5 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

5 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. r ————— (TJ. 8. Weather Bureau Forecast.) rpt_ _ __i . __• 4 Fair tonight and tomorrow, somewhat B * . Only evening paper warmer tomorrow; gentle shifting winds; M Bs^k ^^k in Washington With the H,“SI I" II 17 Associated Press News est,57,at5:45a.m.today. ^kJP i| I f and Wirephoto Services. Full report on page A-8. wH^^^pF 4B B Closing New York Markets, Page 10 >«■ ^ Yesterday’* Circulation, 130,432 . ’ _(Some returns not ret received.) No. 33,730. gr&a tK&as.ygWASHINGTON, d. c., Saturday, September 5, io36—thirty-two pages. *** «.... a.™..* e...., two cents. WOMAN FLYER CONQUERS ATLANTIC, BUT LOW GAS MAY CUT FLIGHT SHORT - ' ■ . • i BerylMarkham Passes Over Cape Race. 1.200 MILES ( TO NEW YORK Continuing Beyond Portland, Me., Is * Doubted. {Copyright. 1938. by the Associated Press.) NEW YORK. September 5.—Mrs. Beryl Markham. English society woman airplane pilot, apparently had conquered the North Atlantic on a flight from England today, but avia tion experts feared she would run out of gasoline before reaching New York. Her small monoplane, powered with sn engine of only 200 horsepower, was believed to have flown over Cape Race, Newfoundland, at 8:45 am.. Eastern standard time, the Canadian • Press said. This was 19 hours, 55 minutes after her take-off. Since the engine's fuel consumption was estimated at 10 imperial gallons an hour, only about 70 gallons could have remained at that time. This amount was believed sufficient > to carry the ship as far as Port land, Me., but scarcely any greater distance. , A Coast Guard plane took off from Salem, Mass., to serve as a guide down the eastern shore of North America to the woman who appeared to have made the first solo Atlantic rrn.«incr frnm tn nr’hipvpri by her sex. Carried No Radio. Her navigation was accomplished Without a radio and in bad weather. Dr. James H. Kimball, Government meteorologist, said that if the report of her crossing w'as correct “her per formance is so remarkable it is almost , incredible.” The blond young flyer, he said, must have encountered headwinds more than half the way across the ocean. Experts estimated the plane's speed to Newfoundland, on the basis of re ports of its sighting, was only 117 miles an hour, although the ship w'as designed with a cruising speed of 150 miles and top speed of 170. The weather relented, in mid-morning, along the coast. A strong northerly wind prevailed, giving impetus for the southward swung to the United States. The Canadian press reported Mrs. •Markham over Renews, Newfound land. at 8:35 a.m., flying extremely low and toward the West. Renews is on the southeast tip of Newfoundland. An hour and one-half earlier the woman who said she wanted to be the first to fly the Atlantic alone from the east to the west had been re ported apparently sighted nearly 300 miles at sea. Circled Bay. , Spectators along the shore of Renews Harbor said the small airplane circled the bay, while its pilot apparently checked maps, then started on a straight line for Cape Race, 25 miles to the southwest. Ten minutes later persons at Cape Race said the plane had reached there. A few minutes later it flew over Brook point. Cape Race is 1,200 miles from New York by flying line. The coast of Newfoundland was blanketed by heavy mists and rain. The master of the S. S. Spaardam , reported he sighted a plane 300 miles from St. John's, Newfoundland, and about 1,500 miles from New York, Mrs. Markham’s destination. She can scarcely reach New York before 5 pm., Eastern standard time, 28 hours after she set out from Abing don, England. Trained m Africa. The master of the Spaarndam wire lessed the Radio Corporation of America: "Airplane, probably Mrs. Markham's, passed S. S. Spaarndam at 7 a m., Eastern standard time. Position 47:54 north, 48:22 west, heading for New foundland.” The 33-year-old blond, who trained In adventure hunting big game in 4 Africa and flying as a paid com mercial pilot, fought storms from the moment of her take-off at 12:50 pm., Eastern standard time, yesterday. The weather off America was cold, misty and harried by a strong north wester. The temperature was down to 44 (See MARKHAM, Page A-2.) RICHMAN TAKE-OFF LIKELY TOMORROW Dawn Hop Scheduled for Ameri cans if Plane and Weather Are Bight. Bl ttfr Associated Press. LONDON, September 5.—Dawn to morrw was set today as the possible time when Dick Merrill and Harry * Richman, American trans-Atlantic flyers, may take-off on a return flight to New York. The flyers declared they hoped to leave if their plane is ready and the weather favorable. They said they were considering transferring the ship from Croydon Airport to another airdrome where a longer and smoother runway would be available. They suggested the Abingdon Airport, from which Mrs. Beryl Markham took off on a west ward flight yesterday. Both Richman and Merrill arose late today after being entertained by American and British friends last night. » A* * The low-ivinged monoplane, the Messenger, piloted by Mrs. Beryl Markham, British so ciety aviatrix, shown in this photo radioed from London to Neio York, as it took off from Abingdon, England, airfield late yesterday. Mrs. Markham (below) began her solo flight to New York despite adverse weather. —Copyright, A. P. Wirephoto. -— < 19 POWER FIRMS HALIT. Vi. SUI1 Issues Held Same as Those Already Passed On by Supreme Court. By the Associated Press. KNOXVILLE, Tenn., September 5. —The Tennessee Valley Authority’s : legal division was notified today that ! a suit brought against the T. V. A. by 19 private power companies in Fed eral Court at Birmingham had been dismissed 'at the request of attorneys for the power companies. James Lawrence Fly, general so- 1 licitor for the T. V. A., said he was in i formed of the action by a Celeveland I law firm acting for the power com panies. The T. V. A. motion in the Birming ham suit asked dismissal on grounds that no issue had been raised by the companies that had not been passed on by the United States Supreme Court decision in the Ashwander case. I A suit similar to the one filed in j Birmingham still is pending in Fed- I eral Court in Tennessee. Both suits were filed by the power I companies last May and asked that ' the power program of the Govern- | ment agency be decreed in violation i of the Constitution of the United I States. They charged that T. V. A.’s i program injured the business and | property of each of the complainants." | "I am pleased to have it reduced to one suit,” Fly said. A T. V. A. motion in the Tennessee suit asks dismissal on grounds of jurisdiction, the authority contend ing it could not be sued outside of the northern district of Alabama, its legal residence. -9 NEWS ROOM STRIKE REPORT DENOUNCED Seattle Facts Unbelievably Inac curate, Says Labor Rela tions Counsel. By the Associated Press. SEATTLE, September 5.—Harvey 3. Kelly, labor relations counsel for the Hearst newspapers, said today Row land Watson’s report to William Green, president of the American Federation of Labor, on the Seattle Post-Intel ligencer newsroom strike was "un believably inaccurate.” Kelly took particular exception to the part of Watson's report which stated the only violence during the picketing of the publishing plant was the beating of one guard. Asserting 10 men were mobbed and the attacks were a matter of public record, Kelly said: “This demonstrates conclusively that in making his report, Mr. Watson either did not confine himself to the facts or was not sufficiently interested to ascertain what the facts were.” The labor relations counsel said he would not answer the report in its entirety. He quoted Kelly as saying: "The American newspaper guild, Seattle Chapter, would not be recog nized in any manner whatsoever, even in the least remote form.” Guggenheim for Landon. NEW YORK, September 5 OP).— Harry P. Guggenheim, Ambassador to Cuba during the Hoover administra tion, issued a statement last night through Republican headquarters de claring the present administration is undermining the Government and urging the election of Gov. Alfred M. Landon, the Republican presidential | nominee. % Safe Smashed in Coal Yards, but Killers Get Little for Crime. A 55-year-old night watchman was beaten to death some time before dawn today by robbers who broke into the coal yard of the James E. Colliflower Co., Inc., in nearby Virginia, and [ escaped after cracking the firm’s safe. The body of the victim—Marion J. Riley of Alexandria. Va„—was found . in the doorway of a boiler room shortly after 5 a.m. His head had been ! crushed, apparently with a club, and his gun was gone. The safe, a heavy iron box on rollers, lay under a coal trestle about 40 yards from the yard office. It was smashed, presumably with a crowbar and sledge. . and the contents stolen. James E. Colliflower, well-known j ‘ Washington business man who heads i the coal company, did not know how | much money was in the safe, but said ; , he believes the sum w-as small. Yes- , terday was pay day for the yard em- , nlnvpx Ordinarily, the pay roll is disbursed : , on Saturday, Calliflower said, and it is believed the robbers knew’ of this \ and planned the burglary when they : thought a considerable amount of cash would be in the safe. Footprints Near Safe. Fingerprints in the office and foot prints in soft ground around the broken safe apparently were the only clues to the identity of the mur derers. Experts from the Washington Police Department were called on to examine the prints and aid in the investiga tion, which is in charge of Sheriff Howard B. Fields of Arlington County. With practically every policeman in the county working on the case, 10 colored suspects were rounded up sev eral hours after the investigation began. They were taken to the Ar lington County Jail to be questioned. Frank- Osmond, 40, of Rockville, Md., Bn oil truck driver, called police when he arrived at the yard, which is just across from Washington Air port, and found the office in disorder. Osmond had difficulty entering the ■ yard, as the robbers had propped an iron bar against the gate as a safe guard against being surprised while they opened the safe. Osmond did not know of the slaying (See WATCHMAN, Page A-3.) < PEGGY RICH WEDS - < HARRISON, N. Y., September 5 (P). \ —Peggy Rich, actress, was married < last night in the office of Town Clerk i William A. Wilding by Justice of the 1 Peace Leo Mintzer to Theodore Royce, 25-year-old British orchestra leader. ; Miss Rich gave her age as 31 and 1 ler address as the Drake Hotel, Chi- t ;ago. She was divorced early in 1935 i from Edward Maxwell of Chicago. She was married under the name of Margaret Lawton Rich Maxwell. Mr. Hoyce gave his address as Manchester, England, and his occupation as lm jressario and busiiyess manager. Law to Curb Cotton Picking By Machinery, Tennessee Plea By *he Associated Press. MEMPHIS, Tenn., September 5.— Edward H. Crump, Democratic national committeeman, sharply criticised me chanical cotton pickers today. "There should be ligislation in every State," against the mechanical picker, he declared. “I believe it can be car ried in Tennessee." He said he understood, however, that “the cotton picker has not been per fected,” and for the present "we will carry our worries to something else.” A mechanical picker invented by John and Mack Rust of Memphis is being tested at Stonevllle, Miss. The Rusts say they plan to place perfected machines in operation due concern for labor. Their intention, they say, is to control the placement of the machines by leasing them to operators to keep a maximum number of laborers at work at maximum wages. Part of the profits, they assert, will be used to better conditions of agricultural workers. Crump declared picking by hand “affords work every Fall lor practically every member of a fanner’s family, Just as chopping Cotton and com does in the Spring.” Crump, who has much land in cot* ton, is head of the Shelby County (Memphis) Democratic organization which is a recognised factor in State politicr era CHARGES REFUSES TO DROP FIGHT WITH A. F. L Labor Head Says Few of 1,200,000 Affected Mem bers Have Been Paying Dues Regularly. PLANS FOR RIVAL UNIT PREDICTED BY LEADER “No Change in Policy'* Contem plated to Delay Action Which Splits Organized Labor Into Two Factions—Deadline Near. ox Jims v. itLsni. William Green, president of the American Federation of Labor, today iassed back to the Committee for In iustrial Organization the onus of spiff ing the labor movement in America. Contending that refusal to withdraw 'rom the C. I. O. or to dissolve that irganlzation constitutes a voluntary ;ecession from the federation, rather han suspension by the federation, levertheless he made it plain that he 10 recalcitrant unions are no longer nembers in good standing of the A. ?. of L. At the same time. Green predicted hat plans of the C. I. O. leaders for i rival federation will unfold and >ecome publicly known in due course >f time. 1.300,000 Affected. Despite the split at this time in i hich some 1.200,000 members' of the V. F. of L. are becoming disassociated rom this body, Green declared in a irepared statement that the Execu ive Council of the federation hopes 'that an understanding will be ulti nately reached, differences adjusted .nd unity restored. The Executive Council asks nothing more than dis olution of the C. I. O.” The federation president denied the inancial importance in the split by lisclosing that few of the C. I. O. inions have been paying dues regu arly. almost none of them making ontributlons in recent months. In closing his statement. Green aid the federation would “carry on iggressive organizing work in all fields ind among those employed in all in lustries.” He declined to clarify this iromise when asked if such work night be pressed in the steel industry, he coal mining industry and others :lose to the C. I. O. unions. Unions' Enrollment. The ousted unions have an en ollment of about 1,174,500. In iddition, two other unions with a total nembershlp of about 88.400 retain af iliation with the C. I. O. and undoubt ■dly face formal suspension action ;ventually. Effectiveness of the suspension or ier voted by the Executive Council of he federation one month ago is just >ne more step in what has been a ong drawn out light between the in lustrial unionists headed by John L. jewis and the United Mine Workers is opposed to the craft union majority action of the A. P. of L. Appeal May Not Be Taken. As far as the C. I. O. is concerned, jewis declared yesterday, there will le "no change in policy, no lagging of ffort and no deadline for our fight o organize the mass production in lustries on an industrial basis." Asked whether any appeal will be nade from the suspension order at he federation convention in Florida n November, Lewis said the question las not been passed on formally by he C. I. O., but added, “My own hought is that it would be utterly utile and a waste of time.” The C. I. O. spokesman pointed out hat the A. F. of L., if it seeks to be

onsistent, must order all subordinate lodies, such as State federations and entral labor unions, to purge them *• V. auiuaico, OULU ail ■ttempt, he continued, might prove no6t embarrassing in such circum tances as that of the Pennsylvania (See GREENTPage A-2.) --- COUGHLIN TO SPEAK Ihicago Rally of Social Justice Union to Hear Priest. CHICAGO, September 5 (/P).—Rev. Jharles E. Coughlin, Detroit radio iriest, will make his first public ad Iress in Illinois tomorrow at an .musement park rally of his National Jnion for Social Justice. Father Coughlin will be the only peaker. The N. U. S. J. office said lis address would be of a general na ure. Scheduled for 4 p.m. (E. S. T.), t will not be broadcast. Readers’ Guide Page. Amusements_A-5 Answers to Questions_A-6 Art.. B-3 Books__B-2 Church News_B-4-5 1 Comics _ B-7 Death Notices_A-8 Editorial _A-6 Finance _A-10-11 Lost and Found_A-3 Music _ B-3 News Comment Features _A-7 Real Estate_C 1 to 6 Radio ..._B-6 Serial Story_B-6 Short Story __ B-6 Society___A-9 Sports_C-7-8 Women’s Features_B-8 Washington Waysld^-A-2 UDGiUOUTADSTi BUT I KEEP You ) .QUESSIN'vJUST / XhHE Bata, Ford of Czechoslovakia, Takes Pride in Heavy Spending For Welfare of His Employes. Industrialist Not Interested in Money For Money’s Sake But Only Good It Can Do Mankind. BY CONSTANTINE BROWN, Staff Correspondent of The Star. ZLIM. Czechoslovakia—The President of the Czechoslovak republic, the prime minister, the taxi drivers and the hotel porter in Prague all asked me whether I had seen Bata at Zlim. I began to be interested to find out what these two names meant. A kind-hearted soul explained that Zlim was a town and Bata (pronounced Batia) was a man. The man was the Ford of Czechoslovakia and one of the richest industrialists in Europe. The luvtu, me luiu me wiiii yi iuc, wild ail exact reproduction of an American factory town. I came to Zlim. I must confess that I would be proud if we had one industrial town as com fortable, as clean and as well organized as this Czechoslovak industrial city. I will start with the town itself. Some 25 years ago it was not even on the map of Austria. It was a marshy dump with a population of about 1.500 inhabitants. Today it is an up-to-date town of 35,000 people. It has an airport, two hotels (one with 450 rooms, each room with bath, at the price of 85 cents a day) and it has rows of houses, workmen’s houses, as you gener ally see only in prosperous suburbs in the United States. Each house is occupied by two families. They have their separate entrances, their own garage—mostly without cars—and their own bath rooms. The rent which the workers pay ranges from $42 to $58 a year. There is, of course, electric light, an excellent water system and everything else that goes with a modem town. Ana au tnis is tne worK oi two young men, tne sons or a snoemaKer. one, the eldest brother, Thomas Bata, was killed a year ago in an airplane accident. His brother John has succeeded him and is now known throughout Europe as the Ford of Czechoslovakia. iSee~BROWN, Page A-8.) John Bata. Republican Nominee Says Ex-President Hoover May Visit Him. By toe Associated Press. TOPEKA, Kans., September 5.— Gov. Alf M. Landon said today in a Labor day proclamation that “labor should be free to organize for fair consideration * * • forever free from governmental or any other form of coercion.” Simultaneously with issuance of the proclamation, the Republican nominee told a press conference that former President Herbert Hoover, who last night announced his intention to speak for the Kansan, “may stop off” for a visit on his way back West after his eastern trip. "I talked with Mr. Hoover Wednes day over the telephone,” Landon said. Regard for Labor. Proclaiming Monday as Labor day and “earnestly” requesting the people of Kansas “to lay aside their business narvK onH inin with t.h^ varimic trorlM organizations In fittingly celebrating this holiday dedicated to the workers," London said: "Under our American system of Government, groups may organize and freely expound their views. With that in mind, let us listen closeiy to labor as it speaks on this day and give due regard and credence to its utterances. “This day has no room in it for class divisions and prejudices. No good citizen would contribute to them. "In 1890 the frontier was gone, and the covered wagon a memory, but the people of this State still believed in sound charatcer, hard work and free enterprise. In 1936 they will join as gladly in a tribute to these qualities and ideals that made this a great State.” Railroads’ Attitude. The Governor was questioned about the Chicago announcement of West ern railroad executives that the Joint reduced freight rates on live stock feeds he had requested for drought areas would be authorized. "It is gratifying and I appreciate very much the attitude of the rail roads," London said. “It will be meet helpful, especially on such things as molasses and cottonseed cake.” The Republican nominee planned a quiet week end before traveling to Wichita Monday for a brief talk to the American Legion State conven tion. But first, aides said, he intended 45ee LAN DON, Fag| A-Jj PRESIDENT GIVEN INDIANA^ COME Tours Public Projects After Arrival at Indianapolis for Parley. Bj* the Associated Press. INDIANAPOLIS. September 5 — President Roosevelt arrived in In dianapolis at 9:30 am. (Central standard timet for his drought-relief conference with the Governors of Ohio, Michigan, Kentucky and In diana. The President was greeted at the Union Station by two of the Gov ernors and some State officials with nthnm Via Te to /-*/-* for Inspects Projects. He then entered an automobile and was taken on a tour of Works Progress and Public Works Administration's’ projects under way in this city. He first passed through the down town streets lined with spectators. Those who welcomed the President at the station included Govs. Paul V. McNutt of Indiana and A. B. Chandler of Kentucky and United States Sen ators Arthur H. Vandenburg of Michigan, Frederick Van Nuys and Sherman Minton of Indiana, Robert J. Bulkley of Ohio and M. M. Logan of Kentucky and Alben W. Barkley of Kentucky. Rides in Open Auto. The President began his tour of the city shortly before 10 o’clock, rid ing in an open, bunting-draped auto mobile through flag-decorated streets. The day was sunny and warm and the (See ROOSEVELT, Page A-8.) IS. THADEN WINS BENDIX AIR TROPHY D. C. Woman Covers Trans U S. Course in 14 Hours, 54 Minutes BACKGROUND— Offered six years ago by Vincent Bendix to stimulate long-range high-speed flying, the Bendix Trophy has become the most fa mous perpetual award for trans continental racing. Its winners have established new ocean-to ocean records and during the life of the trophy the transcontinental record has fallen from 15 hours to a little more than 9 hours. The Bendix race is flown each year as one of the opening features of the National Air Races, with the finish line at the scene of those races. With the trophy this year goes 115,000 in prize money. Bs the Associated Press. LOS ANGELES. Sept. 5.—Plucky Louise Thaden, outspeeding the men in a transcontinental air dash which brought serious injury to the male de fending champion, wore the coveted laurels of the $15,000 Bendix trophy race today—and another woman held second honors. Covering the accident-jinxed course from New York to Los Angeles in 14 hours 54 minutes, soft-voiced Mrs. Thaden of Bentonville, Ark., attached to the Bureau of Air Commerce at Washington, was “more surprised than anybody” when acclaimed the winner late yesterday before cheering thousands at the National Air Races. Accompanied by Miss Blanche Noyes of Los Angeles. Mrs. Thaden turned in. a performance with her 420 horsepowdered plane almost an hour better than that of second place Laura Ingalls, diminutive New York entrant. Howard Plane Forced Down. In a forced landing of the speed plane which he constructed, defend ing Champion Ben O. Howard of Chicago and his wife, Maxine, suf fered fractures of both legs and the plane was wrecked north of Crown Point, N. Mex. Navajos brought out first word of the accident. Howard was leading at the time. A terrific explosion of his Northrup Gamma ship 5,000 feet up, near Stafford, Kans., pitched Joe Jacobson of Kansas City out of the race, but he floated down uninjured in a para chute which he took along only after persistent persuasion by his friend, Ken Behr, in New York. Amelia Earhart Putnam, who has flown over two oceans, had to be content with fifth place, after battling with a loose door at her “flying lab oratory’’ that nearly tore her and her companion, Helen Richey of Pitts burgh, out of the plane. Even before the race started Col. Roscoe Turner, who was nosed out (See RACE, Page A-4.) SHIP TO BE LAUNCHED U. S. S. Winslow Third Naval Vessel Named for Admiral. CAMDEN, N. J„ September 5 (JF).— The U. S. S. Winslow, 1,850-ton de stroyer leader, will be launched Friday, September 18, at the New York Ship building Corp. yards. It is the third naval vessel to bear the name of Rear Admiral John An crum Winslow, Civil War naval com mander. Miss Mary Blythe Winslow of Raleigh, Tenn., a great-grand daughter of Rear Admiral Winslow, will christen the vessel. Flyer and Wife, Injured, Lie 4 Hours in Plane’s Wreckage By the Associated Press. ■ A raff stuffed in a hole apparently CROWN POINT, N. Mex., Septem ber 5.—Asking over and over, “How is my plane?" Speed Pilot Benny Howard, 32, tossed in delirium today In a hospital to which he and his pretty blond wife, Maxine. 22, were brought after lying four hours in their wrecked ship. The plane, Mister Mulligan, which Howard constructed, became a twisted mass in a forced landing as the two were leading in the Bendix air dash from New York to Lo6 Angeles yes terday. Because superstitious Indians refused to go near, it was five hours before the injured couple reached the hospital from the crash scene 40 miles »way. • ruptured in the gas tank behind the pilot's seat told silently of efforts to avert fire during the agonizing hours the two were imprisoned before help was summoned by an Indian trader, his wife and another white couple. Dr. Max E. Feldman listed Howard’s Injuries as. both legs broken, one ‘‘practically amputated,” broken left arm and brain concussion. He may also have a skull fracture and in ternal injuries. His blue-eyed wife suffered broken legs and shock. Billy Juan, a Navajo brave, de scribed Howard’s attempt to land his crippled ship in the rough country (See'HOW^tD6. Page A-4^. MADRID REJECTS DIPLOMATS’ PLEA FOR ‘HUMANIZING’ OF CIVIL WARFARE Rebels Repulse Counter Attack on Irun and Turn Toward Fort Guadalupe for San Sebastian Drive. LOYALIST RESISTANCE IN RUINED CITY ENDS Fierce Battle at International Bridge as Government Forces Make Futile Effort to Keep Hold on Border Key Posi« tion. BACKGROUND— Since revolt flared in Spanish Morocco in July, Fascist rebels have been making slow but steady progress in their drive on key po sitions of Spain’s Loyalist forces. Insurgents have pushed forward until they dominate Western Spain from Gibraltar virtually to French border. This week they claim new victories which place them in po sition to dominate all roads to Ma drid. Fall of Iran, key city, gave rebels latest advantageous spot. By tn* Associated Press. ST. JEAN DE LUZ. France, Sep tember 5.—The Spanish government today rejected foreign diplomats’ pro posals for “humanizing'' the Spanish civil war. Daniel Garcia Mansilla. the Argen tine Ambassador accreditied to Ma drid, issued a communique saying the Ambassadors’ proposals to Madrid had received a reply which constituted a polite rejection. The Ambassadors, made exiles from their Madrid posts by the Spanish war, had sent proposals to each of the Spanish beligerents asking them to exchange hostages rather than execute them. Mansilla, in making public the pro posals this week, indicated that the ambassadors hoped they would open the way to a truce in Spain. The United States Ambassador to Madrid, Claude G. Bowers, had no part in the proposals as the United States’ policy has been announced as one of strict non-intervention in the Spanish civil strife. The Spanish government made no comment on the actual plan of the diplomats in its reply, but declared: “We are concerned for the time being with repressing military rebel lion which has created this terrible situation and which the government desires to see ended as quickly as pos sible by the most humane means." Timv rrvc nv civ crmctTAV Rebels Clear Way For Attack by Fort Guadalupe Plans. (Copyright. 1936, by the Associated Press.) IRUN. Spain, With Rebel Armies, September 5.—With government re sistance blasted out of Irun, the rebel high command tonight trained its guns on Fort Guadalupe to clear the way for an attack qp San Sebastian. Other rebel units meanwhile con solidated their newly won positions preparatory to drives on Santander, Bilbao and other government-held coastal cities. The rebel high command said there was no Intention of an immediate mass attack on San Sebastian, as their strategy would be to clean up the ter ritory around ruined Irun. When all the scattered government redoubts In the area are scotched, then, the rebel leaders said, the entire northern army, under Gen. Emilio Mola. would concentrate on San Se bastian. Rebels Masters of Irun. Rebels were complete masters of Irun by early afternoon after driving off a desperate counter attack by government militiamen. Clean-up squads stalked among the ruins hurling hand grenades at a few individual government militiamen who refused to flee with their comrades. Fascist fighting men walked over the bodies of 10 black-shirted govern ment militiamen on the approach to the International Bridge into Hen daye. The government men had recap tured the bridgehead earlier, only to be driven off by a relentless rebel barrage. On the bridge itself were the bodies of three other government militiamen. The victorious rebels posted a guard on the frontier and closed the Spanish (See SPAIN, Page’ A-2.) THIRD OF 4 HURT IN ACCIDENT DIES Baltimore Youth Succumbs to Injuries Received Near Fredericksburg. Victim of a highway collision that killed a Washington couple, Richard Herman, 15, of Baltimore, died early today in Mary Washington Hospital, Fredericksburg, Va. In the same hospital a few hours earlier, William Banks, 23, colored, 1118 First street, died of injuries re ceived last night when a car in which he was riding with five other Wash ington colored men crashed head-on into a truck five miles north of Fredericksburg. The Herman boy was a passenger In a car driven by his brother, Joseph, 24, when it was in head-on collision on the Washington-Richmond High way with that of John William Knapp, 36, Chestnut Farms Dairy clerk, and his wife, Mrs. Etta Knapp, 32, Government Printing Office em ploye. The Knapps, who lived at 1332 D street north-^st, were Injured fatally.

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