1 Ocak 1941 Tarihli The Key West Citizen Gazetesi Sayfa 1

1 Ocak 1941 Tarihli The Key West Citizen Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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Associated Press Day Wire Service For 61 Years Devoted to the Best Interests of Key West VOLUME LXII. No. 1. Key West Post Office Does Record Business Receipts Last Month Were Much Greater Than For Same Period In Decem ber Last Year Post office receipts in Key West in December were about the larg est in the history of the local station. Postmaster Fred J. Dion announced today. Receipts last month were SB,- 814.18 as compared with $6,358.88 in December. 1939. Last month’s receipts brought to $56,781.35 the total for 1940. This was greatly in excess of 1939. when the re ceipts totaled $40,758.27. Postmaster Dion reported that the receipts for the calendar year put the Key West post office in the first classification of post of fice. Heretofore the city has been rated second class. Whether this wil mean a greater personnel to handle the increased business was not known. “It will be the beginning of the next fiscal year before we will know that, in all probability”. Postmaster Dion said. While the advent of the navy in Key West was held to be one rea son for the increase in receipts last month and last year, general conditions have improved in the city. The tourist trade is larger and the civilian population enjoy ed a greater measure of prosper ity, it was reported. C. DEMERITT, 73, DIED YESTERDAY FUNERAL SERVICES WILL BE CONDUCTED TOMORROW AFTERNOON Clennie Dcrrteritt, 73, died yes terday afternoon at 5:30 o’clock at his residence, 1325 Simonton street. Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at 4:30 o’clock from the residence Rev. Doherty of the First Congrega tional church will officiate. Surviving arc his wife, Mrs. Sarah Demeritt; two daughters, Mrs. Hugh Hinde and Mrs. Oliver Kemp; three sons, Stephen, Har old and Clennie; one brother, George Demeritt, all of Key West, except Stephen, who resides in Arizona, and his brother, George of Tampa; twenty-six grandchil dren and thirteen grandchil dren. The pallbearers will be selected from the police department of which Mr Demeritt was a mem ber and served the city for 81 years as policeman and three years as captain of police. Pritchard Funeral Home will be in charee of the arrangements. FIVE CHILDREN IN ONE YEAR HARTINGTON. Neb—A year to the dav after the birth of trip lets, twins were born to Mr. and Mrs. John Feilmeier. The latest additions to the farm family—a boy and a girl—raised the num ber of children to fourteen. Group Arranging For Legion Convention Next meeting of the board of directors of the executive commit tee of the Key West Convention corporation will be held next Monday night, it was announced today bv Al Mills, executive di rector. The corporation is arrang ing the 1941 convention of the state department of the American Legion Mills expects to report that the new convention headquarters in La Concha hotel building will be ready about Jan 10 The office is located next door to the Chamber of Commerce on the Feming street side of the building and will be complete in every detail There are about 1.000 reserva tions to the convention to date. ®hc 2Cey Meat Citizen THE SOUTHERNMOST NEWSPAPER IN THE U. S. A. MAGAZINE FEATURES KEY WEST PAINTINGS The January, 1941, num ber of the American Home Magazine carries two repro ductions of pictures by fa mous artists that are of in terest to residents of Florida in general and to Key West in oarticular. One is a reproduction of a signed etching by W. R. Locke, the subject “Patio, Old Toledo House", St. Aug ustin, Florida. The other is a reproduction of a water color by Winslow Homer, “Negro Cabin and Palms". This is a Key West scene, and the text reads: "In this Key West scene, Homer satu rated himself in atmospheric effects, excited by the bar baric splendor of southern light and color". REAL ESTATE | DEALS CLIMB i— i County Clerk Ross C. Sawyer reported today that real estate transactions in his office increas i ed last year by 400 over the fig ures for 1939. In 1940 there were 1490 legal instruments recorded , in the office, and only 990 in 1939. At the same time Sawyer re , ported there were 201 divorces granted in Monroe county. This compares with 279 marriage li censes issued by County Judge Raymond R. Lord. In 1939 there ! were 175 marriage licenses is sued. Judfee Lord married 93 of the 'couples himself, while Peace Jus tice Enrique Esquinallo, Jr., mar ried 59 couples. STATIONS AFLOAT; •t • • Have Home Comforts j FOR NAZI FLYERS (Bjr Associated Pr) BERLIN, Jan. I.—Along the French coast of the English chan- | nel, reports the “Deutsche Allge meine Zeitung”. floating rescue stations have been put out to save aviators who have plunged into the sea. Looking like huge telephone booths bobbing in the waves, the buoys are painted on the top with a red cross. Around the edges are lines with which an exhausted swimming flier can pull himself onto a little ladderway up the side of the float. On top a trap door opens and the man lowers himself into the floating apart ment. He sets a little flb to indi cate someone is aboard and waits for the rescue boat. Room is provided for four men to sleep. Water, warm sweatsuits, dry shoes, cognac, food and light are a few of the comforts which await the dripping pilot. Mills said. A complete listing of all the rooms in the city is im-; perative, so that the delegates to • the convention may bv accom modated. Every room in the city must be listed and many of the residents will have to make room to handle the convention. •Th is is by all odds the biggest thing that Key West has ever faced." Mills said. "It is im portant for the city to make every ' effort to accommodate the Legion naires who are coming here It is important to remember that the* successful .American Legion con-; vention will do much to eliminate ■ the poor publicity that is going , , around about Kay West ” PAYS DEARLY FOR FAILURE TOPAYTAXES INTERNAL REVENUE DEPART MENT MAKING VIGOROUS DRIVE AGAINST NON-RE MITTERS (Special to The Cltlsea) WASHINGTON, Jan. I. j Pietro Garofalo, president of the! Cine Lux Corporation of New j York City, which operates a mo tion picture theater in that city, paid a dear but just penalty for embezzling admission taxes col lected from his patrons, Commis sioner of Internal Revenue Guy T. Holvering said today in com- • menting on court action against the movie exhibitor. The case was brought to trial before the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York on December 2. Garofalo and his corporation en tered pleas of guilty ,and United States District Judge William Bondy fined the corporation $5,- OOC and Garofalo $2,000, sentenc ed him to two months in prison, and ordered him deported to Italy upon completion of the prison sentence Garofalo made returns to the Collector of Internal Revenue each month but did not remit the j tax to the Government. His de- j fense was that he used the money , to pay the operating expenses of the theater and corporation. Commissioner Holvering said that the Bureau of Internal Rev enue is taking vigorous action against those owners and opera- i tors of theaters, cabarets, night j clubs and other places of amuse ment which collect admission tax-! es and do not remit them to the ! Government. The Cine' Lux Cor- j poration, he pointed out, evidenc es the swiftness and thoroughness with which the Bureau of Intern- j al Revepue is moving to clean up this situation. WARNING GIVEN OF INFLUENZA URGE THAT PRECAUTIONARY MEASURES BE TAKEN BY FLORIDIANS JACKSONVILLE, Jan. I. (FNS) Floridians were warned this past week to be on guard against an outbreak of influenza. State health officials pointed out that there was no cause for alarm and stated that the form of in fluenza now prevalent is mild athd urged precautionary measures as a means of avoiding it. The State Board of Health said that the exact number of cases in the state is not known, but many had been reported, indicating that the epidemic which started in the west and has been sweeping across the country for the past few weeks has reached Florida. Persons having colds or fever should immediately isolate them selves. the Board said, and call a physician. It was pointed out that prompt care and attention would prevent serious illness and loss of time from work, while neglect and carelessness might ead to com i plications. A bulletin issued by the Board urged persons with colds, coughs, ; or fever to stay away from other people—especially babies and olderly persons, avoid kissing any one. use disposable tissues for nose and throat discharges and dispose of them promptly, wash hands frequently, especially after com ing in contact with discharges, consult a physician and follow his instructions. If a fever is evi denced. patient should go to bed immediately. Sufferers were cautioned to avoid the use of alcohol, which in the case of “flue” lowers the re sistance instead of increasing it making it just that much harder for the body to throw off the dis ease Influenza itself is not par ticularly dangerous. officials pointed out but warned against failure to recognize and treat it promptly, since the real danger would arise from complications caused through neglect which might lead to pneumonia. NEW YORK - BUSY BEE ' Best Sandwiches and Eats~ Specializing in Seafoods. Spanish Cooking—-Conch Chotrdsr Daily KEY WEST, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, JANfUAjRY 1, 1941 Hairai Experiences Related By Prism Captured By Gnus Abandoned By Nazis On Island After Sinkipg Of Ship Owing To Food Shortage (fly A xkuciutcU I'rciM) MELBOURNE, Australia, Jan. r • I.—Stories of shipwreck and cap ture were revealed here today by survivors picked up on the Hebri des Island of Erromange New Guinea. German raiders took the pas sengers prisoners after sinking their ship and were forced to abandon them on the island be cause of food shortage. According to their version of the story, the ships never had a chance. The raiders struck at night, drawing close to the ves sels under the cloak of darkness. A number of the survivors re vealed they received good treat ment at the hands of their cap |tors. Others told of harrowing experiences, declaring that they went three davs without water and that their food consisted of black bread, raw bacon and saus ages. They stated the German. raider still held many captives. Some of the ships’ crews nev-J r saw their attackers. They werfr caught in the blinding glare of searchlights, folnwed immediately by ship-rendering explosions by toqpedoes. German sea raiders in the Pa cific have taken a heavy toll of English, French and Norwegian shipping. . , DESIGN FOR DEFENSE AND STEPPING UP PRODUCTION By MORGAN M. BEATTY, AP Feature Service Writer WASHINGTON. Jan. I.—Presi dent Roosevelt cuts his cloth from ; a world war pattern when he i names anew high command with a single director to step up de | fense production. He also runs I into new, confusing problems of : military tailoring. ! In the mnds of many observers, , big Bill Knudsen steps into shoes , similar to—but not exactly the same as—those worn by Barney , Baruch in World War I. Baruch was the chairman of the War In dustries Board named by Presi dent Wilson. Knudsen is direc tor of the new office of Defense Production. But there are important differ ences between 1917 and now. * In the first place, the 1917 gov | ernment declared war on Ger many, and passed laws giving the President indirect, but none

theless czar-like powers over the nation. War, therefore, had a legal status, and the public was . aware of it. Today we are not at war Most 1 observers agree, therefore, that the public is not imbued with a |‘'wartime" spirit Rather are the times considered “peacetme”. : however much the academicians contend over the question of whether aid for Britain actually means we are warring on the German people. The wartime spirit us generally recognized by political leaders as a force for unity in any nation — a means of setting aside internal differences—until the struggle is ' over. Some observers suggest that the lag m defense production ad mitted by William S Knudsen in .his old job in the Defense Advis ory Commission is due in some measure to the fact that neither workers nor industrial leaders to jday recognize cur effort as an I all-out wartim* push. They do not have before them the image ct military battle as did World .war Americans. GIANT OAK IN LIVING QUARTERS (By Axnorliitrd Pru) MOUNTAINSIDE. N. J.. Jan. 1.-—Dr. Fiske Wood, re tired Westfield surgeon, de cided to enlarge his mountain cabin and make it his per manent home, but there, was a 90-foot oak tree in the most likely soot for his living room. Dr. Wood just built around it. The tree, about 30 inches j thick at the base, pushes its way through a hole which has to be enlarged every few years. A piece of automobile inner tube seals the hole against rain and snow. The cabin, atop Watchung mountain, overlooks West field. From one room. Dr. Wood and his wife have trans formed it into a rambling six room bungalow. The tree is just another piece of furniture to the Woods. They do not like to reflect on the possibilities cf a strong wind's uprooting it. * GUH PELLETS IN BODY 16 YEARS OMAHA, Neb.—A recent X-ray examination revealed that there are still some shotgun pellets in Police Inspector Paul Hazel’s body which he received sixteen years ago while trying to arrest a man. S Barney Baruch’s post-war re port on the war industries board he headed said the ultimate suc cess of the American war pro duction effort depended more on the support by American public opniion of the war effort, than on the dictatorial powers with which Congress clothed President Wilson. There are legal differences, too. In World War days, Congress gave the President power to con trol food and fuel production, transportation, and in one broad sweep, pledged to the President "‘all the resources of the country” to bring the war to a successful conclusion. The draft was so de signed, too. that it could also be held over the heads of labor— and was—by President Wilson These indirect controls gave th.? President and his wartime boards the power to fix prices, establish priority for war production, ration food, compel labor to work, force industrial plant owners to comply with instructions, under threat of taking their property. , It was done mostly, as Baruch's report intimates, with an iron fist in a velvet glove, with an -eye on public opinion For instance, in the Bridgeport strike, the Presi dent had only to threaten plant management with r|tusitKming to end the plant's resistance to a strike. And he had only to threat en a minority labor element with removal of draft exemptions, and to take their right to work in war industries away from them That was enough Public opinion ap proved. Today. President Roosevelt has but one of the legal powers among those granted to Wilson, beyond and above the emergency powers that always rest in the hands of a President He may take over plants that fail to co-operate in the defense effort. He has no similar powers over labor Hostilities In Europe Hailed Between Great Powers During Night MOTOR FAIR NEXT MONTH CHRYSLER CORPORATION TO HAVE EXHIBIT IN TAMPA. FLORIDA • i TAMPA, Jan. I.—(FNS) Chrys ler Corporation’s New York ; World’s Fair show, “The Ply | mouth Motor Fair,” will be ; brought to the Florida State Fair ! in Tampa, Feb. 4 to 15, General Manager P. T. Strieder has just announced. Contracts for the great motor exposition have just been closed here with Tampa dealers sponsor ing the event. So great is the motor show that building facili ties are inadequate to house it, 1 making it necessary to erect two. mammoth tents in the northeast section of the grounds near the Cass Street bridge. Millions viewed he Chrysler I show in New York during the two | years of the Fair where it was con sidered one of the outstanding educational displays in the com mercial exhibitions. Although now i being modernized, streamlined ! and renovated, the show will be much the same here as it was at Flushing. STRANGE MAN; LENGTHY POEMS JAMES COPP RECITES THEM WHILE PERFORMING AT PIANO By HERMAN ALLEN Al* Krntnrr Ncrvlrr Writer NEW YORK. Jan. 1— James |Copp 111 is a strange, long young man who writes strange, long i poems and recites them at the j piano. People at the ritzy night 'spot where he recites, think he’s | very funny. James was bom of Los Angeles social 'register parents in 1917. At 114 he plaved the piano with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Or ; chestra. “Then I stopped taking piano lessons”, said James, “and didn’t play for a long time. At the age of 15 I wrote a strange, long poem and submitted it to the school de- I bating society. I was admitted. • “At Stanford University it oc | currcd to me to pi t the strange. ; long poem to music and try out j for the annual musical show. It , was accepted After that I wrote ] more strange, long poems, set them to music, and did them on I the radio but finally decided it conflicted with my college work”. After Stanford. James studied writing under Robert Hillver at Harvard Peope tried to get him to put on his piano-thmgs in night clubs or on the radio, but he was more interested in short-story writing. At the end of his second year he was awarded a prize for shownng “greatest literary prom ise in the most advanced course in English composition" He had stories published in a national magazine "I finally became serious about mv piano-things when some friends in Chicago persuaded me to appear in an amateur night at abe tel. I won. and Will Osborne, whose orchestra was playing : there, offered me a job” He took the job and wound up j with Osborne in New York. I where he went into night club work James Copp 11l s only explana tion of why he does piano things is “1 guess I just have a queer mind". LARGE KEY LEMONS SENT TO MARKET Remarkably large lemons were brought to town today by Prince Roberts, 911 Terry Lane, farmer on Cafes plan tation. Sugar Loaf Key, some of the lemons measuring ten inches in circumference and said to be exceedingly juicy. Farmer Roberts also brought in extra large ba nanas grown on the same plantation, and from his re ports of conditions on the Keys, the recent heavy rains will be of great benefit to the Keys farmers. GREEKS STILL POUND ITALIANS ELEVEN BOMBS REPORTED AS BEING DROPPED IN TARANTO i <Hr Awcl*Mi Press > ATHENS, Jar,. I.—Stanstill of activities at heme brought no 1 let-up by victorious RAF forces in Greece. Reports revealed strik j ing blows to Italy during the night with the heavy bombing of Ta-, ranto and Naples, Palermo i.i Sicily and Valona in Albania. Eleven bombs were said to have been dropped in Taranta, destroy- ! ing many important military ob- j jeetives. It was at this port that l the Royal Air Force made a sue- ! ccssful attack several weeks ago, crippling the Italian navy. SPEND ENJOYABLE STAY -IN KEY WEST i Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Duddlcson and daughter, Janis, spent an enjovable stav in Key West today and were much impressed with their first visit to the Island City. They were accompanied by Mr. Duddlcson's parents. Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Duddleson of Three Oaks. Mich , and Mr. and Mrs William Deßoer of Stephens Point, Wise., who are visiting the Duddlesons in Miami over the holidays. COLD STORAGE (Hi Aunrliifd Press* IX)S ANGELES —Five chin chillas from the Chilean Andes are on display here in an icebox Accustomed to a temperature of about 40 degrees, they are being given it in their new home. Key West Celebrates New Year’s Fittingly Key West celebrated the coming of the New Year fittingly There were dances, dinner* and parties of all kinds. Then with the ad vent of 15*41, whistles, bells, auto mobile horns and fire cracker* heralded the day New Year* Day dawned bright and with a stiff breeze bkmmg. To many it marked the dawning of a day s work for • day's pay Construction work went forward at the K<v Wes* naval station, as usual, though marly all the civil ian employes enjoyed a holiday. There were seven destroyer* and three submarine* in port. Key West. Florida, has the most equable climate in the country; with an average range of only 14* Fahrenheit PRICE FIVE CENTS Nazis And British Units Exchange Blows Yester day At Several Different Points i Ally Associated Press) Another undeclared truce hat {again halted hostilities between ; the two great warring powers of Europe. Germany and Great Britain. Neither air force report ed action during the night and the dawn of New Year's Day taw another brief period of peace end quietness over the troubled na tions. 1 Reports from Tendon, how ever. termed cossntion of hostili ties due to bad weather condi tions. Highlights of vesterdav’s air raids were attacks on Cologne anl Rotterdam, both being hcav . i’v battered by the Royal Air F-irce. In yesterdav’s raids the Nazis claim striking blows on Essex and other industrial points over the British Isles. Both capitols took advantage l of the second undeclared "hnlldav truce” and made merry. Many persons abandoned air raid shel ters while others showed evidence lof the holiday season by pouring out strains of "Anld Lvnp Svnc”. which were heard in all party of • London. Big Ben. familiarly tolled out !the New Year at the hour of 12. but this vear only to bomh-sear red London. Revelers gatheri'd I near St. Paul’s Cathedral and greeted 1941 with cries of “to hell with Hitler". SEEINGSTARS PAINLESS WAY <|t' Awl*N rttul I NEW YORK. Jan. I—Five hundred naval reserve midship men are learning navigation the easy wav at the Hayden Plane . tarium of the American Museum of Natural History. Constellations are projected in side of the black dome as they would appear In various parts of the world, .and lectures explain how to determine a ship’s posi tion. Capt. J J London reports, “We are training midshipmen to become navigators in a very short time”. Italy Drops Dancinf •*• ff,MI MII-AN, Italv —Public dancing has been forbidden in Italy as a war precaution and they were to remain there throughout the day. The teamen enjoyed the holiday, with special dinners, featuring turkey and all the trimmings, the rule Seaplanes put out from Trumbo base on the regular Key Wist patrol. They were back by 3 p m.. so the crews of the ships could enjoy the holiday. There was a special dinner for the crews at the air base. The majority of the civilian population enjoyed the day to tha fullest There was very ittle ac tivity down town before early aft ernoon The stores were closed; some of thorn taking invmuty s

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