26 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

26 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. -- <tJ. S. Weather Bureau Forecast.) __ Fair and wanner tonight; tomorrow The Only evening paper moetly cloudy and wanner; gentle to in Wnshincrtnn wlfh fhn moderate southeast and south winds; V* "fShihglOn With txie Monday showers. Temperatures—High- Associated PreSS NeWS «t. 67. at 4 p.m. yesterday; lowest, 47, at and Wirenhoto SprvifPQ 6:10 a.m. today. Full report on Page A-2. “uu irePHOLO oervices. Chmif Hew York Mukett, Ptfe 14 OroUiiM, 135,88*. mm,, _ __ dome returns not ret received.)_ No. 33,751. __Washington, d. c., Saturday, September 26, 1936—forty pages. *** ^ M..n. Abated p™ two cents. ^—————— mmmm ■ ——■ mmm ■' ■ - . i——A—— ■ i e MORGENTHAU PLEDGES 2 BILLIONS TO PROTECT POUND AND FRANC; SOVIET RAID ON STERLING HALTED Million Pounds Bought by Treasury. FACT FLEDGE IS FULFILLED Stabilizing Fund Is Ready, Says Secretary. ■y the Associated Press. In a sudden, swift move, Secretary Morgenthau today poured $5,000,000 Into the international exchange mar ket to block what he said was a Rus sian State Bank move to hammer down tha value of the British pound, and coon afterward pledged the entire $2, 000,000,000 stabilization fund to the maintenance of the British, French an/ American currencies. "'Morgenthau summoned reporters to his office to announce he had acted without delay to throw the Treasury’s $2,000,000,000 stabilization fund be hind the pound in line with a Fran co British-American agreement pledging the three nations to use "appropriate available resources’’ to prevent ex change disturbances in their cur rencies. Co-operation is Invited. The three nations invited the "co operation’’ of other nations in this policy, and Morgenthau said this Na tion “trusts that no country will at tempt to attain an unreasonable com petitive exchange advantage and thereby hamper the effort to restore more stable economic relations.” The agreement, announced last tilshf npnvMac fnr Havalnatinn nf tha franc in what Treasury officials de scribed as an important stride toward currency stabilization. In a formal statement today. Sec retary Hull said the move "should greatly strengthen the prospect of stability in international exchange re lationships” and "should result in further strengthening the basic con ditions of our domestic recovery.” Referring to what he called the Russian move to depress the pound, Morgenthau added: “I sincerely hope that this incident Will not be repeated.” Morgenthau spoke quietly, but in a tone of deep earnestness. He said he had been informed shortly after exchange dealings started in New York this morning that the Russian State Bank had ordered the ■ale of 1,000,000 pounds "at any price.” Price Drops 11 Cents. The effect of this was to drive down sterling from $5.02 to $4.91, the Treas ury chief said, at his first press con ference. He refused, however, to express an opinion on what Russia might have expected to gain from the move. At a second press conference a few minutes after the first, Morgenthau said he would go "to the limit” to maintain the stability of the French, British and American currencies. Asked what the limit was, Morgen thau replied "$2,000,000,000” — the amount of the stabilization fund. Morgen thau's action in buying ■kAttftsla aama inllrn Dual dent Roosevelt, but the Treasury chief did not say exactly what conversation he had with the Chief Executive. Asked whether the Russian move had dampened his hopes for the monetary understanding, which had been described as a "gentleman’s agreement,” Morgenthau replied: "As far as the gentlemen are con cerned we are still gentlemen.” Another interrogator sought to learn whether Morgenthau expected any more efforts to depress the pound or other currencies affected by the thsee-power agreement "If there are,” he replied, "we are ready.” Morganthau did not say at exactly what price he bought the pounds, but asserted that they were "bought at a price that gives the United States Government a handsome profit.” He said he received information about the Russian offer about 45 min utes after New York exchange deal ings started this morning and “gave < (See MORGENTHAU, Page A-7.) SAN ANGELO AGAIN MENACED BY FLOOD Horth Concho Hirer Higher at Water Valley Than Before $5,000,000 Damage. MS the Associated Press. SAN ANGELO, Tex., September 38.