20 Haziran 1900 Tarihli Fort Mill Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

20 Haziran 1900 Tarihli Fort Mill Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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7"^ ; FORT MILL TIMES. ~1 V< ;'I IX. FORT MILL, S. (WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20,1900. NO.IL -J . r 1 ? M 'ID BLOODSHED NO* | ' ' Entire npire of China in a State of Actual War. ?i ?.? ALL 1MUNICATION CUTOFF. e t ~ * i)ur C ul Not Heard I rom-Hurried antfc .xeitcd Cabinet Meeting In Wa i njtton. Lo n. By Cable.?A special dispatch om Hong Kong says all the Peklt ;gatlons have been destroyed rfhd tv t the Oermau minister, Baron foD 1 telex, has been killed. What with the reports coming through Tlen-Tsin that the Boxers have massaered a number of native converts and servants of foreigners in the east city of l'ekin. besides burning ; the Catholic Cathedral at Pekin, the gitiuition in the Far East appears perceptibly graver. To add to the diflieulties cobies the news that telegraphic i communication between Shanghai and Tien Tsln is totally interrupted Conse- ] queiiUy the prevailing uncertainty as to the faets and possibilities of the J poei ion will bo accentuated. Im's generally recognized now that ' thtf oaltlon of the foreigners, at IVki W s |>erilous. as there is but a short st? from the massacre of the servants 1 of . reigners to the killing of the for] elr^'irs themselves. a massacre is averted." says The I Si}" tator, "and the nalaee reriiwr>?i in I 8? . dng obedience. the grand difil? ' will be to decide on the next: ft' j The powers can neither encamp r * ianently in Pekln nor leave until i tvrtahlishcd that the government I ft *e|Mired to respect international i nations and able to hold China toftrcter. If anarchy breaks ont in < iui the ohjpct of the powers is de^r ?d The failure or success of the lent efforts may involve a series j] vvars of which no man can see the ontinning. The Spectator suggests t an egress from the present situai a must, be found in the appointa nt, by the representatives of tiie ^-jvers, of a competent vizier, as lias often been suceessfully done in ijier Eastern crises. Otherwise the iJeoua calamity of China falling to ?feces may in a few months be exciting the cupidity and overtaxing tlia iipaclty of all the ruling men. (Commenting upon the supposed lies. Qi atlon of the United States to actively Hrtlclpate in the movement to sup. ess the Roxers. as reported in cable < ispatches from Washington. The Sta.1 st sajs: "No European power will misunderstand the present hesitation of the United States and jump at the conclusion that American feeling and opinion may he disregarded. The United States will undertake military operations in China as it did against Spain If the protection of its citizens require? them or if the powers threat. eh to exclude Amprlcnti oh from their rights in China acquired by freaty. Unless the British ministers tnuddle matters. Great Britain can irujjton on the assistance of the United guiles and Japan in maintaining, even Dy force, the policy of the open door In China." A cabinet meeting held under the presidency of Lord Salisbury was concerned almost wholly with the situation in China. Not a Word From Conger. 1 Washington, 1). C.. Special.?Not a word of news camo to the State Department over night from Minister Conger, who has now been cut off from communication since last Tuesday. Even the United States Consul* in Nortli China ports tire silent. Admiral Kempff has not been heard from slnee yesterday. This absence of official reports has given rise to grave apprehension here. It was expected that (there might be delay In hearing from Mr. Conger, but in the case of Admiral pvemnff an earlv renort wn< ior?u?>.i f.? lind it is feared that the officers of the (foreign fleet at Tnku have been prejvented from reaching the cable station [thero by the open hostilities of the .Boxers or by the sinister orders of the Chinese government. Bryan's Nomination Assured. Chicago. Special.?By the action of the Democratic Stale Convention in California. Missouri, Kentucky. (leorgtft and Vermont Hon. William Jennings Bryan is assured of the nomina. Ition for president on tlie Democratic ticket. The iristruotions given delegates by those five States carry Mr. Bryan's vote, it is believed, considerably ovor the two-thirds necessary to nominate him. Aspirants for ricl.ean's Shoe*. ( Columbus. 0.. Special.?The overj throw of John R. McLean as the leader ' of the Ohio Democrats In the State ' convention this week lias already ; brought out rival candidates for his ' place on the national committee anrtj J for the Democratic nomination for United States Senator next year to succeed J. B. Foraker, Tom L. John^rn, of Cleveland, formerly a member ofj Congress, is the eandidato for national committeeman, and C. N. Haskell, a railroad operator of Toledo and Ottawa, is in the field for the senatorial 1 nomination. t NEWS SUMMARY. The South. Samuel Adams, colored, who enterei the room of two white girls and triql to assault them, was lynched at Columbus, Ga. tseneving be caused her to be turntd out of 'her home. Annie Hill, coloral. stabbed Edward Carney to death fit Norfolk. Va. Pierre Lorillard's famous $LOO.CttO houseboat Caiman was destroyed by fire while anchored in the river nta** New Smyrna, Fla. C. Wilford Peters, in Jail at Chattanooga, Tenn., for alleged bigamy, shys if he really was married a second time he was under the influence of hypnotism. The annual convention of the ScotchJrish Society of America, met at KiioxIville, Tenn.. Acting President Dr. John McIntosh, of Philadelphia presiding. A requisition for extradition of former Governor Taylor, of Kentucky has Iteen asked for. Some one in ambush shot and killed John Ovess and bis young son at Mobile. Ala. The North. John Anderson, formerly in the employ of Broker Adolpli A. Kuhn. who disappeared leaving a shortage of nearly $1,000,000, has heen arrested at Chicago, III., and admits conspiracy. An unknwon man sprang from a Staten Island ferry boat at New York and was drowned. Because James J. Donnelly had a 1..1.U ,.r ....... ?l.w. ...lit. . *.. Ilttl/ll m lVlll|Mllg Ituu |>lCkl.jf Bradley, at New York, his wife seeks a divorce. Cardinal Gibbons has conferred degrees on a largo number of students at the Catholic University, Washington, D. C. Despondent over financial reverses, Thomas B. Cottrell, an old and well- ( known speculator on the Board of Trade of Chicago, 111., fatally shot himself. A diamond pin valued at $1,500 was j stolen at New York from Mrs. T. Suf- j fen Taller, daughter of Pierre Loril- : lard and wife of the well-known fourin-hand whip. An hour before his wedding to a daughter of Millionaire Otto Grantz, at Deadwood, 3. 1)., Henry J. Coventry was arrested for practicing medicine 'without a license. The Spanish cannon loaned to Kansas City, Mo., was found to be loaded. A terrific wind storm passed over Ohio Monday, doing thousands of dollars of damage to fruitGrip, culminating in insanity, caused Rev. Thomas B. Cheney, of Washington Court House, Ohio, to commit suicide. During the first day as attendant at the New Richmond (Wis.) Insane Asylum, Antone Sorensen was killed by a j patient. By shooting Winthrop Fallon, a traveling man. of Brookline, Mass., killed himself In the Hollenden Hotel at Cleveland, Ohio. The American Architectural league will meet in Philadelphia next year. Joseph C. Ix>welyn, of Chicago, 111., was elected president of the League on Saturday. Sculptor Holgie Hoeck committed suicide at Chicago, 1 ill., by drinking prussic acid. The Union I^abor Lyceum, said to be an educational institution, has been organized at Chicago, ill. After receiving two gunshot wounds .Watchman James Delaney shot and killed an unknown burglar at Chicago 111. Foreign. The 1209 immigrants brought by tlie Spanish steamer (Iran Antilla were j landed at Now York after $10,000 had , been given to indemnify the United i States should anv of the imtnliri :mi? . hceome public charges. Kmporor Kwang Hsu, of China, ii reported to be anxious to oust the Dowager impress and resume his power. Doers killed, wounded or captured Tin entire battalion of Derbyshire militia at Roodeval, in the Orange Rivet colony. The Hritish expedition for the reliel of Comassie, West Africa, has been checked by natives. A battle with rebels 'has occurred near Panama, resulting, it is reported, In the defeat of the government forces. Prisoners in the San Juan, Porto Ri. (to. penitentiary revolted on accout of the alleged bad quality^of their food. Appollnario Mablni, chief of Aguinhldo's cabinet, is reported to be penni1 less and dying In an American prison. ?? Miscellaneous. Governor Stephens, of Missouri, in a ?orina! statement accused Mayor Zeigenbein, of St. Ix>uis, with encouraging viu; sirei'i var iiriKcrs ror political effect Ignatius Donelly, Mlddlc-of-the-Road PopullRt candidate for'tlt^ Vice Presidency of tho United 3t^?eS, hAs -written a formal letter ?r acceptance. WRITES 101)1 II WORDS Bill Arp Has to Consult a Dictionary for Their MeaningMANY CHANGES THESE DAYS. People Continually Coining Words ? Theoli gians and Church Doctrines-* M a viiici mailers. o When we were little school boys it was a big thing to spell "Baker." When we reached "crucifix" we had visions of expansion and suspenders and when we progressed to "unintelligibility" and "incomprehensibility" we thought there were no more worlds to conquer. But there were, for away on near the last page was a catalogue of Jawbreakers. such as "ph-th-is-ic," which wc called "tisie," and "m.iohilimaekinac" and "bonny clabber." etc. We innocently supposed that the old blue back spelling book eontained all the words in the world, but. by and by found out that we were only in the rudiments. The little dictionary and English reader and Murray's ('.rammar and Smiley's Arithmetic were all ahead of us. In course of time, however, wc learned to parse, which is a Latin word taken from "quae pars oratione"?what part of speech. Then we mastered the rule of three, which is now called proportion. and soon advanced to tare and tret, which we whispered "was enough to make the devil sweat." About this time we began to wear shoes all the year round and began to brush our hair, anil had picked out a sweetheart and held her hand on the sly when we stood up to recite, and sometimes we used the looking glass to see how the downy beard was coming. When well up in our teens we were promoted to me institute and introduced to initio and Greek and Algebra and History. I remember the iirst sentence in the old "Historia Sacra," "Dens Creavit coelnin et terrain intra sex diess"?God created the heavens and the eartli in six days. It was like a confession of faith ami made a more lasting impression. for we had to study it out and parse it. 1 remember our history and how Thomps Allan, who had been poring over Alcibiades, Pericles. Thucides. Sophocles and Demosthenes, suddenly came on a sentence beginning with the word "besides" and he called it "bes-ides" and thereby got a nickname that stuck to him through life. Put we old men have long since forgotten our I^atin and Greek except the small words that make up much of our modern English. Even a limited knowledge of Latin and Greek is a great advantage and great comfort in defining our language. It is of inestimable value to professional men, to doctors and druggists, botanists and horticulturists and those who cultivate flowers. But nobody can readily read Latin or Greek nowadays except the professors and teachers in our schools. Not long ago I pondered over a Latin preface in a very old book and 'had to | give 11 up. i turned it over to. t'roressor Daves and he rendered it very beautifully and no doubt correetly, but bis Rood wife told me as a secret that be worked on it evey night till midnight fo a whole week wit.li his eoat off and the perspiration oozing from his classic brow. I was ruminating about these things because 1 came across some words today that I never heard of and had to consult the big dictionary for the meaning. Of eourse we have to make new words all the time to keep up with inventions and science, but these words are old, as old as John Calvin, and seem to have created a mighty discussion in making up the Presbyterian confession of faith at Westminster Abbey 250 years ago. 1 was perusing an editorial in a New York paper in which it was stated that over forty presbyteries of the northern ehureJt were in favor of amending the confession of faith and going hack to superlapsarianism, which was the doctrine of John Calvin. That the Westminster confession was sublapsinnrian and not Calvin istic. That was a revelation to me, and so I have boon reading up on these abstruse things, and find that there vp _! c i InnP" ??rv<l liitinr .!?_ ?ueclon o Westminster as to whether God decreed the doctrine of election before h? arnatlon of man or after lie fell. Calvin declared the former, which ho called sublapsinarianisni, but the Westminster assembly declared that the decm' of election and reprobation was' not determined on by God until Adam had sinned and fell. 1 tell you, my Christian friends, those two long, words are to the common mind as unintelligible and Incomprehensible as were "un'intelligibility" and "ineomprehenslbllity" to me when a school boy. 1 have got along without them all those years and 1 am not going -.o strain my mind with them now. There is enough in the sermon on the mount to guide us and comfort us in the journey of life. These old time theologians were desperately in earnest on doctrinal matters, for they were in a mighty controversy with a mighty foe and no man had a right to believe as ho pleased and ho at peace. Rven Calvin had Servotus burned as a heretic because he denied the trinity of

the God head. Servetua was a Unitarian in faith and a pood man in all the relations of life. Sometimes 1 fear we have too much complexity of doctrine. I mean some of the preachers and theologians of the sahools. The people are all right and give themselves very little concern about doctrine. They xvant preachers to preach about lifo ifnd duty, how. to live and how to die. It is not doctrine that takes converted people into this church or Chat church. These reflections on old Father Jacob and his ladder provoke me to say that it must have taken a doctrine of election and some amazing grace to have kept him in the favor of God, for he was a selfish man and kept an eye out for his personal gain. He began by defrauding his brother out of his birthright, and later on tricked his father-in-law out of his cattle, and after he awaked from that dream at Ilethel he tried to make a bargain with the Ix>rd and said: "If God will bo with me and give me bread to eat and raiment to put on. and I come to my father's bouse in peace, then shall the L*>rd bo my God." Almost any sinner Would do that now and even some church members will vow to give a hundred dollars to the ohurch if they Aiake a thousand on a certain speculation.? Bill Arp, in Atlanta Constitution. The Postmaster General has awarded a contract for supplying a large quantity of envelopes, etc.. for the use of the Executive Department during the fiscal year to the 1'nited States envelope Company, of Springfield, Mass. News Items. The National Conference of Jewish Charities, at Chicago, 111., adjourned Thursday. For printing criticisms upon the army. all the editorial staff of the Voce de Mexico were sent to prison for six months at the City of Mexico. Dr. Kennedy, convicted of the murder of IKjlly Reynolds, at the Grand Hotel. New York, has been denied i new trial iiv the Mow Vnrb Court. Confests Settled. Philadelphia. Special.?The Rcpuhlican national committee put in three long sessions on the contests which have been before it and adjourned into Friday night with all the controversies practically disposed of except that from Delaware. An important action was the seating of the Brownlow delegates in the Tennessee contest and refusing admission to the friends of Pension Commission Kvans. The contest was very bitter and at one time there was a possibility of a serious encounter between Brownlow and Kvans. Seized by Sheriff. Frankfort, Kv., Special.?The offii ? of the State Treasurer is in the custody of the sheriff. Assistant Treasurer Long said lie had received no authority from Former Tresurer Day to turn over that office although he had tele?.1. - -i * * Kiuimt'ii iiif uLLier ami no declined to let Demo?ratic Treasurer Hanger in. Hanger took out a writ of possession in Judge Moore's eourt and the sheriff took possession of the office. News Items. Since June 7 15 women and children. who tried to kindle fires with kerrosene oil. were burned to death. While trying to prevent a fight in a saloon at Buffalo, N. V.. Michael Joyce was fatally tabbed by George Fisher. While working on the cantilever bridge at Niagara Falls. N. Y., Henry Soipple fell 200 feet to instant death. Admiral Dewey and party 'have returned to Washington, all well, aftei an eight-days' trip West. Major II. C. Hale has taken oosses ?Ion of the island of Bohol, Philippine group, where he found ah orderly native republic. The designs for the new Baltimore custom house will be considered by the board at. Washington Thursday next. The Grand Conunandery of the Grand Bodge of Masons of North Carolina yuet in Charlotte Tuesday night. Grand High Priest Randolph, of Asheville, delivered the annual address. The Southern Music Teachers' Association opened its semi-annual convention at Atlanta Tuesday night. At the first session Dr. It. 11. Peters, of Spartanburg. S. C., responded to the address of welcome, and interesting papers wore read by William Armstrong, of New York; A. J. Grantvoort, of Cincinnati, and Joseph McLean, of Cincinnati. General Otis arrived in Washington Monday, where he reported to Assistant. Secretary Meiklejohn. Of course women jump at conclusions. That's the season tliev always turn to the last chapter of a novel. Ducks and Cecse Like Weeds. A weed ean hanlly be of any benefit except that it keeps the farmer hustling and thus makes him stir up the surface of the soil, which enables it to hold the moisture much better than if a crust was alowed to form upon the surface. Some of the weeds such as plantain, purslane, ragweed and plu- 1 weed are all what the ducks and geese would term a "u-licacy." and if they were allowed to forage on such food they would in most cases leave grain i for it and would be apt to clean up the spot infested with the weeds in such a manner that it would not be liable to trouble the farmer again for some time I to come. MORE FIGHTING EXPECTED. The Boers Are Occupying New Positions. BRITISH CHANGE POSITION TOO Buller May Move Into Orange River Districts and Co-Operate With Methuen and Rundle. London, by Cable.?Ix>rd Roberts' dispatches leave affairs east of Pretoria Adth the Bocre withdrawn to new positions, Tuesday. News of fresh fighting is expected at the War Office, but none came Friday night. General Handle's patrol had a skirmish with Boer videttew again Wednesday. Some won. der is expressed here as to what he is doing with three divisions. It is assumed by some that General Roller will move into Orange River Colony and co-operate with Lord Methuen and General RtindJe in bagging President Steyn and his 7,000 or 8.000 followers. Part of Christian Botha's force has halted at Paandekop. 18 miles northwest of Volksrust. Boer parties are still near Volksrust and fire occasionally upon the British pickets. The British government is considering whether a substantial force should not be sent to China from South Africa. It is thought unofficially tli.it Lord Roberts could spare a brigade or two. and the necessary transports are now in South African waters. The commander of the expedition it is said will probably be General Sir William Nicholson. A dispatch from Lorenzo Marques, dated Friday, says: "Persons have arrived here who have seen the preparation of the Boers and learned lhat they will retire, when, forced, through the Lydenburg district into the Zoutpanberg region, adjoining Rhodesia and Oazaland." The Lorenzo Martinez correspondent of the Times says: It appears that Steyn and not Kruger. is now the stumbling block in the way of the surrender of the burghers. Shortly after the British entry into Pretoria. Mr. Kruger proposed to reopen the peace negotiations. Mr. Steyn, bearing in mind that his former advice was scouted, demurred to this and pointed out that ac. cording to the treaty between the Republic neither could conclude peace Without tlie other. "Mr. Kruger, equally unwilling to incur the charge of a breach of faith, had to continue the war. Nothing further is known regarding the rumored peace negotiations: but it is n mnttor- ?t toiiety that Mr. Kruger favors pdace on almost any terms, but dislikes personally to take^an initiative that would involve unconditional surrender der. Ninety-seven burghers out of 200 in one commando have returned to their homes. l-'rom the Philippines to China. Washington. D. C., Special.?It seems probbale that, after all, the United States troops in the Philippines will be called upon to furnish a contingent to assist in the rescue of the foreign missionaries in China, and in the protection of tho foreign embassies and legations. A great change has come over the administration in this regard for as late as Friday there was a Arm determination not to go beyond the employment of marines and sailors. There was still such a purpose when the cabinet mot and there is even now a disposition to limit the United States forces employed to the navy, if sufficient force can be secured from that branch of the service. So enquiries are being made of the navigation bureau and in turn of Admiral Remey, to see to what extent the United States forces in China can be augmented. It is relized that the small force now engaged is entirely disproportionate, when compared with the foreign contingents, to the interests and duty of the United States, 'there is reason to believe that the navy has done all that it can do with safety in China at this stage, and that recourse must be had to the army. Already Admiral Remey lias indicated that be cannot sparo more marines, and he is looking to the Navy Department for another battalion to replace the men he has been obliged to withdraw from the naval station at Cavite to assist Admiral Kern pfT. The Sick Returning. Manila, lly Cable.?Senor Pedro Paterno, former President of the so-called Filipino government, has been released temporarily, and he is now conferring with Senor Felipe Ruencamino, former Minister of Agriculture and Commerce, with reference to the latter's peace platform. Two hundred men of the Eighteenth Infantry, who are sick, are returning by the transport Han n, in i uurge 01 captain IA>WIS. Important Capture. Washington, D. C.t Special.?An important capture of Filipino insurgents was reported to the War Department Friday morning, by General MacArthur. in the following cable message: "Manila, June 155. "General Maoabulos, with eight officers, 124 enlisted men and 12-4 rifles, surrendered to Colonel E. H. Liseom, of the Ninth Infantry, at Tarlac, this morning. Maoabulos is the most important and last insurgent leader in Tarlac and Pangasinan. MAC ARTHUR." SOl'TH CAROLINA CROPS. ??? e Past Week Favorable for Cultivation and Harvesting. Favorable temperature prevailed during the week ending 8 a. m., June 11th. The average for the week was about normal, with unusually higher or lower temperatures. There was rain over the whole State, heaviest in Oconee and Pickens counties, with a maximum fall of 5.69 inches at Walhalla. Scattered localities, in other portions of the State, had from 3 to over 4 inches. Washing rains occuired throughout the Savannah valley, also in Colleton and Chesterfield counties. The rain all was generally Sufficient .*111(1 1 tnil ntrtra fain is needed in the Wateree river basin. The rains interfered with barm work over the northwestern counties where fields are becoming grassy. There are few complaints of grassy fields in other sections. Hail fell in Barnwell county, doing slight damage. The week's weather was favorable on all crops, and a marked improvement is noted over the entire State. There was a lack of sunshine during the week. Corn continues small, but is healthy ami is now growing fast. Some has boon laid by. Worms are less troublesome, and better bottom land stand? have been secured. Cotton is now doing well. It is undersized for the season, and some is not up, and in the uorthwestern counties hopping to stands is not finished and the crop needs cultivation. Some sections report the prevalence of lice. The crop now needs sunshine and hot weather. It is fruiting well in the southeastern counties. Wheat harvest is nearly finished, except in the northwest portion wehero it has just begun. The indications are for the best yield in years. Oats harvest well underway. The conditions are variable, and the crop rather below the average. Tobacco worms continue troublesome. otherwise this crop is doing well, but shows the effects of tho previous cool, dry weathers Rice planting is finished^ except in the Georgetown districts where rain and high tides delayed the work. Melons arh very promising. Peaches, plums and apples are ripening, the latter are very scarce. Minor field crops, and gardens are doing nicely. The whole crop outlook is very promising. Appointments No Good. Columbia. Special.?All of the county hoards of control of the State appear to be absolutely without legal authority. Attorney General Bellinger held that the State zoard of control has no authority to commission the members of the county boards of control and that the commissions from that body are without effect. Commissions must he obtained from the Governor, as ar? all other appointments of State or county officers. The question has been decided in connection with the Bamberg case, of which mention has been made. This decision is that all commissions to members of the count! boards sent out by the State board &r? not worth the paper they are written on. A Terrible Accident. Florence, Special.?A Timmonsville mother was a few days ty?o the uncon scious cause or an accident wnicn resulted In the terrible death of her little child. The mother, Mrs. P. It. Rowen, was cleaning a pot with boiling water. Her work done, she turned to throw the water quickly out of the window. In the meantime the little child had clambered upon the window sill, and it was into its smiling little face that the boiling water dashed. The little one suffered intense agony and yesterday succumbed to the accident. Mrs. liowen is heartbroken. News Items. State Chairman Jones has received the following additional pledges; ('. T. Wyche, for Congress, from the lid district; James H. Tillman, for Lieutenant 'Governor; T. J. Strait, for Congress, from the 5th district; E. E. Vcrner, for Congress, from the ^d dis. trict; J. H. Wharton, for railroad com missioner. Prof. J. R. Blake, formerly chairman of tho faculty of Davidson College, and one of the most noted educators of the South died at his home in Greenwood Friday nig*ht from complications following an attack of grip. He had been sinking for several days and his x death was not unexpected. The interment was in Greenwood cemetery at o'clock Sunday afternoon. His wife who wa^s Miss Elizabeth Maxwell, o Pendleton, survives him. Tiiov ii no children. The boiler in Chas. F. Reed's saw mill which is located five miles west of Fife Vake, Mich., exploded early Saturday morning, killing three men and injuring ten others. I*

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