the Capital. Another bomb was ad dressed to him by mail, but it was Intercepted by postal inspectors. Besides his prosecution of radicals. Mr. Palmer conducted a vigorous fight on food hoarders and led the post war battle to lower the cost of living. Among other things, he Initiated an anti-trust suit which ended when the big packers agreed to refrain from en gaging in unrelated lines of business. In October, 1919, he obtained an in junction to restrain labor leaders from tying up the country’s bituminous coal mines. This injunction a few years later was used as a precedent by At torney General Daugherty in proceed ings in connection with the railroad •hopmen’s strike. Turned Over Patents. Soon after America entered the World War Mr Palmer was called on to become alien property custodian, and he seised $700,000,000 in enemy ■properties. Disputes over the methods of handling these trusts ensued for many years. It was under his direc tion that the German dye and chem ical patents were seized and later turned over to the Chemical Founda tion. His contention was that the step was necessary to build up an American industry free from German domina tion and this contention was advanced when a suit was started to cancel the transaction. Even after his appointment to the post of Attorney General the quarrel over the seized properties continued and a congressional investigation final ly determined that the charges against him were not sustained. Before retiring as Attorney General Mr. Palmer, In 1920, announced his candidacy for the Democratic nom ination for President. He became one ©f the "big three,” with James M. Cok and William G. McAdoo, at the San Francisco convention that year, re- I ceivlng a peak vote of 267. Elected te House in 1908. Bom at Moosehead, Pa., May 4,1872, Palmer attended school and college In his native State and was admitted to the bar in 1893. He was elected to the House in 1908 from the twenty sixth Pennsylvania district. As a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, he framed the metal schedule of the Underwood tariff bill, surviving a fight over the higher rates proposed for ferro-man ganese which his opponents charged were to protect the big steel interests. He introduced the joint resolution proposing the woman’s suffrage con stitutional amendment and was author of the act prohibiting the products of child labor In Interstate commerce. On one occasion Palmer ran for a seat in the Senate from Pennsylvania, but was beaten by Boies Penrose. Later he appeared in the Teapot Dome in vestigation, where, as counsel for Ed ward B. McLean, he denied assertions In several telegrams sent to the for mer publisher. No Zevely Partner, He Said. He said then that he had not been h partner of J. W. Zevely, attorney for Hprry P. Sinclalrv and had not looked after the Interests of Albert B. Fall. He denied he had asked Senator Underwood of Alabama or any one else to bring pressure to hear on Senator Walsh of Montana, the committee prosecutor, to keep McLean off the stand. Mr. Palmer held honorary degrees from Swarthmore, Lafayette and George Washington Universities. He was a long resident of Stroudsburg, Pa., where he maintained a Summer residence and where he was identified .With many business Interests. :> He wss married twice. His first Wife, Roberta Dixon of Easton, Md., .Whom be married in Baltimore No vember 33,18M, died January 2, 1933. They had one daughter, Mary Dixon Palmer. On August 39, 1933, he mar ked Margaret Fallon BurraU, a widow, Connecticut. - After retiring from publle life Mr. Palmer devoted his time to the pri vate practice of law in Washington. Washington Wayside . Tales Random Observations of Interesting Events and Things. PROGRESS. HE bicycle may be coming back so far as the general public is concerned, but it went away in the Park Police the other day. Went for good, too. The bicycles which have not been used much in recent years were turned over to the property sergeant of the department last Friday. Some of them had traveled thousands of miles in the service of Uncle Sam before members of the force decided they would rather walk or use their private cars in patroling their beats. At that, the Park Police used bi cycles longer than the Metopolltan Police Department, which abandoned them altogether about three years ago. The bicycle has figured in Washing ton police annals almost from the day it was Introduced. It continued in service after the appearance of the motor cycle in the case of those beats which were too long for footmen and too short to justify the expense of the motorised two-wheeler. Time was. when the local speed limit was 18 miles an hour that bicycle police men used to make traffic cases against speeders. Passing of the “bike” is not quite complete for the officers at the Zoo have kept theirs for further use. If you want to see one as a sort of re minder of the good old days, you can go out there. * * * * TRADITION. pVERY day the bust of the late Claude Kitchen in the Capitol has its face washed. For some entirely unexplainable reason visitors to the Capitol think it amusing to tweak the marble no6e of the late distinguished House leader. Probably each visitor thinks he is yielding to a novel impulse. But he isn’t. He is just obeying an old Capitol tradition. * The dally face washing is the re sult. * * * * NOCTURNE. Out around Newark street and Wisconsin avenue the nights have become a bit too full of music— not the kind of music you're think ing of, but the plaintive melody of a strange nocturnal bird. For the past few nights the bird has started his song between 11 and 12 o’clock, but there was one slumber time when he cut loose at 9 p.m. with such vigor that he awakened all other bird species in the neighborhood. A bit tentatively at first, but finally in full exultant cry, they joined in the song. It went on, and on, and on. It was something to listen to—all the birds going mad in the moon light. Whether it wanted to or not, the neighborhood listened. * * * * WRONG CARD. nr HERE are certain undeniable ad vantages in these quantity-pro duced greeting cards, but Miss Tacie Bolen could tell one of her friends that they also have their disadvan tages. The particular disadvantage which Miss Bolen learned on her birthday anniversary last Saturday is that it is possible to select the wrong card. “Saturday is your anniversary," read the outside of the card. That was true enough. “I hope you always will be happy together." read the last line of the verse on the inside. That isn't true at all. * * * * INSURGENT A YOUNG Chevy Chase matron was greatly distressed when her young hopeful showed up at home with the brief announcement that his kinder garten teacher had suspended him for three days. Under cross-examination the whole story came out. It seemed that the Y. H. had flna rebelled against the “regimentation" to which he and his associates were subjected. He craved excitement and he didn't get it. The blow-off came when the children were lined up for a marching exercise. - 1 —— “You're—you’re just a bunch of ‘sissies’ said the non-conformist ve hemently, looking directly at the as tounded preceptress. From now on silence will be golden —and safer. ■ * * * * HABIT? Habit is harder to break than locks sometimes. Such was the deduction of Police Court attaches in a case that in volved a relatively new employe of an outlying small business estab lishment. The chap was accused of break ing and entering the establishment of his new employer. On the stand, he admitted it teas rather dumb of him to have used that method of paying a nocturnal visit to the place in order to get some beer. Quite dumb, indeed, in view of the fact that he had a key to the store in his pocket all the time. He com pletely forgot. MURPHY COMING HERE Quezon to Accompany Him aa Far as Shanghai. MANILA, May 11 (^.-President Manuel Quezon announced yesterday be would accompany High Commis sioner Frank Murphy as far as Shang hai when Murphy sails May 13 for the United States to discuss with President Roosevelt the forthcom ing Philippine-American trade con ference. Recently Quezon said if there were no prospects for quickly Improving the economic provisions of the hil ippine independence law he would prefer to ask for immediate inde pendence, rather than await expira tion of the 10-year transition period. KIDNAPERS FREE Keep Car in Flight From “G-Men Making It Hot for Us.” > By m« Associated Press. BUFFALO, N. Y., May 11.—Kid naped by two men u he left an Erie, Pa., theater last night, Jeffrey W. So bel, 44, a prominent attorney of Erie, was released unharmed here early to day. The kidnapers kept his car, and made certain they had hi* operator's license and registration papers in the wallet they took from him. Buffalo police believe they wanted his car, and merely took him on the 90-mlle ride from Erie so he could not report the theft immediately. Sobel said they told him they were escaping from “G-Men who are mak ing it hot for us.” In the belief they might be headed for Canada, police guarded the International Bridge to day. Quieted by Federal Agenta. The Erie man, a former assistant district attorney there, was ques tioned for almost three hours by Fed eral agents. They said they had “no comment." Sobel said his captors addressed each other as “Joe” and “Red” and that one was armed with a revolver. He said he was entering his auto mobile as the two came up about 11:30 last night, and with showing the muzzle of a nickel-plated revolver they climbed Into the front seat beside him and told him to “shut up and drive.” Avoided Police Suspicions. They ordered him to observe traffic regulations, kept his speed under 30 miles an hour so police would not become suspicious, and once, near Westfield, N. Y.. one stood guard over him beside the highway while the other drove to a gas station. Sobel was ordered out of the car in Eggertsville, Buffalo suburb. His captors told him he would find his car six blocks iwiy, but it was not found. After notifying police, Sobel called Deputy Attorney Oeneral Alfred P. Cohen, a friend, and it was in Cohen's office that h* was questioned by the authorities. He said the man called “Joe” was about 32 and that “Red" was about 31. Joe had a shabby beard, "Red" a black mustache. PROMINENT AS LAWYER. Kidnaped Man Former Assistant Dis trict Attorney. ERIE. Pa., May 11 —Jeffrey W. Sobel, 44, released by kidnapers at Buffalo today, is prominent in North western Pennsylvania law circles and formerly was assistant district attor ney of Erie County. He is the son of Isadore Sobel. 82, president of the Erie Bar Association and head of B'nai B'rith In Penn sylvania. Police here said the kidnapers forced the attorney to walk four blocks down a crowded street to his automobile, then drove away with him toward Buffalo. WAR ON DEALERS ASKED Punishment Urged for Sale of Liq uor and Tobacco to Minora. District officials and police were asked by the Harrison Bible Class of Congress Street Methodist Church yesterday to “punish dealers who sell beer, liquor, wine, cigarettes, cigan and tobacco to children.” The resolution, Introduced by James S. McCarthy, commended District At torney Leslie C. Garnett, Superin tendent of Police Ernest W. Brown and other* “for their fine service in cleaning out gamblers, bootleggers, numbers racketeers and all forms of crime in the District of Columbia.” The class declared it “takes great pride” in the service of Brown In or ganizing boys’ clubs. Eckener (Continued Prom First Page.) partments before leaving for the White House. Coming from New York. Dr. Eck ener was met at Union 8tation by offi cials of the German Embassy and pro ceeded at once to the Willard Hotel. There he had breakfast and a brief chat with Amelia Earhart and Eugene Vidal, director of the Commerce De partment’s Bureau of Air Commerce. Dr. Karl Ritter, head of the com mercial department of the German foreign office, one of the Hlndenburg passengers, paid a brief visit to Wash Lakehurst as an American Airlines passenger and went to the German Embassy from Washington Airport. At the embassy it was announced that Dr. Ritter had called socially on the officials there. He was unwilling to grant an Interview to newspaper men, it was reported. Dr. Ritter was to leave Washington via American Airlines at 5:23 pm. today for Lake hurst, to take passage on the Hln denburg on its return trip. FAIR WEATHER FORECAST. Prospect for West-to-East Record Bright. LAKEHURST, N. J., May 11 UP).— A prospect of fair weather for its homeward voyage to Friedrichshafen bolstered today the prospects for the Hlndenburg to break the airship rec ord for the west-to-east crossing of the Atlantic. Hie mid-afternoon weather map corroborated previous forecasts that surface cross-winds might delay the movement of the newest and largest German Zeppelin from its hangar, at the Naval Air Station here, to the mobile mooring mast on the field. But station officials aaid the wind would probably abate sufficiently to permit taking the airship out of the hangar by 10 pm. (Eastern standard time) tonight and said weather condi tions over the ocean were good. Time ef Take-Off. On this basis, the Hlndenburg would weigh off from the mooring mast around midnight tonight and immediately turn its silvery noee to ward Germany. It was expected to pass over New York City within an hour after leaving Lakehurst. On its first trip across the North Atlantic, which it completed Saturday, the Hlndenburg established a new record of (1 hours and 53 minutes. The previous best crossing for lighter - than-alr craft was established in 1924 when the Los Angeles was brought over from Germany. The Oraf Zeppelin holds the present record for the test ward crossing which, officers are confident, will be broken by the Hindenburg. 51 Passengers Listed. Passengers for the return flight—a full load of 51 have made reservations —were instructed to be at the air base this afternoon. Lieut. Oomdr. J. M. Thorton and Lieut. H. T. Orville, both attached to the. Lakehust Naval Station, will make the trip as ob servers for the United States Navy Department. The Hindenburg needed only a few final touches to make it ready tor the take-off. Capt. Ernst Lehmann anticipated favorable winds for the eastward flight. "We are making preparations to go at 10 o'clock.” he said. "Cross-winds might delay us a little, but we will have good weather on the way over.” The cross-winds might foroe a change in the planned early evening moving of the ship from the hangar to the mooring mast on the field. The Hindenburg is to make 10 commercial trans-Atlantic trips this year. Speaks at Gotham Dinner. Dr. Eckner told the diners last night he hoped Its achievements would lead to "the rebirth of the American Navy dirigible idea.” Comdr. C. E. Rosendahl, American ace of dirigible aviation, told the same gathering: “I hope other Americans now will begin to appreciate what we