27 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

27 Eylül 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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WEATHER. - (V. 8. Weather Bureau Forecast.) Increasing cloudiness and warmer; to- MPull A^SOfMataH Proco morrow showers, followed by cooler to- fll ° fr®SS morrow night. Temperatures—Highest, B I iNeWS and WirephOtOS 71. at 3:30 p.m. yesterday; lowest, 47, at Sunday Morning and 6:30 a.m. yesterday. 6 fuii report on page A-8. ^very Afternoon. t**> Means Associated Praaa. ' No. 1,645—No. 33,752. gTSS «S1S?S.“"S WASHINGTON, D. C, SUNDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 27, 1936-112 PAGES. * FIVE CENTS TEN CENTS ■ • ■ ■■■■ — ■ ■ —a———a—dNa a————a——— ^———— _ 7 fXJ W A dUTWmVMt FTTfmrmn • U. S. BILLIONS PROTECT STERLING AND FRANC AS DUTCH ACT TO DEVALUE Death Knell of Gold Bloc Is Sounded. SWISS JOIN PARIS MOVE n • n • i soviet itaict upon Pound Repulsed by Treasury. BACKGROUND— Five years of stubborn resistance by a little group of European na tions to the growing movement for lowert valuation of currencies in terms of gold ended yesterday when Switzerland and Holland decided to follow the action o/ the French government in devaluing the franc. Dwindling international trade flu/? m/'r/'/i w'tin 1 -t traceable in part to the refusal of some nations to desert the gold standard in order to revalue with international stabilization, have marked the career of the European "gold bloc.” Great Britain, which left the gold standard in 1931, and the United States, which did so in 1934, have agitated intermittently for the past two years for stabilization after revaluation of the "gold bloc" currencies. The might of the United States Treasury’s $2,000,000,000 stabilization fund was thrown into the foreign ex change markets yesterday to protect the pound, franc and dollar as Swit nciiauu anu utc iicureuauuc ouunuru the death knell of the European ‘'gold bloc” by following the French decision j to devalue the franc, perhaps by as much as one-third. The government of the Netherlands, which with France and Switzerland clung to the gold standard after other major powers had quit it, announced last night it could no longer maintain its ‘'present monetary policy,” the Associated Press reported. The decisions of France and Swit aerland to devalue their monetary units caused a change in the Dutch government'sv position, an official statement said. Earlier the govern ment had announced the Netherlands would not change its monetary policy despite the French action. Gold Embargoed Today. The Bank of the Netherlands and the government reached an agree ment for an embargo on exportation! of gold, effective today, it was an-1 nounced after a cabinet meeting. Stock exchanges will be closed to morrow and Tuesday. The official declaration said: “The government has reconsidered its monetary policy following meas ures taken by France and Switzerland. “Be’ng the only country on the gold standard the Netherlands feels the | highest pressure on the exchange and the geld reserve. "Consequently its considers it im possible to maintain its present mone tary policy.” Switzerland had joined France earlier in her move to devalue the franc. The Swiss Federal Council, after first voting to maintain the gold standard, announced that the government would convoke Parliament tomorrow to ap prove a new alignment of the Swiss franc. Alignment Forced. An official government communique (aid: “After taking cognizance of the ac won oi me government oi me irencn republic in devaluating the French franc about 30 per cent, the Federal Council considers itself forced, in the interest of national economy, to an alignment of Swiss moneys.” The council said it would detail the reasons for its action later. Serving blunt notice the United States would “go the limit” to protect its monetary agreement with Britain and France, Secretary Morgenthau swung into action America’s huge sta bilization fund to block what he said was a Russian effort to depress the British pound. His action constituted the first pub lic move to enforce the “gentlemen's” agreement announced Friday night by France, Great Britain and the United States looking toward stabilization of their currencies. Informed that Russia had ordered the sale early yesterday of 1,000.000 pounds of sterling “at any price.” Mor genthau told a special press conference he “immediately” countered with an order to buy, using $5,000,000 from the stabilization fund. aii jwuoluw ouvirt uujcitua utruieu ifcLSl I night, however, that Russia had un loaded English pounds with the idea of breaking down their value, according to the Associated Press. One explanation of Russia's action In selling pounds was that it was done (See GOLD, Page A-4.) BODIES RECOVERED Two Men Were Lost Off Ship In Hurricane. PAINTER, Va., September 26 (^1.— Bodies of two men missing from the ship Long Island, lost during the hur ricane, were found by Coast Guards men today. xne Doay oi rTea omiin. coiorea, was discovered about 2 p.ra., two miles south of the Indian River Inlet Sta tion, Del., while that of Turrell Free man, also colored, was found a few hours earlier, three-eighths of a mile south of Cape Henlopen Station, Del. The bodies, reported badly decom posed, were Identified by John A. Hayes, an official of the Consolidated Fisheries, of Lewes, Del., owners of the ship. k I c - French Prepare to Crack Down Speedily If Disorder Occurs Extra Precautions Taken Throughout Nation to Prevent Street Disturbances. Deputies Meet Tomorrow. iwupyiiBin, ioou, uj tuc aoouvintcu ritaa.j PARIS, September 26.—The French government tonight prepared to "crack down” at the first signs of public dis order growing out of the plan to de value the franc. Plans for extra precautions against any street disturbances throughout the nation were drawn by Minister of Defense Edouard Daladier and Min ister of Interior Roger Salengro dur ing a night conference with police ex ecutives. Salengro messaged all prefects in France and Algeria that disturbances would be "intolerable” at the present time and ordering them to make "ex emplary arrests” if necessary. Majority Seen for Blum. The concensus of French Parliament members, hastily assembling tonight, was that Premier Leon Blum would muster a majority Monday sufficient to insure passage of monetary meas ures devaluating the franc. Advocates of devaluation were en couraged by announcements of Bel gian support ana tne swiss reaerai Council's declaration that the Swiss franc would be devalued immediately, in accordance with the French ac tion. The Socialist premier himself made public assurances that measures would be enacted immediately to protect the purchasing power of the consumer against a cheapened currency. To wage earners, fearful that a monetary reform would cause a quick jump in prices, Blum said his finan cial program was based primarily on Improvement of the average man's lot. The standard of living for the av erage French family, devaluationists asserted, would be benefited by: 1. Stoppage of gold reserve exports. S. Increase of money in circulation. 3. Stimulation of business by an expanded French share in world trade. Aid to Peace Envisaged. Premier Blum declared that the French financial program would aid (See PARIS, Page A-4.) MOM FIRM TAX ESCAPE REPORTED $43,000,000 Van Swerin gen Deal Loss Held Offset to 1935 Profit. by the Associated Press. ST. LOUIS, September 26.—The Post-Dispatch, in a copyright storj from New York, said tonight "partner! in the banking firm of J. P. Morgan & Co. paid virtually no income tax tc the Federal Government on the profit! of that international banking firm foi the year 1935.” Quoting only an anonymous “authoritative source." the newspanei said, "The transaction by which the Morgan firm wiped out 1035 profit! attracted wide attention at the time it was made (a year ago). It wai the sale at public auction of the stocks and bonds posted as collateral for a loan, said to have been $48,000,000 made to the Van Sweringen brothers by a group of New York bankers headed by the Morgan firm. * * • Loss Put at $43,000,000. "It was held in the auction rooms of Adrian H. Muller & Sons. 18 Vesey street, * * * famous as a 'security graveyard.’ The total realized by the auction was $4,703,000, which left the banking syndicate with a loss re ported at the time to be $43,000,000 "In taking such a large loss through the public sale of depreciated collat eral, the Morgan firm was able, foi income tax purposes, to erase almost all of the profit that had been shown in that ”«ar.’’ The newspaper reported "for s number of weeks experts of the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee which is conducting a special inquiry into railroad finance, have been in vestigating the transaction by which the Morgan firm rubbed out its prof its. • • » Public hearings, which are expected to dwell at length on the affair of Morgan & Co., will begin, it is reporreu nere, soon Hirer uie presidential election In November.” Control Proof Sought. The story asserted the Senate com mittee's investigators were seeking to prove the Morgan firm "did not ac tually relinquish control, but kept strings tied to” the collateral which carried with them domination of the Van Sweringen railroad empire ol 28,000 miles—“a system equaled only by the government-owned network in Russia.” Prom “sources close to the Morgan firm,” the newspaper said, it had learned "every precaution was taken to make the deal, legally, just what it seemed to be—an open-and-shut sale at public auction.” F. A. O. Schwartz acted for the Morgan bank and other creditors at the sale, the story continued. L. P. Ayres acted for the Van Sweringens, and the stocks were sold to him. Financial backers who made it pos sible for the Van Sweringens to regain control of their railroads were identi fied by the newspaper as G. A. Ball, a Muncie, Ind., manufacturer, and G. R. Tomlinson, Cleveland ship owner. I OHIO PARTIES FACE BITTER STRUGGLE State Real Battleground, With Roosevelt Leading Newspaper Polls. BY G. GOULD LINCOLN, Staff Correspondent ol The Star. COLUMBUS. Ohio, September 26 — Ohio today is a real battleground in the presidential campaign. The New Dealers are counting on the labor vote, the relief vote and the Negro vote to swing the State for Roosevelt. The Republicans look to the farmers and the rural communities, the busi nessmen all over the State, to the professional men, and to the women, in their effort to carry Ohio for Lan don and back into the G. O. P. column. Newspaper polls, which have been underway in various parts of the State for several weeks give Roosevelt , me ieaa. ine.se pous, nowever, re flect for the most part sentiment in | the cities and among industrial work | ers and those on relief. The sentiment of the great rural and farming popu lation of the State is not yet fully | indicated. It is on that vote the Re ! publicans are basing their hopes. | In addition, the Republicans point out, there is an underlying tradition of Republicanism in Ohio. There is a saying here that Ohio is frequently Democratic in September, but Repub lican in November. Republicans Frightened. There is no denying the fact that the newspaper polls, among them those conducted by the Columbus Dispatch and by the Scripps-Howard news papers. have thrown a scare into the Republicans. For example, the Dis patch poll, which has proved itself very accurate in past elections, showed today 9,621 votes for Roosevelt. 8,044 for Landon and 863 for Lemke, the TTninn nartr candidate On a Der centage basis this poll gives Roosevelt 51.8 per cent, Landon 43.3 per cent and Lemke 4.7 per cent. The Scripps Howard poll gives Roosevelt an even greater lead, with 21,412 votes to 14.646 for Landon and 3,095 for Lemke. It may be mentioned in pass ing that the Dispatch is supporting Landon and the Scripps-Howard pa pers are supporting Roosevelt. Against these pro-Roosevelt straw votes the Republicans lay the latest Literary Digest latest Ohio poll, which (See OHIO, Page A-5.) BOMBING SUSPECT HELD Havana Police Trace Attack on Newspaper Plant. HAVANA. September 26 </P).— Police tonight arrested Guillermo Ara for questioning in connection with bombing of the newspaper El Pais last Sunday. Ara also Is wanted, police said. In connection with recent kidnapings and alleged terrorist activities. He was found early today in a house in the Vedado section, sur rounded by bodyguards. -- How They Stand Today Possible Division of the States’ Electoral Votes, Based on The Star’s Political Correspondence. Sure ' Leaning Total / Landon 49 106 155 f Roosevelt 150 56 206 \ 1 'u Majority necessary for election-_-- 266 rri . r ..4 o-,*. I Sure | Leaning Total ) _ . , Landon 49 118 167 ( Doubtful Roosevelt 146 73 219 j 145 The Star today presents its second weekly summary of the possible standing (in electoral votes) of the Democratic and Republican party candidates, as estimated by its political correspondents in the 48 States. This standing will be changed as political sentiment crystallizes in the States. For full details in explanation of this table, for the line-up of the States and for political news of the week turn to Part 2, Page D-3, Edi torial Section of today’s Star. I MADRID WARSHIPS SPEED TO BREAK REBEE BLOCKADE Rush to Biscay Ports as Fighting in North Grows Fiercer. FIRST NAVAL BATTLE OF CIVIL WAR LOOMS Insurgents Set for Zero Hour of Attack on Toledo—Government Set for Encounter. BACKGROUND— The current rebellion in Spain began in mid-July with an insur rection among troops in Spanish Morocco. Force of revolt was not felt for week or more, then it spread to mainland and became raging conflagration. For first Jew weeks progress was uncertain with victories for Fascist rebels and Communist Loyalists appearing about equal. Then tn August rebels started making unmistakable gains. The important northern ports Jell and the entire southern coastal area. In recent weeks the rebels have been consolidating their forces for complete occupation of the Biscay ports and a final push on Madrid, the capital and Loyalist stronghold. When that city is taken success of the rebellion no longer will be in doubt. (Copyright, 1B3H. by the Associated Press t BILBAO, Spain, September 27 (Sun day).—The first naval battle of the Spanish civil war appeared imminent today as five government warships were reported steaming under full speed to northern ports blockaded by Fascist vessels. Naval authorities In this besieged city—bombarded by Fascist airplanes all day yesterday for the second time in 24 hours—said a foreign warship had sighted a government fleet off the Portuguese coast, racing toward Spain's northern Bay of Biscay shore. The five ships were reported to be the battleships Jaime I, the cruisers Cervantes and Libertad and two de stroyers. Try to Lift Blockade. Three government submarines and one gunboat already were based at Bilbao. With the arrival of the main fleet they were expected to try to lift the insurgent blockade here and at Santander. The Fascist battleship Bspana, the cruiser Almirante Cervera and the de stroyer Velasco have been ranging be tween the two cities. Two new cruisers, the Canarias and the Baleares, were at the Fascist naval base at El Ferrol, in Northwestern Spain, but the government has de clared the Canarias was bombed and wrecked while the Baleares was under stood to be not ready to go to sea. Bilbao authorities said the ap proaching government fleet bore suffi cient munitions for a two-day battle. War Materials Landed. It was reported more war materials had been landed a week ago at San tander. which could oe used as a gov ernment base. Some sources said these munitions were brought there by "foreign” freighters. A more rigid censorship of news dis patches from Madrid, strict since the (See SPAIN, Page A-10.) TWO PERISH IN FIRE WORTHING, S. Dak., September 26 UP).—Edward Vander Linde, about 30, a farmer, suffocated, and Olaf Ever son, a farmhand, burned to death when lire broke out in the jail here today. Carl Vander Linde, brother of Edward, was severely burned in at tempting to extinguish the flames. Readers9 Guide PART ONE. Main News Section. General News—Pages A-l, B-3*. Washington Wayside—Page A-2. Lost and Found—Page A-3. Death Notices—Page A-12. Educational—Pages B-4, B-5. Sports Section—Pages B-6, B-10. PART TWO. Editorial Section. Editorial Articles—Page D-l. Editorials and Editorial Features —Page D-2. Political Round-Up—Pages D-3, D-5. Civic News and Comment—Page D-6. Veterans’ Organizations, National Guard, Organized Reserves —Page D-6. Women’s Clubs—Page D-7. Cross-Word Puzzle—Page D-7. Resorts—Page D-8.

PART THREE. Society Section. Society News and Comment Pages E-l, E-9. Well-Known Folk—Page E-6. Barbara Bell Pattern—Page E-9. Stamps—Page E-9. PART FOUR. jran+nro €f on+inn News Features—Pages F-l, F-4. John Clagett Proctor’s Article on Old Washington—Page F-2. “Those Were the Happy Days,” by Dick Mansfield—Page F-2. Radio News and Programs—Page F-3. Stage and Screen—Page F-5. Automobiles—Page F-6. Aviation—Page F-6. Children’s Page—F-7. Highlights of History—Page F-7. PART FIVE. Financial, Classified. Financial News and Comment, Stock, Bond and Curb Sum maries—Pages G-l, G-4. Classified Advertising — Pages G-», G-15. AN INTERNATIONAL MONETARY THREESOME. ——-—-. - ■■■ - ' ■ ■ 1 10 LEAD BATTLE FOR REGAHA CUP Notre Dame and Ma Ja 2d in Front—Delphine VIII in Dramatic Spill. BY JOSEPH A. FOX. With roaring, driving battles that brought one near-tragedy and several minor mishaps the speed Icings of the power boat world yesterday afternoon launched the tenth annual President's Cup Regatta before a gallery of thou sands—ashore and afloat—that lined the 2>2-mile course off Hains Point. | Out of the welter came two leading contenders for the President's Cup. the prize from which the regatta gets its name. These are the 1935 champion, Notre Dame, owned by Herbert Men delsohn of Detroit, and Ma Ja, 2d. j which carries the hopes of Jack Ruth- j t erford of Port Washington, Long! Island. Two others have the barest of chances to edge into the picture—Hot sy Totsy, 3d. entered by Howard Ben dig and Victor Kiiesrath of South Bend. Xnd., and the 15-year-old El Lagarto, raced by George Reis of Bol ton Landing, N. Y. The final test comes this afternoon, when the end of the regatta winds up the racing season. It was the first heat of the grueling 45-mile test for the President's Cup that saw disaster overtake one of the flyers and momentarily chill the spec tators with fear of a possible fatality. Delphine VIII Turns Turtle. Making a desperate bid to over take El Lagarto, with 10 miles of the 15-mile heat completed, the veteran Commodore Frithiof Ericson. at the wheel of Horace Dodge's Delphine VIII, was traveling approximately a mile a minute on the straightaway when suddenly the craft bucked. High in the air Delphine VIII jumped. It crashed to the water, leaped again and then turned turtle, shredding bottom and hull and catching Eric son and his mechanic, Edward Mc Kenzie, underneath. In a second rescue boats were on the way, threading a path through the speeding field, but it was fully a minute before Ericson and Mc Kenzie were seen clear of the wreck age. The latter was bleeding from the mouth. Both were taken aboard the nearby Coast Guard cutter Apache, serv ing as usual as the judge’s boat, for first aid, and then McKenzie was removed to Emergency Hospital. It was later reported that his only injury appeared to be contusions of the shoulders, from the terrific force with which he struck the water, but he was kept in the hospital over night for observation and X-rays to determine definitely the extent of his injuries. Ericson, who has been driving boats for more than a quarter of a century, escaped with a slight cut in the fore head. and commented laconically: "It's all in the game.” Crash Laid to Stabiliser. He said he believed that an adjust able step serving as a stabilizer on the bottom of the boat had worked loose, letting water in and throwing the craft out of control. Up to that time the Delphine had been behaving beau tifully, and from the Apache it looked as though Ericson was about to over take Reis when the accident took place. Eight starters faced the gun for iSeeREGATTATPage A-15.) THREE KILLED, 5 HURT AS CAR STRIKES TRUCK Tour of Those Injured May Die. Both Vehicles Bum After Crash. ’ By the Associated Press. MOUNT OLIVE, 111., September 28. _Three members of one family were killed and five others injured seriously today when their automobile crashed into the side of a truck near here. Four of the five apparently had small chances to recover when they were taken to a hospital at Litchfield. The dead: Ned Warrick, Kenney, HI., burned to death in the car. Shirley Ann Warrick, 4, grand daughter. Warren Wesley Warrick, 11, brother of Shirley. Ivan Warrick, father of the children and driver of the car, was critically hurt. The others injured were mem bers of his family. Glenn C. Huss of Kalamazoo, Mich., driver of the truck which burned after the crash, was no*-hurt. I Barrel Designed To Sail Atlantic Floats in Test Ej the Associated Press. BUFFALO, N. Y„ September 26 — Ernest Biegazski had his first ride this afternoon in the barrel he hopes to sail across the Atlantic to Europe and found it would float without leaking. Launched before several hundred persons who lined the pier of a Buffalo shipbuilding concern, the barrel, christened the Nuda. was towed be hind a power boat out near the break wall in the Buffalo Harbor. Calm weather, with scarcely a rip ple of water in Lake Erie, kept the Buffalo World War veteran from test ing the square sail ne will use as his sole motive power on his trip, but he pronounced the barrel seaworthy, none the less. •'Everything went as well as could (.See BARREL, Page A-8.) Board Also Denies Him Cred it for Year Spent in Jail During Appeal. G. Bryan Pitts, one-time leading Washington realty financier, who was sentenced to 1* years for conspiracy to embezzle, has been denied parole after several weeks' consideration of his case, the District Parole Board announced last night. His term be gan March 9, 1932. Denying him credit for more than a year's time In Jail while an appeal from his sentence was pending, the board decided that if he were ready to return to society the board must con sider also if "society were ready to receive him.” In an announcement made by Wil bur La Roe, Jr„ board chairman, the agency remarked that even if parole were denied altogether, Pitts would have a reduction of nearly five years of his 14-year sentence for good be havior. resulting in his release July 29, 1941. Pitts is now 42. Waited Tear to Apply. Pitts waited nearly a year after he pliflHhl* fnr narrvlp before he filed an application for release. The indictments under which Pitts was convicted charged him with form ing several dummy corporations and using them to convert to his own use approximately $5,000,000 of funds of the F, H. Smith Co., the principal business of which was the financing of reel estate. Pitts claimed, the board said, that at the time of his conviction there was an “understanding” he would be granted parole at the expiration of one-third of his sentence. “If such an understanding existed," the board said, “it is contrary to the letter and spirit of the parole law. Parole is denied.” Recalls His Prison Work. In the decision signed by Frank R. JellefT and Dr. Emmett J. Scott, the two other two members, as well as La Roe, the board said: “Good conduct within the institu tion cannot be regarded as control ing, especially where the work to which the prisoner is assigned is less onerous than that assigned to most others. (Pitts performs clerical work.) \ “This board has no right to modify the sentence Imposed by the court (See PITTS, page A-F) Chance Remark in Restau rant Leads to Body in Rooming House. A chance remark about a “cold and ' discolored" body led yesterday to the | arrest of three men as a prelude to the discovery of the corpse of a 36 year-old woman, in whose death they I were being questioned late last night. i Apparently beaten lifeless with a heavy object, the victim, Mrs. Sadie Watkins, said by police to be the com mon-law wife of one of the prisoners, was found on the bed of a rooming hoase at 303 D street. Near the body a battered coffee pot and a knife showing evidence of blood stains were found. Police received their first tip of the slaying from a man who told detec tives he overheard a bizarre conversa tion in a restaurant and suspected a crime had been committed. Two First Arrested. enortiy anerwarci KODert Taylor Wood, 35, of Richmond, Va„ and John McGarrgle, 33, were arrested at the latter'a home at 212 Indiana ave nue. Wood claimed the woman was his wife. They were identified, police said, as the men heard talking in a downtown restaurant by the informer, whose name was withheld. After talking writh their prisoner, police located the rooming house and its grim occupant. One of the men told the other, po j lice quoted the informant as saying, that he had seen a body "cold and dis ] colored and an address in the 300 : block of D street was mentioned. The third man. Edward Thomas I Sellers. 32, of no fixed address, was ! arrested later near Pennsylvania ave nue and Sixth street after police said they learned he had been a visitor at the D street house. Disturbance Heard. Mrs. Florence Millett, landlady at the house where the crime was dis covered, told detectives she was in bed in her rooms in the rear of the house when Wood and the woman and one or two others entered their room about 11 o’clock Friday night. The landlady said she heard a dis turbance and a thumping noise several times, but finally went to sleep. When the couple did not appear thi$ morning Mrs. Millett entered the room and saw Mrs. Watkins on the bed. Because of the bed clothing Mrs. Millett did not notice any blood, and believing the dead woman was sleep ing she straiehtened nn the room and left. Police Search Difficult. Shortly before noon today, head quarters detectives went to the D street address on the strength of the (See MURDER. Page A-7.) U.S. FLYERS ON BEACH Mediterranean Landing Result of Hop From France. MONTPELLIER, Prance, Septem ber 26 OP).—'The attempted flight of two New York shoe manufacturers from Toulouse to Barcelona, Spain, ended today on a Mediterranean beach. Its propeller broken, the plane landed near Gruissan, in Aude De partment. Neither of the occupants. Nathan Abraham Shapiro, 26, and Lee Bot veich, 34. was Injured. Police said neither had a license. Police After “Steve” Again; Rush of Venders Feared Despite tne interest or Mrs. Frank lin D. Roosevelt In Steve Vasilakoe, veteran White House peanut vender, troubles with the police do not seem to be ended. Twice Mrs. Roosevelt has inter ceded to protect Steve from police who sought to drive him away from the White House corner, his place of busi ness for the last 27 years. But now, Steve’s own business enemies, a bit Jealous, of course, are reported to have planned a strategic move designed to bring his defiance at police regulations to a final showdown. Almost simultaneously yesterday re ports reached Commissioner Melvin C. Hazen and Police Supt. Ernest W. Brown,' that a group of indignant street peddlers—banana venders, shoe string salesmen and ice cream hawk era—are threatening to Invade the White Hooee sector and aet up eurb I Slone mantel, inese venaers, u was said, have been advised by some one with a legal mind that the police cannot interfere with them as long as Steve is allowed to sell his peanuts on the White House comer in violation of various regulations. The rumors were particularly dis turbing to Commissioner Hazen. He had Edward Dent, District surveyor, search the records to determine defi nitely whether the District has any jurisdiction over East Executive ave nue, where Steve has conducted his peanut business these many years. Dent went through a mass of plat books and old files, and finally came to the conclusion that while East Ex ecutive avenue is in a Federal Gov ernment reservation, the District has Jurisdiction from curb to curb. “Well.” said Commissioner Haaen. ('See PEANUT VENDERS, Page A-3.) I 'LANIN ASMS ML SECURITY AS CRUEL HOAX ON MING CLASS Milwaukee Audience Told Act Is Unjust, Unworkable and Stupid—Pay-as-You Go Plan Offered. OVATION GIVEN IN PACKED AUDITORIUM “Cash Paid in on Compulsory Old Age Insurance Will Be Used for Current Deficits and New Ex travagances in All Probability, Says Candidate. London Text on Page A-14. By the Associated Press. MILWAUKEE, September 26.—Con tending the New Deal ha* endangered “the whole cause of social security,” Gov. Alf M Tjjnrinn tonicht suport to a "pay-as-you-go” old-age pension system "as a matter of social justice.” The administration security pro gram, the Republican presidential nominee told a cheering audience, was a "cruel hoax” and "a fraud on the workingman.” "In my judgment—and I have ex amined it carefully,” the Kansas Gov emor said, “this law is unjust, un workable, stupidly drafted and waste fully financed.” He stood on a stage facing a throng that overflowed the 6.300 seats of the city auditorium into nearby halls with loud-speaking arrangements. A two minute standing ovation from the vast horseshoe-shaped hall greeted his arrival after a drive from his hotel through the rain. Protection of Aged. Reading his speech on economic security solvency and with emphasis into microphones, he said the Repub lican party would enact a pension plan for the aged which would "pro vide for every American citizen over 65 the supplementary payment neces sary to give a minimum income suffi cient to protect him or her from want.” London constantly used his right hand, either with clinched fist or with forefinger extended, for a gesture of emphasis. Several times murmurs of comment ran through the crowd as the Governor bit his words to stress phrases. Declaring “day dreams do not pay pensions,” the candidate said there was "every probability” that cash paid in on compulsory old-age insurance “will be used for current deficits and new extravagances.” “If the present compulsory insur anrp nlan rpmainx in fnrrp. nnr nIH people are only too apt to find the cupboard bare.” he said, continuing: “To these—our old people, our work ers struggled for better conditions, our infirm—I will not promise the moon. I promise only what I know can be performed: Economy, a living pension, and such security as can be provided by a generous people.” When Landon referred to a “kindly” father who spends money his chil dren bring him partly “in various ex periments that fascinate him," the audience cheered and a voice shouted: “Pour it on, Alf.” There was more cheering when he said “we have good spenders in Washington.” Final of Three Addresses. The candidate's address was the last of a series of three during his farm belt tour. In his first, at Dea Moines, he discussed farm policies and in the second, at Minneapolis, the administration's reciprocal trade program from the point of view of agriculture. His schedule turned him back toward Topeka tonight, with a Sunday visit with Frank O. Lowden, former Governor of Illinois, and a Monday of campaigning in Iowa and Illinois on the program. The candidate was introduced to his auditorium audience by Alex ander Wiley, Republican guberna torial candidate, as “a man who comes—as Lincoln came—from the Middle West; your next President.” Pierpont Wood, national committee man. introducing State Republican candidates to the audience, was in terrupird by shouts of “Where is Landon?’’ “Like Wisconsin foot ball teams he will deliver when he comes," Wood replied. The audience laughed and ap plauded when Landon traced “cash the Treasury gives the Treasury” and told a story of a father who leaves his children “roll after roll of neatly executed I. O. U.'s.” His remarks brought cheers/and laughs. "The workers asked for a pension (See LANDON, Page A-7.) M’PHERSON CHURCH ROW SHOWDOWN THREATENED Daughter Says She Will Defy Her Mother if She Takee Fight to Fulpit. By the Associated Press. LOS ANGELES, September 36.— Roberta Semple said today that if her mother, Aimee Semple McPherson, discusses from the Angelus Temple pulpit tomorrow their argument ever church management, she will take the platform to tell her side of the story. The dispute centers on Giles Knight, new temple business manager. Miss Semple charged her mother wishes to delegate to Knight powers vested in the Board of Trustees. Mrs. McPherson’s mother, Mrs. Minnie (Ma) Kennedy, has entered the argument with a telephoned plea to the woman preachers on behalf of Miss Semple. k

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