10 Aralık 1890 Tarihli The Helena Independent Gazetesi Sayfa 1

10 Aralık 1890 Tarihli The Helena Independent Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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R Wa t AdV' tis.nwt -, 4" .y 31* ~&fla JW?*4TL11XCt~".,~~r. :·ii VOI, XýXI--NO" 51, HIELENA. MONTANA. EDNESDA ' ING DECEMBER 10, 1890 .. ...~ s ~ .. .. . . . . . . ...I... ... . . .. . , , .,...,, -,... . -ARRI S -THE--- CLOTHIER. ONe SQUARE PRICE, DEALING. CAUTION I Unprincipled competitors, tak. ing advantage of proximity, have represented their place of business as HARRIS'. We would say to all who are not intimately acquainted with our Trrmises, to look for the name on the front window. Why, it's good I Of course. You never see business anything else than good with us. Why is it? Because- i That's a ggod reason, ain't it ? But the fact is, beginning with a query, why should business be anything but good with us? Peo ple have to buy goods and they buy them from the houses that offer the greatest inducements. Now, how can you tell who offers inducements unless it is by a firm announcing itself. The most successful firms in the United States, and in fact all over the world, are the greatest adver tisers. They have done good for themselves and done good for their customers. They have a good thing; they know it, and are will ing to let their customers in on it, instead of holding it for high profits and letting its out ini "dribs and drabs." We have several good thirgs and propose to let the public know it. Amongst them are a line pf cheap Pants, that can be seen all this week on a rack at the south side of the store, marked in plain figures at prices that make some of these fake "selling out sales" look very fatigued. We have lots of goods and but little money, and are anxious to see it reversed, so we can say we have lots of money and but few goods. We never brag. A man is a braggart that cannot support his claims. We may make claims that sound improb able, but when you investigate you will find t.ey are "absolutely correct," and will give $1,000 to any person producing an adver tisement of ours that made a claim we did not support. Still, we do say we show a line of Overcoats that can lay out any thing in the city for "beauty or quality, and if you don't believe it, investigate. We have no idle time in our store. Only workers about it, and while we don't claim to be superhuman, we do claim that we have never mistreated a cus tomer, nor has advantage ever been taken of anyone that favors us with their patronagg. If any one in mentioning our firm is ?ad vised "dont go there," rest assured there is a reason for-it--most likely been refused credit. We have re fused many, and it would ·be thou sands in our pocket if we. had- re fused all. We sell @ur goods cheap, but we must have the money. Don't Forget What we say in our notice headed "Caution." It's a fact. A poor man, indeed, that can't get hri trade on businiess merit or the na ture of his stock. The man that would steal the legitimate benefits of his neighbor's advertising and popularity, would steal his purse, if he thought he would- not be found out. HIAIRRIS t4.oeIt Strlo1y again DAY IN CONGRESS. W s 9.-The senate bill to authorize rst National bank of Fort Benton, Mo t., to change its location to Great Falls and its name to the Northwest ern National bank of Great Falls was par.ed by that body. The senate bill in troduced last session to establish a public farm in each county within the limits of the republic was reported back adversely and indefinitely postponed. Plumb intro duced a bill to reduce the amount of United States bonds required of the national banks and to replace their surrendered notes and provide for the free coinage of silver. Referred to the committee on finance. He also offered an amendment "in the same terms" to the bill now on the caleadar so that the matter cant be brought to the senate independently of any report from the finance committee. MoPherson offered a resolution which was agreed to, calling on the secretary of the treasury for a certified copy of the accounts of John I. Davenport, chief supervisor of elections for the southern district of New York for the elections of '84, '86 and '88. The resolution by Jones, of Arkansas, call ing on the attorney general for a statement of the moneys paid or called for by the supervisor of the First and Second con gressional districts of Arkansas, in connec tion with the late election, was agreed to, after a statement by Jones that he had seen a newspaper report to the effect that the supervisor presented an account for $6,000. Morrow, of California, presented to the house the credentials of Thomas Gray, from the first congressional district of Cali fornia, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of J. J. DeHaven. Gray took the oath of office. Thy committee on ap propriatioejs reported the bill referring the deficiency appropriation for public print ing and binding to the committee of the whole. The same committee reported the fortification bill in' the same order. The house then resumed consideration of the Plumb resolution looking to the removal of the remains of Gen. U. S. Grant to Arling ton. After some discussion the resolution was defeated. Yeas 92, nays 153. The house then proceeded to the disposition of the public building measures. Among a number of bills passed were those of Stock ton, Cal.. $75,000; Portland. Ore., $400,000; Kansas City, Mo., $1,200,000. AMONG HIS PEOPLE. Parnell Starts for Ireland to Address the Populace. LonDON, Dec. 9.-Parnell started for Dublin to-night. A large crowd of Irish men, residents of this city, assembled at the railway station and cheered him wildly. He spoke briefly, expressing gratitude at the demonstration, which, he said, would help the fight he had undertaken. They would have no cause to regret that they stood by him and together they would win for Ireland what God determined she should get. Parnell will be -the' guest of the 'Lord Mayor` of Dublin. There wl1 be a large prooe sion on his arrival apd he wiill addre~s the people. He has beri· invited to v.eit Mitchellston and aestred of anaudpoe .of twenty ousand there. A number-of the McCartll aotion were on the same At a meeting of the anti-Parnell section to-day the manifesto was discussed, but nothing definite decided upon. A telegram was received from the delegates in America saying they were co-operating by the meth ods they believe best to secure Parnell's withdrawal and the reunion of the party. HEATHEN HORRORS. lMassacre of Christians by Fanatical Mon golians-Buildings Sacked. SAN FAxorAsco, Dec. 9.-Advices from Chung King, China, state that the troubles at Ta Chu Tsien arose from a massacre of Chinese Christians at Loong Tuhn Tsien by members of the Loo Huy Soi society during the celebration in honor of their patron deity. After the celebration for several days the brotherhood consulted their gods as to whether it would be safe to plunder the Christians. The reply was affirmative, and the brotherhood raided a number of well-to-do Christian families and carried off a lot of booty. A few days after they made a fresh attack and mas sacred many persons. Nineteen bodies were counted in the streets and several were known to be cut to pieces and thrown in the river. The mission buildings and many others were burned and the corpses thrown into the flames. SHUT OUT THE SOCIALISTS. Saniel Not Admitted to the Federation Convention. Dsraorr, Dec. 9.-The Federation of Labor reassembled this morning. It was announced that a national association of retail cltrke and waiters, and a bartenders' union had been orgatiized. The announce menti were received with applause. Among the resolutions submitted was one to the effect that each member of the local, national or international union shall be assessed 10 cents per quarter for a strike fund, from which all men on a strike are to have $2 per week. Referred to the com mittee on the constitution. Among the resolu tions referred to committees was one to take the telegraph lines out of the hands of monopolists and place them in the hands of the govern ment. This resolution was applauded, as was also ons for the World's Labor con gmain Chicag in'9S. A resolution look ag to rpposition to, police aggressions, especially by armed bands known as the coal police of Pennsylvania, was greted with applause. The report of the commit tee on thadmissionof slan , representing the New York Central Labor federatlon,was called for. Secretary Foster arose and re ported: "We have concluded that we can not admit any political party without ad mitting others." In short,the committee reported unfavorably on thegeneral ground that Saniel came from an organization without a charter from the federation. Storims on the Visty Deep. Isue.nuso, Dec. 9.-A bark which has ar rived at this port reports that on July 81, near Cape Horn, she spoke the bark St.' Marguerite. commneanded by Captain Joha Orth, and the Archduke Jt n, of Austria. which was pposed to have been lost while bound from Buenos Ayres to Valparatso. Terribl weather was prevailing at the time the veseats spoke to each other. Fary of the W d.. Araseus. Ga.. D)eae.nS Mosertee Waito aunty, a esins a psaeveral miles long and a headset yards wide. blowing down bos. and klS s thetir e bin d ta 4t ew +M L ý Xaw M ost, Ds. _ 9.-Tb., feM . Joe ft Uren. pew, took l t eouutu frIaa asai ur* qbt t e deir iro pale d InO yr aR lSej THE GREATEST Of THESE. Up to Date Prince Russell's Influence Prevails in the Helena Post-Office. Banders, Power, Carter, Blaine and Wanamaker Go Down Before Him. Mr. Hathaway's Good Luck-Redskins are to Be Hustled Back - The Butte Post-Oflice. WAsem rGTW, Dec. 9.-[Special.]-The Montana pseudo senators called at the postoffioe department to-day to see what had been done towards appointing a repub lican postmaster at Helena. They could only be told that Mr.Wanamaker had taken the papers in the case to the White House several times and had been just as often called down. Congressman Carter has now united with Sanders and Power in endors ig J. B. Walker, and unless Prince Bus sellunoovers his candidate promptly Walker will be appointed. Congressmen Curter surprised everybody to-day by springing a new candidate for the house postmastership, in the person of ex-Internal Revenue Collector Hathaway, and to-night the caucus put him through. He had seventy-three ballots the first whack. Secretary Noble received a telegram last night from Gov. Tools giving an account of Snake, Shoshone, Bannock and Pinte dep redations. To-day Gen. Schofield ordered troops to the spot, and Indian Commission er Morgan directed the agent at Fort Hall to inquire into the matter and report. The effort to move the Butte postoffice has ceased, says the postmaster-general. The office will stay in the Miners' Union building, which will be enlarged. Secretary Noble will issue regulations in a few days for adjusting the forfeited land grants. The delay has been due to the two methods proposed to adjust the Northern Pacific grants at Wallula. If adjusted on the same plan as usual, making the termi nus at right angles to the direction of the road, the Wallula lot owners will have to hunt for new titles. It is proposed to run the terminal line nbrth and south and avoid putting the town in this predica ment. AN ILLUSTRATION. Of the Posslbilites for Infamy Under the Force Bill. WAsusmoro, Dec. 9.-In the senate the election bill was taken up and Berry apoke in opposition. As an illustration of the bad effect of such a law he referred to the -seeentppoiatment by United States Oieoiu Judge Williamn in4Arkanas, of .Jo jM Clure as chiaef. sprvisor of elections. Judge Williams had, he said, lost the confidence of a large portion of the people of Arkansas on aocount of his imposing on them the very worst man in all Arkansas to exercise the high functions of that office. The same thing might occur in other states, super visors holding their office for life. If the cirouit court judges were democrats (as they are now for the most part republicans) the bill would not be advocated on the other side of the chamber. It was, there fore, a partisan measure. Berry savagely scored Supervisor McClure, and entered an earnest protest against the bill as a measure designed to legalize fraud. Daniels spoke briefly, after which George obtained the floor. SILVER LEGISLATION. Bland not Hopeful of Any During the Short Session. WASHINGTON, Dec. 9.-Representative Bland, of Missouri, does not look for any new silver legislation during the present session, but predicts that a free and un limited coinage bill will be passed by the next house with such an overwhelming ma jority that the president dare not veto it. In conversation to-day he declared that the present law, which was passed at the.last session, is unsatisfactory to the country at large, especially to those people who desire that silver shall be placed on a parity with gold. Under the present law silver is simply used as a speoulative prod cot, to be tossed up or pulled down at the pleasure of the speculators. Many of the western republicaus who voted for the bill originally are thoroughly disgusted at the practicaloperations of the law. In the mean time Senator Stewart is out with a bill which, if it is not free coinage, is quite near it. It provides that the government shall buy all the silver in the country, about 13,000,000 ounces, and coin it at once, and after that the holders of home silver bullion may take it to the mint and get dollars or paper money for it at a rate of parity with gold. The Choice of 1Mr.$athaway. WAsu.orox, Dec. 9.-The republican members of the house held a short caucus after adjournment to-day to select a post master to succeed Wheat. Mr. Carter, of Montana, secured seventy-three votes for his candidate, James W. Hathaway, of Helpna, Mont., against thirty-nine for the other four eandidates, Hoamer, of Mas saohusetts, at present assistant postmAster; Reed, of Minnesota, and Barnes and Ralph, of Illinois. Hathaway is a native of Ohio. He ealisted in the One Hundred and Fifth Ohio and was permanently disabled at the battle of Perryville. Ky. He removed to Montana at the loee of the war and has held several federal and County offilces Dunne'es Respportilament ill . Wasmazor, Dec. 9.-Dunall, ohairnnman of the house -ommitteseon the eleventh census. introduced in the house to-day a bill making areapportionmantof congress. men under it. The bill provides that after March 3 next the house shallcassist of 86 members. The following states have in. creased M aolat as follo ' Aa- bamas 1 l, i Sfiafors , I oloado "Ofbt , Ai it i, eli Mins.9 vi 3, Ntbrauk i e V Or"'acsi bill cabo have bean aesarltog, aehaas.Ase. Olbers f trisena es o, s other isudtse aaisnt as all ti~ a- eqadl nsambu of ROAM, " MACK" G WAY. The Montana Crlmia a' # sf lay. rea- for Llb6t; - L> UrrIEao, Dec i-l ,eop a Cl.--"Mac" Macdonald, the horse ~hI from Helena, Mont., who was here ' the' Northwest Mounted Police guariod m awaiting er tradition, has-escaped. Was'ir reasted by Sergt. Rosa on the 16th of September, charged with stealing a horse from the Ho: ter Lumber company, of aelena, and since his incarceration extaa . icpautions have been taken with bim,", as he was believed to be a dangeým .man. His past record is bad. , mho is the second charge of horse stealing, and once he was in the state peniteqtiary, esaping before his time, had expired h.. e fellow is no fool. He has tried gll t$ts of dodges, feigning deafness, stekness, eto., to get a chance to make a break. The way Macdonald made his escape wibld lead reople to 'bleve-he hado con spired with his giuard, for e#e~imply walked out of his cell, through, the guard room, and once outside, the pitch laok darkness made escape almost. oerth An soon as alarm was given patrols t out in all directions, but so farn o `ue has been found. Sheriff Hamilton, of de county, Montana, has been ready. f the past few days to come over to poe , but JudRe Michael has not been able come here. In the meantime, Ber. . - has captured the stolen horse. "Lasa ttle the sheriff was here we had the h but not the hqrse," said an oficer yes y; "now we have the horse but haven't j~i the thief." SOME MEASURES tEIDORSED. By the National Board of , tn Session at New Orl law OILEAN, Dec. 9.- - National Board of Trade resumed i oeassion this m.orning. The report of l.e nmmittee on uniform oommercial lei on in the United States was read and 4.pdot. The body then discussed a resol iton that the government should take .eae ,ot the im provement of navigation of (he Mississippi river and the protection of 1i levees. The advantages of improvement to commerce in connection with the Nicaragua canal was urged. A resolution 'by' the Louisiana chamber of commerce and' industry for the improvement of the MIssissippi river by the national government was adpted. A dis cnussion of, the Chiceg .board of trade's resolutions relative to the interstate commerce act was esumed. The preamble, declaring that the aotashould be amended to make it effective, was adopted. Also a resolutiod relative to the employment of experts by the commission. A resolutioi by Anderson, of Washington, adopted unanimously, refers to. the coming World's Fair. It declares that enlarged commercial relations with the sister.niatton of America are of transcendent importenee; pledges hearty support to the national board of the exposition; calls upon the more than 1000 boards of trade tbrou pout the United States to urge upon: their respective state legislatures the neceessity of early action on state exhibits: The preamble d- yboolu ..ion of the (bicago oatd of ade, com tionofthe nom elation s lading as a menate to ers' hts e was adopted with some^sliht changes. CLUBBED TWO INDIANS. One is Dead and' the Apaches Are After a Sealsi.

DunnaNo. Col., Dec. 9.-Saturday night Thos. Franklin got into an altercation with a couple of Indians'idla sIloon at Armagon,' N. M. Hee struck both Indians over the head with a billiard cue, killing one and seriously injuring the other. yesterday morning several Apaches came to Armagon intent upon having Franklin's scalp, but the sheriff secreted him. Great excitement is prevailing, the Indians declaring that they only wpnt jus tice, but if any attempt is made to get Franklin out of town there will be trouble. The enture population is attending to busi ness with six-shooters strapped around ther waists and a number are carrying Winehesters, to be prepared for an emerg ency. A LEMON GIAFTED. A Bad Man of That Name Attached to a Tree. GazaNwoop, Miss., Dec. 9.-There was another lynching at Rtoebuok, Miss., to-day as a sequel to the Aron murder. One Moses Lemon, colored, became indignant at the lynching of Martin for killing Aron and, it was learned, he was circulating among negroas trying to get up a mob and go to Aron's store, murder the clerks and fire the buildings., The people of the neighb.rhood, both white and black, formed an organization and swung Lemon to a tree. A Ciary Man's lalluelnntion. CataoQn,cDec. 9.-A special from Wash ington says that Edward T. Miller. who, eyer sinc theassination of President Gar held, has given the authorities muoh annoyance, was looked up last night and will probably be placed in an insane qsylum.. After the death of Garfield he was demented for a time and thought he had a ,z lssion to kill President Arthur. Friends sent him away, however, and he re covered. Xdoently, it is stated, his mind beome affected again and he made a threat to kill President Harrison and' Boo. retary Blihe. Finally the officials found it necessary to look him up. Was a Good Young Man. SAouRAw, Mioh., Dec. 9.-Louis A. 8an born, a sinmber of the Methodist churcb and always considLred the most exemplary young man, has left the city, haying rea-. liued on~torged paper during the last ninety days to hn extent'of over $80,000, Previous to hisdeprture he made an assigment to his mother.' his liabilities are estimated at over $100,000. Of His Abundance. Naw Yoga, De. 9.--The will' of Daniel B. Fqyorweathqr, the. millionair, leather dealer. Sled to-day, gives $2,100,00 to col leges. 'The following are the bequests: Yaleh'for the Shelfield Sodantiao school, oo,0q400; olumbJi, $200,000; Cornell, $'00,t oo00; flodoin. $100,000; Am , $100,000; WiiSms. $10000; artm i, Weeleyan. $00o,000; HamIlton o Unione T s.o oo Sht inary, Lo-. c A. A, M rs" WI eh4 Q5 PrxariWu q- P., Dee. 9 --iThe s strike of the snplPy1501 tb u of the BaltlaneBi Ohio railrod 4nt rai. terialse today and a gngin e Is'not regarded The t` daite. d v ' b$have l suteb -mp 00'' SHAMEFUL SUBSERVIENCY A Republican Senator Proclaims His Disgrace Before His Own Conscience. Despises Himself for 'His Inten tion to Support the Force Bill. Plumb Will Soon qvre to Lay the Infamy 'Aside, Hasn BRead the S8lgn Arlght. WAsm.aoero, Deo. 9.-LSpecial.]-Not all the f6rty-one republican senators who voted to take up the election bill are in favor of its passage. Their vote for consideration was in consequence of a written agreement last September in the republican caucus. Just how many are opposed to the bill is not known now, nor is it possible to say whether they will be able to hold, out against the, pressure that will be brought against them and vote against the bill. I had an interesting interview with one of these republican senators last night. He said: "I sometimes despise myself for my want of courage on this question. If I wanted to put an end to my political career, but at the same time make myself famous, I could make a speech which would be read fifty years from now and regarded as one of the great prophecies of modern times. I should predict that in less than two de cades the negro race will be relegated to its former political status,, that is, that they should be freemen without the right of suf frage. A quarter of a century has not brought the race forward. Wherever you find the black man you find him ignorant, servile, ineapable of self government, and inapt to learn the duties of citizenship. Imagine 9,000,000 Sioux in the southern atates treated as the colored race have been treated and what would the result have been long ago? Why, thefe would have been a war of ex termination, and thewhite race would have disappeared from the face of the land. Although I am a republican I do not believe that the negro should be placed on the level with the Anglo-Saxon. If I lived in the south I should do precisely as the southern demoorats do. At the same time, as a re publican also, if I can consistently, I wil vote for any legislative measurewhich shall provide that the black population of the south, if it cannot vote, shall not be counted in the apportionment of presidential eleo torse or members of congress. Sooner or later this view of the race problem will re ceive adherence from other quarters and I believe will become a party policy. I don't pretend to be much of a political Esekiel, and I may not live to see my prophecy fal fiedtt wiU oaease dAthe seaine. *biL1fý a lth~aieis iay recess. He is evdly l enwlg e of ,s acPtion existing among the republican senators at the present time. PLUME'S INTENTIONS. Hie Will Soon Move to Proceed with Need ed LegIslatlon. WAsRmoTON, Dec. 9.-Introducing his financial measure to-day Senator Plumb gave notice that if the elections bill was not disposed of at an early day he would move to lay it aside for the time being in order that the bill just introduced by him and all other measures relating to the nianolal condition of the country may be consid eed. The bill in brief is as, follows: That the compulsory requirement of deposits of United States bonds with the treasury by the national banks be limited to $1,000 for each bank. This applies to the deposits of bonds to insure the public moneys; that United States mint certificates shall be Is sued equal in amount to the national bank notes retired since 1882, and hereafter re tired; that the present silver colanre law shall bb amended so as to direct the aeretary of the treasury to purchase all silver bul lion offered-at the marketpriee not to ex ceed $1 for 871.25 grains of pure silver and issune treasury notes n. payment. When the price is for six months in excess of the above figure the purchases to be suspended and all coinage to be free, the bullion own er to be privileged to receive standard dol lar or treasury notes at their option. No certificates are to be issued, and those now in use are to be replaced with treasury notes." When the mints of France, Belgium and Italy are opened to free silver coinage at the ratio of 15,4 ounces of silver to one ounce of gpld, the preeidett by proclama tion shall prohibit the further coinageof the standard 4123 grain dollas.snd receive de'osits of silver bullion for coinage at the rate of $1 for 400 grains of pure silver, the coin or treasury notes therefor to be issued within a year after the proolamation. The new dollar to contain 4143 grains of stan dard silver, to be full legal tender and to be coined at the rate of not less than 2,500. 000 monthly until $800 000,000 is coined, rhea the coinage is to be continued at the discretion of the secretary, recoining the present standard dollar and bullion on hand. At the discretion of the secretary he shay also cause standard silver bare to be Issued in the redemption of United States treisury notes at the rate of $1 for 400 The amendment prepared , by Plumb is the same in terms as the bill above describ ed and is offered in lieu of the Paddock bill now on the senate calendar to amend the statutes, to provide for the org.nization of national banks with less capital than $0, 58). Capital Notes. The president has spproved the joint re olution authorlising the socr.tryof war to luaue 1,000 atanda of arma to r orth zad South Dakota, Wyoming, Montana and Nebraaka. The houe ommitte on miltary afair completed the onaldation of the army a·propriatb on bill for the next dcamasr. polro. One9.t beins &billa88 nr hse as ros iatlo for a rmy Two bo m Imlposlnga Sax upp compound lard were reported twthort risoommend tlon by Senator Paddock from Ptae oommit tee on agriclture, One is ebill that theboom lat t mel s a soed the other tetrdutce latjanuary I aspwe Boths pvde fowtbeimnposition of taxs dteo tanofa hanha tal hi ý i bý i4cR 3{,D 4r . SI. ' 1f3j the GeebaL.a WAuamnoro. Dec. 9.-lSpecal.]-!t ls apparent that the Indian bureau considers Gen. Miles a good deal of an alarmiat ~"o the situation in the Sioux dountry. The veteran officials of the bureau, whoikow pretty well how to handle Indians, ddolate that Miles has stampeded the administra tion with his exaggerated reports of lhe condition of things among Sitting Bull's followers. Said-Acting Commissioner Bbit to.day: "I think it is all wrong to is.e - extra rations . of beef to quiet those fellows. It is a good deal like throwing a caroaus to the wolves to ame theem. Those Indiana reaso :tiat once they got the extra beef by making art uproar and they will do it again as soon as they can expect precisely the same results. As to the matter of disarming them, that is another absurdity. Those Indiana have the finst Winchester ries, that money can buy. Where did they buy them? Not of the Indian' office certainly. Every little storekeeper all around the edges of the reservations had been making money for years by selling these Indians .guns. The blaeksmith shope around the reservations have driven a hand some little busines since 1878 o akL g tomahawks. These are the fellows who are afraid of being scalped and are making all the outcry. If we take the guns andloin hawks away from the Indians the ~grocery stores and blacksmith shops will start right in to sell the Indians more,. guns and more tomahawks. Another thing about this onts cry. The Sioux are not starving. Our special agent who has just made aoens.u, going intoall the oabins and teepeems anund the agenbies. suay'that everywhrte he *ent* there was plenty to eat. We may have serious trouble, with those Indians, but a good deal of it will be due to too much talk." Four Thousand Gyrating Redsklns. GUTanIi, 0. T., Dec. 9.-H. ). D. McKee, a courier, who arrived here yesterday from Frisco, a small town on the border, states that there are 4,000 Indians in the different sooections west of that place engaged in ghost dances, and that they are trading off their ponies, blankets and trinkets for guns and ammunition. Never before, dring the re oent orase has the aspect in the Indian Ter ritory looked so serious. Arrangements are being made to give the border towns every assistance possible and the Oklalo-n settlers are fully aroused. Seouthern Ute Catching It Gana RiNrn, Utah,Deo. 9.-The southern Utes are greatly excited over news coming from Dakota regarding the coming of the Messiah. They have commenced danoinq and painting themqelves. . ALL LINES INVOLVED. Buslaess Firms ti Varlows Branehee of Kwoynnzg, Tleu., De. -The rail id tion, has been plated 'in te Kan o eceilver, The li(itblitieas arte sattid ht $ 100,000. lhe. Mahssoiachstt & Soutbott Construction companyg building the road, also goes mlto the hands of a receiver. Moa Donald, Shea & Co., contratoars, are dredi tore tdthe extent of $600,000. Another Kanmas Bank. KANssA Orrr, Dec. 9.-A special froIm Arkansas City, Kas,, says the American Na tional bank has failed. Stringency in money and the inability to collect money caused the suspension. The assets and lii, bilities are unknown. 'They elaim the will be ready to resume in a few days. In Dimeulties for Years. NEW YOmK, Dec. 9:- ightingale B o. A Knight, silk manufactureril of Paterson, N. J., have assigned. Liabtiltie :will not be lees than $40,000, anduth sasets ~ ea believed to be only about half that amount. The firm has bea l boning under diflioui ties for seven or eight and the faillre of their chief sutport, . T. Walker, bnas & Co., last month precipitated the crash., In Business Thirty Tears. Boaros, Dec. 9.-Whitten & Young, whole sale clothiers, assigned to-day,. The fr is rated by Bradstreet at $740,Q0to $~,00400q. One gentleman, believod to be w eUl formed, says he thinks the lisbiliti wil in over a million. The ria hsa bgpil business thirty years. ailures Are naeresing, Howeven , WAs umoroTr, Dec. 9,--e. oabunet met t9-day.' r ii understood te 4aanoll sitPu ation was the only question eonsidered. The president and others expressed their satisfaction at the success of Secretary Windom's efforts towards relieving - the money stringency. These Ie Stock Brokers. Naw Yons, Dec. 9.-The failure of' ol bron, Chauncey & Co. has been announced. on the stock exchange. Bosto shoe Dealer. BoroN,. Dec. 9.-G. W. Ingalls, .hoe dealer, has failed. Liabilities $200,00. Building Firm Collapses. Nswl Yoar, Dec. 9.-Birchall'& Hodges, builders, assigned to-day with liabilities of $100;000. Liverpool Merchants. Lrrvanoon, Dec. 0.-Joseph Boamphery & Co., commission merchants, failed with liabilitiee of £50,000. lreaoy Goods Dealers. Mowlrsa., Dne. 9I-Lsanalico Bros., wholesale fancy goods dealers, amgned to dayr. Liabilities, $78,000. GOLD COMINI, Lange Amaunt, on the Way From -a den to New York. Nwir Yas, Dec. 9.,-Over $8,0O,O8 b gold will start for New York froam Esg this week. This will tend very sroauI i. relieve the Pov stringenoy foI country. theaestm:of which w to-day bwes ele s. * for moanes to one-quarter ofon pes ct. a 4. for Npt usoml hi van e'In 'h' Indian ala-Se. 'mt Labored Under thu could Puwdlhau-; . the NMrlr MiassoLa, Dec. 9. .for the execution of deters approaches, te oiled to their fate,' hopes of bein turn little fellow, says: * death;that he has no one who was connected but -that: he did not of the hereafter e h young fellow ha.s lost and worries ai gat Pascale says has no one who aided in hi was taken abro diana present had n In, but wid. :o are the grst ýHt: ha friends would ha kiled all the white to see his chief, been mad at ain not have given up d the white man, but. although he should oale says he is not4 Lala-See says th does not want to bi buy himself off. he came ain dnd Duncan MoDo n l ' him that he would three chiefs did ti They told him that it he had to the white the orimes he had a would be for~gven him. him a chiefiand w a bay of 'his li* the , made Sheritff Hoton for hi own and his compa blood. He said if the sherff on the reservation and ma any oceek or str that the chiefs would wee no nonoenee or it and exýýplanedth idea. Sheriiffp it was notln his ad consult Big pý the know of dien rrPal, tpdcaptiure15f' ati lost a great l iabdoete that w~bto N his ,, ihe a ch arts clall would be able to buy dbi ', tubiteis dian `.ole and th phould ttefor the sheriff woulddBhe made chiefs and murderers left: They all wante thought ofth thern that be woul Chief Toole that tpomer for them b olet 'would ofit h them. They they would consult ing ofi the eietto the bravest. Ino the bravest of the without a doubt ase"ho, ºn dad 1o f ore4 e ioa t a were elen$ orea dar will hereafte e tr countin on their io, Fascae wanted to kno ntits ahdi Wl4liam, who g int hm», were let go hadvkilled some hitee eet, rtueyd to hie es eo w iehndas olote wiu t the moue thwt Anthies at oeu Chief : das. was lilcts bull ha on the undo ubtel w.)L Dual have not visited ,them, lIatamdell told thes prisoe returned. to._ his ,home .he friends to come to- .ic ,'1e. deth watch Is kept or waking, day and niht,, M nouLA, P~. x 9 : ý aoulplng arwe int ths mornings got caught betwteen had hi. cheu*Jma4y argo to the Northern , H. tai. We ine wee judged ienbefpoto jury. Welkin s, the Fist Creel year.. He wilbta in the morulugi Lzvrsoerse Iiioharts va. puD the maogzipi this afternoon pioner Wright s lusano. ebb wll; Paerpeaatmaie minea . is. wift. to~e _ . we$r 'Slo "Fl'

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