10 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

10 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

r——.1 111 —————* WEATHER ! •W (U. S. Weather Bureau Forecast.) The only evening paper Pair tonight and tomorrow; little . TX, ,_ change in temperature; Saturday showers in W dSnmgtOn With the and cooler Associated Press News Temperatures—Highest. 90, at 3.45 p.m. j tit:_t_ -±.. c • yesterday; lowest, 71, at 5:30 a.m. today. and WlTephOtO Services. Pull report on page B-fl. Clo.uit New York P.|. IS____ ~No. 33,735. grfli c“ r5SXSSS.maa_ WASHINGTON, D. C., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1936—FIFTY-TWO PAGES. ***** c*> M..n. A..oci.ted Pr,... TWO CENTS. ' I). S. WAR VESSELS ARE ORDERED OUT . OE SPANISH ZONE TO NEARBY PORTS Four Ships Told to Stay Away Unless Called Back. _ About 500 Americans Re main in Country. "REBELS TURN DRIVE DIRECTLY AT MADRID « informal Armistice in Effect at San Sebastian, Encircled by ! Fascists—Alcazar Still Holds. Government Claims Repulse of I Moor Attack. BACKGROUND— w The Spanish government feeler for an armistice appears to have lost all hopes of success. When the loyalists offered to cease hostilities at San Sebastian the rebel leaders refused, and now seem satisfied that they can take the city at will as the Nationalist Basques have seized control when anarchist ele ments threatened to burn the city. , San Sebastian appears more quiet today than at any time since the bloody civil war started, July 17. Fascist-Royalists have waged com bat since that time with the death toll throughout the country esti mated at S5,000. Both rebel and government forces have claimed varying degrees of success during the past several weeks. Bj the Associated Press. Secretary Hull announced today that the four American war vessels now in Spanish waters had been ordered witli » drawn. The ships, which were sent in late July to aid the evacuation of American nationals from the revolutionary zone, have been instructed to proceed to nearby ports to await possible em ergency calls from Spain. Secretary Hull reviewed repeated and Insistent appeals made by the State Department to Americans in Spain to leave the country and noted that, since the outbreak of revolution, some 1,000 nationals have been removed from the danger zone with the aid of • both commercial and naval vessels. Hull said that, since September 1, when the final warning to Americans was issued, there had been no infor mation to indicate that any of the approximately 500 still there desired to leave, with the exception of a few j In institute circumstances and some ! reported marooned in isolated cities. Previously, the Secretary had said , , that those Americans who had per sis ted in remaining in Spain did so because of business or family reasons. In view of those circumstances, he in dicated, the American Government j * could no longer consider itself re sponsible for their safety. Instructions issued by the Navy De partment at the direction of Secre tary Hul ordered the cruiser Quincy, the destroyers Hatfield and Kane and the Coast Guard cutter Cayuga to proceed to neutral waters and not to return to Spain except in answer to requests by American diplomatic and consular agents. w His statement did not indicate how long the vessels would remain in near- | by waters or to what specific ports they have been assigned. BASQUES SEIZE CONTROL. (Copyright, 1936, by the Associated Press.) SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain, Septem ber 10.—Relentless Fascist rebels, whose northern march has led them “ (See' SPAIN~Page~A-i67) P S ASKS PAROLE . FROM REFORMATORY Pormer D. C. Mortgage Banker Is Serving Sentence on Conspiracy Charge. G. Bryan Pitts, former Washington mortgage banker, has applied for parole from a 14-year sentence at the Lorton Reformatory for conspiracy to embezzle funds of the F. H. Smith Co., of which he was chairman of the board. With 19 other prisoners who are •« also seeking paroles, Pitts will be given a hearing tomorrow at the re formatory by the Board of Inde terminate Sentence and Parole. Pitts was sentenced December 23, 1930, for one term of 14 years and a second term of one year, which would run concurrently. He did not begin serving his sentence at Lorton until March 9, 1932, and as a conse quence became eligible for parole De v cember 27, 1934. The others who will be heard tomor row are Herbert Bailey, Charles Beal, Thomas Walker, James E. Dews, Wil liam J. Koch, Floyd Manuel, John Upshaw, Jerry P. Tillman, Richard Gray, Nathan Milner, Taylor Sullivan, William De Graflln, W. L. Fuse, Gil bert G. Brown, Waddell Anthony, James J. Johnson, George Jackson, Robert E. Russell and Douglas A. Jones. . ALASKA DEMOCRATS WIN NOMINATIONS £t the Associated Press. JUNEAU, Alaska, September 10.