—High waters today again men aced this Central Western Texas city, In the midst of rehabilitation from a $5,000,000 inundation last week. Hie North Concho River ran bank full. At Water Valley a few miles northwestward, observers reported the stream six inches higher than September 17, when the city was flooded. Dannrtc fmm tha VfiHHIa pAnrhh ■aid the river beyond Mertson was the highest in Its history. Heavy rains have fallen for two days north of here between Sterling City in Forsan County and Garden City, observers said the Middle Con cho was a mile wide near the Bass Ranch. City officials mid they hoped, with Lake Nasworthy drained, to hold the crest of the Middle Concho until the main volume of water from the North Concho had passed. last week’s Concho floods, which spread over San Angelo’s business section, paralysed communication and left nearly 600 families homeless, rolled on down the Colorado leaving havoc In their wake. I ft •-;-< French Embargo Is Due Today Pending Parliament Session Assembly Called for Monday to Con sider Measures Rushed to Comple tion by Blum Cabinet, (Copyright. 1036. by the Associated Press.) PARIS, September 26.—Financially harassed France, allied with Great Britain and the United States in a “monetary equilibrium” program, look ed ahead today to a formal embargo on gold exports preliminary to pro posed devaluation of the franc. Members of Premier Leon Blum’s cabinet and the governing board of the Bank of France labored to prepare measures for submission to a special session of Parliament Monday. The proposed statutes, an official an nouncement declared, would reduce “approximately one-third” the franc's gold content. Paul Reynaud, leader of the French devaluationists, predicted the new , monetary policy would succeed "if j conducted with due regard to the ex perience of other countries." If not, he declared, it would mark "the beginning of our downfall.” "This is our last chance,” he said. "We cannot afford to bungle It.” He termed the new policy "delicate because it is tardy.” adding that France had lost 30,000,000,000 francs in gold since he urged devaluation two and a half years ago. The Bourse—stock market—was closed "for several days” as details of the suggested monetary revision were worked out. Informed quarters ex pected the gold embargo, which must bear approval of the governor of the Bank of France, would be proclaimed (See FRANC. Page A-7.) French Moves On Franc End Long Struggle Refused to Yield to Devaluation Pleas. tsy the Auoclmted Press. France's move to devalue the franc marks the end of one of the most remarkable “last ditch” stands in modern economic history. For several years she suffered the severest kind of deflation—falling prices, wages, etc.—accompanied by mounting political unrest. But while other countries, includ ing the United States, yielded and revalued their currency In an effort to halt deflation and give a flll-up to their internal economy and their international trade, France, which had had bitter experiences in the past with money which decreased in value, doggedly refused. Now, under the stress and strain, France at last has yielded. Her gov ernment leaders tacitly have acknowl edged that under present conditions the franc is worth more than it should be. Francs at present are “dear’* in terms of other currencies. Here’s why: When an American sends his dol lars to France to buy its products they are, in effect, converted into francs. At present he can get about 15.3 francs for one dollar. In some other countries a dollar will buy the equiv alent of more than 15.2 francs. Other factors—such as tariffs and quota limitations—being equal, the purchaser will send his dollar to the country where it will have the greatest Durchnsintr newer Thus, the international bargain hunter might find that by sending his dollar to France he could buy 3 yards of ribbon, but that in another country he could get 5 yards. When France devalues it means she is reducing the amount of gold which each franc represents. This makes one unit of gold worth more francs, and, if the relationship of the dollar to gold remains unchanged one dollar also is worth more francs. The American, then, finds that his dollar may buy more French products than before—that he may get 5 yards of ribbon for a dollar Instead of the former 3. This tends to put France in a posi tion to compete for American pur chases. Conversely, however, devaluation may have American products cast the | French more because more francs are ! required to purchase one American dollar. The trade situation created by de valuation might be only temporary, (See DEVALUATION, Page A-7.) RACKETEER MURDERED Vengeance Motive Seen in New York Axe Killing. NEW YORK, September 36 VP).