26 Mayıs 1903 Tarihli The Monroe Journal Dergisi Sayfa 1

26 Mayıs 1903 Tarihli The Monroe Journal Dergisi Sayfa 1
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A fefc tKi THE MONROE JOURNAL, VOLUME X. NO 17 MONROE, N. C, TUESDAY MAY 20, 1003 One Dollar a Year SITlMONSSJ'EAkSIN NEW YORK harmoniously together forilsown and Ohio and Illinois. anl the r-t development. As the minute ! ill lull In ill of I."rll and Fail Iit", Afk r Hearing a ftlow tag Descrip- i more effective lli.iu a handful of ! say uUu.t itf White nu n of the tkm of the New Nor;h Slate to H'l"' " "" "'" Notth Stale with West will mil wmk in cllaUui ih k: ih r j- v- i " """1K,"' forces of school dts lion ith the Cl.n amen. Will the me -Norm taroiir.i .ocuiy oi m ,w,lsli jN s1.j:, ,u u it f tin- ..nli t-..llaU.i ..n rsc .ora.i.ct-; ussc, ,.ic sc- ,XP for r,wU, f.,r m ll-tols, for li Jjro Prubltm in It Industrial Imines. its coining taxes for water kcUtion-The Ne-ra't I'lace b a id light and lrmisoil.u ion mill Ih more powerful than tin- O.il ing to he more of them. I'.iiI w lute t i-:il iiu-nt from North Slate villi its unwieldy uml mcii and women are doing Hie wmk jm J". on the Southern Farm No ICoorn (or Him In 111 J hop of the North or South. Senator I". M. Sim:. mil address tl the North Carolina Society of New York at a banquet in the Walilorf -A slot i.t hotel Wednesday! night. There wen many notable ; men present, ami the teiy sensible sievch of Mr. Simmons mill help on tin imilerslamliii!' which the' Noith seem In In- seeking now re girding the negro proUcin. Af ter I lie ox"iiiij; reference to the new conditions in the State, which we copy Im-Iow, hy Mr. (ii-orge T. W iiistoti, Mr. Sim minis disutsscd the negro problem. or prolilcuis, its lie says. Iliereure three, social. Nlitical ami iiiiliis trial. We copy in full lielnw w hat he saiil on the la-t, omitting I lie first two liecuusc'his views are well known In lie thox- held hy nil Sotithei tiers. The last, the iuilils trial training of the negro, is mi in teresling ami important that we copy Mr. Simmons' words in full. ii. WINsrnSoN TIIK NHW NnlM'll xTri- It hits Ih-cii said of North Caroli na, ''She is the U-st Slate in the I'liiini to move from." I'oinwal lis foiiml it so, afler llie hallle of litiilfnnl. Nearly hall the colonial loivcrnors inuveil out." Tn live in North Carolina has always re ipin-eii more virtue ttian to move out. Five vears Is-fore the Kent I Mt ion the sleepy olil New York borrowed from North Carolina tiiiveriinr William Trynn, a rather promising imliviilual who hail given up all hope of govern ingtlie laud of Tar Heels, llnr nets' Nests, ami I'cgttl.itors. His tory constantly repeals itself. In r. cent teats t lie lurtll of Greater New York could not lie ueeoin plisheil w ithout a Tar Heel mayor. As I lie streams of the lilue litdge carry wealth of soil from North Carolina to oilier States, so her ceaseless streams of humanity have enricheil ami glut ilieil I lie annals of every Slate ami territory in the I ' iiimi. Such wealth of manhood, j no lavishly In'sIowisI, may explain the phrase -a good Stale to move' from;' a good Slate to inoe from, licc.iuse a good State to lie Imru ami raised in. Ict tin' phrase lie changed to reail, 'The Old North Stale a Nursery of Men.' "There is n new North Stale rapidly building upon the fouinla lions of the old. It is a new Stale, us essentially as Idaho, or Oklaho ma, lis forces aie the old forces, newly organized, directed, mid in teusilied. The new North Slate is iii) longer iM'olleel ion of great in di v idnals, or llailgcrs, (iastous and Munguuis, lint of great roinmuui ties, of linihain, Charlotte, Wins ton. High Point, and Asheville. The individual is rapidly disap pearing ns a factor in the life of our Stale. ' nit in ii it i t y power, the greatest of all modern forces, is building up the new North State. It is constructing good roads, where "ill years ago was impassable risk or mud; is levjing sjiecial local taxes for the support ol graded Achools where oil years ago the mere proposition would have cans eel a revolution; is maintaining at the public expense from rural li braries, w here .1(1 years ago ma jority uf the populal ion could not read. Community ower is con Ht meting railroads, securing just rates of transportation, and devel oping resources of soil, climate, and H'ople which lay dormant before the rare genius of it Morehead, a Cameron, or a Murphy. To call these forces to life and rii'ii them to full fruition was the magic pow er of a whole community, working white m ill w nh. in iuiiartial hand. In an actitc pi a.-l n-c of over twcii ly live jeats I hae appeared for luiiidii-d- of lle-m against white men, ai d I Law witiic-ed iheti i d of m ini hundred iiioh- eases ts- with the iic;ro! Then- aie mills Iwi-eu tin m and while men, and I ...l l'...l. .....a ... It... I I... ...ll. .1.. ....I II ., ...... ... .1,1.1. . I . ..' f.l .1 ... l'.. i I. V I : . ...i "'h-g. .1 Hcui(i oi iiiein aiil nine aie j:o- nc ii.i not 11,01 1.111 ai'.i 1 1.0 ..I,...,,. iih juiie ami unorganized counties; its iudiv idn of the faetories in the South. al geniuses and its undeveloped well as in thine ot the North.1 eople. j Where, then, i ak again, are iIii-m- "The new North Shite means not , negro skilled laliorci and factory only community siwer and organ opcratiics to liud employ incut! In ialioii iuMc.id of iiidividiialism, , the M-icv ot piix nl aihipiate, re but skill and machinery instead ol inuni-i.it uc and upliltiiig employ , iglioniul lalior and tueiv luiix le. uieut. under ciniiiiit.tiic-s rxis p 1 Tin-re are in North Caiolina six tioually favorable to his develop ' limes as lu iiiv farms to dav :is oil meiit inbi indi'iM-udei't and si ,f as 1 v u-1'ni. i nit mi: m:i.i;. North Carolina Farmers" Curen ton All iu il. it ion i hereby extendi d to t.niii,-i and other pel vm icier es!i-. in the imp; .neiiieiil of agri ru!:iiie in Noilh ( .u. lni.i I.i n,.-. in ' lihenlio:iat the Nollh I .iiolma Agriculture atal Me i in W et l.'.oi ili. on Ta. sila, nltiesilay, and Thins J day, July .'I. and S:, I'wi.S. A j regular pro-'iauiof iiistimtioii will A I JIT ON TIIK K) l veal's ago. and each is only one fourth as large as formerlv. Inten sir fanning h.is siippleiueiited ex .1. .1 I I : I I sei me ma urn mm i, aim ior w men nc .....i is liaiiiciiniriv :ul:iiil-il iiimi lilliil i there is not a liicsciit negro indits 'Til the midst of ail this clamor J" can n il out; iucliiding lectures, for new conditions aud opMirtuui- discussions, and practical cxpcii tii-s for the iii-gro. all these ex-ri ; ments. The prograui w ill In- pub mentations and exploitations of lislusl sanm, and v ill sieak for it methods and il.-x in-s t make him 'self. a k Inle man in iharailer and ca-1 This eonveni ion will devoie il pabili'ies. I inn heie In make an !!! t clusivclx to a study ofaii apiH'al in In lull ol the m-gi-o and Irullinc. It i intemlcd to Ih- the Ins liadiliou il oi1 ai u-s and a tensive. One ai re of ground has trial problem in thiseoiiutry. Why yiehhsil as inui h profit its was lor inerlv vielded bv n whole pluuta tiou cultivated bv I " slaves. Tlur ly thousand workers in cotton mills are producing now twice as much wealth asL't.IHHI foimcilv la cat ton fields. Truck farms, fruit, farms Mock farms are taking the! -1. .f .1. il-,.,.: . I'l I place oi ine mil piauiaiious. lit ' Tit i: N t". farmer markets his produce in a score of cities when' formerly was none. The general average ol wealth, of education, of domestic and social comforts vnd plcasuri-s has Is-fii raised a hundred x-rceiit. Industrial forces are working a rev olution in fducc.tinu. in social life, and in polities. Industrial educa tion is to tarry the gi-eat move ment forward to its full develop incut. Agriculture and nature study in our rural schools w ill re tain on the farm our brightest country lads instead of sending province nliincui loineeiiy. .Manual iraiinng; and designing in our city school will devvlop a great variety of in ! dustries, making the new North I State the Siullicin rival of Mavst j chusetls. The end w ill Ih ii per I fed blending of the strength anil! virtue of agriculture ami manu facture a model Slate, rich in! climate and resources and richest of all in manhood." lb' has got the mule- he jdid not get him 1 1 in the Freed I man's I'.tuv, u. cither, nor any olh """' m "." "'''' linsl.tuhou- but l,v hard uml l.oii large his opiH.rtui.lt.es already jt.st M.inv ei then, have got ri asonahly amide and lavoia .; ()1.,v ..,.,.; Mll..f the, i, ,S,,....K ou,e.s, .viian.iy o, , j, Uis 11 iioiniiiiii inn auiage ami. in sa ine least, probablv iHiteutial of Isith disturbance to Horse Health ! For puttine in prime condition any horse or niulo the best of all remedies is Asheraft's Condition Pow der. These 1'owdcrs are won derfully ?rTective Ucause they cre ate appetite, the digestion is made perfect, worms and parasites de stroyed, and the system cleansed of all gross humors. The Pow ders fatten but never bloat. Asheraft's Condition Powders are wrapped in doses. In fact, in their preparation the same care is used that a drocgist would exer cise in the fi'.line of a physician's prescription. High grade and real merit is the first consideration. Asheraft's Powders consist of mall doses, prepared from the purest and highly concentrated in sredients. that have been found beneficial to horses and mules. Asheraft's Condition Powders always high grade are not to be classed with the many bulky, goott- for-everythinj powders now on the market. Ask for Asheraft's, the kind put tip in doses, and good for horses and mules only. -HiYln Msl mun? fclnitu nf OmHtltloH Pnw. drrs, I r"llllr A"lHTf- lh lwst nm Ih narLrt. I Iji plwurp In rsmmn,lliir thm !. bit fnen.l- n.t rtuttaMn.H. CAMC- Btl.l.. Hickory. S C. Price 2Sc. package Sold by English DrugCompany sr.N vruii simmiins n tiii: m:i,i;h IMH SI lit VI. sll't'A'l i'lN. The negro industrial situation does not present a present, but on ly a prospective, problem. I'p to the present lilue, the negro has confined his activities chielly In doing domestic and menial service in the North and farm work in the South. For these occupations he is filled, both by nature uml long training and in their pursuit then has been up In the uivscnt tune but little friction hettwccii him anil his white eo lulsiii'i-s. A new destitj is now projected for him. His en erg ics arc not only to lie stimulated in these old lines, but also directed into new channels. In short, the negro is In become the subject of new exploitations, and, as a result, we are in the midst of a noisy pro paganda for negro industrial edil cation. Fnder the new regime, the negro is not only to Ih- taught in the tcchniiiif uml practieeof the mechanic ami iinliistii.il arts and become mechanics and artisans, skilled in the use and manipulation of tools and machinery. His edu cation along these former lines is, in my judgment, uiMtialilicdly com mendable ami its benefits, IhiI It to him and the coiiuti , will Is- incut- iilable. I would not bv unv means suggest his exclusion Irani ciluea tlnnal opportunities along these latter lines, but I recogiii.e the ex istence of a racial sentiment, or prejudice, if vou plea.se, in some sections of this eounlrv, likelv to become us uncompromising upon the subject of lalsir contact with this race iw it is in another section uncompromising upon the Niibject of political contact w ith him, and for reasons not fundamentally dif ft rent : and I would raise here, to l.ighl the ipicst ion whether unless his training for couictilion in eer tain li ilea of employment shall take into consideration these actual ami know n sentiments and be limited and regulated accordingly in en deavoring lo mitigate one assumed unfavorable condition, he limy not he hurled against another coiuli tion, fraught with no good to him and much possible disturbance mid danger, Imtli to society and indus try. I do not mean to say that there is absolutely no present or prosiHi'tive opening in this couu ire for negro skilled labor, 1 do not mean lo sny the door of oppor tiinily ill this direction should lie closed to him. On the contrary, I hnve no doubt that u limited mini 1st of negro skilled laborers may liud employment, both in the Noith and the S inth, esss-ially in the South, lint when this agitation, for taking the negro from the plow handles am! 1 1 icing him in the factory, shall h ue had its full fru ition, t'licii the negro mind shall have, become intlamed with the idea lhal he ran ticst work out his destiny In the shop and the mill and the factory ami lens of thous ands of them shall have liecome skilled laborers, where, I auk, will they find work to dot That is the practically important qiiention, Will the captains of industry in the North throw open the doors of the great establishments to In in In rolloboration with their white em ploye, or in aome iiiKbinrc, lo their rirlnsiunf What answer have the great employers of labor in the North to nuke to these question? What has Presidents lioinpers and Mitchell, what the operativea in the coal mines and smelting fur nacea and faeloriea of Peunsy Irauia trouble to him and industry T' 11 i i:nx ;tiii:mi hi I I.N l i;m. "W illi more or less intimate ae ipiaiiituius- with the character, adaption, and capabilities of the negro, I am profoundly convinced that he can Is-st work out hisdes liny, whcrcicr that is to he. upon the In in, and that iiohIicic in the world are the eondiliaus and eu viriililiients so favorable to his de Velopuieut along collect lilies as upon the Southern farm. Here the number of laborers actually em ployed, compared willithe number which could Ik prolilalilv emplov cd, a n not only comparatively few but there is no rush and scramble lor employment. git, ing rise to ipies lioiisol race competition and prefer mi, such as we have on the Pacific coast between the whites and Chi nesc. or in the mines and the North. Nor is farm pressivc of the best and si longest qualities in man. as is exemplified by the fact that from hence have come many of the men w ho through out our history have exerted a con trolling inlliiciice in every line of 1 1 li i ii a ii clloit. 1 poll the Southern farm the negro is constantly sur rounded and safeguarded by infill cuees which tend to protect him against the temptations to which Ins weak mid credulous nature is peculiarly subject. There he is strengthened, encouraged, and sup ported by close daily contact with a superior race, which lieur for him a sim-crc and genuine friendship and sympathy, and thcui he le speels, loi s, mutates, and some limes essays to emulate. Whatever in the way of improvement and de vclnpnicul be lias achieved in the past mid il has not been incinisiil crable -has lieon almost entirely achieved in these circumstances and surroundings. Nor has nor w ill the moral ami intellectual wel fare and development of the negro in the Smith Ih- neglected. To In sure, the South has not succeeded in abolishing while illiteracy; but we have done something in both directions and, under the circum stances, we are not ashamed that we have not done mure. I luring the past twenty years the uuuds-r of negro illiterates over ten years of age have deci-eascd ! percent. in the South, w hile in the same pc I mil the number of illiterate ne groes over that age have increased over '..'( per cent, in the North. We have expended since the war?!'-'",- 000,11011, raised by taxation, chielly upon the w hite man's properly, for licgio education. The total amount the South has raised and expended for education since the war has not lieen large compared with llie total amount the North has ill that time raised and expended for the sunt purpose, but the amount has Is en fully up to our ability, and, what is mine ilupoitant lo the present point, it has Ins-ii divided, gener ally M-r capita, Is-twcen the white man's child and the black man's child. The white mid black child do nut go to school under the same roof in the South, but wherever yon see there a white school house, somewhere nearby you w ill liud it negro school house nearly, if not ipiile, as good; ami all over the laud there are colored church buildings, to the construction of which w hue men mid women have lils-rally con. tribuled. In the court house jus tice is administered to him and the ,'e il. lou t. I Ix-seoi ll iil. j separate hi, n liom them by filling i his mind w,l!i uin.t'ainable ideas laud delusive 1iom-s. His condit am . may not i I awhile Is wi II enough I In Is- altogether let alone, but he is surely advancing to that condition. itniiiu' the w uk his hands know so well how lo do and which be is conteulid and happ) in doing: ineaiiu hile growing and strength cuing, not by artificial, but by nat ural processes in llie fundamental attributes of better and higher cit iciiship.

' Take him from the larm. cany lliui lo the L'lvat eitv. place him in the factory, orgaiiielnui into labor unions and his individuality. w li it-It is at best small and weak, w ill Is-tlestroM-il; his identity will Im-coiiic uierged in common u.ass, and his si long tribal propensities brought nilh him li in the jungles of Alii ca will undermine and siipplaul many ol the irtins w It it-It are now his Is'st ami mosl valuable asset - mills of virtiicsiiol hereditary and inherent, life re-I hut which have been imbibed bv close ami sympathetic contact w ilh the while man on llie larm - and it w ill Ih- a marvel if his last state is not worse than the tils! if, in al templing to avoid the erroneously supposed Schylla of his present po sit ion he is not stranded upon the ceil. tin Cliarvbtlis of the other. A Startling Test. To saw a life, ir. T. (i. Mci ritt of MehiHipany. Pa., made a start ling test resulting in a wonderful cure. He writes, "a palienl was attacked with violent hemorrhages caused by ulceration of the stom ach. I had ot tt-n loand Fleet Mi lliners excellent lor acute stomach and liver troubles so I piesei iln-d them. The patient gained from the first, ami has not had an at lack in II months." Fleet lie Hit lei's are positively guaranteed for Ispcpsia. Indigestion, Coiistipa tion and Kidney troubles. Try them. Oiily.iiie.nl Fuglish 1 irug Couipany's. Penny the One Who (lot It. I','llllll..l SIM!,-. "The throttling of the pressor Pennsylvania," declares uu ex change, "is an mil rage." The at tempt was, certainly, but t In breathing apparatus has not been even temporarily obstructed. In fact the prcs seems to have just got its .second w ind. Pcnnypacker appears to Is- the winded one. Made Young Again. "One of lr, Kin'gn New File Pills each night for two weeks has put me in my 'teens' again" w riles It. 11. Turner of liempseytow n.Pa. They're the Is'st in the world for Fiver, Stomach and bowels. Pure ly vegetable. Never gripe. Only 'J.V. at Fuglish Ihug Co' s. Bronchitis f i ui us, i an-au Kvn m-Jij! " t hive kenl Arcf'l Chcrrv PcC- fi torsi in my house ("r a 'ci nuny A yrini. II u llie t'i t.mont.s oi lti worlJ lor iiiiktii c -i .'J.J." J. C. w ill. an. , And, N. Y. All serious lung troubles b:?:n with a tickling in the throat. You can stop this at first in a sinele night with Ayer's-Cherry Pectoral. Use it also fcr bronchitis, consumption, hard colds, and lor coughs ciail kincs. rtmtlm: Mc.Mi.l. illtanMl. Fnder Government's Wing All oi'n i .u-niii: inn, "Whar yo' boy now !" sonii! one asked the old tieorgia darkey. "He ( iovei'nicut's Ink i n' care er him." Iut so!" "Yes, sub! He in de new Fed' nil prison, wid it nice giay suit un him!" A Sure Thing. II is said that nothing is sure except deal It and taxes, but (hut is nut altogether true. Mr. King's New Ibseoveiy for ( nusuiiiption is a sure cure for all throat and lung troubles. Thousands ran teslil'v to that. Mix C. Ii. YaiiMctie of Shephi-idtow n, W, Va., sus: had a severe c ieof I'.ioueiiili-taml for a jear li ied everything I heard of, but got no relief. One bottle ol Hr. King's New Ifiseoviiv then cured me al soluetlv." I.'s inlali- ble for Croup, Whooping Cough, (rip, Pneumonia, nud Cm s imp- ttor. Try it. II s gu.iraiileed by Fuglish Itiilg Co. Trial bullies free, licgular sizes "iOe. and A Court of Increasing Power. Jii-itir Hr,-M,'r. In the evolution of the court of public opinion that court might ier than any organized tribunal, nt whose bar are judged all men, events and purposes. Here the press docs mighty work. It col lects the universal opinion, an nounces its conclusions and whirls them against all for gloom or glory. These facts sieak most for the uplift of the mil ion, and in each l iimnim: of a series of North Car olina Farmeis' Con tent tons to lu ll. -id annually during .Inly or Au uu-t at the Siate Agi n tlitur.il Col lege. .. all farmers who can, .-a,.e and bring their wives, mik ing tl.e occasion a p!eas.iiit laui'lj ii-iiulay as well as a means of in slmction. The Agrieu'tur.il anil lech ttiieal College, the Agrienlt ural I ifpaitmi nt of the State and Fie S ate Museum, the Capitol and aiiotis State iH-p.iiliueiils. the Asylums and Penilentary, the Colleges of Kaleigh. ami the city's beautiful residences ami all com bine to render tile occasion woithy of the small liiiieaud expense need eil for the trip. The railroads have granted a fare of one fare and twenty -lite rents lor the round trip, Is-ing special rate tickets to the A. M. College Siiiiiu.fr School for Teachers. The college will bullish board at oO ceiils a day, or -" cents a meal. Fudging may Is- had at the college, if there is iikiiu, olherw ise in the city, at reasonable rates, i Signed I I'll vs. I!. Airirk, tlovernor. S. F. Pa l I l;isn, oin. of Agriciillure. (il'.il. T. WlVsliiX. l'les.A..M.Cnllcge. Cll s. W. Ill l.-KKI T, Prof, of Agriculture. Dies from Drinking Cresolene. n.(,--l ,,r, M - iifc't r un, I Itiii-lli.-iii-t-r Yesterday moi ning the home of Mr. lien Trexlarof (ililletlge town ship was saddened by the tragic leaih ol his little '.' year-old girl. bottle conlaiiiing cresolene, the oil used in a crcsoliiie lump, had been placed upon a table, and the baby climU'd up to the table, got hold of the bottle, and di ai.k a con sideiable tpiautity of the cresolene. Dr. I.. S. Ashe was summoned by 'phone to reuiler uiedicul assist, unco, lint llie chiltl il leil in great agony Ih-I'oiv he reached the house. The little girl's mouth and throat were terribly burned, us the creso lene has about the same ellcct as carbolic acid. Mary .lane Kelly, it white woman w ho lives near Ingrain's mill, just across the river in Ku liinoiul coun ty, coiuiuitled suicide on Monday of last wck by taking strychnine, it is thought. is said that she remarked to some one at the mill III ll si,.. Uollbl "l. it,. 1,1 in !1 h ill an hour mid be in b - I." lint ilhiu just half that length of time she was a corpse. Jealousy, il is said, was the cause of her rash deed. Mr. .1. Ashlev Thomiis of r.iirns- ille tow nship died at his home hist 'lhursdav, the I Ith, alter only I few days sickness of typhoid fe ver, .nr. I nomas was post master it Fry and was a good and iulliieu- lial eilieii of his eoiiniuinil v. He was !. veai-s ohl, and it veteran ol the war iM'lween the Stales. Quick Arrest. .1. A. (iiillcdgeof Yerheim, Ala., was twice in the hospital from a severe ease of piles causing 'Jl III mors. Alter doctors and all reiue dies failed, llucklcn's Arnica Salve ipiickly arrested further iiillainina Hon and eiireil Inui. It eoiiiiu-rs aches and kills pain. --V. at Fug lisli Drug (Vs. A Home Thrust. "The fools a iv not all dead yet," said the angry husband. "I'm glad of il dear," calmly replied the other hall of the combination. "I never did look well in black," (Wi't ror As-t. If k -t . U.M o M h .-f". II h. Wilt fn. o W ukt It. ! I ' . La,t m Willi - "t,f-. i. e At is s. uu. iu. lto Milburn, the ISIind Chaplain, 1 Won His Spurs. j i ilh. i- n, i .. ...I- . ii The death of William 1 1 t x Milburn. for many vens. .iui,,us as j'l'he Fluid C'laplain,'- 1. t alis I In I loinai.lie and ln-ioie iiicnlenls cm ms'tfd with lii hs t-lfi iioii as a jChaplain tl Cote.1 rev- in s",. lieu .Ml. I. ilia was luciity !.., xery slight liglil-e. his hit i-in-ii liivly blind, his light rje bating bill out- little llaiisp n-fiil point noi so big as (he le ad of a pin, v.iv ing him but a glimmei of t In- outi-i worbl. he was Iraw-lnig bv Ohio Piter steamer from Cincinnati to Wheeling. W. Ya. lb- was then entirely unknown to tin- woild ex cept to the little band of circuit rulers among whom he had Ihs-ii preaching in the huekvtooils I'm a Near. To his great delight he found on the stcaiitei a large niiiuU-r of Congressmen ol bo fi Houses, who were on their way to Washington j for the o iiing of a st ssion. Mil ! burn exM'cled great profit from I their conversation, but was soon shocked at their profanity, their, gambling, and their ill iiiihcnm-ss. 1 The Ohio Fiver was Ion, and fogs coining on, t In v w ere detained over suiulay. At breakfast a com miltee of passengers invited Mil j burn to preach, anil a congregation ' of Hint' hundred m-isoiis asscm bled. At the close of a hi icf si r luoii, to the astonishment ol all. he; boned to the men Is-fore him and said: "I understand thai Vou ale mcmls'is of the Congress of the! I niled Stales, and as such you are, or should Is-, the representatives, not only ol tin- political opinions lint also of the intellectual, moral, and religious condition of the pen pie of Ibis country. As I had rare ly seen men of your class, (ell, on coming aboard this boat, a natural interest to hear your conversation, and to observe muii- habits. If I am lo judge the nation by you. I can come to un other conclusion than that it is com posed of profanc swearei-s, card plajcrs. and drunk aids. Suppose there should Is-an intelligent foreigner on this boat, traveling through the country wild the intent of hum ing a well coiisid ei ed and unbiased opinion as to Un practical working of our fits- insti till ions -seeing you and learning your position, what would Is-his conclusion;-inevitably, that our expel iiuciit is a failure, and our country is hastening to tlcsttiic tion." The Congressmen were a plucky lot. nud so ml in I ii I the m-ivc and sincerity of the young preacher, (hat they at once bcstoueil a purse upon him, and on ai i i x ing in Wash iiigtou secured his election as Chap lain. He held the position lor lil'ty eight years. ti" - V - iia 4 I J-m D"a:P I I r IrxtJ-r-J . -k tT-V ??J-i.J j A:- I'KMhc d tot. abort aid BH P L Djtthat'tallpaat-lit'llM'tr I y J o-s, . endure H Jv x -""""-v. Iwoauia, He 'a found scare I I j "" Tia "forte." At night, whea I V U XOT's.i ,l ""j"","1 BerTl 01 " Suaay 1 I 1 1 I:..-:.-', s.,.-., jR-V-tsJrtj I maKcs one chummy 5.1 Jirrn 1 vu'.h rjocd sleep. trjrrFHj p XVoviUrt't rtsivs al Flrat. ' "-TXX Jk rill I Mil I "Till I II I I II liaMlnMW-nlln-MlnU-MM The Latest. I We li.nc just rcs-cixcd .! new lot of Shirt W aist Sets in (iray and Oxodicd 5i!cr f 23 cents I toads, nil colors 25 cents licit Pins, the Sd tint lot, for 25 cents Close out lot 5:1 tent Hat Pius lor 25 cents Inn ou pass our stoic look nt the display in our window and take tour limit c lor cents- The . J. Rudge Co. i 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 iiiiiiioiiiiiiiii;iiotiMoiiiiiiii-riiniiii!iiiniiitiiitimiiittiiiiiiintlttliinH) IMIIII MM . I, r i .i M 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 14 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 lil U W, S. 1 11. Ah IMA, President. A. M. .! ACK, ice President- Tin: J. KAYiTOND SHLTH, Cashier. Bank of Union. A modern b Utful 1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 Safe, But Progressive and Liberal. iy facility for the prompt and '.kilie li'.llst Mtll i l.ilsiiu Get one of our Pretty Steel Banks, carry it In- u", ticp it y ur savings am! get interest on them. uiiMiiiiiiiiiinniuiiiiiinni!Hiiii'iiiiMiiirMlliiii:iiiiiHiiiiiiiiitiiilliiiMiillllililliiii iiiniiiiiiiiniiiiii:iiiiihiiiii,iiiiiii.iiiiii,iiiiihiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimni Young Plants Every farmer knows that some plants grow better than others. Soil may be the same and seed may seem the same but some plants arc weak and others strong. And tltat's the way with children. They arc like voting plants. Same food, same home, same care but some grow big and strong while others stay small and weak. Scott's Emulsion offers an easy way out of the difficulty. Child weakness often means starvation, not because of lack of food, but because the food does not feed. Scott's Emulsion really feeds and rives the child crowing the presa has leen one if not the. ttrenirth 1,-renl tailor. May it roiiliime Itsl ...P cn l nA: work, l.mtnnlin,' .National Fuitv. " ""V' listening ihewilnlion of theen-ut; ness and failure to Kro' social prohlems and hrinein- all' Scott's Emulsion seems to find matters iH fore the eonrt of j nldic it and set the matter light opinion court oi inereiutii-g wis dom and power. tcatta mrf t, ft Minnie t hwiai Is-.ri si. Hew Tori aaa.aMd.aaiall crauwa. 'I. STAFF (IF (MHO, t ii v oi 1 oi i no, 55 1.1TAH tlll'STV, ' Frank J. Ihanev nukrs oath that he is si-linn mi tin i uf the tirni of I-. J. tlicuey tt Co,, iluinj; luisincss in the City of Folt'do, County ami State aloresaiil, and tluil naid Inui vx ill j. iv (he mini ol One ilnnilieil P., Hats t . r each ami every rase of C.ttuiih that nniiot lie cured hy the usr of Hall's Cat. in h Cure. I'kASk J. Ciiam v. Sworn to hefnre ine ami nil'st-rihed in in y presence, tins Mil ilay ol I'e- einlier, A. D, ism. sr i j A. W, (il IASOS, Nol.ny I'tihlif. Hall's Catarrh Cine is taken intern ally, and acts iliiet'tly on (he hlood and mucous fttufucea id the nvstcm. SenJ for testiuioiuals, flee. F. J. t'UKXKY I'd, Toi.kimi, Ohio. Sold hv driijiitU, Wo. Hall a family pills Hre the hest HiKhway Kohhery In Charlotte chailHltr tilp-iTtiT. A'na, Mr. YV. It, liraiiwell, a native of YiuleslMiro, who now lives in Fine ville, was found at in o'clock this nioriiinj: in an uueoiiseious eouili tiou in the railroad cut close to the point where South Church street crosses t lip riiilmiiil. rolicciucn I'rowell and Johnston revived lints well and carrieil him to the jKilice station. He declared lie had U-en assiiulteil mid rohls-d hv an un known man, wluuti he met at the Charlotte, Coluinliia Augusta trestle. llritHwell said that the slraner olleii-d to po with him to South Tryou street where he exMs-tetl to Ifet on a street ear, and wal'sed hy his side until he came to the cut, when he w as struck a tcrriftic Flow on the hack of the head. The wound on ltraswell'a head is deep and ugly, llrnswell is weak from Ions of Wood and is hcing oared for at the iHilioe station. There is no cine to the ideality of the man who S made the attack. j oocxoc-crcocxc TRY The Corn mpire Fertilizer Drill. A W v -St ' '.'-r . ' "H' t , ' -" - si "Strength and vigor come ol good food, duly digested. 'Force,' a ready-to-serve wheat and barley food, adds no burden, but sustain, nourishes, invigorates." If you desire pure Ice, com bined with honest weights and prompt delivery, phone 36. Cadieu & Wallace. It is the hi st investment a fanner can make. It will plant your coin, ftttilic. it, ,11,.! rimr it a', the same time. Take out your pencil, lir.ic the- f .vn g of fcrt licr, add the expense of planting the old way, and you will have your I 'rill almost paid (or at the end of the sr-a'-.m. The Empire is decidedly the best on the market. No chain attachment no links to slip or break, and cause you trouble or inconveni ence, but a rosn i 1: 1 okci: n:i-1), Ask those who have u-ed it if it is not the best riantersold. Take one home and try it; if you don't like it, we'll refund your money. You need it now. Thehjeath-Lee Hardware Co.

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