enthu siasts for. airships have had in mind. We Americans have had our ups and downs. Now, I believe, the curve is upward.” Dr. Hans Luther. German Ambas sador, praised the Hindenburg’! achievement "for the sake of the work for world peace, which the German people and their leader, Adolf Hitler, are passionately striving for—not withstanding many rumors and mis interpretations." R. Walton Moore, Assistant Secre tary of State, brought the greetings of President Roosevelt. "The President has instructed me to welcome you to this country and to congratulate you on the successful completion of your venture,” Moore told the grissled airship expert "I thank you. That’s very nice,” Dr. Eckener replied. Admiral William H. Standley, acting Secretary of the Navy, headed the group of Navy officers in the delega tion. The crowd that milled about the station and filed through the hangar was reminiscent of the early years of dirigible activity here. Four thousand persona were on hand when the reservation gates were opened, the throng continued through out the dayiv BY LABORJLEAGUE Berry and Lewis Tell Execu tive Campaign Quarters Are Opened. President Roosevelt today was in formed by Maj. George L. Berry, presi dent of Labor’s Non-Partisan League, and John L. Lewis, chairman of the

board, that they have opened head quarters in the Willard Hotel and from now until election day will campaign in the Interest of his re-election. Berry, head of the pressmen's union, who formerly was co-ordinator for in dustrial co-operation, and Lewis, presi dent of the United Mine Workers of America, made it plain they will de vote most of their time in promoting Mr. Roosevelt's candidacy. They said after their audience with the Presi dent that this is the first direct infor mation he has had of the purposes of labor and labor sympathizers in the formation of a definite, active instru mentality, such as the newly created league. Definitely tor Roosevelt. In a Joint statement, they amplified: "We sincerely hope that there will be no question as to the motives and purposes of Labor's Non-Partisan League, because we want to emphasize definitely the fact that its sole objec tive is to re-elect Franklin Delano Roosevelt to the presidency of the United States. That ought to be suffi cient to any one who might be in terested." They said they Informed the Presi dent that they have secured the con sent of more than 4,000 speakers who will campaign for Mr. Roosevelt in every State. They added that ap proximately 30.000 officials of trade unions have committed themselves to act and have authorized the use of their names as sponsors for the league. No Neutral Attitude. "There is nothing neutral about Labor's Non-Partisan League." they added. "We accept the challenge of the several organizations that have come Into existence which have for their objective the defeat of the Presi dent. We are neither afraid, bashful or timid in our determination to con tribute to the complete unmasking of the offensives of the Manufacturers' Association, the Liberty League, the so-called Grass Root Democrats of the South, or any other such organi zations formed to defeat the Presi dent." The two then pointed with satisfac tion to the results of their organiza tion in Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ne braska and California. They pointed out that the league does not propose to solicit financial assistance and will not accept contributions from any source except those who constitute the league itself. Both said the President was highly pleased with the league activities. Berry, in response to reporters’ ques tions, said he had never been on the Federal pay roll and never expected to be. « ' ■■■■•■ PROSECUTOR DEMANDS HANGING FOR JAMES Says Suspected Wife Death Plot tar Will Not Be Allowed Life Sentence, By tilt Associated Press. LOS ANGELES, May 11.—District Attorney Buron Pitts said yesterday that any plea of Robert James, held for the murder of his wife by rattle snake poison and drowning, for a life sentence will be rejected. "James must hang," said Pitts. "Our case is complete and we need no more evidence.” James and Charles M. Hope are held on a charge of having forced the for mer’s wife, Mary Busch James, to place her foot in a box of live rattle snakes. and then drowning her in a bathtub when the poison failed to work. Doves Carry Mother’s Day Peace Message Above: The releasing of doves as a message of peace to mothers throughout the world was a feature of the Mother’s day service at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Ceme tery yesterday. The girls, from Fairmont School, are (left to right): Patricia Childs, Mary Catherine Sloan, Mar jorie Murfln, facing the tomb, and Katherine Gernert. Below: William Bond (left) and Don Brandt, members of the Police Boys’ Club Band, which participated in the Police and Firemen’s Catholic Society program in honor of Mother’s day, are shown with the band's sponsor, Col. C. J. Brown, center. —Underwood Underwood Photos. - < TRIBUTES ARE PAID Mammoth Service Is Held in Arlington National Cemetery. Washington joined the Nation in observance of Mother'! day yesterday as church, civic, military and political leaders paid eloquent tribute in ser mons and at patriotic gatherings to the central figure in America's family life. At a mammoth service in Arlington National Cemetery statesmen. diplo mats and patriotic organizations met to eulogize the American War Mothers and place more than a score of wreaths at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. In the morning the Police and Firemen's Catholic Society of Wash ington and their mothers attended mass in St. Patrick's Church, after which, led by the 68-piece Police Boys’ Club Band, they marched to the Wil lard Hotel for a Mother's day break fast. At the Arlington service Senator Robinson of Arkansas and Represent ative Greenway of Arizona were the speakers and the Army Band, di rected by Capt. Thomas P. Darcy, Jr., provided music dedicated to the occa sion. Robintsn Pleads for Peace. "While honoring the mother* who gave their sons to the last great war we must think of and pray for a world of peace.” Senator Robinson declared. Mrs. Greenway emphasised the need for leadership on the part of mothers who give their sons to the world's armies. "The power to prevent war lies with thoee who have the courage to direct public opinion,” she said. ’ Aggres sion must give way to reason if we are to have a warlesa world.” Mrs. Lenore Stone, former president of the American Wa Mothers, read a message from Mrs. Howard C. Boone, president, who was prevented from attending by Illness. “If mothers are right, the world is right.” Mrs. Boone stated. “A good mother makes a good soldier.” Gathering at the Knights of Co lumbus building, more than 600 mem bers of the Police and Firemen's Catholic Society marched to St. Pat rick’s Church to hear Rev. Ignatius Smith of Catholic University preach cm “Motherhood.” Bishop John M. McNamara celebrated mass. Speakers at the breakfast Included Senator Duffy of Wisconsin and several Rep resentatives. A recital featuring Lithuanian songs and dances was presented last night by the Washington and Baltimore chapters of the American Lithuanian Society at the Knights of Columbus Hall. Dr. Povilas Zadeikis, Minister of Lithuania, was guest of honor. A mixed choir, representing St. Alphon sus Church, Baltimore, collaborated with the Washington choir in render ing native songs. An old-fashioned home-cooked breakfast, designed to revive “back home” memories, was served resi dents of the Y. M. C. A. dormitories yesterday as a Mother's day treat by the Young Men's Christian Associa tion. Mrs. Giles 8cott Rafter, past presi dent of the Congress of Parents and Teachers, spoke. George Stafford, chairman of the Social Welfare Com mittee of the Y. M. C. A. Dormitory Council, presided. CONFESSION REPORTED Detective Saye Map Admits Slay ing Niece With Ax. LITTLE ROCK. Ark., May 11 (JF).— Chief of Detectives J. O. McDougal of North Little Rock said last night that a man booked as Charles Haney, 55, second-hand clothing dealer, had confessed to the ax-slaying of Mrs. Essie McCloiaer, his 23-year-old niece. McDougal said the man signed a written confession. Mr. McCloister, North Little Rock police said, was Haney’s niece and housekeeper. Haney was quoted as saying a fight followed his attempt to regain pos session of |ds money. Taxes (Continued From First Page) tion of the tax schedules In the House bill. They will present to the com mittee. he said, a single schedule in place of the five In the House meas ure, which would accomplish the same end. , Before the committee met. Senator Byrd wrote Secretary Morgenthau say ing 11 huge corporations could escape all taxes under the House bill. He listed 29 others which he said might pay less than under existing tax laws. He requested the Treasury to supply him a list of all other corporations with incomes of $1,000,000 and mire a year which might have a lighter tax bill If the House measure should be enacted. Byrd, a member of the Finance Committee, expressed concern over any possibility of ‘‘giving these large cor porations a greater advantage, and perhaps a stranglehold over their present smaller competitors." The tax bill, as passed by the House, is featured by a new type levy on corporation Income, graduated ac cording to the percentage of income withheld from dividend distribution. The tax would range up to 42 H per cent on net income. The bill provides for the eventual repeal of existing cor porate taxes, so a corporation which distributed all Its net Income would pay no taxes. Byrd wrote to Morgenthau that he was "concerned about the application of the proposed tax policies to those corporations which now have large surpluses and a strong cash or credit position." "We must make certain,” he said, “that legislation does not prevent the healthy growth and expansion of our smaller businesses by imposing a penalty upon them if their financial position and their business opportuni ties do not permit the payment in dividends of substantially all their profits. I want your assistance in appraising the situation.” The list of 11 “financially strong” corporations which, Byrd said, can "completely avoid taxation" by dis tributing their income as they did in 1934 follows: American Telephone A Telegraph Co., American Tobacco Co., American Smelting A Refining Co., General Elec tric Co., Goodyear Tire A Rubber Co., International Harvester Co., National Biscuit Co., National Dairy Products Co., Ohio Oil Co., R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and Texas Co. On the same basis, Byrd said the following 13 companies would pay less than 5 per cent instead of 15 per cent under the present law: Air Reduction Co., Allied Chemical A Dye Co., Corn Products Refining Co., Curtis Publish ing Co., E. I. du Pont, Firestone Tire A Rubber, General Goods, Great West ern Sugar, Imperial Oil. Liggett A Myers Tobacco, Parke-Davis, Pennsyl vania Railroad and United States 8melting A Refining. He said the following 1$ would pay b less than 10 per cent Instead of 15: American Can. Armour k Co., East man Kodak. General Motors. Great A. k P. Tea. International Shoe, J. C. Penny, Phillips Petroleum. Jh-octor k Gamble. Socony-Vacuum, Standard Oil of California. Indiana and New Jersey, Texas Gulf Sulphur, United Fruit and F. W. Woolworth Cripples (Continued From First Page > night before had sprawled over hard desks in Walker-Johnson Building hallways. The money came from Miss M. Alice Hill, director of the Public As sistance Division of the Board of Public Welfare. The recipients were well-fed, bathed and rested this morning as a result of it and pleased at their progress toward getting the Government to recognize their pecul iar problem in regard to the relief problem. The demands of the crippled pil grims are threefold. "First.” said Harry Friedman this morning, "we want 5.000 jobs in New York City for the handicapped. Victor Ridder, the New York City W. P. A. administrator, has been to Washington to plead our cause, and yet Saturday they said here they never heard of UB.” ■'Yes.” interjected Jack Martin. • we've studied the W. P. A. run-around system from A to Z. We’ve seen what their word means. They say one thing in man-to-man conversation, but do something else as an official. They keep on getting out of holes by just acting the nice guy.” Would Keep Jobs. "Second,” went on Friedman, "we want them to rescind the November 1 ruling that nobody on relief before that date is eligible for W. P. A. jobs. And, third, we want it understood there are to be no dismissals for handicapped workers already em ployed by the W. P. A.” One point the visitors wish to im press on the works progress adminis trator is their opinion that modern government operates better under a theory of centralization. •'Holt said the States have had re lief to handle for 200 years,” said Friedman, "and that he saw no rea son for changing It now. But when the Federal Government put up $100,000 for vocational rehabilitation work If New York State would match the money, the State could only ap propriate $40,000. So we got $80,000 instead of $200,000. If the central authority had just gone ahead and put out the money regardless, we would be a lot better off.'’ Williams’ promise to the resolute workseekers of transportation back to New York solved one of the pil grims’ most acute problems. They arrived in a truck provided by a friend, which was sent back to New York yes terday. t The National Scene BY ALICE ROOSEVELT LONGWORTH A MEASURE hu passed the Senate and is now in the House Judiciary Committee which Is entitled, “An act to prohibit employers from Influencing the vote oi their employes in na Itionai elections, it provides a nne lor corpora tions and fine or imprisonment for individuals who "influence or attempt to influence, through fear or intimidation, the vote of any person employed by them.’’ It is one of those things that sounds exceed ingly noble and possibly necessary until you try to interpret its provisions. Could a political speech expressing the conviction that some New Deal policy would inevitably lead to industry closing down and throwing men out of jobs be construed as intimidation? And if it is made unlawful for private employers to influence, what about administration propaganda by P. W. AUM J>BfW#rtn. A., W. r. A, »nu outer uuvcuuucm • bcuvicb among workers on projects financed by the taxpayer? And what about the influence of labor leaders? If there is any curb put on free discussion of political questions it would be only fair to apply it all along the line. (Copyright 1»3«> ---f STRIKE IN GREECE PARALYZES TRADE Troops Defied in Walkout. Four Warships Speed to Salonika. BACKGROUND— To the throne of Greece George was recently restored through a plebiscite that was declared to he overwhelmingly in favor of the monarchy. Royalists, before' and since, have had benefit of the sup port of the military leaders. By the Associated Press. ATHENS, May 11—Salonika * stub born strikers defied military orders and forced a shortage of bread and other foodstuffs today. While four Greek warships sped to the troubled area, the strikers flouted District Comdr. Gen. Zeppos decree that they halt business tie-up. Lighting and traffic services were operating only intermittently. ( Troops, reinforced by soldiers from the provinces, broke up a Salonika strikers’ meeting and warded off at tacks by firing blank cartridges. Rifles Are Used. Rifles also were used In the suburb of Toumba to disperse a workers' meeting and in another part of the city to drive off a crowd of strikers, who, armed with clubs, stoned a police station, smashing the windows. A wholesale round-up of labor lead ers and members of the strike com mittee was begun. Representatives of the various politi cal parties decided to ask the gov ernment to consider the strikers’ de mands. meanwhile asking the strikers to go back to work. ' Salonika stores remained closed all morning. Trade in general was paralyzed. Some commercial and in dustrial organizations, however, met at noon and decided to attempt a re opening. Newspapers did not appear, and the few automobiles and street cars \rm evidence were operated with the ai'fl of xnlriipm Streets Patrolled. Up to late this afternoon there were no new disorders in Salonika, but the city continued nervous. Pub lic meetings were forbidden and heavy patrols of soldiers, sailors and gen darmirie tramped through the streets. Minor clashes took place in Athens and Piraeus when police broke up a number of meetings. In a cabinet disagreement, Interior Minister Vryacos resigned. Minister of Justice Logothetis took over his portfolio temporarily. Forty thousand workers had been on strike more than a week, and the Greek Labor Federation called a 24 hour general strike of sympathy to * begin at midnight tomorrow. Government officials acknowledged that the situation was grave, but ex pressed confidence they could sup press further disorders. The strikes began with a walkout March 25 of tobacco workers demand ing higher wages and a fixed pension system. Military authorities took command of Salonika after fierce fighting there between troops and striking tobacco workers, and the navy destroyers were sent to assist the army In keeping order. Disorders spread to Piraeus, seaport of Athens, during the night as tobacco workers demonstrated and clashed with police. Ten workers wera In jured. Automobile workers called a strike of protest, but this move failed, at least in Athens. Tram and railway ; workers of Macedonia resumed work I after another 24-hour strike, but the tobacco workers remained out. * War Minister Gen. John Metaxas 1 attributed the strikes to "purely po ! Htlcal” motives. _ VOTE FOR DISTRICT WINS IN DEBATE National U. Team Consists of Mil dred Coray, Sherman Gunn and Stanley Rider. Arguments In support of national representation for the District received the unanimous approval of the Judges presiding at the final class debate of the year at National University Sat urday night. The winning team, composed of Mis* Mildred Coray. Sherman Gunn and Stanley B. Rider, had the affirmative of the question: "Resolved, that the District of Columbia shall be governed by a board of commissioners elected by the people, and that the District should have national representation in ' Congress." At the conclusion of the debate Gunn was selected as the best legal debater of the class and Rider was picked as the best public speaker. Members of the negative team were Miss Reila Terrell, who received hon orable mention as best speaker; James Hayden and Giles Morrow, given hon orable mention as best debater. The debate was arranged by Thomas E. Rhodes, attorney, who Is In charge of the debating class. Rhodes House Memorial. The house in Bishop Stortford, Eng land. where Cecil Rhodes, the empire builder was born, Is to be preserved as a permanent memorial. i .1 I rcssin TODAY. Senate: In recess as tribute to late Senator Trammell of Florida. Finance Committee discusses tax bill In executive sesison. House: Votes on $2,364,980,000 deficiency aP proprlation bill carrying $1,425,000,000 relief item. Considers discharge of Rules Com* m it tee from further consideration of Fraxler-Lemke farm mortgage bill. TOMORROW. Senate: Will take up unanimous consent calendar. Finance Committee meets on tax bill (executive). House: Program uncertain. Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee considers bill to regulate bondholders’ committees, 10 am. Post Offices and Poet Roads Sub committee considers postal bills, 10 am. Special subcommittee of District Committee continues hearings on Juvenile Court bill, 10 am. Special subcommittee of District Committee begins hearings on nar cotic control bill, 10 a.a.

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler