November 14, 1936 Tarihli The Key West Citizen Dergisi Sayfa 1

November 14, 1936 Tarihli The Key West Citizen Dergisi Sayfa 1
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Associated Press Day Wire Service. For 56 Years Deyoted to the Best Interests of Key West VOLUME LVII. No. 272. ‘CROWN PRINCE’ FOR 1940 IS NOT YET SO FAR NO ONE APPARENTLY HAS BEEN SINGLED OUT IN ‘NEW DEAL’ MANIPULA TIONS By ALEXANDER R. GEORGE (My AMNoclatrd Prm) WASHINGTON, Nov. 14—Will President Roosevelt, like four of the most famous two-term presi dents of the United States, “pick” his successor in the White House? So far no one apparently has been singled out in such fashion as to suggest that Mr. Roosevelt was attempting to develop a New Deal “crown prince” and to build him up in public opinion for the 1940 Democratic Presidential nomination. What might happen in the next four years, however, promises to be a matter of consid erable speculation. The two men hailed as the pat ron saints of the Democratic par ty, Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, openly designated their choice of “heir.” Theodore Roose velt virtually dictated Republican selection of William H. Taft. James Madison, “timid little hus band” of the famed Dolly Madi son, put on pressure for James Monroe as his successor. Jefferson Over-Rode Protests Many members of Jefferson’s! Republican-Democratic party were opposed to Madison. Several Re publican congressmen joined in is suing a formal protest against his selection as the party’s standard bearer, but the prestige of the sage of Monticello easily prevailed. Jef ferson also was said to have ar ranged that Monroe follow Madi son in the White House, and it was j understood between the latter two that the Madison administration ' would exert all of its influence to perpetuate “the Virginia dynas- Anilrew Jackson, idol of “plan people,” has been rated by j some historians as the most braz en dictator of the White House succession. Resides naming Mart in Van Buren cf New York as his heir apparent, “Old Hickory” was reported to have laid down a pro gram of succession for 24 yesi’s— Jackson himself, 8 years; Van Burean, 8 years; and Thomas Benton, 8 years. Jackcon Dynasty Died That report was never verified, however, and the Jackson “dynas ty” lasted only 12 years. Van Buren failing of re-election. There had been considerable opposition to Van Buren’s first nomination and election, but Jackson’s extra ordinary popularity with the elec torate put him over. The next President to be re elected was Abraham Lincoln, as sassinated less than six weeks aft er seond inauguration. Wheth er he would have indicated a pos sible successor for post-war Re publican leadership is unknown. Sensational revelations of graft and corruption, involving members of the cabinet and congressional leaders, brought disrepute to the second administration of war hero Ulysses S. Grant. The Republicans were split into three groups at the end of the term, and President made no overt effort to sig nify his choice for the 1876 nom ination. Panic Upset Cleveland Grover Cleveland ran into the 1893 business panic in his second term. The Bryan-free silver ele ment, dominating the 1896 “cross of go'd” convention, repudiated Cleveland’s leadership of the Dem ocratic party—particularly because of his rigid rd'ocacy of the gold standard. William McKinley, first of the “front porch” campaigners, was assassinated six months after his second inauguration. He had evi denced no preference for a suc cessor. To the dismay of Mark Hanna and other old guardsmen, Vice President Theodore Roose velt stepped up to the Presidency and was elected to that office in 1904. As his second term was draw ing to a close, the popular Teddy picked the similarly popular “Bill” Taft for the 1908 nomination “in a walk” on the first ballot. Their subsequent estrangement became one of the most dramatic chapters in American political history. A DINNER THAT YOU’LL ALWAYS REMEMBER, YES, THE ONE THAT WAS ACCOMPANIED BY REGAL BEER. ALWAYS A PERFECT ACCOMPANMENT ©lye 2Cry Hirst Citizen SUPREME COURT JUSTICES VERY MUCHJSOLATED GREAT PORTION OF TIME AFT ER DARK IS ALSO SHOWN TO BE DEVOTED TO THEIR WORK (By PRESTON GROVER) (By AawUt4 Frjw) WASHINGTON, Nov. 14—Jus tices of the supreme court, un doubtedly are the most isolated in dividuals in Washington. Whether they have cut them selves off too well from the pub lic is much debated these days. Traditionally, they have kept them selves removed from the toil and moil of temporary drifts. "About the only time the aver age person catches a glimpse of the supreme court members is when they are sitting on the bench delivering opinions or listening to arguments. The justices are driven into the garage in the basement of the mas sive marble structure that enclos es the small courtroom, take a private elevator upstairs and en ter the robing room far removed from the public eye. Having donned their black robes, they march silently into the chamber. They eat their lunch in a private dining room and when the day’s work is over leave the building as they entered. Their participation in social ac activities at night also is limited. Much of their time after dark is devoted to their work. They Don’t Like It A little questioning here and there develops that some of the justices are a bit crochety. There are little whimsies about dress, about office arrangements, light ing fixtures and seats that keep attendants somewhere between a smile and a jitter. With scarcely an exception, they seem to d'slike their $11,000,000 bui'ding. As far as these nine justices are concerned, Iftuch op the investment is sheer waste. It is a gorgeous pile, inside and out, but it wasn’t built to fit them. Each has a handsome suite of offices in the building, but seven of the nine ne> er even hang their hats inside,, nor do their secre taries. Justices Sutherland and Roberts use their office by day, but work at home at night. The others do all their wo.k at home save when they are on the bench, which is a small portion of their time. No Snap For Aide* Each has a large library at home supplied by the government, and there they work, with a law clerk (graduate lawyer) and a stenographer. Being handy man to a justice is no snap at times. He may call his clerk and steno grapher for duty at 8 a. m., work until time to leave home for court at noon, then go to work again after the four-hour session, d)r he may ask his help to show up at 11 p. m. and wbrk on through | until daylight. Once the case is in the hands of | the justices the procedure of the court is the acme of simplicity; Red tape ends. No we’ter of bu . reaus stands ready to filter the justices’ views. However, it does seem at times ] the justices have difficulty agree ing among themselves. Their dif ferences have made a lot of recent history. STEAMER BRAZOS ARRIVED IN FORT Steamship Brazos of the Clyde- Mallory Lines arrived in port 4:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon from Ga’veston with heavy shipments of freight. The vessel sailed 7:10 o’clock last night direct for New’ York with shipments of live tur tle and miscellaneous items. Another vessel of the same j lines, the Steamer Ozark, arrived i3:45 o’clock this morning, and i after discharging heavy cargo, sailed 7:20 o’clock for Miami and Jacksonville. The power coat Powers, Cap tain Veral Roberts, of the Over seas Transportation company, ar rived in port this morning at 8:45 o'clock from Miami with forty three tons of freight for Key West. COMPLAIN OF INCREASE IN IMPORTATIONS NEW ENGLAND MILLERS REG ISTER “KICK” IN STEADY INCREASE OF IMPORTS FROM JAPAN By PRESTON GROVER Ally AHMocifiieti l*reNM) WASHINGTON, Nov. 14.—50 j much has been written of the j cheap oriental labor competition confronting American industry 'that a view from another direc j tion is interesting. Almost daily New England cot ton milierg complain of steady in creases in imports of Japanese cloth. The cloth pays a high tar iff, made especially high against Japanese goods, yet comes in to | undersell American goods, j Commerce department figures, j show that in August, 1935, 801,- | 000 yards were imported from Ja ! pan while in August this year it j was 4,881,000 yards. The reason given is cheap Jap anese labor, although an improved ! Japanese loom also receives some | credit. | What If Japanese Revolt? The “Oriental Economist,” com menting on the Japanese industrial rise, insists, however, that Jap anese real wages (what you get for your pay) have increased faster I since 1914 than in the United I States or Great Britain. (It did ; not say the Japanese standard of ' living was as high as in America. Some recent reviews of Jap ! anese industrial conditions havo I raised this question: How long will the Japanese workman wil- j lingly accept his present wage?! If soon he demands more, low ! prices probably cannot be main- I tained. Then, economists argue, : the foreign trade now supporting that naton’s miltary program will shrink. Monument A Best Seller Pawing through the Daybook we find: 1 Even yet, the most admired ex hibit in the national museum is Lindbergh’s ’’Spirit of St. ... Rats occasionally scamper across the main halls of the capi tol. . . . The late Senator Couzens once ordered John Thomas Taylor, American legion Washington rep resentative, to leave a waiting room reserved for the press. . . . Reckless political bravery, that. ... A huge table, 15 feet across, built by the Philippine govern ment from the multicolored wood of a single tree, has become a hat rack and impromptu seat for the press in an outer corridor of the Chief Executives offices. ... In tended for the cabinet, it was too large for inner white house doors. . . . More than 100,000 Washing tonians are voters—by mail. . . . Others are disfranchised. Pennsylvania avenue, although probably the most famous, is not I the busiest street in the city dur ing shopping and theater hours. I. . . That distinction goes to F ! street, two blocks away. . . . The [old Ford theater, just off Penn sylvania, is a Lincoln museum but ' the stage and Lincoln’s box have j been removed. . . . Washington monument is still a best seller [among tourists. . . Cues of visi ; tors stand in line outside daily. ... In busy hours the elevator makes the round trip about every ten minutes. i Proposed Park Has Revived Ghost Story ifflv Axnrliilrit l‘rr) ALPINE, Tex., Nov. 14.—Ne * gotiations for establishing a vast J international park along the Mex i ican border revived a famous { ghost story. j The proposed park includes the ( Chisos Mountains, among the loft j iest in Texas. The word “Chisos” j means “ghosts.” | The story goes that the chief of a mighty Indian tribe was cap tured by marauding tribes from across the Rio Grande. He es caped after years of torture and fled to the Chisos but could not find his tribe. *'■■■ '■■■"■ ' - ■ '■ ANNOUNCING REOPENING La Palma Beauty Shoppe 219 Simontoa Street Mis* Myrtle (Kitty) Sanches, —Prop.— Permanents: $2.50 to SIO.OO KEY WEST, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1936. LANKFORDS ARE HEREJIN VISIT LIEUTENANT COMMANDER AND WIFE CAME IN OVER ; HIGHWAY Arriving over the highway last evening was Lieutenant Com mander J. F. Lankford, Medical Corps, U. S. N., and Mjrs. Lank ford, who are here for a brief visit with Doctor Lankford’s daughter, Miss Clara Bernice Lankford, teacher of home eco nomics at the Key West High School. Dr. Lankford will be remember ed by many Key Westers. He was here for a tour of duty and dur

ing his stay of two years made a host of friends who are glad to welcome him back for even a brief stay. It was his intention to sail with Mrs. Lankford next Tuesday on the Cuba for Tampa, but now in tends to leave earlier for the west coast where they will at Seattle, Washington, board a vessel of the Dollar Line, for Japan and after a brief stay there continue to tho Philippine Islands, where trie doc tor has been assigned to duty. MAKING READY FOR LARGE NUMBER OF CRAFT TBS WINTER PLANS NOW UNDER WAY FOR LIGHTING ALL PIERS IN SUBMARINE BASE, FERA DIRECTOR SAYS Anticipating arrival of the largest group of yachts which have ever before visited this har bor, plans are now getting under way for the lighting of all the piers in the submarine base, Franklin E. Albert, FERA direc tor, said this morning. From the many communications asking information relevant to the facilities in the yacht asin, it is believed that more craft will come to this port this year than at any previous season. Therefore the program of light ing the piers will be started at the earliest possible time and be car ried on until all piers which are available will be lighted. Work will first start in stringing lights on the pier at which the airplane barge is berthed. TRIANGLEPARK BEING BEAUTIFIED PALMS BEING PLACED ALONG " i OUTER EDGE OF SIDEWALK •) * Beautification of the triangle park at the intersection of White head and Greene streets was start ed this week by Miss Mollie Park er, of the WPA supervisory staff, i and a group of workers have made ! much progres on the project. Pritchardia palms are being J placed along the outer edge of the sidewalk, and on the interior of the park grounds will be planted pigmy dates and rows of periwin kles along the side of the fence. The rest of the grounds will be planted in Bermuda grass right up < to the marble shaft in the center j and when completed the park will j be one of the most beautiful of | the smaller parks in the city. - -., , . 1 PHONE 67 Or call at the store that serves you bast for the most complete line of FRUITS and VEGE TABLES in town. We have a fine assortment of ingredients for making FRUIT | CAKE. ARCHER’S GROCERY T|a Store That Serves You Best” Phone 97 814 Fleming Street MIHIE TORRES SHIPPED OUT ORDERED TO LEAVE CITY BY COURT ORDER ISSUED RECENTLY Sheriff K. O. Thompson and his office force this week rid them selves of one Mittie Torres, color ed, who for a long period has been a source of annoyance and trou ble, and this week ordered out of the city by Judge William V. Al bury, and admonished to remain away. On numerous occasions this woman had been arraigned in court on various cnarges, and some time ago was sentenced to a term in jail for assau t and bat tery on Angel Torres. Illness made it necessary for her to be released. | Later Angel Torres decided he would keep her at home and start ed to make pieces out of her shoes and other wearing apparel. She had Angel arrested and tbs week he was brought up for trial in criminal court. Judge Albury sentenced Angel to pay a fine of $lO or spend 15 days in jail after he had pleaded gu'lty to charges of ma’icious mis ch ef. As an alternative the judge raid he would suspend sentence if Angel would buy Mittie a ticket ; and send her out of town. I To, this Angel agreed and Thurs ! day morning Mittie was placed on a bus of the Florida Motor Lines and the last words she was told 'were: “Don’t come back to Key West.” STEAMER CUBA TORESUMERUN NOVEMBER 22 VESSEL, WHICH IS NOW ON DRYDOCK AT MOBILE, TO ARRIVE AT KEY WfcST NO VEMBER 23 FROM TAMPA In reply to a number of in quiries as to the next scheduled arrival of the S. S. Cuba from Tampa, The C-tizen learned today that the P. & O. vessell is expect ed to leave Tampa for Key West Sunday, November 22, and be at this port November 23, resuming her regular schedule between Key West, Havana and .Port Tampa. This information was recived this morning from the offices of the P. & O. S. company, and un less there are further advices re ceived, this information will stand. While leaving her berth in Ha vana harbor Tuesday morning the S. S. Cuba was struck by the Grace ! Line Steamship Santa Barbara, and was injured so badly that it was necessary to send the vessel to drydock at Mobile, wher she now is undergoing repairs. DELEGATION TO CUBA TO LEAVE HEREMONDAY GROUP FROM KEY WEST TO ATTEND CEREMONIES IN CONNECTION WITH UN VEILING OF STATUE Members of the delegation frdm Key West who will go to Havana to attend the ceremonies which have been planned in connection with the unveiling of the statue to General Maximo Gomez, are planning to leave Key West Mon day mornng for Miami and there take passage on board the Steam ship Florida far Havana. It was far- a brief time ex pected that the Cuba would be back on the schedule by Monday and the trip could be made on that vessel. However it has been learned that there will be no ves sel from this port for Havana un til Monday, November 23, and ar rangements have been made to make the trip to Miami on a bus of the Florida Motor Lines and start for Havana from that port. CITES VARIOUS WORK HANDLED BY RED CROSS ADDITIONAL HELPERS ARE ENLISTED IN SECURING MEMBERSHIPS IN LOCAL DRIVE “Although the American Red Cross is usually thought of as an I agency responding to emergency conditions and disasters, its work goes far beyond these fields, ami is a vital part of the year-round, life of people in the United State*. That is one reason why Key West | should respond to the membership [ campa'gn now under way in Mon-, i roe County and help the member- I ship campaign group reach its j quota of 400.” i Robert F. Spottswood, chairman :of the membership campaign com mittee in Monroe county, made the above statement this morning while urging Key Westers to plr.y their part in helping the national as sociation go over the top in its | ill ive by Thanksgiving Day. | Persons are inclined to think of the Red Cross as an agency which usually is first on the scene when floods ravage a country side, earth | quakes tear asunder a ei' ilized and i developed community, pestilence i spreads through ah area leaving in | its wake victims and diseased bod- I ies, or hurricanes or tornadoes [sweep over an area. Many O.Her Activities The activities of the Red Cross, 1 however, go far beyond these ! emergency activities, Chairman Spottswood emphasized. [ * Public health activities. We s*v- : ing corps, constant health educa tion work, and many other activi- Ities of a similar nature are car ried on throughout the year by the Red Cross. One of the most recent additions to its program is the creation of highway first aid stations, designat ed at strategic points along arterial | highways. Taking cognizance of [ the rising number of accidents and deaths on the nation’s h ghways, ! the Red Cross realized that until the motoring public could be edu cated to safe driving and until laws could be passed regulating this traffic more effectively, fre quent first ad stations should be set up. This is being done, and as a result trained first aid work ers—at filling stations, tourist homes and other places along the highways—are saving lives by ef fective first aid treatment until injured persons can reach a hos pital or other means of proper medical attention. Increase Solicitors The program of the Red Cross, Chairman Spottswood added, is so far reaching that Key West cer tainly derives benefit from it jus* as every other section of the coua- 1 try does. In Key West, the corps of work ers soliciting memberships was in creased yesterday, Mrs. 11. /E- Berkowitz, in charge of the can vassing, said. Mrs. James Cooper is to obtain memberships at the local office of the State Plant Board; Mrs. James Roberts will reach employes of the Key West Electric Company; Miss Etta Pat-; terson will canvass Caroline street and Mrs. Juba Bean will seek memberships on Division street. Additional volunteers are still needed, Mrs. Berkowitz said, in or der that every resident of the city, may have an opportunity to par ticipate in the activities of the Red Cross, through membership in it. One of the first reports receiv ed today was from Mrs. Charles B. Barnes, who happily said that , she had met with success and be lieves she will turn in en exce’- lent report from the section adja cent to South Beach, to which she was assigned. JUNIOR WOMAN’S CLUB Fashion Revue and Dance Tonight, 9:30 •’Clack HABANA-MADRID CLUB COUPLE, $1.00; LADIES. Me j Admiral Bader, ttgh Rankhg Naval Officer, Arrived Today, Was EDtertahed At tackon GOMEZ FUNS TO PUSH MATTER W OBTAINING FEES MANY INQLHtIES MAX Z AS TO WHAT HE MEANT ■ STATE V MENT ABOUT HiITT IN SAFE~ at tke Jane paary many qpato j tions kae ban stand Tka Clean ■ said there was “dyaante m that [anfe.” ; “This remark was mato at tke ! meat that he had rrpaf i to Me ' heriff that he had faaad tos sai* riecti-.a a:.o R MN Mil DOMNA ( but was not icfewiag to toe pam he ktesdrd to eaaory tor ton I that the absentee hatots prehanly he entered toe aafe. file his art agaamt tke fcaned at that he wmid ask tke enact to mandamus tke kanrd to pay lam tke performance *f Ik* semens. PLANNING TO j WELCOME HIGH ARMY OFFICER MAJOR GENERAL A. ML SUN DERLAND EXPECTED TO I ARRIVE OVER IMGMW AT THIS AFTERNOON Major J. D MarMeliee. U X A., commandant at Key Wa Bar i racks, in today an iigii tor the 1 reception of Major G i narat A. H_ I Sunderland. V. S. A., who in dar ;to arrive over tke highway tka afternoon in company wita Mm Sunderland. ! Haviag supervimon ever sE har bor defenses in the United Statea, } Panama Philippines and liana i General Sunder*and a an a rega ■ lar routine inspection trip to tank ; over the barock and the dnfaaaas at Fort Taylor, and wM remain until Monday, \ Major MaclluTer tod tta -1 morning he wifi meet the goarr [al and Mm ■aalifl to %m Name Key ami eacort them to tor [city. CRIMINAL COURT ENDS TBS TERM I II to I Criminal court al neat at Monroe coenty met this ■•ruing 9:30 o’clock with Jadpr WLhaa officials present. County Solicitor Allan B. Clear* announced that three mere no farther rears to he triad to tha session, and Jndge Atony dec ar id ember* of the jury atm serv ed daring the aaaama am m derel paid and CM C. tom B. I I DANCE “Charlie mmd His 1 1 landaus” TONIGHT RAU L ’ S JCJL V nacc mn cesra ass ANWAR mmpme asasmm L. to rant at to tor party penamdha to ton and i A, jmTl&'v Mu BMtoa. Mr. E. MeCarthy. Canto sad Geodetor Sarory amt to* toCartoy. W toter Echham to. aad Mm Wm. R. Warren. Mayor aad Mm. to atoMtoa. BoAem to met at Chart i ton. S. C, to Sense America to aatead too pf>m top-jogr

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