— Savagely backed with an axe or meat cleaver, head all but severed from the body, Thomas Kirins, club-footed petty racketeer, was found dead in an alley today back of the New York Central freight yards. "This Is no racket killing,” Deputy Chief Inspector Francis J. Hear said. “It definitely looks like a vengeance case.” TOTAKEWARPOST New Secretary Pledges “Adequate National De fense for Peace.” Bt the Assocltied Press. Pledged to “an adequate national defense in the interest of peace," Harry H. Woodring, a World War vet eran, prepared today to take office as Secretary of War. Still In his 40s, the Kansan takes command of the Nation's land de fenses at a time when military officials are expending one of the largest peace-time appropriations in history. President Roosevelt announced the temporary elevation of the Acting Secretary to full power over the Na tion’s war machine at the Hyde Park, N. Y., Summer White House last night. Woodring succeeds George H. Dem of Utah, who died late last month. Whether Woodring, former Gover nor of Kansas, will be given the poet permanently or whether a new Secre tary of War will be named later was not revealed. Acting Head Many Months. Woodring had served as acting head of the War Department for many months while Dem was too ill to work. Expressing gratitude for the Presi dent’s “confidence," Woodring an nounced he would seek to carry out the policies of Dem. “If I may do anything to further found an adequate national defense In the Interest of peace for our Na tion, I shall feel repaid for every effort,” he said. A banker, Woodring retired from active business in 1928. His first political venture took him Into the (aee wooukimo, rage A-7.) OPERATION GIVES BABY A CHANCE FOR LIFE Surgeon Opens Passage Prom Stomach to Small Intestines to Complete Digestive Process. By the Associated Press. FINDLAY, Ohio, September 26.— An 8-week-old-boy, Bobby Howard McLeod, fought against the danger of infection today as he convalesced from the effects of an unusual operation which opened the way for food to pass from hla stomach to his small intes tine and enable him to complete di gestive processes. His father, Howard W. McLeod, said the boy at best had but an even chance to live, and added that he would summon another physician. Dr. E. E. Rakestraw, to aid the surgeon who perfonrid the operation in the battle against the threat of Infection. Dr. John Hugh Marshall, the sur geon, said that Bobby was bom with pyloris stenosis. The small intestine at the point of junction with the stom ach was only as large as a lead pencil. Dr. Marshall said a muscle in the lower end of the stomach was too thick to permit a “valve” between the stomach and intestine to function. In the operation he weakened the muscle to relieve the condition and permit free passage of food into the Intestines to be digested further and absorbed in the Mood stream. Virginia Court Convicts Man As “Runner” for Attorney aj toe Associated press. LYNCHBURG, V»„ September 36.— Judge Joseph P. McCarron In Muni cipal Court yesterday convicted H. H. Hudson of Amherst of violating a Vir ginia statute that makes it a mis demeanor for one to solicit business for an attorney. Punishment was fixed at 30 days in Jail and a fine of 6100, from which Hudson noted an appeal to Corpora tion Court Hudson was accused of trying to Induce one or more persons to retain Louis N. JafTe, a Brooklyn, N. Y, at torney, as counsel to bring suit against the Chesapeake 6t Ohio Railroad, the “prospects” having been Injured while employed by the railroad last Spring. The State statute, written on the books in 1933, is popularly known as the "runner and capper” act—the violator running after business for k anotner attorney ana men capping it with a contract for the attorney. The State's witnesses charged that Hudson, who is suing the Southern Railway for $50,000 in a New York Federal court, approached A. W. Fer guson , who was injured in a C. ft. O. Railway mishap, and urged that he employ Jaffe. A warrant is out for Jaffe’s arrest, charging Mm with aiding and abet ting Hudson in violation of the Vir ginia statute. The paper has not been served on Jaffe, according to William T. Spenoer, Jr, common wealth attorney, who prosecuted Hud son, assisted by Paul Whitehead. Whitehead waa one of a committee of three appointed by the Lynchburg Bar Association to assist with the prosecution. A large number of Lynchburg attorneys followed the pro ceeding* Gold Bloc Dies in France’s Devaluing. SWISS FOLLOW PARIS ACTION Holland Unmoved. Belgium Backs French Step. m the Associated Press. Leading world foreign exchange center* were at a standstill today as the French government prepared to submit a plan to an extraordinary session of Parliament Monday to cut the value of her currency by approx imately one-quarter to one-third. Securities prices in the New York Stock Exchange—the major world I market ODen—trended unward how. I ever, u Wall Street experts hailed the French move as constructive and London bankers looked for revival of world trade. In Amsterdam the stock exchange was quiet, with Amer ican Issues In demand. The decision to devalue the franc appeared virtually to have ended the European gold bloc, that group of | nations maintaining currencies at 1 pre-depression levels, but The Neth erlands authorities Indicated that they would continue to maintain the parity of their currency. Swiss Parliament Called. In Switzerland, third member of the gold bloc, however. Parliament was summoned to convene at the same time the French Chamber meets to bring the Swiss franc Into line with the devalued French franc. The French government proposed a plan of devaluation similar to that adopted by the United States three years ago, Involving seizure of all gold In the country at Its present value and establishment of a stabil ization fund. The devaluation plan Immediately provoked some opposition from both Right and Left political circles In France, and world financial centers speculated as to how Premier Blum’s Popular Front government would withstand the impact of its dramatic move when the French Chamber as sembles. In Washington and London, the American and British treasuries had arranged In kdvance to co-operate with France to restore world equilib rium. Secretary Morgenthau enthu siastically welcomed the move, honlne It would "establish more solid founds- < tions for the stability of International economic relations.’’ Reich Scans Developments. In Berlin, the Reich authorities 1 watched closely the development of the French-Brltlah-American co-oper ative movement to bring the French currency into line with the dollar and pound, but failed to Indicate what steps they would take. The German currency hu been off the free gold standard and under rigid control for some time. In Rome, opinion was divided, but some experts thought the lira would be devalued along with the French currency. Belgium, which has already de valued Its currency by 28 per cent. In a note to France, England and Amer ica gave its full approval of the plan. (See EXCHANGES, Page A-7.) YOUTH ADMITS SLAYING — Mingled With Crowd at Scene After Shooting, Police Told. CHICAGO, September 26 (JP).—Au- ; thoritles today said they elicited a con fesslon from Frank Tallach, 17, that ' he and a companion shot and killed ' Martin DamamsHs at the rear of his 1 borne ft week ftgo, and after wounding another man nturned to the scene of ’ the slaying to watch the crowds that * gathered. ‘ State’s Attorney John J. Phillips ; and Polioe Capt. John Egan said Tal- -

lach confessed early today after being 1 returned from Bannister, Mich. They said they were seeking William Mil- ( ler, IS, whom Tallach said was his 3 companion. 3 Tallach confessed, Capt. Egan said, * that he and his companion were in terrupted by Damamskls when they 3 were breaking into a small house at 1 the rear of Damamskls’ home. Later, according to the purported ' confession, the pair encountered Louis 1 Rollanec, 50, and shot him during a 1 scuffle. Tallach vh seised while 1 picking corn on the farm of his aunt, 1 Mrs. Anna Konacek. • MOTHERS KILLED AS CAR HITS POLE ’ark Policeman Raspberry Thrown From Motor Cycle and Badly Injured. Two brother*—Ralph Edwards, 26, if 1100 Eighth street and Maurice Edwards. 28, of Hyattsvllle, Md.— *cic muiuy uijurcu uigiu wucu heir automobile crashed into a tele ihone pole at Thirtieth street and Queen’s Chapel road in nearby Mount ialnier, Md. In another accident Park Policeman derrill K. Raspberry, 35, of Arling on, Va., was critically hurt when hrown from his motor cycle over an imbankment at Thirty-second street md Normanstone drive. The victim, rho had previously escorted Miss jells Peoples, queen of the President’s hip Regatta, to her home, suffered a ractured skull. Emergency Hospital ihysicians reported his condition as serious." Investigating the cause of the crash Fhlch took the Uvea of the Edwards »lr, Prince Georges County police oday were seeking witnesses to the iccident. The men were driving out tueen’s Chapel road toward the BeUe ■iew Dairy Farm, where Maurice is mployed, when the car struck the »le. The automobile was demolished md the pole partially dislodged. Both Die at Hospital. The bodies were to be transferred o the District Morgue this morning tending an inquest by Maryland au horities. An emergency operation for imputation of Maurice’s right arm ras performed at Casualty Hospital everal hours before bis death at 1:28 a.m. Ralph Edwards, a lather, uccumbed to bead and chest injuries X 12:40 am. Police had not de ermined this morning which man was [riving. Policeman Raspberry was one of our assigned to accompany Miss *eoples, daughter of Rear Admiral X J. Peoples, U. S. N., director of irocurement, Treasury Department, to ier home at 3420 Garfield street, rhe accident occurred as the victim’s nachlne skidded into the side of a ootor cycle operated by Officer E. S. dast. Catapulted over the embank nent. Raspberry struck his head as te fell. Vaughn B. Connelly of 54 independence avenue southwest, a tasslng motorist, took him to the lOspitaL Three women passengers were in ured today when a Capital Transit 3o. bus crashed into three parked an after a collision with another Lutomobile at Vermont avenue and Eleventh street. The injured—Bernice Clark, 25, of 31 Emerson street; Mrs. Edith Carri on 30, of 3511 Thirteenth street, and laris Briscoe, 26, of 829 Quincy street -were taken to Emergency Hospital, rheir condition was termed “not seri ns.’' Second precinct police said the bus, perated by John N. Freeman 29, of 316 Corbin place northeast, was struck y an automobile operated by Alonso 3ark. 29.2039 New Hampshire avenue. Two other persons were injured in raffle mishaps on District streets esterday. Eleven-year-old Calvin Shepherd, 427 Eighteenth street, suffered in jur is to the scalp, back and chest when truck by an automobile while riding tls bicycle In the 1700 block of Colum 4a road. He was taken to Garfield [capital. Physicians reported his con ltion as “undetermined.” The auto aobile, police said, was driven by Ray dwell, 605 Fifty-sixth street north - ast. James Murphy, 46, of 503 First treet, was treated* at Casualty Hos ital for a cut hand and bruised hip Her be was reported to have walked ito the side of a street car at Fifth nd G streets. ILM DANCE DIRECTOR IS FREED OF MURDER ly tas esaodatM Ptms, LOS ANOELXS. September 56.— tusby Berkeley, film dance director, ad a dean slate today, freed of the eeond degree murder charges which ;ung over him for nearly a year. A Superior. Court jury In his third rial acquitted him last night after ^liberations of an hour and a half. Berkeley was accused of murder for reclpitating a three-car collision the light of September 8, 1835, in which TiUlam Von Brieson, lfrs. Ada Von Meson and Dorothea Daley lost their >TSS- Two previous juries disagreed. Berkeley wept when the verdict was cad. * Fortune Tellers Advise Lovers Be Calm During 1937 By the Associated Press. TRENTON, N. J, September 26.—An advance Up to lovers was offered today by the National Association of Fortune Tellers, which will combine all its mem bers tomorrow for a complete forecast of 1937 at Its first an nual convention. "We already know that 1937 is devastating to lovers," said Miss Helen A. Perota, “Gypsy Lee,” president. “We can advise lovers now not to be too ex cited." TO SEEK PARLEY Chairman Murray Calls Meeting for Report on Organizing Move. By the Associated Press. PITTSBURGH, September 26 — Philip Murray, chairman of the Steel Workers’ Organizing Committee, an nounced today that "within a rea sonable length of time” he expected to demand a conference with steel operators for the formulation of a wage agreement, "or agreements.” Murray, who is a vice president of the United Mine Workers, called a meeting of the full organising com mittee for next Tuesday to report on the progress of the three montlis’ campaign to organize the steel in dustry’s 450,000 wage earners Into one union. Conference With Operators. He said: "We will discuss also this question of a conference with the operators. “I feel that If the steel workers organising committee decided to change its policy with respect to the organising campaign of steel workers that within a comparatively short time they could build up a situation, nu merically speaking, to close the entire industry down.” Murray asserted the committee’s policy, however, had been dedicated to building up a permanent structure “without resorting to strike threats.” Joint Conference Aim. “But we do believe that within a reasonable length of time,” he added, “operating under our present policy, are will have secured a sufficient num ber of members to warrant a demand for a joint conference for the pur Dose of negotiating a ware agreement or agreements. “Responsibility for failure to thin meet with us will lay squarely upon the shoulders of the operators.” The Iron and Steel institute, whose membership Includes more than 95 per cent of the industry’s operators, announced soon after the opening of the organisation drive that It would bend Its "every resource” to keep "open shops.” SARAZEN TAKES TITLE MELBOURNE, Australia, Septem ber 26 UP).—Gene Saraaen, veteran stocky American sharpshooter, cap tured the Australian open golf cham pionship today with a 72-bole aggre gate of 282. IN CH CLASS Jersey Man, Champion, Takes Honors in Sailing Race—D. C. Boat Second. BT J. A. FOX. Scoring his third successive victory in two days, Alton O’Brien of Perth Amboy, N. J, national champion, to day won undisputed honors in the comet class with his Aqulla as the sailing races, preliminary to the Pres ident's Cup race, were ending off Hains Point. De Verner Smythe, Washington champion, was second with his Sassy, and Adolph Grant, also of Perth Am boy, third in the Red Don. As in the two five-mile brushes, which opened the card yesterday, Sassy and Red Don were closest to Aqulla at the finish, with the rest of the field trailing. Total point scores for the three races determine the winners of the trophies which The Star is awarding for the nine classes of sailing boats on the program. In the 20-foot open race, the first event to finish, Dick Hartge of Gales vllle, Md., skipper of the Challenger, was the winner. The victory culmi nated three years’ effort on Hartge's part to trim the Vanitie, sailed by Osborne Owings of ■Washington. Vanitie won the first race yesterday morning, but turned over in the aft ernoon and Challenger sailed home first. When they hooked up again this morning, Challenger had ap proximately a four-minute advantage. Vanitie, however, had speed hon ors for the bout, her time of 59:13 for the first five miles yesterday be ing the fastest recorded. Lady Avon, sailed by Judge P. E. Edrington of Washington, was third in the opens. The snipe class saw another triple victory, the Muriel, sailed by Pete Carlson of Sea Cliff, N. Y„ scoring again today. Snipes and moths are only sailing 2^-mile races. Power Craft Limber Up. While the sail boats were fighting it out, the power craft which are swing ing into action this afternoon were limbering up on the upper end of the course. The brisk north wind of yes terday had given way to lighter breeses, and while the Potomac was choppy, the engine-craft were ex periencing no trouble. Indications were a large crowd would be on hand, as spectators began to line the course early. Attention, naturally, centered on the itrumc wic tiwi dent’* Cup, but the struggle prom ised there with a field of nine crack entries, did not overshadow the sup porting card, ranging from the sput tering lnboards to the roaring "225” hydroplanes. Sailing Race Finals. With the principal scene given over this morning to the finals of the sail ing races for The Star trophies, the power boats were edging into the pic ture with a series of mile trials. The first group of power boats—the (See REGATTA, Page A-2.) Brazilians Awed by Horse God’s Death as Prophet Is Hunted By tbe Associated Press. FORTALEZA, Brazil, September 36. —Dread and consternation stalked to la? through the straw-topped huts of Caldelrao, blown by Brasil's hot north eastern breeaes Trancellm, the hone god. Is dead. Shaggy-haired Lourenco, Its holy prophet, Is hunted by the police. In a stockaded clearing on a wooded bill, half completed, stands the gleam ing white church that Lourenco made Urn awed people of Caldelrao build. Here is the eerie story of Trancelim, »f Lourenco, of Caldelrao: Two thousand souls abide there. In perhaps 400 straw-thatched hovels. All knelt to Trancelim; all obeyed Lourenco. “He made them work in the fields all day," said an officer of tbe arid State of Ceara. “He had them dam up a nearby enek and irrigate the fields, M “On Sundays he put them to wore building a white church on a hill, the church that’s not yet finished.” political bosses of the vicinity began to fear Lourenco’s sway. Some courted his favor. Others plotted his ruin. Came a twilight, a prayer meet ing in a sloping field in Caldeirao. When hundreds of fanatics were arrested and quiet, their weird leader had vanished in the shadowy slopes. He had not even taken Trancelim along. One of the officers mounted the holy horse. There was a new tumult. “Trancelim will kick you to death for touching him!” screamed one of the worshipers. But Trancelim was led away, under heavy guard. Sullenly, he refused fodder and water. Quickly he wasted away. Now he is dead, and fear walks through Caldeirao. I ANARCHISTS SEEK TO KILL HOSTAGES AS REBELS BOMB BILBAO FROM AIR Heavy Fighting Near Toledo. Reports to Lisbon Say City Already Has Fallen to Insurgents. LAST OF LOYALISTS’ NORTHERN CITIES HIT. Shrieking Mobs Surge Through the Streets, Killing Fascists. Basque Leaders Seek to Curb Stricken Populace Aroused by Attacks. BACKGROUND— Last few weeks of Spanish civil war have been marked by undis puted gains by rebel forces. Tri umphant in the important northern border section, near French ports, the insurgents have spent the last week consolidating forces for push on Bilbao, last important city un taken. Meanwhile, in the central part of country fighting has been fierce around Madrid, with Commu nist-Socialist defenders of present regime hard hit trying to defend the capital city from, consistent at tacks by the Fascist rebels. BULLETIN. (Copyright. 1936, by the Associated Press.) MADRID, 2:35 pin., September 20—(Delayed by Censor).—The government announced today it had started a determined attack by several batteries of artillery and a squadron of bombing planes on the Insurgent armies at the thres hold of Toledo. (Copyright. 1936, br the Associated Prats.) BILBAO, Spain, September 26 (by warship to Saint Jean de Luz, France). —Three Insurgent airplanes rained bombs into this chaotic city today aa vengeful anarchists sought to kill in (urgent sympathisers held as hostages. The new aerial attack brought fresh loss of life and property damage to the panic-stricken city. Victims of the explosions included one foreigner and a year-old French girl. The bombing planet dropped leaf lets warning the deadly hail would continue until the city surrendered. The froft ultimatum brought defiant replies from Socialist commanders, who reaffirmed their Intention to hold out to the last man. Anarchists Seek Hostages. Basque Nationalists labored to main tain order aa the frenzied anarchists fought to kill 3,900 Insurgent prisoners in retaliation for the Fascist bom bardment yesterday which killed and injured hundreds of persons. The Basques, striving to maintain their control of this Bay of Biscay port, toward which the rebels are driv ing with hammerlike blows from the east, feared they might be unable to restrain the panic-stricken populace. Shrieking mobs, surging through Bilbao’s streets last night, killed 60 Fascist hostages and forced Elladon de la Tore, Basque Nationalist chief, to promise them the satisfaction they demanded. While firemen fought to bring order out of the chaos and curb the fires ignited by the roaring two-hour bom bardment of eight tri-motored Fascist planes, citizens of Bilbao burrowed into deep cellars to escape the assault expected to be renewed today. Basque leaders considered attempt* tag to lock up as many of their Anar* ctalst and Communist comrades as they could corral, but feared their action would set off the spark which might destroy the city, just as maddened Anarchists, facing defeat, sacked Irun (See SPAIN, Page A-3.) COOL SPELL BREAK FORECAST TODAY Fair and Wanner Today and To night to Be Followed hy Cloudy Weather. Considerably higher temperatures today were expected to bring a “break” in the current cool spell which has kept the mercury several degrees be low normal during the last 48 hours. The Weather Bureau forecast fair and wanner for today and tonight. Tomorrow is expected to be cloudy and warmer. Monday may bring showers. A mass of cool air from Polar re gions sent the mercury to a “low” of 47 degrees at 7 a.m. today. This mark, the forecaster said, was not a record breaker, but was “unusually low" for this time of the year. A 47-degree mark was recorded September 24 last year. The temperature stood at 63 at II a.m., only four degrees lower than yes terday’s high mark, which was not reached until 4 p.m. Temperatures considerably lower than the bureau’s official low mark were reported in outlying sections of the city. ARRESTS IN HAVANA HAVANA, September 36 VP).—Na tional police arrested five men today In connection with the dynamiting of the plant of the newspaper El Pals which killed five persons last Sunday. The arrests, made In La vl bora, a suburb of Havana, were said by per sona close to police to bring the case near solution. Edwin Markham Stricken. NEW YORK. September 36 CP).— Edwin Markham, 84-year-old poet and author of “The Man with the Hoe," recently suffered sn apoplectic stroke. It was disclosed at his Staten island boins last night, whera he was said to be recovering satiafactorUjr. /It’s oniV\_ /Till AFTER. ) V THE ELECTION ( V--^ THAT TUGWELLIAN ALARM CLOCK! _ Readers? Guide Page. 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