18 Eylül 1939 Tarihli The Key West Citizen Dergisi Sayfa 1

18 Eylül 1939 Tarihli The Key West Citizen Dergisi Sayfa 1
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Associated Press Day Wire Service For 69 Years Devoted to the Best Intel ests of Key West VOLUME LX. No. 221, (M Heeting Wll lake Final Action On Tax Min Tonight Cily Council will hold a special meeting tonight, as announced, last Friday morning, to bring up the subject of Occupational Tax i raises to a second and third reading. The measure received a 6 to 1 vole of approval last Thursday night, and it is expect ed that the action will be unani- | me us tonight in favor of the lax- ' raise. The public is invited to the * meeting. The Council members have expressed themselves as de- ! sirous of keeping all business people and residents posted on their activities in behalf of pro-1 viding funds for WPA sponsor- i ship projects. j It is the general thought that; no other means can be found to raise funds, however, if business- { men have any new ideas on the ( subject, their expressions will be ■ welcomed at the meeting to- , night. ANTONIO CRUZ IS j DEAD IN LAKE CITY WAS A MEMBER OF KEY WEST FIRE DEPARTMENT; AWAIT FUNERAL NOTICE Telegrams received last night by Mrs. Everett Rivas advised of the death yesterday of her father Antonio Cruz, in Lake City, from a heart attack. Mr. Cruz had been for years a member of the Key West Fire Department, being retired some time ago on a pension after 16 years of service. He was 63 years old. Mr. and Mrs. Rivas and other members of the family have planned to leave this afternoon or tomorrow morning for the fun eral services and interment, which will be held in Lake City tomorrow afternoon at 4 o’clock. Survivors are the widow, Mrs. Inez Cruz. Lake City; two daugh ters, Mrs. Everett Rivas of Key West, Mrs. Graham Archer, Tampa. Five sons, Oscar, Albert and Hubert Cruz, Key West; Frank and Jack Cruz, of Miami. Two sisters: Mrs. Carmi Ca mero. of Havana, Cuba; Mrs. George Loessner, of Lake City. Three brothers, Enrique, Frank and Joe Cruz, of Key West. There are also eight grandchil dren of Key West, two in Tampa and two in Miami, and two great grandchildren in Tampa. SPLASH! IN FACT, S-P-L-A-S-H ! ! Illr Ah* -Ifclvrt rrM) OKLAHOMA CITY. Sept. 18*—Biggest splash in Okla homa City's history was caused, recently, by a pea nut. A spectator offered Luna, soo elephant, a peanut. She reached and reached for it with her trunk, stretching it far across the moat that sep arated her and the goober. Farther and farther and farther she stretched. The chain fastened around her leg didn't have so much rub ber in it. Suddenly it mapped. Luna plunged into three feel of water. Spectators were drenched. Luna bel lowed and declined to try an ascent up the slippery meat. Finally Keener Leo Blon din drained the moat, built a heavy stairway for Luna to climb out. ©he 2Cetj Mrst ©ttfeen THE SOUTHERNMOST NEWSPAPER IN THE U. S. A. NEW ENGLAND TRIP ENJOYED BY WHITES , SPENT MONTH VIEWING SCENES IN NORTHEAST; SAW SQUALUS RAISED ' , i | After spending an enjoyable j vacation of one month in the ;New England States, Mr. and ; Mrs. Mitchell White; daughter, Margaret, and son, Mitchell, Jr., returned over the Overseas High | way Saturday. i After a visit of several weeks with Mr. White’s mother, Mrs. Mitchell Leßlanc of Lawrence. Mass., the Whites motored to Vermont, Maine, through the j White mountains of New Hamp ; shire and visited briefly in Cana da. J An interesting highlight of , their trip was at Portsmouth, N. j H., where thev witnessed the , raising of the ill-fated submarine i Squalus. Big Increase Of Crawfish IndicatedßySup.Dowling (Nprrlal In The Citizen) TALLAHASSEE. Sept. 18- Supervisor of Conservation R. L. (Bob) Dowling said here today he has received advices from his i agent in Key West, Bennie Rus sell, that the supply of crawfish in Monroe waters has increased about 90 percent in one year. Supervisor Dowling, whose of fice is receiving annual reports from his field agents throughout the state, said the increase in the supply of crawfish is due almost entirely to enforcement of the closed season and the law against LUNCH ROOMS TO REOPEN SEPT. 27 SUPERVISOR HICKS AN NOUNCES PROJECTS FOR TWO LOCAL SCHOOLS Pursuant to instructions re ceived by Supervisor C. G. iHcks at WPA headquarters, the lunch room projects for Division Street and Harris Schools will start their activities on the morn ing of September 27. ) Mr. Hicks said this morning that the projects are to provide j lunches for undernourished chil dren of families who are on the relief lists and funds will be used especially for that purpose. JUDGE GOMEZIN an THIS WEEK ' Judge Arthur Gomez, of the ! Eleventh Judicial Circuit, with ] hedaquarters in Key West, who ihas been attending to his ju dicial activities in Miami, is in I tho city today and expects to re main throughout the week. The judge was accompanied by Mrs. Gomez, who had been spending a lengthy visit in Mi ami and will remain for a while. Ahern Funeral Home Aero-Car Ambulance Service "Air Cooled" AMBULANCE SERVICE Phone 22211 Miami, Fie ARMY OFFICERS ! INSPECT AIRFIELD i i HERE SATURDAYI I | MAY LENGTHEN FIELD AS j AUXILIARY FOR SQUAD- j j RON BASED AT MIAMI; AC- ! COMMODATIONS ADEQUATE i * i— ! A group of army officers from j the U. S. Army plane camp at i | Miami Municipal Airport were in the city Saturday afternoon in- i 1 specting the old Pan-American ‘ Field on Roosevelt Boulevard. | They made the trip from Miami by plane. I There has been talk of the | Pan-American Field being length- j I ened to permit its use as an aux- s . iliary field by the Army fliers ! based at Miami. ! Mention has also been made of j ! the possibility of the Army unit j being moved to Key West. In- ' | adequacy of accommodations at; Miami for the Army fliers has j been cited. At Key West bar- ! racks and Fort Taylor there is ! ample accommodation for a large personnel. j Visiting Army officers, due to recent strict War Department (regulations on publicity, did not (commit themselves to The Citi zen. GEM-INY CRICKETS! HOVE, England—Edmund Dis tin Maddick, former naval sur igeon and air force major, in ac ; cordance with his will was j buried wearing a pin presented ' him by King George V. Other ! i jewelry was buried with him in ja box. taking crawfish weighing under one pound. This conservation work has been going on for more than a year, and the same bene ficial results are reported algo in the Miami area, it is indicated. Agent Russell ijftas 1 been on duty in Monroe county for sev eral months. Other agents also 'have worked at variuos times in Monroe county, patrolling the coast and doing enforcement work in the areas near the north ern border line of the county. Supervisor Dowling said his agents report an almost complete , right-about-face in the attitude i of fishermen and dealers in Mon roe coury, where once they | were opposed to efforts of the conservation department. Now, it . is said, a majority of those asso ciated in any way with fishing jand other phases of the seafoods industry realize the work is of : direct benefit to them and to all of Florida. Results, therefore, are quite gratifying. Agent Russell reports having | released into the waters alive | about 3,000 pounds of crawfish [ that were penned up during the ' last closed season because of the law which makes it a penalty to possess them during the closed months. He said the catching of ! crawfish under one pound in ! weight, which is a violation of | the law, has almost been aban | doned. Only one arrest was necessary to halt it. Conservation agents, at the di rection of Supervisor Dowling, jhave done much in eliminating i illegal sponging in Monroe wa iters, there having been a number ! of arrests for this offense while 'the department’s patrol boat was in those waters. One of the state’s patrol boats, with Capt. Yulee Thompson in charge, has been ordered to Mon roe county and already is enroute to Key West for an indefinite tstay, Mr. Dowling said. hoteTgroCp to I MEET TUESDAY Hotel and Rooming House As- I sociation will hold regular monthly meeting at 2:30 o’clock tomorrow afternoon at La Con cha Hotel. Other rooming house owners who do not belong to the organi zation are cordially invited, presi dent R. A. Lehmann stated. KEY WEST, FLORIDA, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 1939 Poland’s Army Fights On As Officials Flee (By AMKoclnted PrewO LONDON, Sept. 18.—With the Polish army hemmed in by German troops from the north and south and also by Russian troops from the west, which invaded Poland yes | terday, it faced surrender or Annihilation in the next few days. i The Polish government has already fled to neutral Rumania, with Rumanian officials taking great pains to quell any demonstration which might cause its neutrality to be in question. Polish troops who were near the Rumanian border have been running their horses, their arms, field artillery, tanks and ether equipment across the border rather than let them fall in German or Russian hands. It appeared today that Russia and Germany would have a one third-two third split-up of Poland with possi ! bility of a buffer state between the Russian and German portions being established. German batteries were laying down a heavy barrage : on Polish positions today. England and France, it was stated today, would probably not declare war os Russia, for coming into war against Poland, because of the possibility that she may yet not joi~ the German forces in the war against the Allies. / A formal protest will be sent the Russian govern ment by the Allies. PRESIDENT CALLS TWO PARTY CONFERENCE ON NEUTRALITY WASHINGTON, Sept. 18.—President Roosevelt has asked leaders of the Republican and Democratic party to meet Wednesday to discuss the neutrality legislation which is being prepared for the special session of Con gress Thursday. Alf M. Landon and other Republicans have accepted the invitation. Roosevelt’s secretary Stephen Early said

that the President is determined not to let party lines in terfere with the important question. GERMANY SINKS AIRPLANE CARRIER; BRITAIN RETALIATES WITH PAMPHLETS LONDON, Sept. 18.—British airplane carrier “Cour ageous” was sunk yesterday by a German submarine in an undisclosed location at sea. British censors would not allow the location to be re leased but it is believed that it is close to shore since ves sels bringing survivors are expected to reach the English coast today. The censors did not release the number of the dead, but said that families of those who died in action would be informed as soon as accurate lists were ob tained. British reports said that the German sub was also de stroyed in the fight, but informed sources doubted that this was so, saying that it was probably British propa ganda. Meanwhile Britain showered Germany again yester day with pamphlets painting Hitler in the blackest of terms. The messages urged revolt against their leader who, the pamphlets said, had dragged the German peo ple into a war which alienated the sympathies of all na ; tions excepting Russia. German bulletins claimed that 30 English ships have been sunken by German submarines, but this estimate is declared very high in the light of reports from news serv ices. throughout the world. BACKGROUND OF THE WAR Digest Of War News From All Fronts SIEGFRIED LINE ■ Greatest obstacle to the French and English invasion of German territory is the Siegfried Line, also known as the Great Wall or Limes Line. This barrier against approach ing armies is composed of forts, outposts and blockhouses. It runs 350 miles in length and is 30 miles deep. Interlocking un (Continued on Page Four) NEW CHARTER IS IMPERILED; FIVE SECTIONS OMITTED INFORMATION CONCERNING ENROLLED CHARTER IS RE CEIVED FROM SECREARY OF i ! STATE. R. A. GRAY . i I Robert A. Gray, Secretary of State, today dropped a “bomb ! shell” into the midst of Key West 'city government proceedings in | the form of a letter written to the president of City Council in ! which the new charter as voted • into legal being at Tallahassee last spring is shown to be minus a few important sections. I At least, as far as The Citizen j is able to find out, the situation appeared further tangled in that j regard. It will be recalled that • the referendum sections were i ; omitted from the new charter as I passed, making it unnecessary to i hold an election. This matter was officially recognized by City Attorney Henry Taylor when he stated that the new charter was law. Subsequent to that opinion, the Council has returned to the old charter. Attorney Taylor had not been i asked for an opinion on the new discovery at press time today, j According to Secretary Gray’s j letter, sections 56 to 60, inclusive | were left out of the enrolled bill, i which, by state statute, is the j law. WPA Work Prepares City For New Tourist Season Works Progress Administration project to beautify the city | through a city-wide tree-plan,t --| ing program will be brought. to la close some time in December, it was announced at W.P.A. i headquarters today. Among trees, which have been : planted, are coconut palm, ma j hogany, poinciana, spathoeda, 1 orchid, woman’s tongue, cassia, j pomgranale, laurel, tamarind. The | one regret is that the trees pro ■curred are rather small and it ' will be some time before they grow to appreciable size. Care is being exerted to care fully dig out surface rock and fill with loose dirt so that the ! tree will have plenty of space in , which to grow and to receive ' necessary moisture, i Building of the curve at the j turn near the Stock Island bridge 1 leading into Roosevelt Boulevard i j will be completed within the I next 30 days. Covering of as phalt will be placed on the turn, , which is nicely banked. Lower- CAPTAIN LH. MUSE GOES ON FURLOUGH I CAPT. MEDD TRANSFERRED FROM POINCIANA TO TENDER IVY I | Captain Charles P. Medd, of i the Coast Guard-Lighthouse i * Service, has been relieved of the ; command of the Tender Poinci )( ana at Miami and has been in i structed to proceed to Tampa to take command of the Tender Ivy to relieve Captain L. H. Muse, who will return to Key West and I begin his furlough. Tender Zinnia left 8 o’clock : this morning for Tortugas with j supplies for the light at Logger- j head Key and for the keepers who are stationed at the light. Passengers on the vessel were Assistant Keeper Warren Ben nett, recently transferred from the Coast Guard, Mrs. Bennet and Mrs. Walter K. Light and baby, wife of another assistant keeper, who left for the light last ( week. Bridge Conmission To Hold Important Mating Wednesday C. G. OFFICIALS i TO BE EXAMINED ' DEMERIT!*, HASKIINS AND SCHONECK AWAIT ORDERS TO GO TO JACKSONVILLE Instructions have been receiv ed at Coast Guard-Lighthouse headquarters ip Key West from Washington headquarters for Principal Lighthouse Engineer William W. Demeritt, Lighthouse Engineer Henry B. Haskins and Assistant Lighthouse Engineer W. |J. Schoneck to proceed to Jack | sdnville when orders are re ceived. They will report to Captain J. F. Hottel, president of the board, which has been convened by the commandant to ascertain their mental, moral and physical quali fications for induction into the Coast Guard Service. Mr. Demeritt stated this mom j ing that specific orders relative jto the date on which the orders j will become effective will be re , ceived at a later date. ing of the curve two feet from j its former height was i one of the features of the curVe. Formerly, the turn, which banked sharply j and was very high, had been a danger spot. Work on building city streets j continues with principal work on George, Ashby and South be- i tween Thompson and First Street, Avenue E at Key West Realty Company tract, Royal and Florida streets ana a colored section I near Fort street and another on Petronia. Patching of streets, through which the new water and sewer lines have been run, is being rushed to a close before the proj ect is shut off on October 31. The more important thoroughfares are being treated first. On Roosevelt Boulevard the main force is working on the south side, resurfacing certain areas after laying a cap of marl, i A "patch” crew is working on the north side of the Boulevard re pairing certain holes through which water may seep and de stroy other parts of the surface covering. At the Botanical Gardens on Stock Island, two nine-foot wide roads are being constructed pa | rallel to the single road which is now there. This is meant to al low facility in turning for auto j mobile traffic. TARGET PRACTICE TUESDAY | PRACTICE WILL BE WITH PISTOLS ON FORT TAYLOR RANGE . \ Battery “E”, Thirteenth Coast i I Artillery and Detachments, will j I begin conducting target practice with the automatic pistol on* the I range at Fort Taylor, commencing ; tomorrow morning, September 19, 1 and this period of practice will be continued through Wednes day, September 20. Lieutenant-Colonel J. D. Mac- Mullen advises that the danger area will be about 1,000 yards south of Fort Taylor and small boats, which are operating in that i vicinity are advised to proceed with caution. Key West, Florida, has the most equable climate In the country; with an average range of only 14* Fahrenheit PRICE FIVE CENTS lltv A Mi>rlntr<l Prowl MIAMI, Sept. 18.—John Slade, chairman of the Overseas Road and Toll Bridge Commission, an | nounced this morning that a meeting of the commission will be held at District office head quarters in Marathon, Florida, Wednesday, September 20. Two important subjects are [Scheduled for action, according jto Chairman Slade. Final dis position of the matter of toll rate i to charge will be disposed of and the appointment of a permanent manager to succeed B. M. Dun !can will be made. These two matters are left i from the meeting held August 12 at Marathon, at which a 75 per cent raise was voted subject to approval by the RFC. In that no approval was forthcoming, Chair ; man Slade ruled that the new rate should not go into effect on September Ist. General Manager B. M. Duncan was dismissed at that meeting, effective Septem | ber 15, preceded by a two-week’s | vacation from the first of Sep itember. GREAT INCREASE IN FLORIDA BUILDING j OVER $2,000,000 ADDED TO NEW CONSTRUCTION LAST MONTH In Thf Citi/cn) i JACKSONVILLE, Sept. 18- Forty Florida municipalities re-, 1 ported a combined building con struction total of approximately '57,000,000 last month to give the state a gain of almost $2,000,000 lover August, 1938, according to a compilation released today by the research department of the j Florida State Chamber of Com : merce. i Grand total of the 40 cities for •last month was $5,616,799 as cum -1 pared with $4,834,073 reported by them' for the same month a year ago. This gave them a $1,796,756 gain over August, 1938, reports. Fifty-two cities last year report ed an August total of $5,036,207. Several of them, however, have :noi yet reported their August, j 1939, figures and they have not yet been added to last month’s ■ statistics. Ten cities reported totals valued in the $ 100,000’s. They weie: Miami, $2,087,828; Miami Beach, $1,508,294; Jacksonville, $632,531; St. Petersburg, $535,- 442; Ft. Lauderdale, $315,886; West Palm Beach, $210,530; Or lando, $193,814; Hollywood, $130,- 948; Gainesville, $118,921, and Tampa, $111,560. Other cities and the totals re ported follow: Coral Gables, $91,453; Daytona i Beach, $76,565; Pensacola, $69,- 805; Ocala, $60,203; Lakeland, $54,409.40; Lake Worth, $45,390; Jacksonville Beach, $45,050; Clearwater, $38,430; St. Augus tine, $32,172; Delray Beach, $29,- j 545. | Bradenton, $25,645; Winter Park, $21,600; Sarasota, $19,256; Vero Beach, $14,030; Key West, $10,800; Sebring, $10,700; Apop ka, $10,400; Sanford, $9,720; Pan ama City, $7,475; New Smyrna. $7,010; Eustis, $7,000. Palatka, $6,550; Ft. Myers, sls - 402; Punta Gorda, $4,575; Fema drna, $2,990; Stuart, $2,645; Ven ice, $2,115; Dunedin, $1,790- Da venport, $1,500; Avon Park si -200. ’ *

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