— Democratic legislative, congressional and territorial candidates, who advo cated abolition of fish traps and the retention by the Territorial Liquor Control Board of full power to enact liquor legislation, defeated their Re publican opponents in Tuesday’s pri •jnary, returns indicated today. Delegate Anthony J. Dimond, main taining a 3 to 1 lead over his Repub lican opponent, Lester O. Oore of Ketchikan, was assured another term mq Congress. « J German Army Officers Hound Hitler to Keep Moods” From Jeopardizing Diplomatic Gains Impressionable Leader Believed Capa ble of Anything When Left to Brood Over Real or Fancied Wrongs. The following is the second of a series of articles on Germany’s foreign and military program written by Mr. Brown, The Evening Star’s foreign expert, after a visit to the leaders of Germany’s official life. BY CONSTANTINE BROWN. BERLIN.—Every time Reichsfuehrer Hitler goes to his mountain re treat at Berchtesgaden, the German foreign office is worried. And, if it happens that the international situation is more complicated than usual, Herr von Neurath and his assistants are scared out of their wits. It is not safe, tkntt hni’n fmin/1 ♦ n lnnua ♦ Via TJaiaVlpfiiaheai* alone with his thoughts. You never know what might flash through his mind, and, if his sensi bilities are touched by something somebody abroad may have said about him or N&ziism, anything is possible. This is the reason the for eign office w'ill contrive somehow or other to dis patch Field Marshal von Blomberg to keep Hitler company each time he leaves Berlin for a rest. The field marshal and der Fuehrer are close friends now. One might even say that Von Blomberg. who genuinely idolizes Hitler, is the only man who may call himself an intimate of Germany’s dictator. The com mander in chief of the forces of the Reich has a becalming influence on his boss. It may be that the former corporal feels that the field marshal is genuine in his affections for him. Marshal van Blombcrt. There are not many in Germany who actually love Hitler. Hitler is admired, feared, respected and obeyed, but not loved by his people. Yet, I am told by those who come in close contact with him, he does not lack that natural charm of the Austrians. When he is not playing to the gallery and allows himself to relax he can be entertaining, kind and thought ful. But somehow or other he has never been able to gain the love of the (See BROWN, Page A-13.) 212 ARE SAVED IN SEACOLLISION 159 Passengers and 53 of Ship’s Crew Taken Aboard Liner. By the Associated Press. BOSTON, September 10.—The spec tacular rescue of 159 pleasure-bent passengers and 53 crewsmen whose ex cursion boat sank into fog-shrouded Boston Harbor brought praise for cool seamanship today—and at the same time an investigation by the Federal Steamboat Inspection Service. The steamer Romance, returning from a trip to Cape Cod, sank 20 min utes after a collision with the Man hattan.bound liner New York tore a hole in her port side last night. In those 20 minutes was enacted one of the most stirring dramas of this historic harbor. To many it seemed that a major sea catastrophe was averted—only a day after the second anniversary of the Morro Castle tragedy. A bridge of ladders was thrown from the liner New York to the Romance. Across it went a majority of the ex cursion boat's passengers. Others were saved by five lifeboats lowered by the New York. While the passengers and crew of the Romance scrambled to safety the New York kept her prow jammed into the side of the other craft. A moment after Capt. Adelbert C. Wickens left the Romance the ship plunged under the waves bow first, her whistle moaning. Today only the top of her superstructure remained One woman lost her footing on the ladders and fell into the wreckage be tween the two vessels. Some one pulled her to safety. Capt. Wickens himself ' nearly drowned. Chief Engineer Joseph John son said Wickens was on a life raft. Another raft slid off the Romance on top of him. Wickens and a sailor went under, but escaped with a soaking. Five persons were taken to hospitals. A few others reported minor injuries. "We can thank the perfect discipline af the Romance’s crew that we are alive today,” said Tolbert McKay of Milton, Mass., an experienced yachts man. “You can’t give too much credit to the crews of both ships for their cool, fast work in saving the Romance's passengers.” Others of the rescued echoed his statement. Takes Rescued to Boston. The New York turned back to Bos ton with the rescued. Her own pas sengers were put aboard a train for New York. The New York’s flash at 6:18 p.m. (Eastern standard time) had mobilized every Coast Guard boat in the Boston area, Boston Police harbor boats, and the Navy tug Iwana, after a day in which shipping had been greatly han dicapped by the worst fog of the Sum mer. Mrs. John A. O’Brien of Belmont, Mass., said the Romance crew "even tied the life preservers on to us.” Corning Benton, treasurer of Phil lips-Exeter Academy, Exeter, N. H., a passenger on the New York, said "the ships struck with barely perceptible impact, amidships of the Romance.'” Among the, rescued was a sleek doberman pinscher dog, saved with its owner, Victor DeGerard, Russian Lan guage instructor at Harvard Uni versity. Mrs. Josephine Brown of Cambridge (See RESCUE, Page A-3.) END OF HEAT FORECAST; SHOWERS LIKELY TODAY Fair Tonight and Tomorrow, With Little Change in Temperature Predicted. Overcast skies and possible showers will keep the mercury at a reasonable level today, the Weather Bureau said In predicting an end to the higher temperatures that have prevailed for the last two days. Tonight and tomorrow, the fore caster added, will be fair, with little change in temperature. The maximum yesterday was 90 legrees, recorded at 3:45 p.m. This morning’s low was 71, at 5:30. if FLYING BOAT NEAR GOAL IN SEA TEST German Zephyr Is Speeding to New York, With Half of Flight Behind. BULLETIN. ABOARD THE S. 6. EUROPA AT SEA (By ship-shore telephone) September 10 (fP).—The German flying boat Zephyr, flying from the Azores to New York, passed over this liner at 11 a.m. Eastern stand ard time, 800 miles out of New York harbor. The plane was expected to reach New York between 4 and 5 pm. Eastern standard time. It was cruising at a speed of about 139 miles per hour. 8? tea Associated Press. NEW YORK, September 10.—With her two oil-burning engines roaring a prophecy of things to come, a Ger man flying boat neared America to day on a survey of the Southern flight route across the North Atlantic. At 7 a.m., Eastern standard time, she crossed the half-way mark on the journey from the Azores, her starting point 1,196 miles behind. By 8 a.m. she had covered 140 miles more. The speed was increasing from the slightly more than 90 miles an hour maintained mrougn me mgm, iouow ing the take-off at 7:10 p.m. (East ern standard time). The fuel load was lightening and a tail wind had replaced the western breeze which had hampered the 10-ton ship previously. Carries Four Men. The flying boat is the Zephyr, owned and operated by Germany's interna tional airline, Lufthansa. She carries four men—Flight Capt. J. Blanken burg, Baron K. A. von Gablens, technical managing director of Luf thansa, serving as second pilot; Me chanic A. Eger and Radioman W. Ehlberg. There were no passengers and no mail. Those are things to come over the North Atlantic. Lufthansa has been carrying mail on weekly sched ules over the South Atlantic more than two years. The flight is being made with the assistance and co-operation of Pan American Airways, the United States’ international airline, which also has plans for establishing a trans-Atlantic air service. Pan-American provided air harbor facilities at Port Washington, Long Island, the Zephyr's goal, and main tained constant communication by radio with both the flying boat and her mother ship, the Schwabenland, which tossed her into the air by cata pult last night. IjllfeUICa VBQ VI HUG VUi Not only was this the first flight from the Azores to the United States. It was the first time a plane powered by engines using erude oil Instead of gasoline has flown the North Atlantic. It was attempted yesterday by the Zephyr’s sister ship, the Aeolus, which started for Bermuda but had to turn back after 600 miles because of a leak in its cooling system. The Aeolus is ex pected to start again tonight or to morrow. Both flying boats can take off and alight on the water, but they must be catapulted into the air in order to get away with a sufficient load of fuel to last for the 2,390-mile flight being performed today. Port Washington, although the ter minus for this test, is merely a tenta tive selection as the United States’ terminal for a regular trans-Atlantic flying service. Charleston, S. C„ and Baltimore, Md., are also understood to be under consideration as western terminals. LOST BOY, 3, FOUND, CLAD ONLY IN DIAPER By the Associated Press. WASHBURN, Wls„ September 10. —Clad only in a diaper, 3-year-old Harold King was found today by a searching party after being lost three days in dense woods near here. The rest of his clothing was tom off by brush and the boy was suffering from exposure. At a hospital he was reported slightly delirious and doc i ton said pneumonia might develop. STATES BUT ONE Says Landon Will Pick Up Needed 25 Votes West of Mississippi. NO SLUMP IN WEST; CALIFORNIA STRONGER 0. 0. F. Chairman Telli Fren Maine Will Be Swept by Lan don—To Speak Tonight. BY G. GOULD LINCOLN. John Hamilton, chairman of the Republican National Committee, pre dicted today at a press conference here that "every State east of the Mississippi and north of the Ohio, with the possible exception of one, will be carried by the Republicans.” "We will pick up the necessary 25 electoral votes west of the Mississippi to elect Oov. Landon,” he continued. Hamilton, who is to speak at a luncheon at the National Press Club, then was asked about the situation in California. “I said, when I was on the Pacific Coast, that the situation in Cali fornia was not so hot,” he replied. "I’ll say today that things in Cali fornia are in better shape.” Slight August Slump. Hamilton said he realized there had been a “bit of a slump" in August for the Republicans, but that it was confined to the East. "There was no evidence of any slump in the West," he said, “and my reports from Utah and Idaho are better than they were.” Hamilton insisted that Oklahoma was a "battleground." In support of this statement, he said that in the first place, many former Kansans now live in Oklahoma and feel to ward Gov. Landon asf the people of Kansas do. “They have had a spendthrift State government in Oklahoma, in direct contrast to the Landon administra tion in Kansas." he said. “Also there have been defections in the Demo, cratic party, among them former Gov. Murray. For those reasons I do not believe that the Democrats can hope for their normal majority in Okla homa." Hamilton gave the Republicans “a bit of an edge” in Michigan. He said he thought the Republicans would be in better shape there after the pri maries are held. Senator Couaens’ recent statement that he favored the re-election of President Roosevelt, Hamilton aatfd, had been no surprise, but had been already discounted be cause of Couzens' known position. Up-State G. O. P. Strong. "The Republicans will roll up a three-quarter-million lead in up-State New York, which will be more than enough to overcome the Democratic majority in New York City and carry the State for Landon,” Hamilton said. New England. Hamilton said, “was in good shape." He predicted the Republicans would carry Massa chusetts, as well as Maine and the rest of the New England States. He was questioned about the reports of du Pont contributions made in Maine to the Republican campaign fund. “They were made directly and I have no knowledge of them,” said Hamilton. "I would like to know what Democratic contributions have been made in Maine. hllf T nntino than flora nnt Raan vnnHa public by the Senate Committee.” Hamilton predicted a Republican sweep in Maine, with the election of a Republican Governor, a Republican Senator and three members of the House. Asked If he thought Landon was going into Maine because the Repub licans expected victory there, Hamilton smiled and said: “I’ll put it this way. I wouldn’t send him into South Carolina." Hamilton was asked if he believed that the colored vote, which turned to Roosevelt in 1932, was returning to the Republican party. "I do not make a distinction in con sidering the Negro vote,” he said. "There is no question of race or of social standing in the matter. The (See HAMILTON, Page A-2.) FLYING COUPLE SAFE Xirowr and Miss Strangroom Are Believed in Nome. FAIRBANKS. Alaska, September 10 (/P).—Pilot Hans Mirow of Nome and Miss Eileen Strangroom of Fairbanks were believed safe in Nome today, after being reported missing on the British Columbia Coast yesterday. • Provincial police searched the coast to locate the flyers, who took off from Vancouver September 2. They left Fairbanks, however, yesterday for

Nome. Invades South on Political Tour—Will Deliver Ad dress This Evening. B9 the Associated Press. ASHEVILLE, N. C, September 10.— Thrilled by the natural wonders of the Great Smoky Mountain National Park, President Roosevelt arose early today to complete writing his address for a Southern State rally at Charlotte. A brief Informal address at McCor mick Field here was the only engage ment arranged for the Chief Execu tive before he started the approxi mately three-hour motor drive to Charlotte. He kept to his room at the Grove Park Inn late last night dic tating the only formal address he will make on his current dip into the South. nill apwt lonigni. The President timed his departure so as to arrive In Charlotte shortly before 6 p.m. (Eastern standard time), when he was scheduled to take the platform at the new W. P. A.-built municipal stadium and talk to Gov ernors, Senators and other citizens of half a dozen Southern Common wealths. Organized by Young Democrats, the rally was In charge of Haywood Rob bins. Charlotte attorney, who had In vited party wheelhorses and their friends within several hundred miles to gather in the "green pastures" and "make the Solid South more solid for Franklin Roosevelt." Arriving at his mountain resort hotel here just before dark last night, the President, through Marvin H. McIntyre, a secretary, expressed de light at his 150-mile auto tour of the Smokies of Tennessee and North Carolina, 685 square miles of haze shrouded peaks, thick forests, creeks, waterfalls and valleys. The trip, starting at Knoxville, Tenn., required nearly nine hours. Crowds turned out in all the towns along the route and applauded as the Chief Executive waved his straw hat. "For 30 years,” he commented aft erward, "I have wanted to come here. "Not only am I not disappointed, but I am delighted and thrilled with It It. km a srand trin ” Honored by Indiana. Leaving a picnic lunch in the midst of a thunder storm atop Clingman’s Dome, 6,000 feet above sea level, the President crossed into North Caro lina by way of a Cherokee Indian reservation, where he was Inducted into the tribe. Chief Jerry Blythe, a wrinkled Red Skin, placed a crown of brown turkey feathers, tipped with red, on the President’s head and called him "Chief White Eagle.” After questioning the Indian about the number in the tribe and the make-up of his new headgear, the President squinted through a long blow gun handed him by Blythe—a ! 0-foot bamboo pole through which the Cherokees blow feathered darts. “Well, this is very, very interest ing,” Mr. Roosevelt Remarked. A few miles away, at the Lake Junaluska Summer home of Josephus Daniels, Ambassador to Mexico, a huge sign read: •’lake Junaluska greets Chief White Eagle.” Mr. Roosevelt dined in his hotel suite with his son John. Gov. J. C. B. Ehringhaus and Fred Seely, Asheville friend of the President. Judge Disgusted With Job After Five “Stormy Years” Bf the Associated Press. NEW YORK, September 10.—City Magistrate Overton Harris (of the Louisville, Ky„ and Social Register Harrises) confessed today after live stormy years on the bench that he is “disillusioned” with courts. Formerly a high-paid corporation lawyer, Harris said: “I took this job out of a sense of adventure and a desire to work with people rather than papers. I felt that I could do a little good and that this would be a sort of genteel retirement. "I find that the job was neither genteel nor retirement. It has been live years of bitter conflict. The end of it all is a cynical philosophy, which Is not a philosophy at all, but rather an erosion of the spirit. “I am convinced of the uttter hope lessness of accomplishing anything in the city courts and the thanklessness of trying." Magistrata Harris is warded by lawyers who come before hi as “bard T boiled.” His removal was once asked by the Bronx Chamber of Commerce because "he is temperamentally un fitted for the work.” "I’m convinced," he said, "that the New York public does not want any thing better than the hippodroming of which Mayor La Guardla speaks. The place reeks with cheap senti mentality. "It is easy and spectacular for a magistrate to read a homily in sten torian tones, give the defendant advice on how to rear his family and turn Viiiri loose so that he goes out and beats his wife again next Saturday night.” Magistrate Harris said he had re cently sat in Magistrate’s Court in London. "What a contrast between court there and here,” he observed. "There, one is impressed with the sense of fairness of all persons concerned. Here, it is a case of one slicker against another, trying to wins however be earn” “ . Soviet Aerial Fleet Lands 1,200 Troops In Army Parachutes FT me Associated Pres*. MINSK, U. S. S. R., Septem ber 10 —Soviet Russia's army, to the accompaniment of amazed gasps from foreign observers, landed 1,200 troops and a regi mental band simultaneously from a fleet of war planes in parachutes today. The feat was accomplished during war games in progress here. The troops, carrying machine guns and ammunition and rein forced with Jeid pieces dropped from other planes, occupied an "enemy” airfield and began to use it as a base, deep within "hostile” territory. TIME BEATEN! IN GEORGIA RACE Russell Piles Up 2-to-1 Lead Over Governor for Senate Seat. By th« Associated Press. ATLANTA, September 10 —Sena torial hopes of Gov. Eugene Tal madge, New Deal critic, were buried today under an avalanche of ballots indorsing pro-Roosevelt Richard B. Russell, jr., for re-election. Russell, tenth Southern Democratic Senator to be renominated this year, made loyalty to the President the keynote of his successful fight for the six-year term in yesterday s party primary. The red-suspendered Governor, his gubernatorial "heir apparent” and a slate of half a dozen State House offi cers were swept out by popular ma jorities running up to two to one. Russell, lean, 38-year-old 6-foot bachelor, maintained his record of no defeats in a political career which sent him from the Governor’s chair to the Senate. It was the first political setback for the swarthy, cigar-chewing execu tive who has fought Roosevelt for nearly two years, often carrying his opposition to the radio and into Northern and Eastern cities. Vindication of New Deal. The junior Senator hailed the re turns as a vindication of the New Deal and a blow at "reaction" by the State that Roosevelt calls his “other home.” The President maintains a residence at Warm Springs. Talmadge received election news at Luc ^uucuiatuimi iiittlLSluil lie Will w cupy until next January, but when asked for a statement said: "Wait until full returns come in." E. D. Rivers, 40-year-old House Speaker and former Talmadge ally, kept pace with Russell in rolling up a wide lead over Senate President Charles D. Redwine—Talmadge’s gubernatorial choice—and Judge Blanton Fortson, another anti Talmadgeite. Democratic nomination is tanta mount to election in Georgia. Reports from each of the 159 coun ties, 53 of them complete, gave: For Senator: Russell 165,111 popular votes; 344 unit votes. Talmadge 86,203 popular votes, 66 unit votes. For Governor: Judge Blanton Fortson, 21,055 pop ular votes; 10 unit votes. Charles D. Redwine, the Talmadge candidate, 70,333 and 44. Rivers, 134,980 and 356. Under the county unit system the candidate polling a plurality of the county popular vote wins all the unit votes which are equal to twice that county’s representation In the State House of Representatives. A majority of these unit votes is necessary to nominate a Governor or Senator. Ten Representatives also were nom inated yesterday. Five incumbents were unopposed and the other five were leading in returns available early today. The New Deal and “Talmadgeism” Issues did not play a large part in these races, Repre sentatives and aspirants alike gener (See TALMADGE, Page A-4.) SAN DIEGO SHOW OVER SAN DIEGO, Calif., September 10 OP).—San Diego's biggest show drew 7,320,000 persons. At midnight, a bugler sounding "Taps” on the Palace of Pine Arts, rang down the curtain cm the 1911-6 Cali fornia Pacific International Ssposltlon. BIG SLASH FACED $18,000,000 Reduction in Estimates Held Necessary by Donovan. BY DON S. WARREN. At the outset of public hearings today on the proposed estimates of District departments for the next fis cal year, Budget Officer Daniel J. Donovan stressed the financial plight facing the District by showing that nearly >18,000,000 must be sliced from the estimates chargeable to general fund revenues if the budget was to be balanced. He showed further that unless the Federal payment to the Capital is raised above the >5,000,000 granted for this year, present operation costs will exceed by $1,877,000 the total ex pected general revenue fund for next year. "This would mean,” he said, “that instead of having even one dollar for Capital improvements, the District would have to raise nearly $2,000,000 more to cover operation costs.” Specter of Tax Increase. The statement definitely raised the specter of Increased taxes in the minds of those attending the hearing, since the Commissioners have indicated they believe many of the proposed increases in appropriations are needed. Early in the hearing a demand that estimates be slashed to "fit the cloth of expected revenues” was made by the Washington Taxpayers' Association. The group also urged the Commission ers to launch a determined drive for collection of personal property taxes, charging delinquency in present col lection efforts in this field. The association insisted direct re uer De halted summarily at the end of this fiscal year, charging use of money for relief was “wasteful,” and proposed the Police and Fire Depart ment retirement systems be placed on an actuarial basis In the interest of savings. Commissioner Hazen. who opened the hearing, which was broadcast over WJSV, voiced the reminder the Com missioners will not know for some time what recommendation as to the Federal payment will be made by the com mission named recently by President Roosevelt to study that problem. “Under the circumstances,” Hazen said, “this appears to be a case of re ducing the estimates. If we granted all the requests, there would have to be increased taxes.” Deficit Estimate Raised. Donovan's report showed he had found it necessary to raise his estimate of the deficit expected at the end of this year from $960,000 to $1,400,000, or by nearly $500,000. He had counted heavily on collection of delinquent taxes, but found progress during the past year forced a reduction in his calculations of such collections. The Taxpayers' Association, through its secretary, Rufus S. Lusk, took a slap at the office of Tax Collector Chatham M. Towers while demand ing economies in the hope of avoid ing increased taxes. “We suggest that the collector's of fice live up to its name,” he said. “At the present time, it is a little dif ferent from a receiving teller in a bank. It is a receiving office, not a collecting office. The average busi ness man doing a credit business would starve to death if he used our present methods of collecting over due personal taxes. “We have literally thousands of ac counts that are delinquent and little (See BUDGET, Page A-3.) FORMER FARM LEADER EXECUTED IN CHINA Feng Jui Convicted on Charge of Victimizing Growers of Sugar. By the Associated Press. HONO KONG, September 10.—Feng Jui, director of agriculture In the former Southern (Canton) Chinese government, was executed today after conviction on the charge of corruption. Feng, manager of the government sugar refineries, was charged with vic timizing farmers by forcing them to accept a paltry price for sugar he had induoed them to grow. Sugar is a government monopoly in China. It gras asserted he Imported sugar without paying the customs duties and repacked it to make it appear as a government' product. Feng earned a large amount of money, it was charged, from commis sions on govsAsment purchases of sugar mill mit^aery abroad. POLITICAL DEBATE BAN CUTS TALKS AT PON PARLEY Five U. S. Speakers Off Program After Ruling Is Read. CONSERVATION IS URGED FOR NATION’S RESOURCES Obligation of Government to Take Hand if Private Interests Fail Is Discussed. BY JOHN C. HENRY. Under a strict censorship against political discussions obviously aimed at American delegates, the Third World Power Conference today con fined itself entirely to problems of na tional planning and conservation of natural resources. The invocation against political con troversy was read to the session by Maj. Gen. Edward M. Markham, chief of engineers of the U. S. Army, who was presiding as chairman. Directly afterward, it was disclosed that five American speakers had withdrawn from the program % for the morning. Morris A. Cooke, Conference Execu tive Committee chairman and rural electrification chief, later issued a statement expressing deep regret over the controversy. Those who withdrew were E P. Scat tergood, chief electrical engineer and general manager of the Los Angeles Power and Light Bureau; Robert E. Hardwicke, oil engineer; J. E. Pew, vice president of the Sun Oil Co.; Edwin S. Hall, petroleum expert, and Fred A Eldean, independent delegate. Their action left only T. W. Nor cross, chief of the division of engineer ing, United States Forest Service, as representative of the United States during the discussions. Six other speakers appeared lor foreign coun Two Papers Heard. As a partial basis for the delibera tions, however, the conference had before it two papers from Stuart Chase, economist, and Walter S. Fin lay, jr., of the West Penn Electric Co., on the matter of conservation. Finlay, admitting the need of co-or dinated conservation, stressed the part which private interests have taken in the past Chase, however, emphasized the obligation of government to inter vene in preserving resources where private interests fail through lack of co-ordination. Most solemn warning on conserva tion necessity, however, was sounded by David Cushman Coyle, consulting engineer, who declared “a tangle of inconsistent rights and powers of sov ereign states" is hampering an essen tial task of the government. Limit to Expansion. “We cannot expand our destruction of forests and soil, coal and petroleum, without limit,” Coyle said. “Un less we mend our ways and stop living on our capital we shall not merely press against the limits of subsistence. We are threatened with a crisis in which essential materials will be exhausted and the population will have to be drastically reduced by war or starvation. Nature sets the terms, we must obey or suffer.” Commendation of the European policy of making the profit motive in utilities subordinate to public service was expressed last night by Frank R. McNinch, chairman of the Fed eral Power Commission, at a banquet at the Congressional Country Club of the International Executive Council and the International Commission on Large Dams. McNinch declared he had found rural electrification virtually 100 per cent complete In several European countries. America, he said, mu4t strive for a similar achievement. Big Banquet Tonight. The big banquet of the week is scheduled tonight, when all delegates to the sessions will dine in an impro vised banquet hall in the outer wait ing room of the Union Station. Speak ers of the evening will be Secretary of Interior Ickes and Owen D. Young, chairman of the board of the General Electric Co. A corps of 42 chefs is preparing a typical American meal of canteloupe, Philadelphia pepper pot, Maine sal mon, Virginia lamb and ice cream. Today’s session found many of the delegates still arguing with some heat (See POWER, Page A-2.) BONDS OVERSUBSCRIBED 13 TIMES, OFFICIAL SAYS By the Associated Press. Revising an earlier estimate, Secre tary Morgenthau reported today that a Treasury offering of $400,000,000 of 20.23 year 2% per cent bonds had been oversubscribed 13 times. Morgenthau told his press conference this was shown on the basis of almost completed tabulations. Asked whether this was a record oversubscription Morgenthau replied: "I think so—it is also my lucky num ber.” Readers9 Guide Page. After Dark-B-14 Amusements. B-18 Answers to Questions_A-10 Comics.. C-7 Cross-word Puzzle_C-7 Death Notices_A-12 Editorial_A-10 Finance _A-18 Lost and Found_A-3 News Comment Features .A-11 Radio.B-16 Serial Story_C-6 Short Story...._B-12 Society .. B-3 Sports. C-l-2-3 Washing^ Wayside.A-2 Women’a^eatures_C-4-5-6 (3S)/! -—' /I fcOMT CARJEV / HOW MUCH 1 ( OIM SAYS. 1 I HE GIVES ME \ A BREATHING/ \3?tL\Sy VmM

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler