1 Ağustos 1900 Tarihli Fort Mill Times Dergisi Sayfa 1

1 Ağustos 1900 Tarihli Fort Mill Times Dergisi Sayfa 1
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

p ' FORT MILL TIMES. VOL. IX. FORT MILL, S. C., WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 1. 1900. NO. 20. THE STATE CANVASS j Politics Not Quite as Hot as the Weather. I SENATOR TILLMAN IS ALONG TOO ? ? . And Helps the Boys Contribute to the (layety of Nations?Synopsis of the Speeches. Lancaster Meeting. Lancaster. Special.?The 1 looting | here was quiet. The audienc^ was ! thoroughly undemonstrative and attentive. There was little cheering, no noise. Mr. J. P. Dertiam was not preseut and sent excuses. Ho was absent on account of Bickness and announced his platform and showed the work of his office. Mr. Brooker started out by saying he had already saved the State $".0.00'> and was in position to save thnt much bmioc. The present tax administration Is absolutely faulty and wrong. He ' charged llotKlllir prlmiml 1 11! iman ! regularities and charged Incompetency in the present officers. Mr. Clyburn said he made the Chesterfield settlement in 1897 and it was entirely satisfactory. Ho agreed that in 1898 the papers wero sent to Columbia. Neither Mr. McMahan nor Mr. Capers were present, when their names were called. Gen. Floyd made a patriotic speech. Ho come to show how ho had restored J the prestige of the adjutant gfeneraJ's | ttflie. It was now, he urged, the beat militia organization the State has had in 25 years. Brooker said the books here were in excellent condition. 3upt. McMahan came in late from 1 Rock 11111 and was presented. He out- j lined hie experience, as a toacher, , thinker and student, which he thought qualified him for his work and thou showed how he had worked and was still working for the common schools Then came the railroad commissioners. W. D. Evans and J. G. Etheredge wert* absent. Then came the governors, G. Walt Whitman iuslstid that from what others saw the various depart- | ments are In bad shape and he wanted , to remedy things. Disregard of law in j South Carolina was amazing and dia- i graceful, not only jus to the dispensary law, but everything else if these speakers are to be believed. The best men at limes, he feared, took Just a little too much liquor. A little drunkenness doe., not affect a man as much as t?Uihg a He. God never made u misfit and there is use for liquor. Col. ,T. A. Hoyt said Mr. Whitman had stood on every platform that ha.< ever been erected. The people of I.ancaster were already convertd to prohibition. The dispensary Is put forward as the best solution of the liquor nroblem It is :i svstftm nilnntoit In ;i i monarchy, but it is not for America. The corner-stone of Democracy is that whatever com's to the people should come from them, and he explained how tl.ifc was not the case. He explained ' how dispensaries have been forced on the people. The dispensary has its good features, if they were enforced, but t' ey are not enforced, and the good eaturos are trampled in the du-f. In 'he request books you will find the same signatures and you will find drunkards and minors on the lists, i Why should the law be continued when It was admitted that it. cannot be enforced in Charleston and its good fea turos are trampled tinder feet? The dispensaries are the supply depots of the tigers. The system is rotten to the core and deserves to be taken out of the books. This great dispensary will build up a great political machine and It la liut t^> 1, It ..n II- 'V. defended prohibition. Ho touched briofly on educational mutters and said thqra w{ui no difference except as to the liquor problem. Boquats were presented Col. Hovt by the "Women of Lancaster." Mr. Frank B. Gary thought the flow, ere apt for Col. Hoyt'a political funeral. He was not here to villify or abuse anyone. Ho argued that no better plan than the dispensary was yet proposed Ha knew this to be a prohibition county, hot he would not change his views. All are marching to temperance. Prohibition will bring tigers. He was no apologist for the dispensary as now run. tt is not a system for revenue. He was reliably Informed there are 200 tJgerB in Columbia. If elected. Oarv said he would enforce the law in Charleston and Columbia. For three months before we pot hold of'htm the eonstables seized only 11,000 worth of liquor, and yet last month alone they seized that milch. Mr. A. Howard Patteradn said the people, not the papers, were the jury. Tf Gary stood no better chance than Bryan he was sorry for Gary; but he fa/ored Bryan. He stuck to Gary and hla family all along and has pone down with the family. He announced hlnieelf before Gary and had a t ight to run. thf^i read from the report of Gary's Charleston speech and empha iirni i \jtii y vmhiiii nui answer hi* 0'i'vrtions in Chnrlo ton. lie devoted time to Mr. Gary and said if yon hav* local option It will be good-bye to dlBpenftary. He then took up the dispensary and defended it. and urged its advantages oyer prohibition. There was not a blind tiger in Barnwell, and he showed bow crime and drunkenness have ueCfQAsed. lie took up the prohibition platform and defended the dispensary i a? a system. Is the minority never going to submit? Col. Hoyt told you nothing about favoring a coalition, and bia prohibition platform is full of politics. He waa in favor of prohibition if it cjould be enforced, but it would be a farro. lie favored the dispensary law all over the State. Governor McSweeney congratulated the audience on the good feeling and prosperity of The State and wanted to Stop harr;uigulng When they charge that the incumbent has not been succpesful he hurled it bark at them. The dispensary is beter enforced today than ever before, and he can prove it by letters from mayors. Charleston is a seapprt and It la difficult to enforce the law there. He had done his best to en force the law there, but he had done as well there aa any one else. He saved the State $10,000 in constables* salaries. Ro did this as a business matter. Some of these candidates tell you what they would do with the dispensers. He asked all to view the attitude of the people towards the constables. He wanted to say reference was made that constables were hero howling for him. Tliey were no! hero by his orders. He did not countenance their being here. They hare no business here, unless they have work hero. He was going to investigate the matter and if any constables have been attending meetings for political purposes they would be removed and they certainly would not be paid for being here. He knew the constables were not hero In his interests. They were free men and any constable could vote for whoever he pleased, but they must attend to their business. Gov. M< Sweeney then gave an ac uvuui ?>i ma puDin* services. The lieutenant governors came next, anil more of their speeches will be given from gome other meeting. Col. Sloan saiil he had to sing fnsl and he sung the praises of Blulr and Jackson and Sims and Jones and then recounted hie services and qualifications. Ho denied that, there were tOfl tigers in Columbia, for his people were law abiding. Mr. Cole L,. Blouse urged that the prohibition platform demands the sale of liquor for mechanical and scientific purposes. They condemn the sale and still insist on the sale. All laws are violated, so must all laws be repealed, as la arguod. He argued for good, free schools. Favored biennial sessions. Mr. .las. H. Tillman said he had more ; kin people here than In any other c'JUn- j ty. He sntd Col. Sloan's remark about tigers In Columbia had better l>e salt od down. He Jumped on Col. Sloan for lighting tho aepnrate corn h law. As to I Blease and schools, he voted to take $250,000 from the schools. He Insisted that when you strike down the dispensary you lose the best friend temperance has ever had. He read numerous letters to show that prohobitlon did not suit. Mr. Knox Livingston sympathized with the audience for its patience. He gave his certificate of character, so to spealt, by showing that he had never been defeated at home. He has always been consistent in favoring prohibition when the people wanted it. Mr. Winkler spoke of his services in the house. He was emphatically in favor of tho dispensary and urged that it had worked wonders. His only regret i was that tho good prohibitionists and others had not helped to support and i try the law. He wanted better school I houses, bettor teachers and better pay. | He spoke kindly of the veterans. Mr. James H. Moore, for attorney , general, said he \v;is charged with l*oing a former Charlotte printer. He has had his experiences and he was glad of this experience. Work was nothing to be ashamed of. He was proud of his North Carolina descent and that he uniiu unc mr ins nome. Regrets were presented from General ' Bellinger, who was unable to be pres- ' ent. Captain Jennings, for State treasurer, made a clover speech. Chester Shaking. Chester. Special.?Senator Tillman made a red-hot speech and put new ginger in the fight. He was held until the very last, and when he talked, made it lively. Tillman was received | I with tlinf oid-time whoop. Tillman 1 said in part: I This was his seventh meeting rnd I he protested against always being put last. There were some who thought he ought to remain at home. It was not his fault some one else does not want to he Senator. He never felt happy unless he had opposition, and lie preferred it. He may be a fool, but he was never accused of it, and, there, fore, he did not try to be a dictator, but felt free to give advice. As long (U> iiu ?