11 Kasım 1937 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 2

11 Kasım 1937 Tarihli Evening Star Gazetesi Sayfa 2
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

HARLAN PERJURY TRIAL SET NOV. 22 Attack on Indictment of Ted Creech Fails in District Court. BACKGROUND— Senate Civil Liberties Committee began its investigation of alleged reign of terror in "bloody” Har * lan County, Ky., one of world’s richest soft-coal fields, during last * session of Congress. Dozens of witnesses recited incidents of shootings, beatings and other al leged terroristic activities by dep uty sheriffs and private police of mine operators. Spokesmen for operators denied the charges. An attack on the indictment charg ing Ted Creech, 35-year-old son of a Harlan County (Ky.) mine owner with committing perjury last April 16 be fore the Senate Civil Liberties Com mittee, failed in District Court today and the case was set for trial Novem ber 22. In a memorandum opinion, Justice Joseph W. Cox overruled a demurrer by Creech’s attorneys to the true bill. The principal argument which had been put forward by William E. Leahy, chief counsel for the husky coal mine superintendent, was that the Senate investigation of violence and labor intimidation in Harlan County was .beyond its authority under the Con stitution. Mr. Leahy contended the inquiry bad no possible relation to prospective -legislation. Investigation Held Proper. Justice Cox, in his opinion, adopted •the position taken by Chief Assistant United States Attorney David A. Pine that the investigation was proper and that its subject matter could be the basis of constitutional legislation. The charge against Creech is based on testimony he gave before the com mittee concerning a conversation he had with Richard C. Tackett, another witness, during the noon recess. Two days before Tackett had ad mitted on the witness stand that he ■and others were employed by an as sociation of coal mine operators in Harlan County to intimidate United Mine Workers of America members and to violate the rights of employes. Testimony False, Is Charge. ‘ On April 16 Creech allegedly told the committee concerning Tackett's testimony: j “He came up and told me he came up here and got drunk and made a statement here and did not know just what he was talking about when he made that statement." This testimony by Creech, the in dictment alleges, is false. In answer to an argument by Leahy that Creech's testimony was immaterial and hence not perjury. Justice Cox said: “Prom the facts alleged, it would seem clear that the statement was a direct attack upon the credibility and trustworthiness of material testimony previously given ■ by Tackett.” • > — -.- ■■ • - ■ ... STAR TRUCK DRIVERS IN 3D DAY OF STRIKE All Editions But Maryland and Virginia Fully Delivered, and 65 Per Cent of That. A strike of drivers of Star circula tion trucks moved into its third day this morning as the operators of rural delivery trucks resumed their picket line around The Star Building. * Despite the strike, all editions of The Star were fully delivered yester day with the exception of the Mary land and Virginia edition. Officials of s the paper said about 65 per cent of “that edition reached subscribers and * that a higher percentage would be de Jlivered today. The strike was started by 20 of 26 rural drivers, who were not under con * tract with the company. The Star •had a contract with the Newspaper -Drivers, Paper Handlers, Mailroom and Garage Helpers’ Local No. 605 of the International Brotherhood of Team sters, Chauffeurs, Stablemen and ^Helpers of America, an affiliate of * the American Federation of Labor. ?The rural drivers were not covered by 'the contract, as they joined the union After it had been executed. " The contract contained an arbitra ■•tlon clause, and the company contends ’that the strike of those members cov ered by the contract was a direct vio «lation of that clause. m '• jlEWS ERROR CORRECTED * «• — ■ J&llcrest Citizens’ Resolution Con n * demned License Grant. m * Due to a typographical error, it Swas erroneously stated in The Star Tuesday that a resolution was intro duced by Rudolph Malth at a meet ing of the Hillcrest Citizens’ Asso ciation “commending” the action of «che Alcoholic Beverage Control Board Jn granting a Class A liquor license to permit sale of alcoholic beverages at •2700 Good Hope road S.E. Mr. 'JMalth’s resolution condemned the ac tion of the board. “ The Star regrets the error. Playgrounds Backed. * People of England have subscribed "#12.500,000 to the National Playing ■Fields Association which will open playgrounds throughout the country. The Apple Is the Big Shot in Martinsburg, W. Va., in November More than 25,000 persons are expected in Martinsburg, w. Va., today to watch the parade of the Third Annual Apple Festival. The fiesta opened yes terday with the coronation of the Apple King. Here we see six school girls doing the coronation folk dance—Mary Thurston, Helen Griffith, Betty Mason, Jean Martin, Arian Adams and Mary K. Jones. Apples for the Apple King are placed before the throne by the Royal Gift Bearers, Julia Butts and Edna Grannigan. Later Ambassador Aranha of Brazil, made an apple speech. The coronation of King Edward III% Emperor of Apples. Actually he is Edgar A. Leathefman, 54, apple-grower who man aged the festival. Ambassador Aranha officiates. Representative Jennings of West Virginia, and princesses look on. —Staff Staff Photo. Move to Keep 15-Year-Olds In School Hit By the Associated Press. HARRISBURG, Pa., Nov. 11.— Bearded and black-frocked Aaron Beiler, brought a request from the Amish farmers of Southeastern Penn sylvania today that Amish children be exempted from certain age require ments of the State's new school code. Officials in the Department of Public Instruction said the new code, effective January 1, would permit exemption for farm hands after they are 15 years old. The exemption at present is 14 years. Beiler insisted his people wanted the 14-year limit continued. The Amish, he said, were strongly in favor of education, but considered education beyond the 14-year limit a matter of “worldly wisdom” and a challenge to their religious beliefs. The Governor’s office turned the re quest over to the attorney general. MARRIAGE TRAINING COURSES ARE URGED Increasing Divorce Kate Smashes Old Fallacy, Education Di rector Asserts. The old assumption that marriage alone can make a success of a home has been proven a fallacy by the increasing divorce rate, Willard W. Beatty, director of education of the United States Indian Office, declared last night in urging establishment of suitable courses in marriage training in the schools. Mr. Beatty was speaker at a dinner at Barker Hall that brought to a close the two-day Parent-Teacher In stitute sponsored jointly by the George Washington University and the Dis trict Congress of Parents and Teach ers at the university. The three major areas in which youth needs marriage guidance are economic, psychological and physio logical fields, according to Mr. Beatty. No school need dodge the issue because of lack of material, he added, because the Progressive Education Association has had a commission at work for the last two years preparing that. Yesterday afternoon the mothers and teachers heard Miss Ellen Lom bard of the Federal Office of Education on the joint responsibility of the home and school in childhood education. $5,000,000 IN GOLD GOES TO ENGLAND Metal Is Taken Out of America's $1,272,000,000 Inactive Treasury Fund. The Treasury disclosed yesterday that $5,000,000 worth of gold will be shipped to England today, bringing to $15,250,000 the known exports of the metal. A $10,250,000 shipment which left for France yesterday was the first physical outflow of gold from this country in nearly two years. The metal was purchased by the English and French stabilization funds to prevent their currencies from going too high in relation to the dollar. The gold will be taken out of the $1,272,000,000 inactive fund of the Treasury. Wagon Propelled by Wind. Three hundred years ago Simon Stevin, a Dutch inventor, devised a “horseless wagon,” a great, boatlike wogan propelled by sails which caught the breeze blowing in from the sea. 'l'" ------ □ LABOR CONTRACT National Board Tells Edison Company to Free Men for Any Union. By the Associated Press. The National Labor Relations Board ordered the Consolidated Edison Co. of New York to break its contracts with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, an American Federation of Labor affiliate. It also directed the company to advise its employes they were free to join any union they chose. The board's order followed a com plaint by the United Radio and Elec trical Workers, a C. I. O. affiliate, that the company and the A. F. of L. union had conspired to freeze the C. I. O. union out of Consolidated Edison plants. The order quoted Floyd L. Carlisle, chairman of the company's board of trustees, as having told employes the company would not enter into contracts with any other organization during the life of contracts with the I. B. E. W. The board also found that officials of the company’s old employe repre sentation plan, done away with when the Supreme Court upheld the con stitutionality of the Wagner Labor Disputes Act, had gone over to the I. B. E. W. and had used employe representation plan facilities in en rolling members for the A. F. of L. union. — ■ - - •-- ■ ■ ■ S. E. C. MAN SEES VIOLATION OF ACT Anti-Manipulative Provisions Not Observed by Three Persons, Examiner Reports. By the Associated Press. A Securities Commission examiner reported today he had found that Charles C. Wright of W’-'ght & Sex ton, NeW York Exchange firm, and two other persons had violated the anti-manipulative provisions of the Securities Exchange Act. The examiner, Edward C. Johnson, asserted that Wright, Herbert King, Norman Stern and Arnold & Co. cre ated a “false and misleading appear ance” of active trading in the com mon stock of the Kinner Airplane & Motor Corp., Ltd., a security regis tered on the Los Angeles Stock Ex change. / Johnson absolved Jere A. Sexton and George S. Simpson, co-partners of Wright, and Roy W. Arnold, Mau rice Goodman, Giuseppe Russo. Sam uel Strasbourger, Benjamin H. Ar nold and Benjamin P. Goodman, co partners of King and Stern. Commission officials said the firm of Arnold & Co. no longer is in busi ness. SCHOOL OF RELIGION APPROACHES CLOSE Rabbi Rosenzweig and Dr. Jones Deliver Last of Series of Addresses. The three-day convocation of th« School of Religion at Howard Univer sity drew to a close today as Rabbi Efraim M. Rosenzweig and Dr. Rufus M. Jones delivered the last of their series of addresses which have fea tured the sessions. Dr. Jones, who is connected with Haverford (Pa.) College, chose as hir subject "The Calming Hand,” citing the need of people to develop calm and peace "in the midst of chaos and turmoil.” Rabbi Rosenzweig of the Madison Avenue Temple in Scranton, Pa., talked on “The Shores of Truth.” RACING RESULTS Pimlico— FIRST RACE—Pane, *1.000; steeple chase; far 3-year-olds and np; the Con soUtian; 2 miles. Hideaway (T. Roby) 23.80 6.70 3.24 Swimalona (C. Brook*) 3.00 5.M Wmmbmw (A. Bauman) 2.64 Time. 3:47%. Also ran—a York Miller. Blackcock. aStcel Past. a lelrh McCarthy entry. Rockingham— Bp the Associated Press. * FIRST RACE—Purse. *800; eiaiminc; 3-rear-elds and np; 6 forlonrt. Happy Nymph (Hartle) 12.70 8.30 8.84 James A. (Bierman) 6.10 8.04 Prince Danny (Krcyits) 4.24 Time. 1114. , Also ran—Westr* Duke, Spey Crest. Euryalus. Takawalk, Bank Holiday. Car. rants, than time an ^ Bob Charlie. Hounds Would Rather Trail A Hamburger Than Hunt Fox sy me ftbsouaicu ricsa. JACKSON, Tenn., Nov. 11.—It seems that fox hounds would rather trail a hamburger than hunt a fox. The National Fox Hunters Associa tion was forced to. that conclusion today after a losing fight to keep entries in the field trials on the trail of foxes, instead of detouring to Jimmy Trollinger's roadside kitchen. Rober^ Rodes, Bowling Green, Ky„ association president, summed up the situation: "A fox hound can smell the aroma of hot coffee, barbecue and hamburgers a quarter of a mile away—which, you can see, is neces sarily disconcerting to the hounds." Trolllnger's rolling cafe has been parked near the starting point of the three-day-old trials and the nine Judges, after due deliberation, posted this announcement: “To relieve the situation, fox hunt ers should not patronize the lunch wagon, even though it is located on a public highway.” Trollinger had a ready answer for that one: "My best customers are the Judges,” said he. i Last Japanese Annapolis Grad Is Dead at 80 j ADMIRAL SOTOKICHI URIU. i i By the Associated Press. TOKIO, Nov. 11.—Admiral Baron Sotokichi Uriu, last surviving Japanese graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, died today at his home at Odawara, southwest of Tokio. He was 80 years old. Admiral Uriu played prominent roles in both the Chinese-Japanese War of 1894 and the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-5. Upon announcement of his death, Emperor Hirohito posthumously pro moted him to the senior grade of the second court rank and decorated him with the Grand Cordon of the Rising Sun With Paulonia Flower. Admiral Uriu played an important part in naval victories which estab lished Japanese naval predominance in the Far East. It was Uriu who struck the first blow for Japan in the Russian War when his squadron blockaded the Korean port of Chemulpo February 8, 1904, and sank two Russian warships. Uriu’s command then was convoying the first Japanese transports carrying troops for the campaigns in Manchuria. He was graduated from Annapolis with the famous class of 1881, one of the survivors of which is former United States Senator O. E. Weller of Baltimore. MANNS WILL DESCRIBE TRIP FOR ZOO ANIMALS The thrills, difficulties and amusing adventures they encountered in a round-the-world expedition after ani mals for the Washington Zoo will be described and illustrated with mo tion pictures tomorrow night by Dr. and Mrs. William M. Mann in the first of the National Geographic So ciety’s fall and winter lecture series. The lecture of the Zoo director and his wife will be presented in Consti tution Hall. The expedition, which had its base camp in Sumatra, on the other side of the world from Washington, collected more than 1,000 birds, rep tiles and beasts for the Zoo. It was sponsored by the Geographic Society in co-operation with the Smithsonian Institution, which administers the Zoo. TUSKEGEE BAND PLANS 2 CONCERTS TOMORROW The Tuskegee Institute Band of 75 pieces, under the direction of Capt. Frank L. Brye, will give two concerts here tomorrow. At 3:30 p.m. an especially arranged program for public school students will be given in the Gamet-Patterson Junior High School, Tenth and V streets N.W., and at 8 p.m. a program will be given ip the Armstrong High School. The band is here for the football game between Howard University and Tuskegee to be played at 3 p.m. Sat urday in the Howard Stadium. A JEWISH AUXILIARY SETS BENEFIT WORK Pajamas and Funds for Home for Children to Be Sought by Shower, Dance. The Washington chapter of the auxiliary for the National Home for Jewish Children in Denver gave a membership tea yesterday afternoon in the rooms of the Variety Club at the Willard Hotel. This organization takes care of children of tubercular parents from all parts of the United States who are hospitalized in Denver and also maintains a preventorium in that city. Yesterday's tea was under direction of Mrs. Hyman Berman and Mrs. Jos eph Zupnik, co-chairman, assisted by a committee. The president of the chapter. Mrs. Albert W. Jacobson, re ceived the guests. A program of vocal solos was presented by Mrs. Bernice M. Ratner accompanied by Miss Elena Crivella. The chapter is planning a

pajama shower to be held November 2* at 2 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center, when the price of admission will be a pair of pajamas for a child of any age from 5 months to 20 years. These will be distributed to patients in Glenn Dale Sanatorium and to chil dren throughout the city. The chapter is also planning a for mal dance to be held at the Willard Hotel December 8. when the proceeds will be divided between the national home in Denver and underprivileged children in Washington. APPEAL FOR RED CROSS MADE BY ROOSEVELT Tells People It Is Important That “We Further Increase the Popular Support.” President Roosevelt, who is hon orary head of the American Red Cross, yesterday asked citizens of the Nation to "respond generously” to the organization's annual membership roll call which begins today and ends Thanksgiving. "In order that the ever-increasing calls for Red Cross service may be met promptly wherever and whenever they are sounded, "the President said in a prepared statement, "It is of the utmost importance that we further increase the popular support always given to this great organization. 1 therefore urge our people everywhere to respond generously and promptly to the Red Cross membership roll call.’1 Mr. Roosevelt said the Nation could look with pride on the acompllsh ments of the Red Cross in that year when, “acting as our national rellel agency, the Red Cross gave practical assistance to move than a million people driven from their homes by the floods as "the gravest disaster in * • * peace-time history” of the country. MUNICIPALITY GROUP PLANS INCORPORATION Committee to Draft Papers foi Council on Administration Named. The newly-formed District Coum cil of Municipal Administration me last night for the third time at thi Hamilton Hotel and laid plans foi incorporation. The group is composed of repre sentatives of various civic organise tions and is designed to combat tai evils of the District and to form ai equitable basis for taxation of Wash' ington trade, business and profeS' sional people. A committee was appointed las night by Chairman A. Julian Bry. lawski to draw up by-laws and in' corporation papers for submission t< the next meeting at the Hamiltor at 8 p.m. Wednesday. Seventeen associations were repre' sen ted, of which six are immediately ready to affiliate And will be the in corporators. More than 30 mem bers are expected to affiliate by thi lint of the year, according to Jaequo Downs, executive secretary. mm plea Company Asks That Utilities Commission Be Made to Hear Its Plan. The Arlington St Fairfax Auto Rail road Co. asked the District Court to day to compel the Public Utilities Commission to consider its petition to run the "auto-railers” now operated in Arlington and Fairfax Counties, Va., into the District. Pointing out that extension of its service into downtown Washington would be a great convenience to its passengers traveling to and from nearby Virginia, the company has asked to be allowed to operate a "pick-up-and-delivery” service into Washington as far as Constitution and Pennsylvania avenues N.W. At pres ent the auto-railers stop at the Vir ginia end of Key Bridge. Through the law firm of Douglas, Obear, Morgan St Campbell, the com pany told the court the Public Util ities Commission has refused to con sider its application until it obtains authority from the Interstate Com merce Commission to engage in in terstate commerce within the Dis trict. Asserting it does not intend to ex tend its tracks into the District, the company said the proposed additional service is not an "extension of its line of railroad” within the meaning of part 1 of the‘Interstate Commerce Act, and consequently no authority from the I. C. C. is necessary. PENNSYLVANIABARS DECISION OF I. C. C. Refuses for First Time in History to Agree With Commission Opinion. By the Associated Press. HARRISBURG. Pa., Nov. 11.— Pennsylvania refused yesterday—for the first time in the history of the Commonwealth—to agree with an In terstate Comitnerce Commission de cision, by rejecting the requqest of railroads for a 15-cents-a-ton increase in freight rates. The refusal came through the new State Public Utility Commission. The decision, said Chairman Denis J. Driscoll, would help the 10 soft-coal producing counties of Western Penn sylvania to compete “a little better” with the West Virginia fields. Commissioner Richard J. Beamish said that coal shipped from West Vir ginia to the New England markets "enjoyed” a freight rate of $1 less than that shipped from Pennsylvania. “And the distance is less from Penn sylvania,” Beamish declared. Although the refusal to the rail roads' request was "flat,” Driscoll said the commission would investigate to determine “the reasonableness” of the increases. The commission said it would await the reply of the railroads to yesterday's action before going ahead with the inquiry. Railroads included in the proceed ings were the Pennsylvania, the New York Central, the Erie, Lackawanna, Reading, Jersey Central, B. St O. and Lehigh Valley. ROBINSON’S MURALS ARE NOW BEING HUNG Fainter Has Depicted 16 Great Lawmakers of Ages for Jus tice Department. The hanging of Boardman Robin son’s paintings of 18 great lawmaker* of the ages, to be placed in the cere monial entrance leading from the Court of Honor at the Department ol Justice Building, will be completed within a week, it was announced today by the Procurement Division of the ; Treasury Department, which commis , sioned Robinson for the work. The murals, 12 feet 6 inches ir height and covering approximately , 1,000 square feet, depict in two addi tional panels the signing of the Coh ; stitution and the English Magne i Charta. The lawmakers shown are Socrates Jesus, Vitoria, Grothis, Justice Holmes Thomas Aquinas, Chancellor Kent . John Marshall, Blackstone, Sir Ed ward Coke, Papinlan, Justinian, Solon Hammurabi, Menes and Moses, i Mr. Robinson, who is art director ol i the Colorado Springs Pine Arts Center (pent two years and seven months or . the canvases which are now beint ’ hung, wallpaper-fashion, in the Justice Building. Moat of the time, the artist said, was spent on research for the i character and authentic likenesses ol i the men portrayed. He will receive 820,000 for the work. I PROBERS SUMMON EMPLOYER GROUPS Senate Body to Look Into Repression of Labor’s Right to Organize. Organized employer interests were being put under the spotlight of the Senate Civil Liberties Committee to day as investigators followed up the service of subpoenas on some half dozen associations and several un named individuals who are believed to have concerned themselves inti mately with labor's exercise of its rights of free organization. Announcement of service of the subpoenas, with no returnable dates disclosed, was made yesterday after noon by Senators La Follette, Progres sive of Wisconsin, and Thomas, Dem ocrat of Utah, as part of a con tinuance of a study into “employer associations and so-called vigilante groups.” "The scope of the committee’s study,” the statement added, “will include the groups which have as a purpose the defeating, or influencing the right of labor to organize and bargain collectively, or which tend to influence, or repress the rights of free speech and assembly.” Senator La Follette said subpoenas had been served on the following: The National Civic Federation of New York, the Constitutional Educa tional League of New Haven, Conn.; the National Association of Manufac turers, New York City; the Johnstown Chamber of Commerce, Johnstown, Pa.; League for Industrial Rights, New York; New York State Economic Council, New York; George Williams & Co., New York. The National Association of Manu facturers has been a critic in the past of 'many Roosevelt administration policies. Johnstown. Pa„ whose Chamber of Commerce was summoned, was the scene several months ago of a C. I. O. strike against the Bethlehem Steel Corp. Senator La Follette said the com mittee’s study was an outgrowth of surveys in Michigan, Minnesota and Pennsylvania in recent months. Committee attaches said it was doubtful if necessary material for hear ings could be prepared for several weeks. For some time, committee investiga tors said, the committee has had agents looking into labor activities of the Ford Motor Oo. They asserted, however, that the agents have not reported and that no decision has been reached on whether subpoenas would be Issued for company officials. TALK IS GIVEN HERE BY BISHOP TUCKER Necessity of “Vocational Educa tion” Emphasized in Address by Prelate. The Right Rev. Henry St. George Tucker, Bishop of Virginia and pre siding bishop-elect of the Protestant Episcopal Church, emphasised the necessity of "vocational education" in churches of the world and warned against losing sight of this vocation in an address last night before more than 500 Sunday school teachers, clergymen and laymen attending the 40th anni versary services of the Sunday School Institute of the diocese. "I do not believe that God will ever permit the teaching of His truth to cease," he said, "but I do believe that God takes the privilege of leadership, and even of existence, away from one portion of the church when that por tion fails of its vocation, and hands it over to another.” The meeting was held in 8t. Mark's Church, Third and A streets S.E., with the Rev. W. R. Moody, rector, presid ing. The Very Rev. Noble C. Powell dew of Washington Cathedral, spoke at a meeting yesterday afternoon and the Right Rev. James E. Freeman, Bishop of Washington, at a dinner earlier last night. DEMOCRATS ELECT OXON HILL, Md., Nov. 11 (Spe cial).—Owen Thome has been elected president of the Young Democratic Club of Oxon Hill. Mrs. K. Breen was named secretary and Ed Gib bons, treasurer. The meeting, held at the home of Miss Bessie Phelps, past president, was attended by more than 500 per sons. It was announced that a plan is being considered to change the name of the club to the Hartwell Tucker Democratic Club. ’OWE RECAPTURE ' _ Escaped Receiving Home Inmates Are Found in Hobo “Jungle.” It cost police a lot of wind, energy end at least one injury this afternoon to outsprint two youths who had escaped several hours earlier from the Receiving Home by dashing out through the kitchen and upsetting a colored cook occupied with her pots and pans. The light-footed fugitives—Joseph Isenberg, 16, of the 1200 block of Eleventh street S.E., and Milton C. Gussman, 14, of Asheville, N. Y.— were spotted in a hobo “jungle” Just off the freight yards at Eleventh and M streets S.E. by Policeman R. P. Pitkins of No. 5 precinct. Officer Pitkins, having heard that ^ the boys had galloped through the kitchen of the Receiving Home, vaulted a 5-foot board fence at the rear, and outrun the guards, figured he needed help to capture the pair. He tele- * phoned his precinct for reinforce ments. Half a dozen officers responded. They closed in on the "jungle,” aware they might have a brisk foot race once the boys learned of their presence. When the youngsters spotted the blue coats, they set off across the railroad tracks at a lively pace. All Are Caught. Policeman E. J. Fitzgerald was traveling fast when he slipped on the rails, cutting and bruising his shins, knees and hands so badly he had to be treated at Providence Hospital. The officers, however, came off victorious. They overtook the boys and returned them to the Receiving Home. * G. H. Leonard, superintendent of the home, said that Isenberg, Guss man and another boy apparently had planned the escape this morning, act ing in concert as the other children were being seated in the dining room for breakfast. Guards at the home were able to overtake the third fugitive, who was younger and less agile than Gussman and Isenberg. The Juvenile Court is planning to send Gussman, an orphan, back to * New York. He was picked up here by members of the automobile squad in connection with the theft of a car. Isenberg, suspected in several house breakings, was arrested Monday shortly after he escaped from the In dustrial Home School on Wisconsin avenue N.W., police said. | Home Overcrowded. Mr. Leonard said that overcrowding at the home made it difficult to keep the inmates under adequate supervi sion. There are 52 beds for inmates * in the old building rented by the Dis trict. This morning there were 63 children in the home, about an aver age number. For years Mr. Leonard and other District officials have been seeking an appropriation from Congress for an adequate building to serve as a re ceiving home for juveniles. Their re quest for a $200,000 appropriation has been turned down several times. Meanwhile, overcrowding makes it difficult for officials to separate the delinquents from those unfortunates , who may be lost, destitute of a suit able home or otherwise in need cf temporary accommodation and supet vision. The escapes today, according t > police, are only two of many which occur at the home from time to time Little can be done about the situation, officials say, until better facilities are provided. FOUR POWERS TALK • POLICY ON FAR EAST TJ. S., British, French and China t Discuss Course if Japan Won’t Negotiate. By the Associated Press. BRUSSELS. Nov. 11.—Envoys of the * United States, Britain, France and China attending the Brussels confer ence on the Far Eastern war met to day to consider a possible policy in the event Japan refuses to talk peace with China. Dr. V. K. Wellington Koo, China's conference delegate, said a useful ex change of views had taken place, but that nothing concrete developed. The four-power talk followed an early morning visit by Norman H. Davis, United States delegate to the conference, and Britain's delegate. Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden, to Paul H. Spaak, foreign minister in the , resigned government of Premier Paul van Zeeland. None of the leading conference dele gates joined in the Belgian Armistice Day tribute before the flame of the unknown soldier’s tomb, but Mr. Eden attended a brief service at the British church and laid a wreath on the, Anglo-Belgian memorial. JOURNALIST TO SPEAK ON STATUS OF SPAIN Leland Stowe to Talk Tonight in Rialto—Dr. Chi, Stewar Also on Program. Leland Stowe, winner of the Pulitzer prize for Journalistic achievement In I 1930, will be principal speaker at a ,1 peace meeting of the Washington Friends of Spanish Democracy and the American League Against War and Fascism at 8:30 o’clock tonight ' In the Rialto Theater. Mr. Stowe, who was a correspondent in Spain for some time, returned re cently from an Inspection trip of the Loyalist battle fronts. Maxwell St. Stewar, associate edi tor of the Nation and formerly a member of the faculty of Yenching University in Peiping, and Dr. Chao’ Ting Chi, Chinese economist and historian, also will speak. Mr. Stewar i will talk on the basic causes of the spreading world conflict.’ Dr. Chi, who at present is a lecturer at the New School of Social Research, will discuss the war in China. HADASSAH WOMEN PLAN OBSERVANCE TOMORROW Hadassah Sabbath, with the serv ices In accorance with tradition as conducted by the Hadassah women, will be observed tomorrow at the Adas Israel Congregation at Sixth and Z streets N.W. Mrs. Raphael Tourover, president of the local Hadassah, the Women’s Zionist Organization of j America, will coinduct a apeclal forum. > I 5 ART PICTURES [ • Sets Number 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 E Now Available c nA^ .one ^ entitled to °^e week’s set of Four § Pictures in the Art Appreciation campaign | of'The Star upon payment of only 39c at the Art (Counter in the Business Office of The Evening Star. By mail—inclose 46c (stamps not acceptable), addressed to the Art Appreciation Counter, The Evening Star. “ Indicate desired set—No. 1—2—3—4—5 Address_______ \ A«e (if stalest)-Tean. i 1 i

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler