14 Kasım 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Dergisi Sayfa 1

14 Kasım 1936 Tarihli Evening Star Dergisi Sayfa 1
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„ (V. 8. Weather Bureau Pereeaet.) The only evening paper Cloudy tonight and tomorrow; wanner Jj. Washington with thp tonight, colder tomorrow afternoon and TT WRI1 tne night; lowest temperature tonight about Associated PreSS News 45 degrees. Temperatures-Hlghest. 58, at and WireDhotO Services 4 p.m. yesterday; lowest, 33, at 6 ajn. to- ” 11 ct'uuw 0,51 day. Full report on page A-18. _ CWhn H.w York jfcg P.„ 14__ WITH SUNDAY WORMING l»moH__^gfjftgggSjSg; 84th YEAR. No. 33,800. WASHINGTON, D. C., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1936—FORTY-TWO PAGES. ** <*> M».n. A..oci.t.d Pr.... TWO CENTS. ■ .. - 1 . i ■ i ■■ .— ■ , - 11 ■■ — i ■ < .- ■■■■■■■■ —■ ■■ 1 1 1 i" ” — COERCION IS ASKED BY STEEL WORKERS Roosevelt Also Asked to Recommend Act to Ban Company Unions. REPRESENTATIVES TALK WITH LABOR SECRETARY Letter to White House Charges Threat to Force Employes to Accept Pay Increase. BT the Associated Pres*. Elmer J. Maloy and George A. Pat terson, employe representatives of the Carnegie-Illinois Steel Co., today asked President Roosevelt to recommend to the next Congress adoption of legisla tion outlawing coercion of workers by employers and forbidding company financed unions. In presenting their appeal to the President, Maloy and Patterson com pleted their campaign for Federal sup port in resisting the Carnegie-Illinois employe representation plan and the proposed wage agreement which the company has asked employe repre sentatives to sign. Yesterday they were successful In Obtaining from Secretary Perkins an opinion that the company's employe representatives do not have authority to sign a binding wage agreement. The company has offered a 10 per cent increase In wages contingent on signing a year’s agreement—starting Monday—which provides that wages shall be adjusted upward and down ward with fluctuations in the cost ol living, as computed by the Labor De Threat Is Charged. Maloy and Patterson said in a let ter delivered at the White House that “The United States Steel Corp. (ol which Carnegie-Illinois is the largest subsidiary) has gone to such desperate lengths in trying to force employe representatives to sign this agreement, namely, using a threat that the plants not signed may not participate in an increase, keeping these representatives In almost continuous session for three or four days to force them in line, telling them most of the other plants have already signed when the truth Was, they had not, calling in indi vidual representatives so that greater pressure could be exerted, and even going so far as to place on bulletin boards all over these plants circulars erroneously crediting the President of the United States with approving such a yellow dog contract, we feel that you should recommend to the next Congress appropriate legislation to eliminate such coercive tactics and provide adequate punishment for vio lations.” Ask Law With Teeth. In addition, they asked that pro vision he made to provide expenses foi workers who are a party to litigation against employer coercion or dis crimination. The letter added: "We also request a law with teeth, absolutely forbidding the financing ol company unions by the management, In any way, and providing that all meetings by employe representatives be held outside the plants and be free from all Interference from the managements, and that the men of each plant be permitted to choose Whatever rnllerMve harmiminn „ they wish without fear or favor.” Maloy and Patterson expressed “heartfelt gratityde” to the President for his statement yesterday at a press conference in which he said the cost of living should not be a de termining factor in wage rates if it acted to curb improvement of wages. They said they were grateful for "the splendid manner in which vou clarified your stand on living cost Index base, such base being the es sence of the so-called agreement on wages being offered by the United States Steel Corporation.” Lewis Followers Gain. Followers of John L. Lewis also re joiced today in the result of another preliminary skirmish against an em ployes' representation plan in the ag ricultural implement industry. On complaint of the United Auto mobile Workers, a member of the Lewis camp of industrial unionists, the National Labor Relations Board moved to demolish the “Harvester In dustrial Council Plan” in operation at (See LABOR, Page A-2.) DOCTOR KIDNAPED, $5,000 DEMANDED Brother’s Report Enlist* 6-Men and Postal Inspectors’ Help. By the Associated Press. CHICAGO, November 14.—Depart ment of Justice agents and postal In spectors were enlisted today to in vestigate the assertion that Dr. Mil ton Ochs, physician of suburban Oak Park, was kidnaped, forced to op erate upon a wounded gunman in Wisconsin and later made the target of a $5,000 extortion note. Dr. Arthur Ochs lodged the com plaint last night with the Oak Park police department as a new version of his brother’s disappearance last Monday. Dr. Milton Ochs, returning to Oak Park Wednesday night, said he had been on “a fishing trip in Wisconsin.” He declined to comment last night on the story related by his brother. Dr. Arthur Ochs said three armed men seized his brother Monday morn ing as be left Frances Willard Hos pital, blindfolded him and took him by automobile to a Summer cottage near Oshkosh, Wise., where, with a pistol trained upon him they forced him to minister to their wounded companion. Later, Dr. Arthur Ochs said, he received In the mall a crudely pen ciled note demanding $5,000 to “keep your brother from being the target of machine guns." m % _ Harrison Made Filipino After Ruling Isles Ex-Governor General First American Naturalised. Br the Associated Press. MANILA, P. I., November 14.— Francis Burton Harrison, former American governor general of the Philippines, became a naturalized Filipino today. He took the oath of citizenship at a special ceremony before President Manuel Quezon of the commonwealth. The ceremony was held at historic Malacanan Palace, Harrison's home from 1913 to 1921, when he was gov ernor general of the islands, and now Quezon's official residence. Harrison is the first American to become a citizen of the Philippines. A special act of the Assembly made it possible for him to change his citizen ship without the usual formalities. After taking the oath, the former Governor General said: "I am glad to have been associated with Mr. Quezon and the Filipino people for the last 25 years in their struggle for independence. I am grati fied to be able to see the successful conclusion of .that struggle as a Fili pino citizen.” Harrison, a former Representative from New York, has been frequently praised by Filipinos as one of the leading Americans in their fight for J freedom. Now 62 years old he is en I tering the business life of the Philip pines. ! Passes On to Commissioner i Hazen Opinion It Would Detract From Area. Secretary of Agriculture Wallace entered the Benning abattoir con troversy today with a letter to Com missioner Melvin C. Hazen pointing out that officials of the District Arboretum had Informed him “the character of the area in that vicinity is likely to be adversely affected by the presence there of a slaughter house.” On the outcome of the fight to pre vent Adolf Gobel. Inc., from re engaging in slaughter house operations in Benning. it was learned a short time before Wallace’s letter was made public, depends the fate of a privately I planned housing project in the area. Explaining that the Agriculture Department’s attention had been drawn to the proposal to erect the | abattoir, the Secretary pointed out that the location is "in the general vicinity of the Arboretum adminis tered by this department.” The letter | added “Those in charge of the Arboretum inform me that the character of the area in that vicinity Is likely to be adversely affected by the presence I there of a slaughter house, and I am calling this back to your attention, feeling that the general Indirect re sults of this kind will be an important' consideration in your handling of the: application for a permit.” Legal Aides Plan Policy. Meanwhile legal aides of the Dis- j trlct and several Federal agencies ■ continued preparations to uphold the Commissioners, who plan Monday to make a formal denial of a building permit in the face of pending man damus proceedings. Argument of the Gobel suit was set by the United States District Court for the follow ing day. Arthur B. Grover of White Plains, N. Y„ and Charles A. Layman of Scarsdale, N. Y., are partners in the proposed housing development and own a large tract of land just off Benning road, across the railroad tracks from the existing Gobel sit*. Grover, in a telephone conversation with The Star yesterday, gave in formation about the housing plans. isccs rrujcct iuuuit«ppcu. "If the abattoir ic constructed on the Gobel site.” he said, “it will make it impossible for us to obtain insur ance from the Federal Housing Ad ministration or to rent any houses if we bum them.” In a map prepared for The Star by officials of the National Capital Park and Planning Commission and reproduced in last Sunday’s Star to ■how the location of the proposed abbatoir, in relation to other points in Northeast Washington, an area near the abbatoir was labeled "P. H. A. (See ABBATOIR, Page A-2 ) JOHN F WHELAN DIES Retired Cigar Stores Vice Presi dent Was 75 Years Old. MOUNT VKRNON, N. Y., November 14 UP).—John F. Whelan, who retired in 1929 as a vice president of United Cigar Stores Co., died today after a lingering illness. He was 75 yean old. Born in Syracuse in 1861, he was one of the founders of United Cigar and became a director and first vice president when the company was or ganized. WEEK END DRIVE URGED FOR CUES! AS PLEDGES GROW More Than 30 Per Cent of Goal Attained—Renewed Effort Planned. BIG REPORT MONDAY IS WORKERS' DESIRE Chairman Jennings Reports Group Solicitation and Government Units “a Little Behind.” With more than 30 per cent of its goal attained, the ninth annual cam* paign of the Community Chest planned to move forward over the week end with intensified efforts looking toward a big report meeting Afon Ho v No luncheon report meeting was scheduled for today, a departure from previous custom, as Chest officials made the experiment of leaving out the Saturday meeting to determine whether solicitation results would be improved. While no public gatherings are scheduled for tomorrow, the workers planned Saturday and Sunday activi ties following the urg ig of Cam paign Chairman Coleman Jennings to prepare for a “grand" report Monday. Pointing to the big showing of the Special Assignments Unit which al ready has reachM 73.8 per cent of its quota. Chairman Jennings at lunch eon yesterday said that both Group Solicitation Unit and Governmental Unit were “a little behind" in then schedule of progress, as compared with last year, while the Metropolitan Unit was a “little bit ahead.” Wages Week End Effort. Explaining that generally “we are not moving ahead as fast as we should," Chairman Jennings chal lenged his workers to go into the week end as a “grand time for solicitation.” The figures at yesterday's meeting showed 9,547 gifts amounting to *147,780.13; which brought the total to date up to 16.381 gifts, amounting to (598,142.19. This is 30.38 per cent of the total goal of *1.969,000 which the campaign plans to reach Novem ber 24. Dramatizing the character “Crime," which is one of the designated public enemies, in the Chest campaign, a skit was presented at the luncheon, in which Crime impersonated by Maurice Jarvis, attempted to defend himself, and was bitterly Indicted by Mrs. Harper Sibley, chairman of the Women’s Division Mobilization for Human Needs. Chairman Jennings called on Crime to make his defense, while awaiting sentence. "Crime” Dragged Into Hall. Struggling as he was roughly dragged into the hall by two "C men,” the character "Crime,” masked and in cap. snarled out his words: "Stare at me and shudder, you people of Washington," he said, "you sit here and think yourselves safe, secure, protected. Do you know the temptations I put before young men and women? Do you think you can guard boys and girls from me? "Oh, yes, I see through your fool ish idea that if you guard your chil dren it doesn’t make so much differ ence about the others. But I know better. No home is safe from me. I can reach the sons of the rich as well as the sons of the poor. I con sort with lads in tenements and man sions and teach them to do my will. I train my puppets am} you pay the (See CHEST, Page A-2.) SCHOONER BURNS OFF CAPE SAUMON Vessel Believed to Have Exploded in Lower St. Lawrence—Fate of Crew Unknown. QUEBEC, November 4 (Canadian Press).—An unidentified vessel was believed to bave exploded and burst into flames early today three miles off Cape Saumon, 80 miles below Quebec. Residents of Cape Saumon who saw a blaze before dawn believed it came from a distressed coastal schooner. Observers at the signal service sta tion reported flames were sweeping over the ship, but were unable to de termine the fate of the crew. Eulisse Bouchard, telegrapher for the signal service stationed at Cape Saumon, rocky promontory in the lower St. Lawrence, reported the flam ing vessel. Bouchard said there was no sign of life aboard the boat as it wallowed, flaming, in the storm-tossed St. Lawrence, some three miles from shore. The vessel appeared to be about 100 feet over all, one of the hundreds of little schooners that ply the Lower St.'Lawrence on Itinerant freight runs, carrying a crew ranging from two to six or seven, depending on their size. • . King and Mrs. Simpson Decide Not to Marry, Says Writer BY JOSEPH DRISCOLL. By Cable to The Star and Mow York Herald-Tribune. LONDON, November 14.—King Ed ward VUl baa definitely decided not to marry Mrs. Warfield Simpson, ac cording to the latest information ob tainable in Informed circles which profess to know what they are talk ing about in relation to this curious Anglo-American romance. The King’s decision has been taken reluctantly and in a spirit of self sacrifice for the best interests of the state. Fleet Street, which hears every thing and prints nothing about the Simpson case, assumes now that coronation will proceed on schedule on May 12, and that if the King evar again inclines to marriage bis bride will not be Mrs. Simpson. Mrs. Simpson, as well as the King, is pictured In a sacrificial role in the present situation. Just as the ruler was once reported to be determined to defy Prime Minister Stanley Bald win, the Archbishop of Canterbury and every other power, if need be, to marry Mrs. Sim peon, so was the Amer ican-born woman until recently re solved to become the Queen of Eng land. Edward willing. When' pressure was brought on the TO RAISE STOCKS S. E. C. Accuses New York Exchange Member of “Manipulation.” by the Associated Press. The head of a firm on the New York Stock Exchange today met Se curities Commission charges of man ipulating shares on the “big board" with an observation that “it seems the commission thinks there is a man ipulation whenever a stock goes up or down.” In its first accusation against op erators on the metropolitan exchange, the commission charged W. E. Hutton Si Co. and H. H. Michels. Oakland. Calif., broker, with creating a “false and misleading appearance of active trading" in the common stock of Atlas Tack Gorp. Joined in his denial by statements from the firm and from Michels. James M. Hutton, sr.. president of the firm, declared In Cincinnati: “We never manipulated the stock. We never had any reason to manip ulate It. There was no motive on our part for anything like that.” Threatening expulsion from their Exchange memberships in various cities, the commission called on the New York firm and the Oakland broker to explain activities which it said pyramided the stock’s market price from $9.50 in November, 1935, to $30.25 in February, 1936. Atlas Tack, described by Wall Streeters as a stormy petrel known for wide fluctuation of price in recent years, was traded yesterday at around 16?* on the “Big Board." The commission, in its order, said the brokers had entered matched orders and had engaged in “wash” or fictitious sales. They were charged specifically with entering purchase orders with the knowledge that selling orders of “sub stantially the same sire, at sub stantially the same time and at sub stantially the same price” would be entered by the same or other parties, and with entering selling orders with the knowledge that similar purchase orders would be made. They were charged also with using "divers means and instrumentalities of interstate commerce" in "creating (See HIJTTON, Page A-3.) Trailer Comforts For Park Service Snagged on Ruling Acting Controller Gen eral Says Plan Would End Per Diem. It looks like the plan of the National Park Service to permit field employes to embark on a sort of light-housekeeping program in auto trailers has been snagged. Some of those workers who pass i much of their time in the wilds had i thought of procuring trailers for the ' Government cars they use. and just carry all the comforts of home right along with them. Secretary of the Interior Ickes,' favorably inclined, took up the matter j with Acting Controller General Elliott, j “This department.” he wrote, “feels j that the attaching of a modern trailer i to a Government car is Justified in cases where suitable accommodations are not available without a large , expenditure of time in going to and frotft work over roads frequently ren- i ! dered Impassable by Inclement' i weather. The increased coat of opera tion and maintenance of the Govern ment car, if any, due to the elimina tion of that travel necessitated by seeking accommodations, would be ; inconsequential and would be offset I administratively by reduction in the amount of per diem allowed the employes.”

Elliott, in a decision yesterday, said it would probably be all right for the employes to use the trailers, but—"the payments of any per diem while an employe occupies his own trailer would apparently have to be nega tived.” So. unless Elliott can be out-argued, j there will be no gypsying. ROGERS ESTATE TAXES SAN FRANCISCO. November 14 j (JP).—The estate of Will Rogers owes j California *28.000 in personal income taxes which the State probably never will collect. Attorney General U. S. Webb said yesterday in an opinion. Federal taxes of *115,000 due on the estate have priority, Webb said. Rogers' California estate has been appraised at *106.900. The humor ist’s large insurance policies are not a part of the estate and are exempt from taxation. His income from syn dicate writing was paid directly to his wife, under the terms of his contract. Summary oi Today’s Star Page. Page. Art ..B-3 Obituary .--A-13 Amusements C-16 Puzzles .....C-ll Books .. -- B-* Radio . A-# Church News Real Estate B-S-6-7 C-l to 1# Comics .C-ll Short Story.. A-7 Editorial_A-» Society .. A-lt Finance_..A-14 Sports — A-16-17 Lost & Found A-3 Woman’s Pg. B-8 Music - B-4 NATIONAL. Clark Howell, editor of Atlanta Con stitution, dies. Page A-l Fomer U. S. Oov. Oen. Harrison be comes Filipino. Page A-l S. E. C. accuses N. Y. Exchange mem ber of “manipulation.” Page A-l “Suicide bet" revealed in death of writer’s guest. Page A-3 Court denies petition for removal of Hoeppels. Page A-J Marine workers threaten “new action" if strike is not settled. PageA-13 FOREIGN. Japanese link to missionary's death is probed by y. 8. Page A-l Mrs. Merry man In England as Mrs. Simpson's chaperon. ■ Page A-l Rebel air raid shakes U. S. Embassy In Madrid. Page A-l Disorder breaks out at celaneae strike in Cumberland. Page A-l WASHINGTON AND VICINITY. Secretary Wallace comes out against proposed abattoir. Page A-l Community Cheat pushes annual cam paign. Page A-l D. C. auto club seeks new speed penalties. Pagg*A-S Two critically hurt in Capital traffic accidents. Page A-l Auto Show opens after parade of venerable vehicles. PageA-ia Judges refuse to ban pick-up freight service. Page A-S Infantile paralysis bequest of 1350,000 to Johns Hopkins. Page A-ll Ballou effort to bar non-resident pupils scored by Olass Page A-ll Naming of prober for police-bond case delayed. Page A-ll Ickea boosts funds for Howard U. library to $1,101,711.58. ^PageA-ll "Pin ball trial" will be resumed Mon day. Page A-18 S. E. C. continues study of cemetery project. Page A-18 1,000 P. W. A. workers assigned to D. C. parks. Page A-18 • > EDITORIAL AND COMMENT. This and That. Page A-8 Answers to Questions. Page A-8 SUrs, Men and Atoms. Page A-8 David Lawrence. Page A-9 Paul Mallon. Page A-9 Mark Sullivan. Page A-9 Jay Franklin. Page A-9 Headline Folk. Page A-9 REAL ESTATE. Silver Star Home. Page C-l Large office building planned. Page C-l Real Estate Convention. Page C-l Building Permits. Page C-l Financing sets record in October. Page C-I Home Modernization. page c-z Designed for Living. Page C-» The Home Gardener. Page C-9 SPORTS Ancient rivalries color grid program throughout Nation. Page A-18 Top teams of foot ball world facing tough foes today. PageA-l* Landon and Beilis pacing District’s prep school teams. PageA-l« Eastern’s tie with Tech provides an other school upsets. Page A-19 Defeat of Trojans will smooth Rose Bowl path of Huskies. Page A-17 Plans for Brsddock-Louis February bout are progressing. Page A-17 Escobar, bantam champ, kayoes Quin tana in first round. Page A-17 District woman golfers planning full slate for 1937. Page A-17 MISCELLANY. Washington Wayside. Page A-l Traffic Convictions. Page A-4 Young Washington Page A-l City News in Brief, Page A-7 Betsy Caswell. Page B-t Dorothy Dlx. Page B-S Nature’s Children. Page C-4 Bedtime Story. Page C-l Vital Statistics. ^ PageC-14 Thanksgiving PROCLAMATION November 26 193G -■ r—— ffijiotrrefl—* U. S. MISSIONARY’S DEATH IS PROBED Japanese Troops Reported to Have Driven Him III From Home. E* the Associated Press. PEIPING, November 14.—Investi gation of the death at Kalgan of Karl Bernhardt Olsen, American missionary of Gully, Minn., was ordered by the United States Embassy today on the basis of reports he had been driven from his home by Japanese troops while ill with smallpox. Representatives of the embassy were dispatched Into North China to inquire into Olsen’s death, to detei mine the whereabouts of two other American missionaries and to gather first-hand information on reports of fighting in Sulyuan Province. Olsen died at Kalgan early today. Reports at the embassy here declared his death followed eviction by Japanese troops from his home 80 miles north west of Kalgan. Military Denies Knowledge. Japanese military circlet here de nied knowledge of the report and at the same time called it "patently absurd.” The embassy said it was informed Japanese military authorities north west of Kalgan had desired for sev eral weeks the property of Olsen's in dependent mission for their use. Re cently they took over his tiny chapel, refusing to permit the missionary to conduct services for his Mongol con verts, an embassy spokesman declared. Shortly afterward, Olsen was taken ill with smallpox. While he was lying ill within his home, next door to the confiscated chapel, Japanese of ficials demanded the house for mili tary purposes, the embassy report as serted. They forced him, despite his illness, his wife and three children to vacate the residence, the spokesman said he was informed. Evicted, the refugee family managed to reach Kalgan where Olsen was reported to have died as a result of hardship and lack of medical atten tion. M Americans in Area. The diplomatic officials were in structed to investigate the situation on the Suiyuan-Chahar border and if necessary to go further into the north west. Approximately 40 Americans, prin cipally missionaries, were scattered throughout the northwestern area where communication systems are very poor. ljmbassy envoys were instructed to investigate the whereabouts of two Dinuba. Calif., missionaries. Rev. and Mrs. Abraham Wiens, attached to the Mennonite Brethren Mission with headquarters in Chicago. Rev. and Mrs. Wiens were reported to have been captured by bandits and carried off to the mountains. SUIYUAN INVASION REPORTED KALOAN. Hopeh Province. China, November 14 (JP).—One thousand regular Japanese soldiers were re ported to have arrived today at Pail ingmiao. Northern Suiyuan Province. Chinese sources declared the pres ence of Japanese regulars was indica tive of Japan’s participation in Mon golian Invasion of the northern area and projected extension of Manchu kuoan influence westward. Invasion of Suiyuan has been re ported only from Chinese sources, however, while such a movement has been denied unofficially by the Jap anese. Considerable airplane activity in Eastern Suiyuan also was declared to have been observed. Dispatches reaching Kalgan de scribed highways between Pallingmlao and Kwelsu as blocked by Urge num bers of Japanese army trucks hauling supplies into the area. Smoke Covers Madrid in Heavy Aerial Battle 30 Planes in Combat as Rebels Try to Open Path to City. (The following dispatch, delayed in transmission, gives an eye witness picture by an Associated Press correspondent, with the fascist forces outside Madrid, of the aerial battle and bombardment of the capital yesterday.) BY ELMEE W. PETERSON. CAMPAMENTO, 8pain, November 13.—The biggest air battle since 1918 —with more than 30 planes in the clouds at one time—raged over Madrid yesterday. Fascist commanders claimed their pilots shot down eight government planes including one Martin bomber. (Associated Press correspondents in Madrid reported government officials claimed four planes, three of them fascist, fell during the sky fight.) Two planes landed inside Madrid after insurgents turned loose the full strength of their aviation in an effort to clear a path into the capital. The result was the most intent, direct and furious warfare since the civil war began. Drop 220-Pound Bombs. Tri-motored insurgent ships dropped 100-kilogram (220 pounds) bombs in such quantities on Socialist positions around Segovia Bridge that the capital at times was almost totally obscured by clouds of smoke, dust and debris. Fascist artillery at the same’ time poured a constant stream of shells into the same area. The large Mon tana Barracks, near the northern rail road station—one of the targets of the bombing—apparently was almost completely destroyed. Moors and Legionnaires blasted at the government defenders in a day long attack from houses around Segovia Bridge—houses from almost (8ee RAID, Page A^3T) HARWELL 73, DIES AT ATLANTA — Two Months’ Illness Fatal to Editor and Georgia Na tional Committeeman. t» the Associated Press. ATLANTA. November 14.—Clark Howell, editor and president ot the Atlanta Constitution and a director o 1 the Associated Press, died at his home here early today after a two months' illness. Death came to the 73-year-old Georgia Democratic national commit teeman at 6:15 ajc. (Central standard time). Hia wife and other members of his family were at the bedside. Howrell had been active in opera tion of his paper and in State and national political affairs until about eight weeks ago. when he was forced to bed with an intestinal disorder. He underwent two operations, the latest one last week, but failed to rally. He sank into a coma early last night and did not regain full con sciousness. Pioneered for Roosevelt. A pioneer in the formation of "Roosevelt-for-President" clubs. How ell maintained an active interest in national and State politics until the end. He was chosen last June to succeed Gov. Eugene Talmadge as the State's Democratic committeeman, a position he had held from 1896 to 1924. A one-time supporter of Talmadge, Howell broke with the Governor when the latter launched an attack on farm and relief policies of the New Deal. Although the editor opposed Sena tor Richard B. Russell, Jr., for the Senate in 1932, he lined up with him for re-election against Gov. Talmadge in the September 9 primary, throwing the columns of the Constitution into tbe fight. Russell was renominated by a vote of landslide proportions. Aided Aviation Study. Howell served as chairman of a Roosevelt appointed commission for the study of aviation in foreign countries. Howell, known nationally for his journalistic work, was one of the original directors of the Associated Press. He was elected to the position in 1900 and held It at the time of his death. A "scoop” of his cub reporter days on the New York Times was the sub ject of a story he sometimes told. He obtained an interview with Gov. Samuel J. TUden of New York that definitely ended the talk of nomina tion by the Democrats of the “old ticket” and paved the way for the nomination and election of Grover Cleveland to the presidency. The Constitution's winning of the Pulitzer prize for "meritorious service” (See HOWELL, Page A-13.) Pacelli Back in Italy. NAPLES. November 14 iff).—Eugenio Cardinal Pacelli, papal secretary of state, returned to Italy today and told prelates welcoming him he had re ceived an “unforgettable reception” In the United States. He was met by a delegation of church officials from Vatican City. “Dead” Man Returns to Farm Satisfied to Remain “Dead” BvthaAMoeUtM Press. PITTSBURGH. November 14.—A man legally dead (or seven years— officially recorded as murdered—re turned to bis job as a farm band today, satisfied to remain “dead.” He is John Kachnycs, who left his home in Pittsburgh in 1939. to work an farms in Western Pennsylvania. Subsequently a friend identified the picture of a man killed in a quarrel as Kachnycs. A man was tried^-and acquitted— for murdering him. Neighbors collected benefits under insurance policies on his life. Then be came back. He tried unsuccessfully to find the man who had been charged with bis “murder.” He told the courts he was still alive But, legal technicalities of “return ing to life" were too great. John told his friends “goodby” and went back to his Job on a farm in Butler County. He's still dead, so tar as court records are PLAZA IS BOMBED By REBEL RUNES; • S3 KILLED,15D HURT U. S. Embassy Shaken in Renewed Aerial Attack on Terrified Capital—Water Mains Shattered. DEFENDERS ORDERED TO WIPE OUT FOES Relentless Drive on Foes of City to Be Undertaken—Bodies of Victims Lie in Littered Streets. Many Buildings Are Wrecked. Truck Smashed to Bits. BACKGROUND— The immediate causes of the devastating Spanish civil war spring from the establishment of the republic in 1931 after Alfonso XIII was driven into exile. The revolt flared last Summer when Gen. Francisco Franco placed him self at the head of native Moors and Spanish foreign legionnaires in Morocco. The fighting spread to the mainland with the rebels against the Communist regime in Madrid gaining ground steadily. A%out a month ago the attackers moved into position for battle lor last government stronghold: Ma drid. Then began air raids over capital, climaxed by heavy aerial battle yesterday. Hi me Aasociaiua rress. MADRID. November 14.—Insurgent bombers, unloading high explosives into a thronged Madrid plaza, killed an estimated 53 persons and wounded 150 others today. This estimate of the dead was an ounced at 4 p.m. by relief workers. The aerial attackers dropped eight explosive missiles, five of which fell into a throng in the Glorieta Atocha Plaza, where a defense mass meeting was being held. Stung to fury by the raid. Madrid's defense commander ordered his armies to "wipe out 50,000 of the enemy." "Before you are rebel armies, about 50.000 strong." proclaimed Gen. Josa Miaja. "Smash through them! Wipe them out!" He ordered a relentless drive on tha besiegers of Madrid a few hours after the air raid, one of the most dis astrous of the siege of the city. The force of the explosions was felt in the United States Embassy, where more than 50 American nationals have taken refuge from the assaults on Madrid. The crowded plaza was turned into a scene of horrors by the blast, which shook the capital to the foundations. The assembly had been called to hear plans for the defense of Madrid. The power of the bombs was demon strated by the fact one blew a large hole through the roof of a subway which had been considered a bomb nr/irif ghbltbr Two huge stone columns in front of the ministry of public works were toppled. Water mains, shattered by the ex plosions. sent streams high into the air. Bombs Fall Near Hotel. Two other bombs fell near the Hotel Nacional and one near the govern ment barracks on Maria Cristina street. Several more exploded near the Segovia bridge. Bodies of men. women and chil dren, many of them maimed beyond recognition, lay in the streets beside the carcases of horses and mules. Dozens, suffering from shrapnel wounds, were unable to move, moan ing for help. Those unhit scattered pell-mell through the side streets opening on the plaza, which is located in the southeastern part of Madrid. Apartments Wrecked. Every window in the vicinity was shattered; several apartments were wrecked, and the ornate facade of the ministry of public works was damaged badly. Two large stone col umns of a building nearby were top pled Into the street. Ironically, the meeting hi the plaza had been called off at the last minute by its organizers. However, hundreds of persons, unaware of the change in (See SPAIN, Page fc-3.) EARLY-MORNING FOG CAUSES 10 CRASHES More Than Score Injnred in Series of Accidents Near Mary* land U. B> the Associated Press. COLLEGE PARK, Md., November 14.—Dense early-morning fog caused a series of about 10 minor acciden's near the University of Maryland today, involving more than a dozen cars and causing Injuries to a score of persons. Most of the automobiles carried uni* verslty students hurrying to early classes. None was hurt seriously. All of the crashes occurred on University lane, a back road leading directly into the campus from Wash* lngton and northern Montgomery County. The fog was so thick drivers of the cars were unable to aee smashupa ahead of them In several instances, sudden stops caused one machine to strike the rear of another. One or two other machines piled into the first two before traffic could be routed around the stalled group. Most of the damage was confined to front and rear bumpers, radiators and rear gasoline tanks. Most of those huit were able to continue /to classes or to work. AU were suffering from minor cuts or 1 shock.

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