10 Kasım 1937 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1

10 Kasım 1937 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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_ i WEATHER. - <D. 8 Weather Bureau turecaat.) ' Cloudy, followed by rain beginning late tonight or tomorrow; colder tomorrow; ‘ lowest temperature tonight about 46 de grees. Temperatures today—Highest, 67, at 2 p.m.; lowest, 42, at 6:30 a.m. Full report on page A-12. Closing New York Markets, Page 18 CENTS. - NEW CONSTITUTION 4 CORPORATE STATE Promulgation Gives Vargas Unequaled Powers as President. INDETERMINATE TERM OF OFFICE IS EXPECTED Senate and Chamber of Deputies Would Be Dissolved, Says Francisco Campos. By the Associated Press. RIO DE JANEIRO, Brazil. Nov. 10. —Minister of Justice Francisco Cam pos announced today that a new Bra silian constitution, designed to create a corporate state, had been promul gated. Returning from a meeting held at the presidential palace, Campos said the new constitution, to be published later today, provided for dissolution of the Senate and Chamber of Depu ties, as well as state legislatures and - municipal chambers. Vargas on Radio Tonight. He said President Getulio Vargas would make a broadcast to the nation tonight. (Campos, sworn In only yester unj no umnoi/Ci ui jusuic ttliU ill" terior—politically the key post in , the Vargas cabinet—was the chief collaborator in drafting the new constitution, according to earlier advices.) . It was indicated, from information available while the document was be ing drafted, that it would vest execu tive powers in a president with inde terminate term of office, vest limited legislative powers in a “corporate as sembly'’ and give certain powers of opinion to a “council of experts or elders.” There would be an executive cab inet, in part responsible to the Legis lature, but whose chief would be picked by the President. * Under the old constitution, which Itself had been in effect only since 1934, President Vargas could not have been re-elected. His present term of office expires May 3, 1938. Tight Censorship in Effect. The old constitution already was partly in abeyance, due to a state-of war decree of October 2 because of alleged Communist danger to the na tion. Tight cencorship went into ef fect with the. decree. Campos, one of Brazil’s newer states * men, came into national prominence after the revolt of 1930, which was headed by Vargas. Campos at that time organized the "October Legion,” a Khaki Shirt movement devoted to “safeguarding principles of the revo lution.” To become minister of justice and interior he left the post of secre tary of education in the city govern ment of Rio de Janeiro. Vargas’ Powers Unequaled. * By the Associated Press. BUENOS AIRES, Nov. 10.—The first New World attempt at a corpora , tive system of government was put Into effect in Brazil today with pro mulgation of a new constitution. By this measure President Getulio Vargas assumed powers unequaled in Latin America at the present time. Because of the Brazilian censorship, it was not possible immediately to learn details of the new constitution, but they were expected to be revealed * in a broadcast by President Vargas tonight. Advance information on the consti tution indicated it was modeled closely on the Portuguese constitution. (Dorothy Thompson writes on “Pas cism in Brazil” on page A-ll.) 11,000 BACK AT JOBS AT HUDSON FACTORY Return to Work Pending Settle ment of Difficulties With Company. By the Associated Press. DETROIT, Nov. 10.—Eleven thou sand employes of the Hudson Motor Car Co., idle yesterday because of a labor-dispute, returned to work to day pending final settlement of dif ferences between the company and the United Automobile Workers of America. * The Bohn Aluminum & Brass Corp. plant No. 2, also Involved in labor difficulties, remained closed. t A spokesman for the U. A. W. A. said the Hudson company had agreed to retime operations in the paint de a partment, where the dispute centered yesterday. The Bohn No. 2 plant was closed at 3 p.m. yesterday. ' Apparently the major point in the dispute was in terpretation of the new State occu pational disease law. The day shift remained in the plant to prevent the night shift from going to work. It was the sixth time this year that a unit of the, Bohn corporation has. been closed b^ a strike. City Designer’s Plaque Is Taxed By Philadelphia ( By the Associated Press. PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 10.—The city that Capt. Thomas Holmes, who died In 1695, mapped for William Penn has placed a $1 tax on a plaque the State Historical Commission set up near the site where he lived. Philadelphia then was Just a village at one corner of Penns Woods. > The levy is based on an ordinance providing a tax on all signs used for advertising or commercial purposes. The company owning the building to k which the plaque is attached turned thd tax bill over to the Historical Com mission. The commission has asked the city to remove the assessment. * I D. C. Girl Finds Italian Student Is Count Just Before They Wed COUNTESS SAVELLI, NEE MISS NANCY HALL. SHE married him as Mr. Luigi Savelli, a popular but unpre tentious Italian graduate stu dent at American University, but it turned out that he is a count and now she is hob-nobbing with roy alty in Rome. The 20-year-old Contessa Savelli was, until last June 4, Miss Nancy Hall, who worked as a secretary for the Foreign Policy Association here and lived with her mother and step father Mr. and Mrs. Raymond G. Church, 2328 Thirty-seventh street N.W. Mrs. Church received a letter from her daughter today telling of being entertained by the Infanta Beatrice of Spain, exchanging greetings with the former Queen of Spain at a tennis match, and a gay round of dinners at embassies and royal homes in Rome. Nobody was more surprised than (See-3AVELLI, Page A^T) SECRETARY TO ASK Miss Perkins to Propose Modifications as Result of Studies. BACKGROUND— Administration sought passage last spring of bill to regulate wages and hours in interstate industry. Measure was stalled in House Rules Committee as Southern block re fused to vote it out. When President Roosevelt issued call for special session next week he placed wage hour legislation among quartet of desired measures. By the Associated Press. Secretary of Labor Perkins said after a White House conference today that she would propose changes in the ad ministration’s wage and hour bill when congressional committees start new hearings on the subject. The Secretary said she had dis cussed the bill with President Roose velt, but preferred not to say what changes she had in mind. She told newsmen that if congres sional committees seek her views she would have some modifications to sug gest in the light of studies the Labor Department has made since the bill won Senate approval last session. After it went to the House, marked for speedy passage, it was tied up in the Rules Committee, where it is still held. Chairman O’Connor has pre dicted, however, that the committee will release it for consideration in the special session beginning next week. Asked about proposals to have Con gress, rather than a board, fix control of minimum wage and maximum hour standards, Secretary Perkins said a bQard would be necessary if the pro gram was to be approached “from the point of view of flexibility.” She said if the standards were to be fixed by Congress all that would be needed would be an enforcement. HERMAN ROGERS^SAILS; DENIES WINDSOR STORY Host to Duchess Says He Is Not Making Trip to Arrange Duke’s Postponed Tour. By the Associated Press. , CANNES, France, Nov. 10.—Her man Rogers and his wife, hosts to the Duchess of Windsor when she first went to France from England during the abdication crisis last De cember. sailed from Villefranche to day for New York. Rogers’ associates here indicated he might represent the Duke of Windsor in the United States in new prepara tions for the Duke’s postponed tour. Rogers denied this, saying his trip concerned only personal affairs. The Rogers sailed aboard the Conte di Savoia. URUGUAY CUTS IMPORTS Automotive Products Prom Abroad Are Barred Indefinitely. MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay, Nov. 10 UP).—President Gabriel Terra today issued a decree prohibiting indefinitely importation of automobiles, omnibuses, trucks, chassis, motors and bodies. He acted at the request of the min ister of finance. I \ Police Impound 3,000 Addi tional Ballots in Bronx Boxes. Bt the Associated Press. NEW YORK, Nov. 10.—This city’s first proportional representation elec tion tally was fast developing into a major vote fraud scandal as police today impounded 3,000 more ballots in the Bronx. The ballots seized brought the total of impounded ballots in the Bronx to 7,500, or approximately 2 per cent of the estimated vote cast there. The seized ballots were allegedly tampered with by the *10-a-day spe cial canvassers, many of whom have been the target of general charges of dilatoriness and obstructionist tactics to give “P. R.” a bad name. Today’s ballot seizure was ordered by Special Assistant Attorney General Matthew M. Levy and Acting District Attorney Sylvester Ryan of the Bronx. The ballots will be submitted to the Bronx grand jury in an Investigation in which four canvassers are already under arrest. The tally in the Bronx resumed to day despite the impounding of ballots, through a separate count of im pounded ballots in the district attor ney's headquarters set up in the armory where the borough count is in progress. The count came to a standstill yes terday because the two borough direc tors decided the law would be violated if the count were not conducted in the prescribed order, impossible then by reason of the seizure of all the ballots from certain districts. Meantime, Samuel Seabury, vigorous champion of “P. R.,” blamed compli cations of the tally on “the bungling of machine politicians.” ROOSEVELT SEEKS PRIVATE BUILDING AS BUSINESS SPUR Stimulation of Investments in Housing Projects to Be Discussed. PRESIDENT WILL TALK WITH EXPERTS TODAY Reiteration of Balanced Budget Intention Seen Precluding Fur ther Federal Spending. By the Associated Press. Stimulation of heavy private in vestments in housing construction de veloped today as one means the administration may seize on to aid business and employment. President Roosevelt called Federal officials and private business men to discuss the possibilities with him this afternoon. White House attaches, emphasizing any new undertaking would be apart from the Government’s slum clear ance and low-cost home building pro gram, said the conference would be concerned with methods of inducing private capital into the housing in dustry. The Impression prevailed that sug gestions for general increases in Gov ernment spending as an aid to busi ness would get nowhere. V. S. Pump Priming Seen Ended. The President’s reiteration at his press conference yesterday that he intended to balance next year’s budget led informed observers to believe there was little prospect of more Federal r “““‘j. The group called to the White House for an afternoon conference has been making a study of housing possibilities for the President. It included Marriner S. Eccles, chair man of the Federal Reserve Board; J. M. Daiger, special assistant to the board; Robert E. Wood, president of Sears-Roebuck; Edward F. McGrady, director of labor relations of the Radio Corp. of America; Gerard Swope, president of General Electric Corp.; Henry C. Turner, president of the Turner Construction Co. of New York; Samuel S. Colt, New York banker, and Isador Lubin, chief of the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Confers With Jones. The conference followed one late yesterday with Jesse H. Jones, chair- I man of the Reconstruction Finance I Corp., at which it was understood | the same subject was discussed, but i in a broader way to include ways to ] bring about industrial construction j as well as housing. Secretary Morgenthau may bare 1 some of the administration’s inten- I tions in relation to present business : conditions in a speech in New York ; tonight. Talks on "Pump Priming.” He has indicated this speech, on "Pump Priming," might be an official answer to advocates of heavy Federal expenditures to offset any slowing in the business pace. Mr. Roosevelt himself may touch on business conditions when he speaks over the radio Sunday night in an appeal that the unemployed register in next week's special census. He continued, meanwhile, his study of economic developments, with con ferences on taxes, spending, relief ana allied topics. Into these he dropped a hint that the public utility industry might win some Federal assistance if it would change its sys tem of evaluating property. No Specific Pledges. He gave no specific pledges to the industry, but his remarks were in terpreted in some quarters as bear ing on complaints that administra tion policies have “frightened” utility firms from proceeding with construc tion programs. The Committee of Utility Execu tives recently said it has “a vast untapped reservoir of jobs outrival ing the programs of the P. W. A. and W. P. A.,” and that the industry has fallen $2,600,000,000 behind its normal construction schedule. If utilities would adopt what he called the common law method of valuation and capitalization, Mr. Roosevelt said, the administration would be able to go along. At the Capitol, there also was news of interest to business. A House Tax Subcommittee tentatively proposed that the present capital gains levy be eased by permitting a carryover of losses from one year to the next. Summary of Today's Star Page. Obituary_A-12 Sports A-14-15-16 Radio . ;.._.B-lt Short Story..B-5 Society _. B-1 Woman’s Pg. A-13 WAR IN FAR EAST. Nanking feared next objective of Jap anese drive. Page A-l FOREIGN. Appraisal of MacDonald's life divides England. Page A-l Brussels conference is adjourned until Saturday. Page A-2 England takes drastic action in Pales tine terror. Page A-2 Britain tightens bonds with Ameri ca. Page A-4 NATIONAL. * Private building as business spur 6een Roosevelt aim. Page A-l Opposition developing to Maritime/ Commission program. Page A-l Senate group ready to push prepara tion of farm bill. Page A-3 U. S. trade treaties are criticized by Grange head.. Page A-4 WASHINGTON And VICINITT. First returns in Chest drive to be made today. Page A-l Stepfather held in alleged kidnaping of boy. Page A-2 Fred S. Waiker resigns post with Typo graphical Union. Page A-3 Purchase of radium for cancer treat ment hern ia discussed. Pag* A-3 I Alley Dwelling Authority’s handicaps cited. Page A-7 Judge William J. Graham dies sud denly at home herp. Page A-12 Collins to propose restoration of people’s counsel post. Page B-l Hook to waive extradition in numbers slaying. Page B-i Warrant upheld in gambling trial here. Page B-l President to lead observance of Armi stice Day here. Page B-l Painters’ strike at Capitol ended by agreement. Page B-l Labor Department seeking to settle Capitol strike. Page B-l EDITORIAL AND COMMENT. Editorials. Page A-18 This and That. Page a-1# Answers to Questions. Page A-1S Washington Observations. Page A-10 David Lawrence. Page A-ll H. R. Baukhage. Page A-ll Dorothy Thompson. Page A-ll Constantine Brown. Page A-ll Lemuel Porton. Page A-ll MISCELLANY. Traffic Convictions. Page A-6 Shipping News. Page A-B Vital Statistics. Page A-8 Dorothy Dix. PageA-13 City News in Brief. Page B-2

Nature's Children. Page B-8 Bedtime Stories. . Page B-6 Men’s Fashions. Page B-12 Cross-word Puzzle. Page B-18 Letter-Out. Page B-18 Winning Contract. Page B-19 8Going\ L HARD \ LEP OUR >S OM OUR ) wu Rancher Severs Robber’s Hand, Kills Him After Gruesome Duel Intruder Demands Money and Bran dishes Knife—“Host” Seizes Sivord, Then Shoots to Kill. fcj tne Associated Press. SANTA ROSA, Calif., Nov. 10.—A story of a gruesome, deadly duel be tween a 79-year-old rancher armed with an old, rusty sword and an In truder, brandishing a butcher knife, was pieced together by officers today ' from the dying ^irvivor’s gasps. Thomas Elliott, the rancher, cut off the intruder’s left hand, but finally was overpowered. Surrendering, he promised to get his money. Instead, he grabbed a gun. killed the invader with one shot. Elliott was so critically wounded hospital attendants gave him little chance to survive. Story of Grotesque Battle. Sheriff Harry Patteson reconstructed this story of the grotesque battle: Answering a knock at the door of the house where he lives alone, Elliott was confronted late last night by a hooded intruder, holding a flashlight in one hand and a butcher knife in the other. "This is a robbery,” the hooded man said. “I want your money!" Elliott fled upstairs, grabbed the old sword from its scabbard on the wall and wheeled to battle his assailant. They duelled about the room and battled down the stairs. A sudden swipe of Elliott's sword cut off the stranger's left hand. The stranger stooped, picked up the hand, stuffed it into his pocket. Rancher Overpowered. Then, despite loss of his hand, the intruder suddenly overpowered the elderly rancher, threw him to the floor and waved his butcher knife menacingly. "I surrender! I'll get the money!” the rancher shouted. The man let Elliott up and attempted to stem the flow of blood from his arm. Elliott stumbled toward a cupboard. But instead of cash, he grabbed a gun. turned and fired. The invader dropped dead. Elliott staggered a quarter of a mile to the home of his nearest neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Schilling. The sheriff found the stranger’s body in the wildly disordered room. The man, about 50, was plainly dressed. Patteson suggested he probably was a rancher or worker in the district. The hood over his head was a barley sack with slits for the eyes. 9,871 Contributions Make Up 11 Per Cent of $2, 059,000 Total. More than 11 per cent of the record Community Chest quota of *2,059,000 already has been raised, volunteer workers reported at the opening meet ing this afternoon in the Willard Hotel. Chairmen of five of the six Chest units reported they have received 9,871 contributions totaling $227,142. The Special Assignment Unit took an early lead by reporting a total of $110,950, or 19.39 per cent of its quota. The Group Solicitation Unit has raised 10.3 per cent of its quota of $419,000, Chairman John L. Vande grift reported. The Metropolitan Unit reported 9.4 per cent of its quota, the Government unit 6.89 per cent and the Suburban Unit, 0.12 per cent. The Capital Unit, with a quota of $10,000 to be raised among the colored population, has not yet submitted its initial report. Early success for the Chest cam paign was predicted by Maj. Gen. Frederick W. Coleman, U. S. A., re tired, former chairman of the govern mental unit. On the results of today’s meeting campaign' officials expect to be abl<r to forecast to a considerable extent the progress of the coming campaign. Rising Costs Enter Picture. Officials admit that in the ranks of the District’s low-salaried govern mental and commercial workers there is likely to be greater dif ficulty in meeting this year’s Record quotas. Such factors as increased living costs, new motor vehicle and other taxes, increased street car and bus token fares and other increased personal costs are expected to make it more difficult for the average citi zen to meet the new budget for charity. Leaders, however, expressed optimism over the final outcome of the drive. Two new Chest clubs were brought into existence at today’s meeting. They are the “$250 Club” and the (See CHEST, Page A-4.) STOP FOR REPAIRS Ape Swats Elephant and Train Is Halted at Pittsburgh. PITTSBURGH, Nov. 10 (JP).—A train made an unscheduled stop here for repairs to a passenger—an ele phant. The.stop was made after Jiggs, a fun-loving ape who performs in Frank Buck’s animal exhibition. swatted amiable Minnie, the elephant. It took two veterinarians to patch up Minnie. h i / Ex-Prime Minister Dies on Ship Bound for South America. By the Associated Press LONDON, Nov. 10.—The death of James Ramsay MacDonald, the son of a poor Scottish farmer who lived to decline an earldom, divided Britain to day in appraisal of his life. Against those who lauded the three time prime minister as savior of the nation in the dark days of 1931 there were others who regarded him as a traitor to the Labor party he built. The 71-year-old Scotsman, Britain's first Labor prime minister and the first prime minister to visit the United States, died last night aboard a South America-bound ship on a quest for the peace and happiness he had failed to find in his unique, stormy political career. Sailed Last Thursday. He had sailed last Thursday in search of what he called “the most elusive of all forms of happiness— rest.” Death apparently was due to a heart attack following a long period of poor health. His daughter Sheila, his sole companion on the voyage, messaged that the body would be taken off the ship, Reina del Pacifico, at Bermuda Monday and returned for burial either in England or at his beloved Lossiemouth, Scotland. Relatives said Mr. MacDonald prob ably would be buried beside his wife, Margaret, who died in 1911, in the tiny cemetery of Spynle Kirk at Lossie mouth. The cemetery ires near where the river Lossie pours into the wind swept Moray Firth. Mr. MacDonald often praised the beautiful countryside which, he said, “makes a Scot want to stay there forever.” Tribute came from all parties for the man who rose from humble origin to No. 10 Downing Street. But the tribute was for two distinct phases of his career. Conservatives praised Mr. MacDon ald’s momentous action in forming a national government at the behest of King George V in the financial crisis (See MACDONALD, Page A-4.) OUT OF BUSINESS SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 10 (/F).— White-haired Peter P. McDonough, wealthy bond broker once accused as the director of a (1,000,000 police graft ring, was ruled out of business today under a stringent new State law regulating bail, bondsmen. The action climaxed a two-year in vestigation of alleged police graft which resulted in resignations or dis missal of several police officials and patrolmen. -t ' a NANKING IS FEARED JAPAN'S NEW GOAL Reinforcements Landed at Hangchow Bay for Campaign. BACKGROUND— Japanese campaign against Shanghai now nearly three months old nears completion with all Far Eastern metropolis captured with exception of Nantao, Chinese sub urb south of the French Conces sion, where small group of deter mined Chinese troops continue to hold out against the Japanese. Main Chinese forces retreated from Shanghai Monday to "winter lines” around Nanking. By the Associated Press. SHANGHAI, Nov. 10.—Japanese re inforcements landed on the south and north shores of Hangchow Bay today for what may become a major drive toward Nanking, China's capital. Chinese feared the reinforcements would attack Hangchow as the first step in a Nanking drive, now that Shanghai is in Japanese hands—except for Nantao, native quarter in which are remnants of the Chinese Army which retreated from Shanghai yes terday to defense lines further inland; and the International Settlement and the French Concession. A few Chinese also were holding out in Pootung, industrial center across the Whangpoo from Shanghai. Japanese utilized airplane and artillery bom bardment today in an effort to drive out the remaining Chinese. V. S. Ships Endangered. Many bombs fell along the Nantao Whangpoo River water front, within a few hundred yards of American and other foreign war vessels anchored in the river. * Chinese said 34 Japanese transports already had arrived off the Chekiang coast in the new Hangchow move, carrying approximately 40,000 soldiers. Capture of Hangchow would cut one of the two railroads now open between Shanghai and the capital. Chinese authorities declared the government waS confident that Chi nese forces now being rushed to Yuao would be able to check the new Japa nese reinforcements. Shanghai Battle Scene. Shanghai Harbor, off the French Concession, tonight was the scene of a bitter machine gun battle between Japanese war craft and Chinese troops on both banks of the Whangpoo. At nightfall three Japanese vessels Joined the efforts of their land forces to expel the Chinese from Nantao. The shelling of the Shanghai suburb was designed to drive out remnants of the Chinese Army which retreated yesterday. The Japanese shells and bombs probably took a smaller toll of life than might have been expected be cause of wholesale evacuation of civil ians from Nantao within the last 24 hours. Chinese soldiers near the French Concession border indicated they had no intention of withdrawing. Before the aerial bombardment they had withstood an attack by Japanese shock troops and had declared they would resist until death. Planes ranging west of Shanghai bombarded the airdrome area of Nan king, the nation's capital. Some Nanking residents said they feared a resumption of extended raids which had been interrupted by Japanese in tensification of the Shanghai cam paign. Battle Across Creek. A number of blocks to the west of the Nantao region subjected to bom bardment, Japanese and Chinese troops engaged in a spectacular, inde cisive battle across narrow, winding Zahwei Creek before thousands of spectators in the French Concession, including American observers. Comdr. Harvey Overesch, MaJ. E. G. Hagen and Capt. Evans Carlson saw the battle from reserved seats in the upper floors of a Chinese teahouse at the junction of Siccawei and Zahwei Creeks. The nearest fighting was less than 50 yards away. There were reports that the Jap anese planned to use Soochow Creek to transport military supplies despite the fact that it runs through Ameri can and British defense sectors. Suspended From Commons. LONDON, Nov. 10 (IP).—.David Kirkwood, Laborite, was suspended to day from the House of Commons, by vote of 178 to 104, after a stormy scene in which he shouted from the floor “I don't give a damn for the lot of you.” i OPPOSITION GROWS TO NEW PROGRAM EOR U. SHIPPING Proposal of Maritime Board for Mediation Unit Most Controversial. BUILDING OF VESSELS BY PRIVATE FIRMS SEEN Giving Commission Responsibility for Developing Oceanic Air Travel Also Disputed. BACKGROUND— Created for task of building up American merchant marine, Fed eral Maritime Commission found no reliable background of infor mation available when it took of fice. Consequently, commission has spent most of its time since last spring in developing facts for recommendations and future ac tion. Results of this inquiry were released this morning. By the Associated Press. Opposition was developing today to three major portions of the Maritime Commission's program for restoring what it termed America's "very sick” shipping industry. The biggest dispute may result from a recommendation for a mediation board to handle maritime labor prob lems. The commission said a solu tion is essential to continued exist ence of the merchant fleet. The other controversial proposals w7ere: That the commission be given re sponsibility for developing transoce anic air travel. That the ban be lifted against con struction of American ships abroad if savings would result. The commission outlined its program last night in perhaps the most com prehensive survey ever made of Amer ican shipping. There is prospect, it said, that pri vate companies may build 65 new cargo ships in the next five years. They would cost $137,000,000, of which the Government would pay more than $50,000,000 in subsidies. Government Must Build. If shipping falls off or if the com panies fail to raise enough capital, the commission said, the Government itself must build ships to meet for eign commerce and national defense requirements. Contemplated replacements fall short of the number of ships ready to retire from service. Of 155 ves sels in the subsidized fleet, 131 will be obsolescent in five years. Of 1,422 vessels of all types in the Nation's entire seagoing merchant fleet, 1,305 will be obsolescent in five years. These aging vessels are what re main, the commission said, of the "magnificent armada” of merchant ships which America had in 1922. In the age of vessels the commis sion noted one of the causes of labor troubles—cramped quarters. For al lowing these to exist, for paying sea men poor wages and for giving them generally poor working conditions, the commission blamed ship operators. On the crews, it placed responsibil ity for extraordinary "abuses” of their employment through strikes, break downs in discipline and order and costly interruptions to service. Mediation Group. The proposed mediation group would be similar to the Railway Mediation Board. Leaders of the National Mari time Union. C. I. O. affiliate, already have voiced opposition to such an agency on the ground it might limit labor's power. There was a question, too, as to whether labor would be whole-heart edly behind a commission proposal to organize at New York City a school, under Coast Guard supervision, for training 500 new seamen a year. In regard to aviation the commis sion predicted regular operation of North Atlantic planes in the near fu ture. It foresaw a possibility of dirigible service across the Pacific. In contrast to the commission's re quest for authority over these services, the aviation industry generally has taken the view that it should develop separately from other forms of trans portation. American shipbuilders were expected to oppose the commission’s recom mendation about foreign construction. Federal Subsidies Limited. The board noted that Federal subsi dies, designed to meet foreign low-cost competition, are limited to 50 per cent of the American cost of a vessel. If a ship can be built abroad for less than half of what it would cost here, the commission said, foreign construction would be cheaper. N The commission recommended to Congress nine changes in the Mari time Act. Most of them were designed to attract private investments, which probably wfl come, Chairman Joseph P. Kennedy said, from sources already identified with shipping interests. The nine proposed changes in the Maritime Act follow: 1. Authority for the commission to waive the present requirement that no official of a subsidized line be paid more than $25,000 a year. 2. Authorization for American lines to build ships abroad if they can do so at less than 50 per cent of the cost of American construction. Alternative (See MARITIME, Page A-3.) Tags Are Urged For All Bicycles In Pennsylvania HARRISBURG. Pa., Nov. 10 (iP Secretary of Revenue J. Griffith Boardman today urged licensing of bicycles in Pennsylvania because they “are getting to be a mighty big prob lem on the roads.’’ Boardman. whose department issues licenses to motorists, said tags should be required on bicycles to give their riders “a responsible status.” Page. Amusements B-10-11 Comics ...B-18-19 Editorials ...A-l# Finance __..A-17 Lost Si Found B-l*

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