<io ot'liaiui UC mi life l&IK. ' All arc agreed on national issues and 1 there was no use to talk on such mit- | tcrs unless he wanted to sheer around j or say sonic sweet things. He had seriously regarded his duty. He had thought it over, and feeling his obligations, he felt it carried with it some responsibility to assist in throwing light. Did you not teach me to use this tongue and to use it vigorously? Did you laljel that tongue "for national ugc only?" if so, say so. If you say so 1 will obey. If not otherwise advised he was going to talk right out on the I T?... '? -nun. in** wuif lin; to do as they pleased and he wanted thin to do so. It la charged that tint for Tillman there would now be pro. h\Mtion. He said he worked for the dispensary law. The prohibition ?oto east was nothing like a general vote, and over .'tO.bOrt did not vote at all. Aj to the dispensary being a great political machine. When it cattle in he nad just been re-elected and he needd no machine. He advised the dispensary because he did not believe prohibition could bo enforced. He did this to s ive the State from degradation and being hypocrites under prohibition. The people have voted on this question almost solely ou State offices, and the legislature in four elections, and mil iui nun it ?uuni iiii>? ' ?i juii in the constitution without any huts or ifs. He did this because the supreme court decision was pending. He wrote the clause, and whenever his tongue grew forked lie wanted to bo kicked out. The candidates for the various State offices spoke about in their accustomed view. There was nothing new or sensational in the developments here. The crowd was a good sized and orderly one. and the senttmeut seemed pretty fairly divided up among the several candidates. Senator Tillman's speech was the leading feature of the programme. NVinnsboro Mect:ng. Winnsboro, Special.?Senator Tillman's speech was again the feature of j the campaign meeting. He replied to Col. Hoyt as to the Interference of Senator Tillman i na family quarrel. The meeting was opened with prayer. Oen. Floyd spoke first. Superintendent McMahan explained why he employed Prof. Patterson, of the Chicago Institute, to teach arL He was miall fled and he saw nothing In the fact that he was a Northern soldier. He explained why he and others insisted on having white teachers at the tvead of colored Institutions. This is Mr. MeMahan's home county and ho Is popular hero. Mr. Ellison Capers lauded McMahan personally, but attacked his administration. which he felt would not be supported. He jumped on his conduct of the summer school because of alleged overriding of county authorities. 'Hie railroad commissioners came next. Mr. J. H. Whartou avoided big Jokes and talked al>out discriminations, rates, stops autl the like. Harnard Li. Evans said rate?s were higher hero than elsewhere because of iudifTorftce ' or subsidizing. Nimrod Horry wanted the candidates measured by the standard of business ability. integrity and sobriety and ! cited his claims. J. E. Pettigrew wanted his character closely scruti- j ulzed and judged by his work and standing at homo. He would no*, promise things he could not accomplish. U. D. Maylield wanted special attention given to the development of manufacturing enterprises. He was opposed to the commissioners being paid by the roads. \V. I). Evans said there were six men jumping on one and he could not answer the.m and make his speech in ten minutes. When he went on the hoard there wa<s not a wholesale grocer in Columbia; there are now Ave. It was easy to make charges. Frank 11. Gary went over with vigor the arguments heretofore made. Ho devoted a hit more time than usual to show that prohibition was not practical. Ho said that the whiskey people and the high license are going to support Col. Hoyt because they expect to crush the life out of the dispensary. He warned the Prohibitionists when tuvj U I\M mf) wuuiu not get it. He was here mainly because tlie dispensary was not now en forced. The lnji condition of affairs In Charleston and Columbia was .the reason ho was running. A. Howard Patterson took up the charge that Gary tried to straddle on the dispensary in Charleston and Georgetown. He again read extracts from the reports of the Charleston and Georgetown meetings and said that Charleston wants the license system ami that cold water would kill the Charleatonians. The Georgetown pa~ per placed Gary in favor of local option directly, he charged. He went over hie usual figures as to Maine and South Carolina. Then he jumped on the Prohlbtlon platform, written by Col. Hoyt. He said that high license men were advocating prohibition, in which they did not believe. He paid his respects to the six hundred tigers alloped to bo In Charleston an<l the two hundred in Columbia. The new point in Governor McSweeney's speech was his reply to Gary's charge that the constables have boon made to work harder since the campaign l>ogun. He said: The seizures for March were 444 1-4 gallons of whiskey and 119 1-2 dozen lx>ttles or boor; 120 gallons of Ix-er in kegs; one team confiscated. Of this tho United States government seized 114 1-2 gallons. In April tho seizures were 79.* gallons of whiskey; 122 l>ottlos of beer, 190 gallons of boor in keju-, three stills confiscated Of this the I'nited Stat** government seized 206 1-2 gallons. In May the seizures were X94 gallons of whiskey; 242 dozen bottles of l>eor; 240 gallons of beer In kegs; one team confiscated. Two confiscated this month. The United States government took 97 1-4 gallons of the whiskey seized. In June the seizures were 448 gallons of beer in kegs; one teajn confiscated; two stills confiscated. The United Stat** government took of this ;?? i-~ ru-imiiis ??i wimsKey, i no average number of gallons s?*1zod for each of tho four months was ">12. So It appears that June Is a little below tho average. The only instructions given tho constable are to do their duty and those instructions they have had during tho time I have been governor. He never

would build himself up on trying to pull down others. Governor McSweeney <U<1 not speak long as usual, but covered the ground. Col. Jainos A. Hoyt said he was not roejK>nsible for the good things said of him. but he was delighted at these expressions. He <!1d not pose as lading l>etter or holier than others, but he would allow no reflections to be made as to him. He warned the people to semi mcml>ers of the House who would bring the situation Imek to 1N9'2 when the voters stood for prohibition. Until there is a fair and square election on the liquor question It will continue to come up. Too natch power to establish dispensaries, he said is given to county tK>ards. He wanted j the dispensary wiped out and prohibition put on the books. The dispensary hns good features, but they are not enforced. The dispensary is used | for everything an<l would supply the tigers In order to inrreuse the sale of liquor. O. Walt Whitman kept the crowd in a good humor by arguing that what j tho people wanted was temperance and not prohibition. The chief object ion wns to drlnTTing to excess. The dispensary has 1>*<U) shamed lu the house of Its friends. The best regulation lu* now think* 4s to license individuals anil cori>orations to sbll liquor under the constitutional regulations. The meeting adjourned for dinner. After dinner Col Knox Livingston spc ke of the express telegraph hill, which he had passed and fathered. Ho oomplLmonted Senator Ragadale, of thlB county, and then discussed his own work. H.'ol. James H. Tlllmnn joked nt>out Col. Uvingston and his platforms. He wanted to reiterate that he thoug-t all negro schools ought to l>e cloaod. He would never vote for appropriations for colored college. He favored the dlspen- ! snry. Mr. Winkler was glad to hear of the new railroad between Kershaw and Fairfield. He said his record was clear In voting for Increased pensions. Col. John Sloan spoke of tho distin- | gulshed sons of Fairfield and his re- | cord. The people of the different counties should hnve what they want as to J liquor. He knew the people could Ih> counted on and that would be the only settlement. Mr. Cole L?. Blouse argued that the preachers should talk for temperance, but keep out "Of politics. The whole fight of the Prohibitionists now was to kill the dispensary and that would brirtg high ttconse. Senator Driee insisted on varying the pregranmic and presented Senator Tillman and naked for three hearty cheeps, which were given. As soon as he was presented some one said: "Get mad. 1'ncle Ben. and give it to "em." He thanked the audience and said he | was embarrassed by the existing conditions. A campaign had been ordered and he was expected to he present. If ho did not attend his enemies would says ne nun tne swell neau una tnat sort of thing, and when he did coma I some said he tried to play Ikihs and I dictate, atid it was the same old tiling, : he would be damned if he did and be damned if he did not. He owed the people a duty. He said: "You are mighty prone to go to sleep and if I can keep your eyes open it is my duty. The News and Courier and the State say I should keep out of the fight. I am not hero contending as to men It is ray duty to i>oint out wherein and why certain advocated policies ought not to prevail, and I am present in defence of my ad ministration, f am charged with defeating prohibition when it was voted for. Must 1 remain silent under all sort of charges and seimons? 1 think not." Then Senator Tillman explained the Prohibition vote of 1SK2 and lu>w the dispensary law was enacted. If a majority had voted Cte- prohibition ho would never have stood against it. Ho cerCalnly needed no machine now. as charged, as no one would even nm against him. Ho spoke as he did because he had convictions and lie simply spoke against prohlbtlon because it is no good. He nerver was told he was to be gagged after he got to Washington, and especially after he was under tiro and attsu*k. His enemies did not give him credit for any honesty or patriotism such as they claim for themselves. They have used bad words and sneered about me. The ministers are good men, but they are wrong up here. (Pointing to Ids head) They had 110 right to attack him and he would say nothing harsh or rude about nu m. 11 no were a *eil-seeHing politician and wanted to look out for himself and not the people, he would go around and talk sweet and Dot talk aa he did. This abuso was enough to make him mad. but he would not get mad. He would be a coward if he did not talk out, and was only sorry he could not pet where some iieople have already been bamt>oozled. He knew prohibition could only t?e a farce arm that was why ho wanted the dispon i sary. He did not want to make liars, because he knew the people would have their liquor, lie was a common sense man and always acted as he thoupht. He differed with his ministerial friends, or enemies, as they prefer, about there being anything wrong in selling liquor or the Bible opposed its sale us a sin. Ho went over his conclusions as the best method of teaching the people to use liquor moderately. The dispensary was then defended at night. The tree bears good fruit, and the Prohibitionists are with their axes and are trying to cut down the fine dispensary tree. Who is on tllO nthor hn/?lfincr') TMw* Mcrh license people, the saloon keepers. Then ho argued that George I). Tillman, Sohumpert and Featherstone failed two years ago aJid now all the?o wore In line fighting tne dl?Hx*nsary. Senator Tillman next discussed the evil of personal gain in any other than the dispensary system. He said his nose was red but lie had never drunk a barrel in all his tifty-three years. As to himself, he did not care, but lie had sons and neighbors' sons and wanted them saved. The Prohibitionists have half a loaf now. and it is good and sweet, hut they want all or none. Then he alluded .o the free liquor and prohibition period, while the law was .uffering from the interregnum. That was such prohibition as will come. He wanted to know why ministers would not recognize men as they were and not us ihey ought to he. There was something in the ltible against good men consorting with had men. He supposed they wanted to crucify hint. Th's is a free country and yet the ministers seem to lie after him. One of tin in denounced hint as a liar: a Bishop. Til ink "1* that, a Bishop, and simply for ex- re sing an opinion. The only question is whether what he said was true, and that was the saloon people and Prohibitionists were allied in this fight. He then spoke of the danger of going hack on the dispensary and what has been gained by years of work. The primary system, he said, war going to break down, under the time limit and the poor attendance at the meetings. The people were putting themselves in control of the newspapers again. They were his friends. He warned the people for no good to himself but possible injury. He diselnitne-d any purpose of offending the ministers. He had no quarrel with the ministers, recognised 'their high tone and purposes, but he would talk out regardless of tho ministers. Neither Mr. Bellinger or Mr. Moore were present. C'apt. .leanings introduced IV. Timnierinan, his opponent. The crowd had badly scattered. IV. Timmwraan said lie expected no votes here.- that he came to say he would bo tiie next Treasurer. He explained that he was not a bloated banker or wealthy. as reported. Ho delicately referred to his services in the Confederate army. Capt. Jennings said Dr. Tim merman was mistaken about defeat inc htm He is whistlini? t<> keen uj> his courage. Mr. Derham sent regrets. Mr.. Brookor finished up tho list. Yorkvillc Speaking. Yorkvillo, Special.?This was a full fircus day. The full aggregation was here. The attractions wore taken out to the exhibition stand in vehicles, a brass band was present and the regular circus seats were provided. Tillman was easy. Derham and Brooker punched at each other figuratively. Capers and McMah'an rapped hard. The performance was long .and wearisome. The audience was the largest of the campaign. M.aj. B. B. Rvuns said lie would not spare h.is tire because he was in the reiterated his charges and pounded on the pen til ty sisked for not buying: ticket*. Mr. Thos. N. Berry presented himself a.s a business man and prohibit inist in theory and practice, lie simply wanted to impress his name. T. K. Pettigrew spoke briefly of his qua 1 ideations and services to the State. The commission Wiis necessary because of railroad combinations, lie was not running on promises. \V. I). Muyfield pressed his regular platform. He charged no corruption, but the commissioners should not he put under obligations to the railroads hv their During salaries and lsfuiinu passes. The commissioners will admit that many rat?>s are too high. W. D. Evans paid his respects to It. M. Evans and Jumped on liim for palming off l>ogus policies on the State. Barnard sold this was false and W. D. knew 4t to he false. W. D. referred to the attorney general's report. W. D. said he only referred to tilts because it was insinuated he was rotten, ignorant or subsidized. Chairman Ilriee insisted on avoiding personalities. W. D. Evans then went on to defend himself. Mo was charged with being dishonest, and spoke of how he wanted to proteet his reptatlon above all things. He took up the excess fare question and he and Harm y had another tilt J. H. Wharton insisted that lie made no charge* or insinuations, but argued that, there are wrongs lie would like to remedy. The candidates for governor and lieutenant governor and the other officers spoke with about their accustomed vigor and nothing sensational was developed. i Both Want Veterans. At tlir? iomin? annual State reunion of Confederate veterans at Greenwood ; there will he a lively contest over the j place for the next reunion. Columbia | and Sumter are the two bidders for the 1 next reunion. Columbia will present a ! strong invitation. Sumter's will be j ba.ckod up by the i ndors tnent of the i eity <ouueil. The Columbians who ' have the matter in charge feel eert.iin I that they will secure the gathering, i They will be backed up also by the city 1 council and probably the Merchants j and Manufacturers' Club. The highest court of appeal In fJrent Itrttaln has sustained the decision that a circulating library can bo bold pecuniarily responsible for libelous state- j monttf contained in any of the volumes which it circulates. ' THE STATE FARMS. Good Crop Prospects and Cood Health Among the Convicts. The ?ttnte farms of South Carolina comprise abotu 3,000 acres, and arc in Sumter and Kerahaw counties. Tho l)t?Saussure farm Is In Sumter and the Reed farm in Kershaw, the county line being the line between the two (arms. The DeSnussure farm is managed by Mr. \V. R. Gardner of Kershaw county. who is considered a good farmer. Two hundred acres of Mr. Gardner's farm Is in cotton. A low estimate of the yield would he 17f> to200 bales. Pfty-four acres were sown in wheat, which yielded 020 bushels. mo;tsured from the threncr. rnree uunoroa aim fifty acres were In oats, whMi yielded 10,0')0 bushels. These oats have beou threshed and arc now fa one large l.am. The barn is lfja n -fa feet and the tlooriscoveredto xfa shrd slvnl cisfwcs floor is covered to a depth of about four feet. The most of the land that was in wheat aivd oats has been sown in pens. ^ On this farm there are about .">00 acres in corn, tho yield of which is yet uncertain ; s the mostof it is lato. Tlie early plantings though will make from 40 to 00 bushels to the acre. The Reed farm contains aimut tlio same, in acrcae. as the DeSaussure, and Is directed andsupervised by Mr. J. H. Morris of Marlboro county, a practical business man. The acreae In cereals and < otton is about the same as that of the DoSaussure, hut the outlook at present is that the yield In both ootton und corn will considerably exceed that of the DoSaussure. Mr. Morris has about a00 aer<*? of corn, which at a low estimate will yield 7f> bushels per acre. In addition to tlresei staple crops these larmo raise abundance of syrup, potatoes, rice, vegetables, etc., to supply thorn. tinder the present managemetn the farms are not only self-sustaining, but are asounce ofconsiderable revenue to the t$tat?v When Messrs. Morris and Gardner took charge last March ono year there was not corn enough to last three months, consequently they had to buy all the coin they used front June until the* crops were in ado and harvested. There is now on each of the farms plenty of corn to carry them through, after having sold 2,000 bushels each to the penitentiary. They have also sold large quantities forage such as peavine hay, slirended corn and fodder, and Mr. Morris says that he has enough left to run the. place another year without touching this year's product. The labor of the farms consists of 120 to 150 convicts, who run OS plows. , Everything moves along without friction, and the men seem happy and contented. Col. J. I). Grifllth, of the penitentiary, visits the farms about once a month and gives direction and suggestion. The greatest drawback to these lurms has heretofore been that they wore not healthy, but Col. Grifilth has to a great extent improved their health I by having deep wells bored over the farms at convenient points for the hands to get Water wliTTe working in the fields. The water from one of these wells (and they are all alike) has been examined by the State chemist and pronounced a good and safe drinking water. The sanitary conditions of the Reed farm are such that any small I town in the State would do well to pet| tern after. i iH'ro is mil a case 01 lover or any sickness on the place nor has there been this spring." ?| VVlnthrop Trustees. The executive committee of the hoard of trustees of Winthrop College met in the college parlor Thursday night, frovMcSweeney. Senator Tillman. Snpt. McMahan. Mr. VV. J. Roddey, and Dr. T. A. Crawford being present. The meeting was held, says the ltock Hill Herald, to look after some details in connection with the building of the new dormitory. The board decided to put a now slate roof on the new building instead of tin. The hoard alsoi decided that owing to a lack of funds it would for the present abandon the idea of erecting a separate building for the model school, but would continue the school in the rooms of the main building heretofore used for that purpose. The hoard accepted with regrets the resignation of Prof, lireazeale. His successor has not been chosen. New Hnterprlses. The Exchange Brokerage Conijxiny, of Charleston, was chartered with a c apital of $5,000. Jjt. 1*. Tu' kor is president and W. It Fitiekney secretary. A com mission was issued to W. B. and H. I.. Kerr and .1 E. Marshall, o{ Itork Mill, as corporators of the Korf Live Stock and Livery Company, of Rock Hill. The capital stock is to bj $10,000. Lutheran Sunday Schools. Orangeburg, Special The Orange, burg Sunday School convention and conference of the Lutheran Church opened here Friday morning with a good attendance of delegates. Rov. W. A. Rogers, of the Methodist Church, delivered an address of welcome. Miss Janio Salley^a member of the Lutheran Sunday school of the city .extended a warm greeting to the delegates. Those addre ses were responded to by Miss Maggie llolloway. d lighter of Mr. J. M. ON. llolloway. and Rev. J. A. It. Scherer, I>. I>.. as altern.ato for Mrs. Xeherer. Mr. It. F. Bryant., superintendent of the Orangeburg Lutheran Sunllnv ttrthnol U'fiO <.locti.il nreuitlent nt >!#? j conference; Mr. H. A. Smith, of I Charleston, vice-president, and MHs | Maggie Hollo-way, secretary.

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler