25 Temmuz 1900 Tarihli Fort Mill Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

25 Temmuz 1900 Tarihli Fort Mill Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
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\ FORT MILL TIMES. VOL. IX. FORT MILL, S. t'., WEDNESDAY. FLY 2.*>, 1900. \(). ,?) STILL STUMPING ON Politics Not Quite as Hot as the Weather. SENATOR TILLMAN IS ALONG TOO And Helps the Boys Contribute to the Clayety of Nations?Synopsis of tlit SpeecheSw At Bennettsvillc. Bennetts llle, Special.?The meeting here was attended by over a thousand nPllnle r.twl Uiav nntnn fanmilnr. ... 1 . ...... vmiiv iv/. iuin a iu iirur the discussion of live issues. The first speaker was Barney R. Kv- ! ans. He said he had been taunted with the fart that he would not in Marlboro attack tin record of \V. 0. Evans. He renewed his charges taday and said they were direct at \V. It.'s official record. W. 1>. has no right to ride on a pass, lie trust pay his tare and railroad rotunds according to law. Mr. Berry said this county was pros, porous because it wa. a prohibition county. Prohibition docs prohibit here Col Pettlgrew was willing for \Y I). Evans to carry the county, but , he wanted the votes not going to Evans. \Y. B. Evans, who introduced his 1 competitors, had not intended to speak, ' hut replied to Barney. The rates are not driving mills out if the State. Five | have been established in this county , since he went on the board, i'acolet is building a new mill in C.eorgia because the*altitude o Cheraw Is too low. and the mills twin- i-iinniiinr ...... ....... 1-- i * uvui iy all the cotton raised in tin- State. .1. 11. Wharton proposed to correct evils of demurrage, overcharges, etc. W. 1), Mnyfleld is not here. Rther* idge has not been with the campaign for live meetings. The first candidate for governor to speak was Frank B. Gary. 11" said he would not force a dispensary on Marlboro and he did not want prohibiti >n forced on Abbi ville. T,pf each have what it wants, lie believed in the dispensary law. Patterson was the next speaker. He is not well has been 'Sick for three days. This, is the political birthplace of Ben Tiilni'.n. There is a powerful newspaper trust, ami M> Sweeney tried to get the ptilI of the press. Patterson stilted he had stn k to t e dispensary through the scandal last fall. He did not want to force the dispensary on Marlboro, but prohibition is hut a : sentiment here. In addition to Charleston's tiger hub stry. he claimed that there are over 200 in the city of Colum- i bia. The law can suit lie absolutely enforced in Charleston, but he would do it better than it is done now or step down from office. Gov. Mi-Sweeney said that all Patterson wants is to fool the people to put him in office. Pattorson looked all over the vouchers in the c mptroller general's office and could find nothing against the administration but war- ! runts paying for a few newspapers. No man in South Carolina is so Ignorant as to think that a newspaper's support can be bought for a dollar a year. Every governor had subscribed for papers?some had even taken magazines. Col. Walt Whitman came at the eleventh hour, arriving from Cheraw. : His quaint witticisms kept the crowd i laughing. Col. Jas. A. Hoyt is in accord with ' Marlboro?a prohibitionist as long as 't Marlboro has had prohibition. This county has resented any attempt to chunge. Marion hud been a prohibition county, but a dispensary was established there without the consent of the people. Dillon had tried to have the dispensary removed and could not. It Ill-becomes a candidate for governor to.go around the country abusing the papers for not supporting him. Patterson has been into sixteen counties and it Is a reflection upon him that no pa- | per has come to his support. Col Hoyt could not repudiate or reject the Slip- ! part of papers that oppose prohibition, and yet they have taken him up on his manhood. Col. Knox Livingston Introduced his competitors, speaking In kind terms \9\ funi ui uiriu prr.stMii. as wtrii us 01 Col. Tillman, who wired that he wan left in Aitg'tstn. Cole s. Blease, Winkler and Sloan ; each made a strong speech. Many people think there is as much eloquence j anions; the colonels as among the can- j didatrs for governor. I>r. Tlipmerinan and Captain Jen- ! nings were here and spoke. Judge j Moore spoke. Bellinger was abseut. 1 MiMahan w..s not h re. C. pers made a hit. Hrooker and Derh im had a little tiff Hrook< r a> t used Ilerham of Dervertina the rreord Derhain told him ho mu-t not say.that Hrook.r returned that Derliam had exhibited a letter from Auditor Sauier of Columbia statins that some of Itrooker's oh irge- wore 1 not true The latter went to see Sqtiler and the latter denied writing , It. Derliam exhibited the letter from Sqnier. The candidates f >r Congress foil wed these those for State offices. The day's speakin.R was closed with a vigorous and eharaeteristic speech by Senator Tillman. D'.rlington's Day. Darlington. Spec ial.?There wa- no excitement at the campaign meeting hore. Col. lloyt. in a good Matured way, got after Hea Tillmuu for meddling iu the gubernatorial race. Tillman, as at Hennettsville. had the reply on Col lloyt. Tho meeting Was not as large as othwr recent gatherings, but a very good crowd was present. The farmers are working with their tobacco crops. Tillman made about the same speeeli lie did at Ucnnettsville. Mr. Frank H. Gary was the first speaker. There are three in the race advocating the dispensary and one prohibition. He did not want to be rejected on specious plea that he has kin people who are some account, lie was cordially applauded at his conclusion. Patt? rson began by twitting Gary about making a set speech about pensions for old soldiers. Garv had never introduced a bill for their relief in the legislature. Me has no objection to the Gary family holding office, but Frank ought to run against McLaurin for the senate two years from now. Gov. McSweeney was applauded as he was presented. Me spoke of tho good feeling, happiness and prosperity | in the State to-day. Mis opponents I try to make the people think that he 1 is in league with the blind tigers, if Charleston supports hint it is because, his Administration has been free from politics and anything contemptible, a business administration. Col. Hoyt was received with applause sprinkled all over the yard. After paying his respects to Gary and McSweeney he said that Patterson reminded him of a cogwheel railroad. Me has the same old speech and if lie : slips a 1 og he can't go. In speaking of illicit sales in Maine in comparison with dispensary sales here. Patterson says nothing of illicit sales here. All of the public men on both sides in ' Maine are agreed that the people want prohibition and the political parties ar.> afraid of any attempt to repeal the , law. Patterson knows Hint ilmi v...c continued to denounce as false any charge of collusion on his part. Walt Whitman, too. protested against his ancient friend. Senator Tillman, coming into this race. Patterson tries to prove that the noonday stin shines. Kveryhody knows that the law is not enforced in Charleston. Any law can be enforced wh ch has. a semblance of right, by an executive who has nerve. He had advised McSweenev not to make this race. He ought to have taken wait's advice. Col. Jas. 11. Tillman paid a tribute to his late p? rsonal friend George Dnrgan. Jim voted 14 times in "70 although he was only 7 years old. Why don't Illease and Winkler go back to the legislature and lie elected speaker, Frank Gary isn't in their way? Col. Sloan was in the Senate eight years and couldn't be elected president pro tern. lie had had a lot of trouble getting Col. Livingston on a platform, but he is not on the pro iKinuon piauorm. i 111111:111 advocated the dispensary. Col. Livingston said that the Pee Dee is more bond than boundary. Marlboro and Darlington had been side by side in '76. He had not gotten on the prohibition platform because it is popular. He is standing where lie did in the legislature in the '80s and in the j '90s and is now standing in the Sen- \ ate. York county had asked for the , dispensary to be removed, and he had ! had the manhood to tight for the re- I quest In the face of the powers then ' in control. He would cast the decid- ! Ing vote in the Senate for prohibition. The next speaker was Mr. C. L. Winkler. The people do not care from which section a man comes. What they want to know is what is the man? Every man in this race for ..eutenant governor is on his merit, not a^? a coat-tail swinger. He is running upon his record in the general assembly and upon his ability and integrity, no advocated the dispensary. Col. John T. Sloan said he comes up to the requiremonts laid down by Winkler. Was in the house of representatives in 1876, n the constitutional convention and wa<s State Senator for eight years. He has had sufficient parliamentary training to make him competent, lie o.un't believe in "pro tern." business. He wanted to be elected fairly and squarely by the people. Col. Mease said he had a record and be la proud of it. When he wan but 22 years of ape Newberry gave him 1,300 out of 1.900 votes for the legislature. He opposed prohibition. The majority of prohibitionists want to keep other people from drinking and get all they can for self. Man is responsible to God alone for drinking liquor. J. 11. Moore said he could never manage to meet his opponent on the stump. The latter has gone to Washington on a wild goose chase, Iicllinger's record is one of failure. Bellinger \*r.s not here. Dr. Timmerman said he could not leave his office to make every meeting in the campaign while his opponents is neglecting bis office of clerk of the court of Fairfield. ? niii. nun iic nas :i deputy clerk who can attend to the work. I>r. Tinnncrnian is State treasurer and at the same time president of a bank at Columbia and an officer in other banks. Neither llrooker nor Derhnrn was well to-day ami the usual spat was omitted. Their speeches were unusually tame. This is Mr. T. N. Berry's home town and he did not speak, but introduced 1 his competitors of whom he spoke' kindly. Senator Pettlgrew said he was a native Darlingtonian. His firse public service was for Darlington. He had served in the civil war and in 1876. \V. 1). Maylield again stated that tinpresent freight rates forbid manufacturers from coming here and are discriminating in their tendency. Me was applauded. W. D. Evans said that when he went 011 the board there was not a passenger train going through Darlington. The board had this matter changed. The Atlantic Coast lane had been charging local rates on all commodities. The commission reduced this rate 25 per cent. The rate on brick had been lowered ;uid Darlington It;. I profited by it. He was applauded when he sail! that ! Ihirney talks about his fighting stock and yet never went to Cuba until the war was over, lie had been connected with a rotten administration in a Republican postoffice. so no wonder he smells something rotten in tne railroad commission. Col. Wharton could not claim to have helped make Darlington honored. but he had served his State and his county in war and in the legislature. He was applauded. Maj. 11. U. Evans was received with applause. Harney said that he had never flinched in time of war or peace. | lie had awaited orders to go to Cuba : in the cavalry, but they had not been j called out. Where was W. D. Evans during the civil war? He was not running on W. D.'s demerits, but on j his own qualifications. He charged W. i I>. Evans with betraying the Alliance when he was president by running one of the biggest stores in Marlboro conn, ty. The fertilizer factory at Darlington is in the hands of the trust because the local freight rates were too j high. The rate on tobacco is detfi- j nientat to Darlington. It was tnen about -itdo o'clock and Senator lillimin wanted to speak so he could get off on the train. Col. lloyt was not in the audience. Senator Tillman was received with applause. He had always received the support of this county, lie wanted the people to see how fat he is getting People grow fat on abuse and pap. lie had worked tor every cent lie gets. Prom some words uttered here some- ; might he led to mink that he is med- ! tiling. That old gag of coat-tail swing- | ing has been heard again. He had never posed as a boss. He had al- ! ways led the people in the way they | wnntid to o. Col. lloyt is an honor- ; able man. who hears upon bus person j the scars of battle. Hut lie ought not to object to Tillman's differing with ' him on public issues. Mr. Kllison Capers followed Sena j tor Tillman. He said that MeMahan hud crammed a summer school down the throats of the Partington people. If elected he would let the county superintendent have the responsibility of running the summer schools, and he would help the county superintendent. He went to the State summer school and found three out of four of the teachers failures. At Chesterfield. Cheraw, Special.?Tlie.ro wore about COO or 800 farmers at the court house ut Chesterfield to hear the candidates for State offices. This Is W. I). Evens' native county. Mr. Barry married in this county, and Pit' grew came from an adjoining county. Barney Evans sailed into Wj 1). very vigorous. May field spoke as usual. Wharton was not here. The speeches for lieutenant governor were about the same us usual. Mr. Durham was quite unwell and remained at Cheraw. Mr. Brooks was not in goon rorm eitner. M eMail an rejoined the campaign and met his opponent. Capers. Capt. Jennings was at the meeting. but Dr. Timmerman was not. Solicitor Johnson and his opponent, Senator Brown, spoke. For the first time in the campaign national issues wore discussed, and then briefly. Strait set the pace in the contest for his old seat in congress, now occupied by 1). E. Fin ley, and the latte** kept it tip. Both advocate the Kansas City platform. McSweenev read letters from his constables, his own appointees, to prove his record. Patterson waa slightly applauded. McSweeney made a stronger speech than usual and waa very well received. He is running on his record, and if it is not creditable he does not want to stand. He declared that the mayor of Charleston and the police are trying to do their duty by the dispensary. There was not much enthusiasm in the meeting until Patterson interrupted Col. Hoyt in his speech, fhe colonel replies spicily and the crowd cheered him. Col. Hoyt sai?l Tillman had rebuked McSweeney at Bennettsville. Tillman has the technical right to meddle in this race, but it is not expedient. Ben had come into the campaign to single out some candidate. Why not tako Watt? He could mane a new platform to suit Ben and "would rais hell on Chicago's street" to perfection. G. W'nlf 0.0V-. ? -- *"?< > ?? ? *n"iiiiilioii 01 ntmseir. am a kind of business man and t tale sman combined." Gary was received with applause. Ho and MeSweeney received flowers. Gary made his same speech, except to allude the Robinson bill, the local opinion bill

which Col. Moyt had charged him with not supporting- He showed a copy of the bill to Col. Hoyt and calico bis attention to the fact that it proposed to abolish the State dispensary, and for that reason lie had not supported it He hud thought that Col. Hoyt would have the fairness to make this statement, but be had not done him the justice to do so. Ohio and Indiana are in litigation over the Ohio River. The river is tineonselous of the trouble ami at last neeoiints was wending its way unruffled to the sea. I CHARM IN LETTER N Arp Says Democrats Have the Bulge This Year. | CANDIDATES HAVE THE CHARM. I No Ticket Where Both Candidates' I Names tinded With "N" Was liver J Beaten. | A paragraph in a New York paper asks: "Is there a charm in the letter N?" and all's well that N's lends) well go the writer tells i.s that the natne.s of ten Presidents of tile 1'nited St ites ended in N. lie might have gone further aud said that no Presidential iimdidate whose naaie ended with N had ever generally hi en laid on the political shelf as buck numbers and under the ban. It has been -aid that this was j the reason why Itoesevclt did not wish to be nominated. But this is a mistake. Jeffer- m was a Vne President and so were Jackson and Van Littren ( But it is astonishing bow little 1 generally known of Vice Presidents. Ilow 60011 they are forgotten. Kvett the best histories of the Pnited States fail ti mention them in any table or order or index. Indeed the defeated candidates for Vice President are equally ignored Who did Taylor run against? Who didl William Henry Harrison? Who Van Bttr'en. Who Madison? Who was J. Q , Adams' Vice President? Who Jeffer j 6on's and Jackson's, Monroe's and Madison's? Yon can't tlnd answers to ttwvj* In arty school history, and 1 found them only after much research in Ap pi et on's biographies; and who ruii( against Jefferson for his second term' Who against Monroe and Taylor and Pierce? Nobody knows hardly. Now hori is a table of reference that lover* of history may look over and paste in a hook for referc nee: Washington and Adams, Washington' and Adams. Adams and Jefferson, Jef. ferson and Hurr. Jefferson and George Clinton, Madison and Klhrldge Cerr>, Monroe and Danh 1 Tompkins, Monrin and Daniel Tompkins. J. Q. Adams and John C. Calhoun. Jackson and Calhoun. Jackson and Van Huron, Van Huron and It. M. Johnson, Harrison and Tyler, Polk and Dallas, Taylor and Fillmore, Pierce and William It. King Htjehanan and Hreckenridge. Lincoln and Hamlin, Lincoln and Johnson. Grant ami Colfax, Hayes and Who ler Garlleld and Arthur, Cleveland ami I Cleveland and Stevenson ())-.;?t KK Hendricks. Harris n and Morton, Clove mini miu oicveii^uu, Jefferson ran against C. C. I'inckney. Mains.>n ran against He YVitt Clinton. Monroe ran against Rufus King. J. 0 Adams ran against Jackson. Jackson ran against Clay. Van Huron ran against Harrison. Harrison ran against Van Huron. Polk ran against Clay. 'Paylor ran against Cass. Pierce ran against Scott. Buchanan ran against Frooniont. XJneoln ran against Hreekeiiridg# and Hell. Grunt and Seymour Grant ran against Seymour. U.;yi "n* against i llden B&rfleld ran against Hancock. Cleveland rnn against Hlulne. Harrison ran against Van Huren. Now pick out those successful candi| dates whose names, presidents and vic? [ presidents, ended in N. Jefferson and Clintou, Madison, and I Clinton .I ieVaon Van Itnren :iiul R M Johnson, Lincoln and Hamlin. Lincoln and Johnson, Harrison, and Morton. And now if thoie is any churm in the letter N look out for a ground-swell that will roll Bryan and Stevenson into office next November. Look out. 1 say. and have as much faith as do in seeing the new moon In a clear sky over your right shoulder. Bryan was defeated the last time because tin name of his running mate ended In L That's why the wise men wouldent take Hill this time?too much L (hell) in it they said. But all's well that N's (ends) well, so Mr. Shakespeare says. Bryan and Stevenson will sweep the coutry. for the double N's have never yet been defeated. And there Is another shameful neglect in our histories. They tell us nothing scarcely of the mothers or wives of the presldets; nothing of their chil dron nor who was born in the white house. Of course we know about Wash- I ington's mother and his wife, and about Dorothy or Dolly Madison who was a widow Todd, and maybe was kin to Mrs. Lincoln, for she was a Todd. We know something about General Jack son's wife and about Mrs. Mat on for ! there was a scandal about her, and because Mrs. Calhoun and other* wouldent visit her in the white house, Jackson broke up his c.iblnot and took a new ore. We know that Jefferson had no sons, but that his daughter marrled a Mr. Kppes, and her descendants are quite numerous. One of h< grandsons was my classmate i!i college. We know something about Mrs. Polk and Hariet I.ane who kept the White Mouse for Murium m ami ahout .Tula Dent Orant and Miss Kolsom, 1 whom Cleveland married, but this is about all. Tlie mother of a great man J deserves the highest consideration of | the historian, but they have not had it. j With the few exceptions that I have named our people know nothing of the mothers, wives or children of the Presidents. How many New England peo pie know who was Daniel Webster's wife or mother? How many Carolinians know of Calhoun's, how many Kentuckions know of Henry Clay's? Tint the women are at last com in;-. to ! I the front, ami will hereafter occupy a | I higher place. We are impatiently ' I waiting for the coming of the promtsrd volume of Mrs. Sarah ltutts, giving I the biography of notable Southern wo- I men. A woman ought, not to lose her i name when she marries. My wife j ought to sign her name Octavio llmlg- j in-; Smith instead ??' Mary Ortavia j Smith and every woman preserve her j father's name i thi.- way. Well, 1 am away down here in Mont- ' gomery county basking in the sun- j ! shine of Mount Vernon, nn old-time, unpretending village beautifully situ| ated nil perhaps the highest plateau [ : in the county. It is my first visit aud ! 1 am pleased to he invited here, for to j | me it is classic and venerated ground. < Kighty-tiwo years ago my father ! : taught school here, an old field school, ; nd there ir e a few people still living | I who rente nher the old log schxolh mse. I Hut it lr s long since pissed away and not a p itr<m is alive and so far as 1 can , learn not one of his pupils is living. AH gone. M iny a time did lie tell us of i his experience while t. ta iling here and how re.de hoys rebelled agaiuju his dis- ! eipltne. and for a month he had t. ft lit his way. hut finally subdued and I subjugated tlieni and became famous with his patrons, for those lioys huu ran off three teachers before he came and the community rejoiced when they got a teacher who \.vs game enough to conquer mem. i ?>< 1^1 quiet, Ueltghtftil place to rest. K\en the signs of antlquity arc pleading to the eye. Beautiful legisfretuias in full bloom orna- : nient the front yard of my hotel. They are not bushes or shrubbery, hut are , large trees and I reverence them, for they were niy mother's favorites awav buck i 11 my childhoo .. and there are still sweet memories clustering around them. 1 oin here right in the midst of flowers anil fruits. Oh the fruits that eyerywhere abound. Indeed, this si a blessed country to live in and he happy. and as for that. 1 have not suffered at all nor found any difference ix'tween his region and n >rth Georgia, provided you Keep in the shad". The nights are cool and id nsant. Mill Arp in Atlanta Constitution. TILLING THE THUTH. N?wnpu|>c<r*.? \ iTIlflnuH l)U?tTl|ll lull II f at The Palmyra iMn.l Spectator under- . takes to show t>v entire what niu'.ii' he e\perteit Were editors sometime to speak their minds. Here are a few of the Spectator's samples: "Willie Shortike and Itettie ltloomers were married at the church hist ev. oing. The church was very prettily decorated with tlowcrs and pottted plants, borrowed promiscuously from over town from people who didn't I want to lend them. The decorating was done under protest by some of the members of the church, who were asked to do so by the bride and couldn't well refuse. The Indios tiro of the opinion that if the couple wero fo bent on having a stylish wedding they should have been williing to have paid some one to chase all over the I town for :l ?!av ffpftlllir ftnuroru .? gothcr and then taking them home ! again. The bride wore a handsome : Silverstoln gown, made at home, r.nd ' the groom was decked out in u flu j hand-me-down suit. The ushers wore i cutaway coats borrowed for the occasion. Sal lie Potts was made of honor, j and the consensus of opinion was that | she was two-to-one bettor than the i | bride. Tho young couple took the 1 morning train for St. i/ous. where they | will spend more money in a few days than Willie can earn In throe months, i Willie says that now he's married he's ' going to settle down. Some of our merchants think it would have been I better if he had settled up first. The I groom gets a salary of $'27 a month. | which is nlxmt the allowance Betttie j has been used to for pin money. We wish for Willie's sake that the old ! saying that it takes no more to support two than one wasn't a lie. The ; bride sent us a shoe l>ox full of a conglomeration of stuff supposed to ho I cake. If this is a sample of llettie's I cooking wo feci sorrrow for Willi-* j Our janitor's dog fell heir to the cake and now he's lying in the cold, cold ground. Mut this wcdd.'ne is none of our funeral. If Willie anil Hetttie are satisfied we've got no kick coming." Origin of " Canada." In the Revue Kcientifkjuo M. Perfnult gives an Ingenious explanation of the word "Canada." (Jlovnnni <Jn hoto, who Is also known as Cabot, landed in tluU country in L4!>7, being the first Huropeau to arrive there. After him ennie some Spanish ves- I Sels and In 1 ."ifMl Helivs 11 I-'renelnim > 1 and Verraz/.ani, 11 Venetian, took possession of tho country in tho name of France. At liiat time, says M. IVr riinlt. tin* French often In-anl the unlives use the Spanish words "Aca nadn." which signify "Nothing hero." Tho natives Ii.kI picked up those words from the Spaniards who had 1 sea relied for gold and silver, and who, i because they had found nothing, had speedily departed. The French came 1 to tl?e conclusion that the words so \ often used by the natives were the original name of the country. Another explanation is that Canada tucaus a 1 village or a town. ASSAILANTS JAILED, The Two Negroes Who Attempted OuiraRi in Florence. Florence, Special.? The two negroes who attempted a rape at the national cemetery ou Monday last are now in the hands of the sheriff. The governor has ordered this officer to protect t.ho prisoners at all costs. The citizens are incensed against ail the officers of the law tor cheating thctn out of vengeance. The negroes were pursued relentlessly for live days hy men from Florence. Mariou. Williamsburg and Horry. They were captured Saturday morning hy ox-Sheriff Wall of Marlon , through watching the sister of one of the fugitives taking food to the swantp. Tlie n< groes made a desperate light for a time hut, one was mortally wounded. They are .lames Clink and John Livingston. Sheriff Kvans of Marion took eharge of the men after a stiff resistance and notified Sheriff McLcndnn o>f Florence. Sheriff Me* London tried to keep the arrest quiet, tint it leakt d out and a large crowd attempted to go to rrlurion on a special train but the sheriff gave them the slip. The crowd got a special train and followed the sheiiff's special ten minutes later, according to rail road rules. When tin- citizens arrived at Marion they found tin* prisoners in a car thoroughly guarded. The crowd say the sheriff promised to bring them hack to the Florence jail and on such a promise they returned peaceably. A large crowd gathered at the depot in the afternoon, hut the sheriff's special did not return. (?ov. McSweeney ca.ine down from Chesterfield and addressed the crowd from tlie .lacohi house, lie said he believed Florence would stand by law and order. Ho pointed out the necessity for defending the law and said lie would have the men brought hack here and jailed if the crowd would assure them protection. The crowd cheered. State Senator llderton then followed in a speech which aroused the tire in the crowd and they yelled for the return of the prisoners to Florence. Tin* Timmonsville C.uards came up by tlio governor's orders through Sheriff McHcndon and w? re greeted with hoots This sentiment is believed to lie that of only a portion of the people and many leading citizens felt sure that the prisoners would he safe here. Pressure was brought to bear on (!ov. McSweeney to return the Timmonsville Hoards on the evening train but <.. ..f #?w, -I ... ..... ... III. lirinuiinUULIIIlin .11111 speeches declared that lie could not do it and that having boon asked for hy the sheriff they would lie under that officer's orders. A telegram was sent to Sheriff MeIjondon at Marion to hold the prisoners there for further orders. Mayor Malloy lias offered all the city's power in co-operation with Sheriff McLendon. The crowd insist that the parties are guilty of the attempt and should he dealt with as well as if the crime had been committecd. While the law penalty would he only a few years in the penitentiary. Florence is greatly excited. Ordered to Marlon. At 2 o'clock Sunday mqrning Gov. McSweeney received a telegram from Sheriff Mclaendon of Florence county and P. A. Willcox, Esq.. of Florence, requesting liim to onler the Tlmmonsvllle Guards. now at Florence, to b* sent to Marlon at once for the further protection of the two negro rapista now incarcerated in the Marion Jail. The governor immediately wired the authorities of the Atlantic Coast Line to furnish the Timmonsville Guards a special train to take them to Marion, declaring at the same time his determination to do all in his power to prevent a lynching. A telegram was also sent the captain of the Timmonsville. Guards ordering him to take his company to Marion on the special train provided for their transportation. Supplies for Militia. Gov. McSweeney has been notified by tin- war department that this State'a requisition for supplies for the militia forces had been honored and that sup |iin:e wwi wi Ml LIU! HKKrPKHK' J.)./??.'j;t would be shiped at once. These supplies Include about K00 blouses, with raps and leggings. The new materials will not he ohtainod before they are needed. Several companies of the. Passenger Train Wrecked. a,,.? Anderson's Confederate rionumcnt. Anderson. Special.?The design for the ('onf? It rate monument is now on exhibition. The monument will be T1 f< t:t high. A soldier in private s unlform will surmount the shaft. The east die of the pedestal will he Riven to an inscription to lie selected by a committee of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, tin the west side will lie a II t of the most important battles in which the soldiers from this county foiiRht. On the second die will he cut a representation of stacked arms with the monoRram "C. S. A." and below in lutRe letters "Our Confederate Dead." It is ho|>ed to lay the cornerstone next Thanksgiving day and unveil tho monument Juno 10, 1901.

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