25 Haziran 1855 Tarihli The New York Herald Gazetesi Sayfa 3

25 Haziran 1855 tarihli The New York Herald Gazetesi Sayfa 3
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The V?W York Guards kwoai Da* la lutOB. _ . [From tha Bostea traveller, Jan. 21 1 tts New fort Oily Guards, B9 tMMiiidij tluNiw England O4WJ1 sad Boa (on City Guards, marched to tha Commoa where, ta the prestns* nnmber of a pec tat ora, they ware ran* wad by Col. Chtckertng. Immediately toliowing tha rsvtsw a beautiful standard, painted by Lorenzo 9oa*rby. wai P?**Bted by th* hew England Guards to ta* New York City Guards. Th* standard la of ri >h white sUk edged ... K?!(l buUloa, and oa ooe aid* bear a an elegant painting of tha national coat of a rata, eupported oy a England Guard and a New Yora City Guard, with the motto " B Pluribui Unum" o*#r the painting, and ** Pro Patra" below the aame. Oa the rovers* are t wo wreathe, rapraaaating oak and laurel leayaa, taste full* intertwined, and aurrounded by thirty one uclden atafi sunbeams, Ac. At tha reeldence of Ool. N A Thompaoa, a peat Com mandar of the City Gnarda, the thrx oompaatea partook of a fine eoUatlon, and then marched toFaaeail Hell. _ . THff BANQDBT. Th? hall waa aplendldly decorated with flaga and atraamara feeteoned from the ceutre of tha oetling to tha gaueriaa, and hong along tha adgea of the galleriei, and worn light ta light, in graceful tolda Between each pillar on the lace of the gnllery waa the name of oaa of the President* ef the United Spates thoae of Washing ton and Jefferson being In tue moat prominent pacts oppoeitethe platform, while below, at -he top af each of the lower pillara supporting toe geUeri-a, waa a red and blue ahield with a white eron bar, eaco of which bore tha names of one of the present or past officers of the three- companies. Three names were?Ferris Henehaw, Sbepard, Up ham, French, Bulkley, Porter, Kitshie, tiaear, Fox, Thompson, Harding, llraper, Lymau, N-al, Uolbrook and Lintee. These decoiations were put up by Mr Yale. The tables themselves, however, surpass*I anything of the kind that waa ev*r gotten up in cliia city. Mr. J. Smith, the cittTtt of the efeoia^, b%a received carta Uancht from the managers of tn- occancm and per formed his duties in unequalled style livery delicacy of the season bad been provided, etoh to be diacusaad In ita proper order: beside eaoh plate was a lresh anl fragrant bouquet, while down the centres of tha various tables, at intervals, wars arranged larger groups of flowers, In vasea of the costliest description The bills of fare, toe, were in style suitable to tha sumptuous ness of the whole. Upon the front of theplatiorm ettod a large eagle, with outspread wings, procured by Mr. Smith, and here, resting upon if, Aojutanc French, ex Captain Boston City Guards, displayed tne flag presented to the New York corps by the h. B. Guard, its silken folds drooping toward the lower teblss. At eight o'clock, the Brigade Band having taken Its position in the front gallery, played e march as the in vited guesta entered the hall, to the number of at least a hundred, nearly all clad In the un.loru of field, staff, regimental or oompany officers, alter au interval the band played a second march, and the msmoeri of the different corps entered In true fraternal styl?, la trios?a member of each oompany being in each trio, and thus seated themselves at the tables until the nearly four bundled plates were occup ed. The signal then, at ten minutes past eight, was given, and the itch and bounteous repast rapidly disappeared before the repeated and determined attacks of the Bat talion of Guarda. At flva minutes past nine, Captain Henshaw, N. E. G., -who presided, called the company to a state of ?' atten tion," and then, in a brief ana appropriate address wel comed the invited guestr. The 22d of June, '55, would be ever remembered by the N. E. Guarda, as tha day on which they had the pleasure of receiving the New York City Guard?a pleasure none greater than which could he remember in tha whole aixteen years of his connec tion with bia corps. They felt, too, grateful for the readiness with which the Boston City Guard came for ward to assist in entertaining their guesti and ours. He concluded with: The Boeton City Guard and the New York City Guard ?The 22d of June, 1865, will ever be remembered by l)Otlle Capt Shrpsbd, of the Boston City Guard, rose to re spond?In this sacred temple or Fsntull Hall, with the ?tars and stripe* over our heads, ana toe two great faces overlooking us-George Washington, the citizen soldier, and Daniel Webster?(tiemsncous applause)?in the midst of such associations sacred memories of the past clustered to inspire us, while teaching us tke sacred les sons of antiquity?to remind us of our duty to practice them. Here were the face and the memory o! Adams, who years ago this day, gave forth in this hall thoie words which were interpreted by Patrick Henry m the Virginia Hons* of Burgesses, and called *orth a reply from New York and the United Colonies, til liberty, bars in this ball, was christened in blcod on yonder battle height. Those days gave a standing, il not an origin, to citizen soldiery, who till that day wers almost unknown to the world in their true character. And to us their duty had descended. We were citizens of cat common coun try with them, and the momories of this place called us to do our part with them in all that was great and good. He concluded with:? Our Guesta. the New York City Guard?As their fa thers responded to the kindling influence of freedom, and inspired our fathers with the spirit of liberty, oa the farm and the field, so may their sons inspire us with new enthusiasm to equal them In all that 11 manly, glo rious and good. This was followed by "Hall Columbia" from the band, and nine hiaity cheers. Capt. Fkhbis, of the N. Y. City Guard, was received with nine cheers as he rove to reply, and said he fount it difficult to do so, after the eloquent remarks of our Bheppard. Ha lelt it difficult to stand her* and do jus tice to this pines, for he had devoted all hit attention to his ccrys, and little to the art of expressing the feelings of his heart in public. He referred with pleasure to tha visit of the Guard years ago, when the Boston City Guard, under Ool. Thompton, received them The cour tesy and generosity with which they had been reoeiv* 1 in the British provinces waa alluded to. anil the allusion hailed with applause, and it waa said that the corps ha 1 there everywhere found the warmest feeling existing to wards the people of the State*. He concluded with? The Stat* of Massachusetts?Msy she continue to give the Union such statesmen as the names which surround us here. Mnaic sod cheers followed. Adjutant French was Introduced as the toist-natter of the evening, and received with cheer*. The first toast, "The PreslJent of the United States," was reeeived with "Hall to the Chief." Ex-Mayor Fbothwgham, or Charlestown, was called on to reply, and spok* of the feelings with which every lover of the Union should receive this toaat?the Union whieb pror need Washington and Webster as specimen! of American*. Hs gave:? Onr Union?Always first in the hearts of the Ameri can people Bend?Yankee Doodle. Hie second toaat waa:? The Commonwealth of Massachusetts? She welcomes within her borders, with cordial salutations, the oitizen soldiers of the Empire State. Governor GaBDsm felt prond to respond to the senti ment, and wished Massachusetts had a more eloquent eon to take the place he was called here to occupy at tblittime. Massachusetts was limited in size, but su:h as she was, there was an exemplification of her charac ter here to-night in the warm welcome given to our friends by the citizen soldiery ef Massachuseet*. He spoke of the feeling whioh had dictated attempts to de stroy onr train bands, as no else; our fathers, with the school and the church, bad established the cititen sol dierv, end it was wiee to retain the organization, tint* we knew net th* hoar when foreign war might desolate our homes. It was with pleasure th* guests wers wel comed here, and their faces would be remembered long after they had gone back to their abode In the Metropol itan State?a State already ooloasal, bat to whioh he bad added with e stroke of his pen not Boston, bat a plaoe arrogating to itself the title of Boston Corner. He concluded with:? The State* of New York and Massachusetts?Meatl cal as they are in interasts, may they soon be one in principle and in spirit. The next toast was? The Empire State?The Intelligocce and Industry of bar citizens have gif?r her an influence which ent ties hvr to that name; and the representatives of her mili tary children here present are weil worthy of tuelr parent. Chaplain Hknuiqcw. ef the New York Guard, follow ed, and alluded with pleasure to the reception the corps had met with everywhere, almost Uke a triumphal mireb. The next toast was? City of Boston?Two centuries of history have left a ? record so full of, glorions memories that her proudest compliment is echoed by her name alone. Mayor Surra spoke of the pleasure he experienced in looking upon this scene. He was always pleased to see the oitiv a soldiery, for he felt he could always depend upon them in times of trouble. Tbe character of Beaton he expressed himself proud of. and gave? The G.Mr.en* of New York?Never to be disregarded while the people of Boston regard the New York City Guard. The next regular toast waa in honor of the navy, to which licut. Wi.-uc responded. Th* next was "The Army," Ac , which was responded to by ox Captain Ki.noxams, of the Boeton City Guard. The next rv gular toayt was? The Firit Division of the MaMaohneettsi Volunteer MUltla?An organization first In discipline, first In the heart* of the people, and second to none other in gene ralship. Major General Eonanm, of th* First division M. V. M., felt sn interest in fneh scenes as this, beuaus* he bad been among the flrit who assisted in bringing about these plea*ant re-unions. and from hie own visits to New York he oould testify to th* readineu and generosi ty with whioh the soldiery of that city performed their part in those acts of hospitality. He leferred approv ingly to the discipline of th* New York City Guard, and concluded with a sentiment In honor of th* citizen sol diery. Adjutant General Stone was tbe snbjeet of the next toast, and responded briefly, but well. Ex Capt. Cordo.v, of the New Eogland Guard, was called up, and responded with ref-rence to the oblige lions which had been showered upon hie own corps at a former vult to Nsw York, by tbe guests of to night, and the joy and readiness with which hie corps sprang to respond. He rsjo'.ced that he kad been th* haaored medium of presenting to the New York Guard tbe stand ard which it would tarry back as a memorial of this event. He concluded with a reference to the oltlsea sol diery, and a sentiment. Tbe ?e*t sentiment was :? Iha First Regiment of Light infantry?Th* harmo ny of ita un.forme, and tinsoiled folds of Its standard, are only Indicative of th* hearts thri beet beneath In attachment and devotion to their gallant commto lor. nOol. Chick Milan waa announced sod reeeived with en teuslaMIc and prolonged applause. He responded with gratitude for hia reception,and expressed his gratification at the warm union and unbounded generosity of two companies he was proud to eall his rwn. Hs closel with til# n#nti fluent'.? The Colors which Overhang our Heada?The American flag?A trun type of our blood and veins; Amerlea's star* will always be In the ascendant while we ar# wil ling to spill the on* and drain the othsr as an offering upon (he altar *f liberty. To the next, in honor of the paet commander* of the Boston City Guard, Gen. Truth replied, end closed with a seailment to the oitizen soldiery of th* whole country. TO the next, Paymaster Brarea, (Burton's theatre. N. Y ,) of tfce N. f, City Guard, being called on, replied tott hosaocoualy, eliciting w>?ttid end c?m turned Ahouti of laughter, and after a wall iutroduoed uUusiea to Webster, gaaa:? Tha He torn ViaIt of tba Boaton Soldiery to Kaw York, Ac. Tha text toast was to tha Boaton Independent Ci data. Major Bpinlkt responded, and eonsladad with a aenti meat coasplmientrrj to tha soldiery o( Nan York. Tba next waa, "Tha Laiiea," he , to which acting Quartermaster Ha tha war, of tba New York City Guard ([and of tha Worcester City Guard), raaponded eloquent Col. Nxwxli. A. Thompson waa next introduced aa a gentleman dear to all, and warmly reoeired. Us ax - pressed hinaelf happy, as a e tls?n of Boaton, to contri buta toward the entertainment of tha sorpa watch his own had reoeired like favors from in o her days. Ha alluded to tha fact that thla waa probably tha laat time ha abould appear in uniform In an offlotal cbtractor, aa ha had signified hi* daeire to resign his pitoa on tha Ma jor General's stair, yet ha ahonld always take that deep interest in tha militia of tha country wnioh n true citi tan ahonld. Ha paid a tribute to ax Capt. McAxdla, of the New York Guard, now in n far distant land, and con cluded with n toast to bis health which waa reoeired with three times three hearty cheers. To n toast in honor of the First Providence L'gkt In fantry, Lieut. Browns, of that corps, responded. - The Common Council of Boston was nsxt toasted. Tha New York band played n maroh, wltioh waa raptu rously applauded, and to the toast President l+roBT re plied, with true eloquence. To ' The Albany Burgess's Corps," Lieut. Kinslxy re sponded, and on behalf of the oorps gave? A Soldier's IHeadship? It survives every mlsfartune and every calamity of Ufa. to "The Editors and Reporters of tha Boston press," Mr. Eaton, of the hiUlHytnccr, responded. To "The Wo bi.ru 1'haUnx," Lieut. Grammar responded. To n toast in refercnoe to the Pulaski Guards, Capt. Wright, of fouih Boston, responded, and spoke with pride of the last Legislature which almost unanimously voted down the attempt of n few fanatios to injure the militia. To vhe representatives of the people all credit wss due for this, sod even had thn House passed the bill, tba Senate stood ready to reject it. Capt. Kimball, of the Lanoers, responded to n senti ment in favor of the 1st battalion of Cavalry. Further rsapeaaes, to other calls, were made by Commissary W. L Rodman of the Providence Light Infantry; Gen. Lockwoed, of Western New York} Capt Snow, of the Boston FuaJeers, which corps were toasted; and Dr. Fisher, of the New York City Guard; and a toast from Mrs. Partington (B. F. ShlUabeer of the I'oit.) waa read by Mr. Labia. The ball was coon vacated, and the New York City Guard# were escorted by dstashmenta of the New Eng land and City Guards to their quarters at Union Hill, the bance playing constantly as they passed up Wash ington street to Boylaton. and making tbo before still air of the midsummer night resound with the farewell echoes of their martial strains; and as the bells of the city ciooks tolled the hour of one, their musical notes mingled with the last drum beat, and left the spint of silence end rest to reign undisturbed in the quiet streets. Opposition to the Construction of the Ninth Avenue Railroad. SUPREME COUBT?SPECIAL TERM. Before Hon. Judge Cowles. Jan. 22.? IVttmore and Others vs. Story and Others?Edward Boyle's examination oontinusd:? It was not hia duty to take any notice of the mate rials on the ground; it was to examine them after they were put in, to see if they were defective; Street Commissioner Foray gave him no further di rections than to go with Mr. CharlLk and he would tell him what to do; never saw his written appoint ment until yesterday, and never saw the grant of the Common Council. Charles G. Resahel proved the wid h of Greeiwich and Washington streets from measurement. James A.Craig laid toe Ninth avenue rail tra k; commenced on Friday afternoon, March 31, and completed it for two blocks before Taeaday, April 4, and dug out the street ready for the timbers nearly to Forty-eighth street; the two blocks ex tended below fram Fiftj-flist street; continued the road steadily, with a few interruptions, to Talr Uenth sireet; did not contraot tor it; was first em p'ojed the same day he went to work; had thirty or forty men with him; was empl yod by Oliver Charlick; nothing was said about price or wages oniil latter part ol April or 1st May; these two blocks wtre nearly all paved by Monday night; drew the material aB they used it; road is now com pleted about two miles; would take about four months of ordinary working to do this much of woik; finisied down to Bnirtoenth street last No vember. Cornel ins Vocrhecs, starter of cars on the Eighth Avenue Railroad?Knows Wetmjre's premises oa Washington street; he ha* about seventy-five feet on Veeey street; has seen iron pilel up then. John J. Hoi lister? Owns and keeps the Bittery Hotel, on Battery place, Washington and Green wich streets; acquainted with these streets eighteen tears; goes through them every day; between Liberty and Jay streets there are some good stores kept on the sidewalks; a great many or those who occupy stores there turn out on too sidewalks every thing they keep inside, and leave them there to show and for sale; this is so all along the market, with a few exceptions, leaving but a narrow space for passers-by; some have wooden shedi over the walks; butchers back up their carts there and feed their horse* in them; has seen the street in front of Wetmore's store, on Washington street, filled with carts and wagons standing still; never saw him take in goods there; he nses the side on Veiey street;, counted, the other dsy, fourteen carts in front of Stuart's, waiting: has seen 200 to 300 hogs heads of sugar there, loading-and unloading; they have a large door on Rsade street, wide enongh for a cart; drove a carriage a few months ago; never found any inconvenltnoe driving across the rail road tracks; the streets where the railroads are, are generally in a better condition than those that bave no railroads; carts seleot the tracks to drive on in five cases oat of six; has often stood three hoars watohing the carts do this in the Third avenue. Thinks a railroad through Greenwich and Washington streets would accom modate the pnbli j at large, acd increase the valae of property there?jadge so because the property at the lower end of the Sixth and Eighth avenue railroadB is worth more now than before those rail roads were boilt. There are stores like those in these streets in other parts of the city. Tney ex pose their goods on the side wslk in the same way as here. Is a party to the Broadway railroad grant. Thinks a railroad there, with the stages out, would be a great benefit. Benjamin i. Fair child, gro er in Nisth avenne, waa formerly cartman?roinks this railroad would be an advantage to the pnblic and to business. The incumbrances in there streets are carts standing un employed. This has existed as long as he can re collect?does not think the railroad would affect the property opposite Washington market?knows of no inconvenience produced by railroads on carta or wagons. i Don Alonzo Coshman resided here forty five years; owaa considerable real esta'e; owns southwest cor ner of Washington and Cedar streets?railroad would benefit bis property and accommodate the public, because it gives certainty and regularity of conveyance. Does not think it would injuriously affect property on Greenwich acd Washington streets. Has several lots at the terminus of the road?say 80 or 90 lots?has none fronting on Green wioh or Washington street?judges Irom the working of tbe railroads in Chatham sireet, that this road would have a beneficial effect on Greenwich and Washington streets. Cannot my they have en hanced the value of property on Chatham street; have on Hudson street. The business done on those streets, and on the Sixth and Eighth avenues, is nothing like that done on Greenwich and Washing ton si rests. John N. Sharp.?Lives at G19 Ninth avenue; re collects the oonaitlon of this railroad on Barer day previous to April 3; it was all laid and paved from Fifty first afreet to about Fiftieth street; by Mon day evening the cross timbsrs and sleepers were down to near the front or his honsee, between Forty-eighth and Forty-ninth streets. His atten tlon was called to it on this Sunday, because he liktd tbe looks of it; it looksd like business; went out and saw fifty or sixty people there- ? number of them he knew; has forgotten their names: they stopped in front of his honse, because they had to excavate a rock which projected there, wliioh took about half a day. Oliver Charlick.?Lived here twenty years; was Alderman of the First ward three years; acquaint ed with these streets; employed Mr. Craig to con struct ibis road; made application to the Street Commissioner to appoint an engineer; this permis sion sad appolctnent were given to me the day they bear date; about the fore part of Marsh col lected material to build tnia road; called on Furey about the middle of Marsh for permission; called on the 26th or 27th; b* raid I might begin and get all tbe cecesaaiy grades, Ac., and when I was ready for a surveyor he would send oae; on the 27tb or 28th gave fiireotions to have soma stuff taken to Fifty-flrat street; commenced immediately, and by the 30th bad safficlent material on the ground to o mtnenoe; cannot be positive as to anything being done before this in preparing the ground; did not ccmmetoe ear her, because of the frost in the grant d; by Monday night, April 3, there were be tween 816 to 330 feet completely done; the gronnd bad btea opened and trenohee dug for above 000 ftet altogether; about 50 to 60 feet of this had then been bl?sk stoned; on April 4th, there was enongh material on the ground, and on the block between Forty ninth and Fiftieth streets, to lay five blocks. . . ?^1* P?t in evidence the city ordinances of 1846. David T. Valentine- Hasi been connected with city government sinoe 1831; streets here are need by sewers, gas and Croton pipes; been so ever sinoe h!a rvcDlierUoo. A discussion here arose as to admiaalbltttv of oral testimony, to show that the Common Council, from the year 1732, have by ordinances exercised entire control ovsr the streets of the city. Without aay decision being given upon the ques tion, the court adjourned to Mondny moraine, ?| iq fpdk FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL. ?Off? T harkbt. Scndav, Jane 24?6 P. M. Ths excitement la Ma stook market duriig thv past week baa mot bean equalled before for many months. All the embarrassment, loose* and bank ruptcy of Last year appear to have been loot eight of, and opt ratou malted into the whirlpool of apeculatioa aa eagerly and ae Mongbtleaaly aa though enoh a thing aa a panic and revulsion were unknown. Ex perlresoe does very little good in Wall atreet. No eooner are stock operators through with one ool iapea than they are ready for another. It may be that a new eet of operators am in the field, and they may be a class who bam never been severely bitten, but they can no more eocene than an ineeot fly it g through the flame of a candle can eecapo being singed. We cannot belie re that those who peeeed through last year, scathed or uneoathed, hare so soon forgotten the bernes and trials of that period, and it is therefore reason able to suppose that the speculators now engaged in inflating a took i with so mnch rigor, area new and fresh class of operators, who hare as yet bat a rogue idea ef the shoals **?if quicksands which beset the nariga tor in the latitude of the Stock Exchange. The most experienced and the most skilful bare been stranded, and those who escape may attribute it more to their good luck than their good management. At the close yesterday, prices were not so high as at the commence me r.t of the week. The infla tion went oartpldly for a few days, when a re action took place whioh nearly wiped oat the entire improvement Yeeterday, at the first Board, West ern railroad stocks ruled considerably below the highest points ot the week, bat we do not look for a oompiete relapse to the starting points. A moderate advance oan be bUBteined, end it oaa be gradually enlarged, bat the stack market la not in a condition to be ran ap at the rate of two and three per oent dally. Par or the neighborhood of par, is the maximum for the beet Western railroad stocks on the market, and all beyond that is the result 0/ speculations, whioh moat, sooner or later, react upon these who bare been prometen of the artifi cial expansion. Honey matters remain about the tame aa previously reported. The supply keeps far in advance of the demand. A. H. Nloolay's regular semi-weekly auotion sale of sto.ks and bonds will take place on Monday next, at 12| o'clock, at the Merchants' Exchange. The People's Fire Insurance Company hare de clared a dividend of five per oent. The Continental Bank, a dividend of four per cent. The Central Bank, Albany, has declared a semi-annual dividend of four per cent. A convention of rej resentatives of banks located in the interior of this State will be held in Syra cuse, on Tnesday, the 10th of July, for the purpose of perfecting some plau for the redemption of the issues ot ocuntry banks, to take the plaoe of the one now in operation, and to do a way .effectually with the system of extoriion whioh has for some time been practised by the Metropolitan Bank of this city. The country banks of Massachusetts are en gaged in the same business. Several meetings of delegates from country barks have been held in Boston, and the probability is that a Bank of Mntaal Redemption will be established in that city, with a large capital, to take the place of the old Suffolk Bank. It is about time that both the Suffolk Bank of Boston and the Metropolitan Bank of this ci'y( were superseded by institutions in whioh all the country banks were interested as atookholdsra. The two banks above named have been regalar Jack Sbeparda in the banking community, demanding oeitain terms, or the life of the Institution or asso ciation refusing. The country banks have the ttmcdy in their own hands; and if they hesitate about using it, let ua hear no mora complaints from them. Coupons falling due on the 1st or July, on the bonds ot the La Croase and Mllwaokle Railroad 1 Company, will be paid at the Broadway Bank. The anthracite coal trale the past week has been very heavy. The whole tonnage of the three severs lines for the week is about equal to that of the hea viest week's business this season, reaching 123,88 1 tons. The tonnage thus far this season is 1,791,493 tens. The Reading R&i.road brought down tor the week ending on Thursday, 50,672 tons, making for the season, 1,052,435 tons, against 910,477 tons to the corresponding period last year. The Srhaylktlj Navigation shows a tonnage ef 30 084 tons for the week, and 301,791 tons for the season, against 332, 177 to the same date last year. The oaal shipments from the Lebigh for the week ending with Saturday last, are 43,233 tons, against 43,187 tons for the cor responding week ot Last year; for the season,347,273 tone, against 303,582 tons to the same time last year. The ialiing off in the shipments daring the week pre ceding the last was occasioned, as we are jniormsd; by high water preventing the loading and the ran. cing of boats. The retail market has been dull dur log the past week, the wet weather interfering with the delivery ot coal in good order. It is repreeente s however, that the point of depression in prices has been reached. There is a decidedly improved feel ing in the roaiket, and a general expectation of in creased activity. Even at this time we understand that the enpply cf seme sizes of Lehigh coal, more especially ef lump and stove, is Bhort of the demand. The indications are clearly in favor of an approach ing torn in tho market, and there appears to be no good reason to doubt that all the ooal that can be brought down will be wanted. The Boston Traveller of the 22d inat., says:? It is reported that the directors of the Vermont end Canada heiiroad, (John Smith, C. O. Whitraore, George M. Dexter, J. P. rutnem, and T. Wheeler,) will take posseteicn of the Vermont Central road on the 1st of July for non-payment of rent. A recent decree of the Vermont Court requires the Cennde road, on taking pos session, to assume nil the debts contrasted by the trus tees, (John Smith, WUliem R. Us, and J. S. Bdridgs,) amounting, It is said, to ?400 000. Three of the direc tors of the Canada road are also directors of the Central road, Including Mr. Dexter, the President of the Central; and ilr. Smith, the President of the Canada, la one of the three Central trustees. In a multitude of counsellors there is wisdom; but there is anotser important qu&Uty more necessary for the welfare of the bondholders ana stockholders, which it is hoped may be exercised for thair benefit, whatever changes may be made in the management of the corporation a affairs. Tha debts of the trustees of tha Central, for which they give bonds In the aum of $360,000, will form but a small part of the liabilities to which tke Canada will be subject, if the onion of tha two roads takes place. Under the new arrangement, the Canada becomes responsible for all the debts of the Central, of whatever name or nature; and under thn existing lews of Vermont, this will render the whole stock of the Canada liable to attachment, and It la qneatlonabla if tha stockholders, generally, would authsnm n step so seriously affecting the value of their property. The Great Western Railroad Company of Crnda earned in the week ending June 15,1855, ?9,305, against ?5,981 for the same time last year. A meeting of stock and bpnd holders of the 8audu? ky, Mansfield and Newark Railroad Company, Mane field and Sandoakj City Railroad Company, Ualam bus and Lake Erie Company, and Huron and Ox ford Railroad Company?the three last mentioned being consolidated under the name of the first men tamed? Is summoned by advertisement to take plaoe at the Actor House on Tneeday, the 26th inst., at 2 o'clock P. M., to consider a plan to be then submit ted ot adjusting the financial difficulties whioh exist The Lake Superior Naet of June 14 gives the shipments of copper from that regioa for the previ ous week, amounting to about 800,000 lbs., of which 367,756 were from the Cliff Mine, 320,735 from the Hianesota, 10,810 were from the Adventure, 2,672 from the Northwestern, 54,896 from the North Ameri can. 6,647 from the Nebraska, 28,721 from the Fo rest, 36,775 from the Copper Falls Company. The Ntvt adds Mat the prospect is that much more will be done for the future. Devid LongeneckamEsq., of Lancaster, hi! re signed the Presidency^! the Philadelphia and Ban bury Railroad, on account of hie time being required by his own private estate, and the Hon. Win. L. Helfenetein has been elected In his stead. The se kctlon of Judge H. ae the successor of Mr. L. is a juet tribute to the energy, ability and success with which Judge H. haa prosecuted the developement of IboShamokin Ooel baeln. i The annexed statement exhibits the quantity and i value of cqrifla WW* Sported igto tfel* ?*rW doling Um v?k Mdiog, Ml including Friday, the 2 Id of J use, 1866:? ComuacKor m PotrorNiw Yoax?Weuklt [Mrarrt Pkgt. Vmlue. Pkijt. Value. Book s 46 86,038 Guttapercha. 20 2,780 B route* 2 941 India rubber. ? 10,381 Broker 1 770 Ivory 3 1,940 Button* 18 6,378 Musical last's 13 3,342 Omeet 460 007 Optieal 4 1,214 Ckaraa 6 134 Jewelry IS 9.224 Ci|nia ? 23,678 Oil paintings. 14 1,140 Clay 246 2,483 MuiUrd 20 374 OmI 636 2,912 Liquors? Coffer 12,676 149,246 Ala 460 3,640 Co ft y am 180 674 Brandy 17 1,217 lft ugs, Ac? Gin 122 6,443 Aloa# 9 167 Portsr 110 1,638 Bicarb Soda.. 800 804 Bum 218 9,260 Biea 1'owder ."2*8 3,296 Metal Goods? Br.raatoue..., 200 296 Cutlery 31 12,416 Cbpeiba 2 104 Cbaina 10 816 Cubeb* 81 636 Guns 21 3,320 Dragon Blood ? 326 Hardware.... 42 9,977 Eaaecree 2 117 Iran, toaa... 066 24,397 EsaLOils 2 460 RaUroad ....4,421 20,60S umDamar,. 12 398 Sheet. 1,719 6,841 urn Copal... 3 211 Tubaa 179 2,400 Gum 378 2,902 Wire 37 481 Iodine 2 402 Pig 320 0,374 Ipecac 10 1619 Natl* 40 198 Gaelic Acid... 4 302 Needier 7 4,008 plum 10 4,236 Steel 1,699 12.293 eg. Aatm'ny 24 1,719 Tin 11,211 79,296 eruv. Bark.. 731 17,516 Plumbago.... 140 900 art. Acid.... 42 7,673 Zinc 340 18,490 oda A?h.?., 629 8,926 Sheathing.... 87 16,973 ther erttnee ? 1,326 Per. cap*,... 2 025 Dyewoooa, Paint*, Ac? Saddlery 1 8-19 Baryle# 971 4,362 Mtllt'ry gooJa 8 2,310 Deri Dot!.... 162 116 Metal do .... 1 127 Fustic ? 1,978 Silver ware., 3 309 Color* 56 1,371 Leal, pig..10,149 71,999 Indigo 22 1,903 Machinery... 8 1,118 Madder 60 4,994 Old metal.,.. ? 6,656 Logwood ? 8,532 Miilitoaer 219 3,500 Lack Dye 19 742 Molasses..., 1,202 25,863 Oila 16 302 Paper 20 1,207 Oil Linseed... 113 12,111 Perfumery... 23 1,020 Oil Olive 10 111 Pipe* _ 2,091 Parti White.. 202 888 Plaater 440 480 Paint* 4C9 6,560 Potatoes ? 4,347 Vermillion... 1 721 Rage 180 3,038 Whiting. 160 341 Rattan 8,814 1,646 EYuita? Spice* 39 3,576 lamon* ? 4,912 Belt ? 18,905 Nut* ? 3,284 Seed* ? 1,450 1 Orange* ? 6,300 Soap 11 381 Pineapple*... ? 10,362 Stationery... 199 7,737 Earthenware. 129 4,008 Sugar, hirtrs. 700 273,980 Emery 70 7C7 Do. bxs&bg* 6,400 100,348 Engravings.. 3 2,431 7ea 8,081 68,532 Esncy good*. 28 5,223 Tobacco 587 20,434 Flax 100 8,129 Toys 9 983 Eur* 70 36,187 Watche* 42 59,438 Glare 1,823 4,308 Wlnei 1,029 9,305 Glaseware... 7 832 Woods? Hair 62 10,361 Mahogany.... ? 1,151 Heado 2 988 Wool 71 4,043 Hetagooda... 0 6,177 Flock*....... 110 2,591 Hemp 240 6,282 Waste 103 2,956 Honey 70 1.454 Other article* ? 3,915 Value of merchandise put on the market du ring the week $1,361,435 Do. dry gooda, do 602,013 Total imports $1,964,048 It will be Men by an examination of the above lable, that the balk of general merchandise is made op of a few Imported article* of universal consump tion, such ae eeffee, $149,245; tin, $79,296; lead, $71,969; molaeeee, $25,b53; sugar, $374,328, tea, $53,532. The at nex:d state meat exhibits the quantity and value of oertatn articles expoited from this port du ring the week ending and includi ng Friday, June 22, 1855, distinguishing the destination and extent of shipments to each placB:? Conmkbok oFtmi Port or Nsw York?Wkkklt Exports. LIVXRPOOL. Quati. Value. Quart. Value. Cotton, ha...3,824 $131,460 W. apparel... 3 $777 Corn, bu.. 112,452 110,430 O p'tlng*,c*. 1 200 Cheese,lb*. 30,771 2,816 F'nlture, bx*. 12 300 S. oil. gal. 8,979 18,432 P'laah*i,bbla. 30 925 Brazil nut*.. 774 8,079 SparsA'matta 28 2,331 Camwood, t*. 35 2,929 Drugs, c*.... 20 839 Spindles, c*.. 2 260 Raisias, bbla. 193 1,200 Starts 4,000 356 I. rubber,bga. 370 10,309 Yellow matel. 54 1,709 Coppir lb$.202,308 4(,5S8 Rags, ha 54 1,466 Hops, ba 130 4 8i5 O. & h'spa's 3,939 3,IK5 Fish, bbis.... 100 '790 Bacon, lbs..87,477 8,7*7 Mahogany.... 1 130 Tobacco ..120,039 7,091 Shook*, hhds. 239 301 Hd'ware, ca.. 12 1,414 Stav*a 20,600 2,275 Roaln, hbl*. 2,155 4,063 Wiue.c* 6 804 Shoe peg*.... 100 300 Station'ry c*. 3 3'10 Clock*, bxa.. 221 4,996 Lard oil,ga1*.3,021 2 5*8 Fufitta, tons.. 278 6,790 Beef 25 658 W*bone, lb* 16,420 6,940 Total $830,654 LONDON. Bugles, c*.... 4 $339 Rosin oil, gals 924 $222 Oilcake, bnga 100 1,350 Turpt.bbU..2,160 9,983 Tobaeco, tee. 25 4,050 Oars 804 650 do....lbs 12 000 1,800 Stave* 3,500 650 Brasil nuts, b 385 3,200 Hemp, bales. 37 3 2,746 Rosin, bbl*. 2,430 6,330 Cheese, lbs 46,476 1,682 Samp. gr. bis 60 950 Beef, tea .... 445 1 3 350 Fsncygde.cs 7 1,275 Le?. cloth, as. 43 4,790 Gum myrrh.. 6 476 Statuary, c?. 5 1,600 Hops. bale*.. 503 17,465 Sp. turp bbls 150 2,629 Fure&ekins, c 201 81,476 ? Total $155,947 GLASGOW. Coin, bush.26,461 $27,809 Rosin, bbls .. 483 $950 Hope, bales.. 45 1,763 Hair 41 1,721 Total $32,224 I VALXXCIA. ! Guano, ton* 1,338 $49,400 TOULON. Pork, bbl* 1,700 $32,320 ROTnCRDAM. Tobacco,lbsll,320 $1,198 Mshog'y. logs 117 Ex. logw'd,bx 100 660 I. R goods, cs 169 Whaleb'e lb*. 632 256 Sp. turp. bbls 400 Roaln, bbls. 1,094 2,724 Saltpetre, bgs 839 Potashes 167 6,409 Cedar logs... 20 Preserves, ca. 3 100 Laa cloth, o* 6 Coffee, bags.. 100 1,187 Staves,.... 19,000 P'laahes, bbls 101 2,877 Total $37,747 HAMBURG. Hope, bales.. 15 $588 Clock*, bxa.. 30 $631 Coffee, bag*.2,396 30,950 Tea, bxi 32 223 Sponge, bales 8 162 Cascarillo, bx 29 126 I. R. goods,cs 690 17,263 Bsvolvsrs, cs. 1 191 Rosin, bbls. .3,086 6,623 Combs, cs... 1 603 L'wood, tons. 259 5,613 Pictures, bxs 3 1,290 Ex do, bxs.. 650 3,635 Sp. turp bbls 210 3,600 Bark, cs 417 2,839 Ashes, bbls.. 23 490 Skin*, bales.. 5 300 Domestics, bx 100 3,733 Bronzep'wd'r 1 300 Dry goods,c*. 4 600 Lifsboata.... 2 1,075 Otbsrarticles ? 214 Total $79,394 hrhucn. Honey, cs... 40 $1,397 Ssltpetrs, bgs 100 Red oil, ck*.. 13 932 Lea. cloth, os. 2 Shoe pegs,bbl 204 612 Ststuary, cs. 1 Corn,bus..., 81 97 Tobacco.lbsl4*106 Hemp, bales. 60 2,643 Tea, pkg*.... 57 Cedar logs... 12 101 I. R. goods,pk 96 Sp. turp. bbls 10O 1,690 Hop*, hales.. 65 Tobacco, co.. 43 309 W. app'l, cs. 1 Charts, bxa.. 1 175 Fur-ssklns cs 45 Hides 3,508 3,260 Drugs, bales. 13 W'bono,lbs 18,378 1,070 Rosin, bbls..2,746 Pot ashes,bbl 104 3,491 Staves 10,000 Total $63,423 ANTwntar. Cotton, bales 209 $8,968 Sperm oil, gal. 209 $408 Corn, bubels 91 108 Sp. tptn. bb. 1,055 17,012 Beef, bbla. .. 30 420 Rosin, bbl*..2,420 6,847 Pork, bbls. .. 160 1,791 Cjffee, bgs. 8,004 37,671 Hams 10,000 1,000 Pot aabe*, bb 266 6,983 Lard, bbLs. 32,100 3,200 Pearl do., bbls. 10 238 Straw goods, cs. 1 200 Typo, bx. 2 500 Provisions, co. 63 2,204 Staves, ,...4,000 330 Quer. barb,ck.20 630 Mahogany, ..420 3,261 Total $90,661 VNNICS. Coffee, bgs..4,600 $31,720 Logwood, tons 100 $2,075 Rosin, bbla. ..500 93$ Bassafrasroot,o. 1 104 Total $34^838 CONSffAIITIItOPI.il. Rum, bbls. 1,600 $27,851 Logwood, tons 80 $600 Sugar, bbls. 608 7,861 Coffee, bgs... 50 000 Segsrs, os. .. 19 660 ??? Total $37,562 ROCHELLM. staves r.40,400 $7,869 RRiaroL. Beef, ck* 10 $246 Fustic, tons . 35 $759 Rosin, bbls. 698 1,669 8tav*s 4,COO 308 Sp. trpnt. bb. 310 6,640 Total $8,613 ONMOA. Guano, tons 606 $28,300 OPORTO. Corn, bosh. 3,300 $3,762 Rosin, bbls .. 310 Tea, bx 49 800 Logwood, tos. 66 Tar, bbl* 100 875 Staves ....1,400 Pitch, bbls.. 1C0 260 Spars, masts, 28 Total $7,611 BRimm NORTH AKXRICAN CO MINIM Flour, bbls. 2,206 $17,877 Tob'cco, lba.2,029 Core meal.... 838 4,222 Pitch 44 Beef 14 161 Tea, cb 4 Pork 870 18.860 8ol* leather.. 37 I-ard, lbs.... 1,326 162 Drugs, cs..., 10 Cheese 2,184 243 Tobacco, bis. 8 Safes 2 200 Other articles ? Total $39,072 MATH. Flour, bbls.. 410 $4,742 Domestics,ba. 26 $1,877 Cornmoai.... It 80 Bread, bbls.. 130 630 Pork... .... 30 610 Tobscoo lbs.2,203 317 Che?so, lb*..3,658 433 Soger, bxs... 23 637 Lard 11,670 1,489 Fish, bbl*... 236 466 ButteT 4,016 906 Coffee, bgs... 12 152 Shot, bgs ... 66 99 Uoddsh, lb* 16,030 477 Drugs, ks.... 18 ?09 Candles, bxs. 40 263 Types, bxa... 4 141 Hd. wer*?e*. $0 394 Boe.bbll... 146 2,47$ Paint, kg*.... loo 130 Powder, 4*.. 26 138 Lumber.,,... ~ 1,080 Soap, bxa...1,100 *,197 Other article* ? 1,091 team 8 $74 i W. $21,27 T ??jtot mw nMii. Rye fl'r. bbl*. 68 $2,810 BnMti,ci? 11 3230 Meal ?? 69 364 Rlea, lei 3 00 Dru^m, cm.... 10 1W I'm b|< ... ?? 1ST Boot* k shoe* 10 443 Buttur. lbs 4,267 1,072 Dry good* ea 12 434 Cordage cla69 336 May, bU 40 163 Otn, pa 410 3,691 I'ork, bbla... 10 163 lev ok* IS 221 Brandy, pa... 12 2,100 Other articiaa ? 1,424 Flour, bbla.. Ill 1,176 ToUl 316,434 0914. H. Wilt, ea... 22 32,018 Rica, tm 30 31,317 Guna 1 140 Bait, aha .... 460 614 Copper, bxa .. 3 640 Macataery... 0 313 Dogmata 3 6*2 Lumbar, ft.. 400 160 Ltrd, lba.. 13.087 1.403 hhoeka* hd* 4,794 8,290 Candle#, baa. 160 629 Hoopa ? 1,540 Soap y o 223 Had* ? 499 Paper, ra.... 2C0 146 ? ?U1 316,704 ?anuria. Beef, bbla... 336 82,090 1 K. good#, cs 1 3213 Lopword, to* 34 150 [komeatici, ea 4 854 W bona, lba.4,064 2,123 Cassia, ea .. 600 8.874 Clothiol 1 20<t Spirit#, ea... 64 6,480 a turpaotiaa. 160 2,693 Other articles ? 294 Clock*. baa.. 16 310 Total 321,347 DUTCH KM I.1D1H8. R. flour, bbla. 80 3248 Codttab, lba .2,780 3124 Corumaal.... 62 276 Tobaeeo,lba.4,146 847 Ueet 28 216 Flour, bbla,. 444 6,474 Wh oil, gala. 180 137 Bread, bbla . 26 124 Butter, lba. 1,962 386 AJeohoL bbla. 0 174 Rice, bbla.... 42 631 Domestic*, bs 24 1,334 I-ard, lba.... 1,184 144 Brandy, bill. 12 269 Sugar, baa... 34 646 l)iy goods, ca 6 364 Soap, baa.... 320 380 Other article* ? 832 Canolea, baa. 66 231 ? Bread, bbla.. 68 286 Total 312,821 ARGKN11NR Rkfl'BUC. Lumber, feet 206,348 34,698 ?zona. Tea, cheat* 13 3712 Stare* 53,000 900 Total 32,612 chili. Machinery.... 2 3710 Hoklea, bbla. 61 3616 Stilia 42 4,443 WhUaey, '? . 121 2,298 B?ef, bbla.... 630 10,176 Vinegar. ?. 40 168 Pork, " .... 360 5,426 Molaaaea, ?' . 38 864 Rice, " .... 78 950 Carriage" 3 1,290 Drd. applea... 47 906 Soap, noaia.. 122 660 Buttei, lba..6,040 1,673 Matreaaea, ba. 28 604 Cheeee, " ..5,970 1,134 Clothing, ba.. 93 6,518 Bccka&mapa. 43 2,596 Shoes, boaea. 8 663 Rum 60 727 Muatard, 72 197 Pitch, bbla ... 100 250 Pepper, " 72 136 Cordage, pkg 274 8.399 Caudle*, ? .. 100 1,165 Dry gooda, ea. 113 8,574 Wcod rare.. 47 185 Stare* 6,000 390 Luu. oil. gala. 302 241 Hardwaie.c*. 106 4,416 Hpaimcil,''.1,012 1,178 Tobacco, 1m 16,631 2.693 Lumber pea. 1,147 264 OU paintings. 26 4,622 Agr lmplem . 46 279 Drugs, c*.... 172 7,586 Othar articles ? 181 Blocks 2 301 Bronze pow'r. 2 999 Total 384,376 Paper hang'g. 12 400 NEW GRANADA. Beef, bbl*.... 219 33,001 Wire, case*.. 69 3961 I'ork 200 2,943 Merchandise . 7 766 Bread 318 2,621 Lumber, poa 2,017 604 Rice 150 2,746 Drugs, ba^a.. 382 8,008 Tallow, lba.. 1,130 113 Dry gooda, c? 62 4,191 Soap, baa.... 50 211 Pepper, bg*.. 10 100 Hour, bbla... 301 4 630 Powder, keg*. 258 701 Sugar 180 1,931 Boot* & 8., ca 0 648 Molaeaet 25 320 Booh*. 11 493 Beana 10 115 Karthtron... 21 204 Lin. oil, gala. 8 291 Fish 22 271 Candles, has. 376 2,330 Piano* 5 997 Butter, lbs.. 1,332 357 Sadlery &Har. 4 700 Lard 18,340 1,834 Glastware.... 10 120 Hard.&Cutl'y 85 1,831 Furniture.... 6 395 llama, lbs...6,061 624 Frame p'.oces3,OC.O 2,940 Pkint, kegs.. 26 919 Wagon* 25 1 300 Rope, co'la... 16 670 Braady, cika. 10 219 I. R.good*.... 16 1,170 Hon*, ba!**.. 10 100 Felting, case* 5 240 Oilier articles ? 2,440 Alcohol, kegs. 20 180 ? Lamps, ba*.. 60 223 Total 356,479 PANIHIl WIMT INDIK8. Wine, case*.. 157 32,739 lire flour,bbla 40 3331 Straw bata, e* 1 250 Meal, butbels 60 1,150 Drug*, case*. 52 1,151 Flour, bbla... 60 676 Candle*, box. 380 1,481 OU, bbls 9 170 Lard, lbs... 13.812 1,729 Beef, bbl*.... 210 1,360 Buttrr, lb*. .4,366 1, 06 Bread, bbl* .. 370 1,618 Cassia case.. 1 186 Spices, case*. 3 160 Print mat's,oa 1 461 Indigo, case*. 1 164 Furniture, c*. 6 118 Sugar, boxes. 10 176 Dag. mat's,c? 3 120 Cheese, lba..1,326 143 Hardware, c?. 56 310 Ham* lbs. ..1,190 164 Spirits, bbla.. 25 660 Pork, bbl* ... 12 496 Dry goods, e*. 2 500 Tar, bbls 40 119 Tea, chest*.. 22 462 Rope, ooiU... 45 754 Blinds, esses. 3 167 Bthsr articles ? 1,104 Fleh, bbls.... 30 190 Rice, tierces.. 102 2,135 Total 321,808 Flour, bbls.. 9?0 311,000 Kosia. bbls.. 400 3720 Drugs case.. 1 90 Codfish, lbs .5,000 240 Laid,lbs.. .20,642 2,670 Woodwaie.doz 150 325 Tea, cbesta... 20 445 Pepper, bags. 10 130 Domestics.... 40 2,346 Furnlture.es. 61 604 Matches,cases 10 130 Lumber, lt.23,270 428 Cordage, co l* 20 145 ? Total ..319,172 Recapitulation. Liverpool 3386,654 Hamburg 379,804 London 165,947 Bremen 58,423 Olaegow 32,224 Hotter lam 37 757 Valencia 69,400 Oporto 7',611 Toulon 32,320 Antwerp 90,881 Venice 34,838 Constantinople 37,662 Kocbelle 7,859 Bristol 8,613 Genoa 28,300 Br. W. Indie* 16,431 Br. N. A. Colonies. 39,072 Haytl 21,207 Cuba 16,705 Sardinia 21,387 Dutch W. ladles .. 12,821 Argentina Republic. 4,508 Azores 2,612 Chili 84,375 New Granada 66,470 Danish W. India*... 21,808 Brazil 19,172 ? Value of merchandise exported during the week 31,232,503 Total value of imports 1,964,048 Excess of imports ever exports 3731,645 The value ol exports for the season, notwithstand ing the deficiency in oar supplies of breadstuff), in quite large, while on the ether hand the importa tions continue limited. Oar exports are made op of the usual variety, without any article except cot ton exhibiting any active movement. It will be eeen that the deetinetion of exports last week wae, in several instances, out of the usual channels, and the distribution mush greater. The following is a comparative statement of the value of export* bom the commencement of the year to June 21:? 1864. 1855. Increatt. Decrease. Cotton 37,668,051 6,6C4.568 ? 2,053,483 Flour 4,634,363 2,034.246 ? 2,600,117 Corn meal.. 191,694 176.946 ? 14 648 Wheat 2,413,083 67,938 ? 2,3*5,145 Corn 2,134,679 1,653,431 ? 481,248 Beor 639,368 853,344 218,970 ? Pork 638,582 1,773,126 1,344,644 ? Total...318,309,720 12,168,599 1,353,620 7,494,041 Net decrease to June 21, 1865 36,141,121 The United Statet Insurance Gazette gives the annexed table of the capital, number of shares, par value and latest maiket price for the stocks of the fire insurance companies of this city:? Nkw York Fiaa Insuranc* Companies. ? "tympanies. Capital. Share*. Par. Lit. Price. .?.ma *200,COO 4,000 360 110 a 112 Artie 260,000 6,000 60 98 a 100 Astor 160,000 6,000 26 90 a 90 Atlantic, Brooklyn 160 000 8,000 60 100 n 110 Beekman 200,000 8,000 26 76 a 70 Bowary 300,000 12.000 25 190 a 193 Broadway 200,COO 8,000 26 98 n 100 Brooklyn 102,000 6,000 17 116 a US Ctiiaena' 160,000 7,6(0 20 ISO a 132 City 210,000 3,000 70 136 a 146 Clinton 260,000 6,>100 60 90 a 95 Columbia 200.000 4,000 60 90 a 92 Commercial 200,000 2,600 50 100 a 101 Commonwealth 200.500 4.0C0 96 95 a 100 Continental e(i0,000 5,000 100 100 a 101 Coin Exchange 200,0C0 4,000 60 97 a 98 Eagle 300,COO 7,500 40 120 a 126 Faat River ISO,000 10,000 16 80 a 82 ExceDior 200.000 4,000 60 80 a 83 Firemen's 204,000 2,000 17 118 a 120 Fulton 160,000 6,000 26 87 a 88 Greenwich 200,000 4,000 26 136 a 130 Grooer* 200 000 4,000 60 116 a 118 Hamilton 16u,0o0 10,000 16 70 a 76 Harmony 150.000 3,0(0 50 95 a 98 Home 600,WO 5,OOU 100 96 a 96 Howard 250,COO 6,000 60 140 a 145 living 200,000 8,000 26 80 a 82 Jeflerson 200.000 0,6C0 30 130 a 135 Knickerbocker 28c,000 7,000 40 116 a 126 Lafarge 160,000 3,0(0 60 00 a 62 Lanox 160.000 6,000 26 80 a 86 Inrulanl 2(0,000 8,000 25 106 a 108 Manhattan 260,000 6,WO 60 116all8 Mechanics' and Trad'* .200,000 8,000 26 95 a 06 Mercantile 200,000 4,000 60 90 a 93 Merchants' 2( 0,000 4,000 60 100 a 105 Metropolitan 500,000 3,000 100 92 a 96 Naaaau 160,000 3,>M)0 50 90 a 92 National 160,000 4,(DO 37 K 177 a 178 New Amsterdam 200.000 8,000 26 93 a 94 N. Y. Equitable 210.000 6.000 36 126 a 130 N. Y. F. 6: Man 200 000 2,COO 100 150 a 162 Niagara 200,006 4,000 50 105 a 108 North Ameitcan 250,0(0 6,000 60 114 a 115 Nor*h Rarer 360,0(0 14,"00 26 133 a 134 i-tmflc 200,000 8.000 25 05 a 100 Park 200,000 2.000 100 90 a 06 People's 150,CCO 8 000 60 80 a 83 Peter Cooper 1?0,0(0 7,600 90 80 a 85 Republic 15'',CCO 1,600 109 92 a 94 Rutgers 290,000 8,000 25 70 a 72 St. Mark' 6,000 26 70 a 71 8t. Nicholas 160,000 6,000 2} 40 a Rtayrecant 200,000 8,000 25 91 ? 100 Catted Hta'el 250,000 10.000 26 110 a 112 Washington 2C0,?XI0 4,000 60 90 a 100 Williamsburg City ....110,003 8,000 6? 95 a 100 The aggregate capital of the fitty .sight cimpantee am-acts to two millions and flit, n* thousand dol lais. Theetcck of treaty fire c uifauiei sells abate par, some of them at a very premium. It U cor tmpreMloa that the quotations for many of these et^ks 3(9 f*r )*<>" "tat* " 3lO Erie Kailraad. *8 61* 160 do... ?1* 10 do .. ?* 400 do... 62 460 do... ?1* ICHi do... 62 50 do... 61* 60 do... 61* 100 do... ? * ?k0 do... 62 100 do... 62 50 do .. 92 100 do... 62 325 do. .. 62 100 da... ...biO 62* 240 do ... ,.. bfiO 62* 10 New Jersey RR.. 127 ehrald be tha object of a mtfuiK deroM to on* intoraot, to h?v* *1 its figurra Bad toato ?DMta beyond question. ?Sock kxrhuM. Batusuat, Juno 22, IBM. 83000 Virginia 6'?... 100 tuO N T C R she sto 1*0* 3000 Tnaa. 0'? '80.. ^ 100 do *A0 100* 6010 lad. State five* 84* 100 do b30 101 10000 E. C.ba,'Tl.b?? MS 100 do slO 1*0* 3000 do *3 M 'Z00 do *3 100* 10000 Erie bda '83.90 93* 100 Harlem RR... *10 29* OOOO do ??0 94 100 da 29* 10000 Erie ba, '75.b3 91* 100 do a 29* 10000 do *8 91* 100 do *10 to* 1000 Hud.K.2d m ba S3 250 do ...b60 to* 4000 111 OenRR ba b3 83 * 13 Chieaf* k K 1 BR to 15.100 do 83* 10 ^n to 6000 da 8-t 226 I'aaama RK 100 500 do 83* 14 CI C k Cm RR... 1?8 eoo N.Y.Oaa.RR be 92 6000 do 92* 300C 111 Fi* eland ba. 82 10COOICRF B.wpb3 78 11000l.H.AA.liitm B 85 1000 T HAAlt 2dm R 86 20 aba Shoe & Lr I* 102 200 Caiittn Co... x60 27* 200 do bOO 28 66 do 27* 60 do a80 27* 190 Mich. C. RK. a4oa 100 CO do 100 i.0 Nlc Transit... b3 17 550 do a3 18* MO do b0O 17 100 do aGO 18* ? 28 Cumb COal Co... 61* 76 Nor k Wor RR.. 40 100 do bOO 31* 176 Reading Kit...ai 92 76 do 31* 150 do C 92* 1(0 do bZO 51* 740 do 92* 100 do 31* 840 do bfiO 92* 11C0 do 31* 100 do a90 92 300 do bl6 31* 48 CI k Pittsburg RR 61 800 do a AO 31* 5 da 60 100 do b30 31* 60 do bl5 50 260 do bOO 31* 60 do 49* 100 do.... bl6 31*' 60 Gal A Cole RK... 10* 800 do 31 60 do bOO 104 100 do bftO 31* 26 Clev k Teledo RR 90 100 NY Can RR 101 60 do a3 00* 176 do 100* 246 do 91 600 . do 100* 50 do. a3 01* 100 do. b30 101 100 da 91* 100 do b30 100* 60 do 91* 60 do 680 ICf* 100 do a90 99 100 do 100* 20 Ilinoia Can RR.. to* SECOND BOARD. 910(0 Missouri 6V., 97* 100 Cum Coal 0a..a90 St 9000 do 97 * 300 do 31* 10000 IU CenKR UalO 63 * 100 do b7 31* 6000 do ... b30 83* 100 do a00 31* 3000 do 83 * 200 do 31* 1000 N Y On 7'a .. 102* 40 Erie Kailrond... 6t* 600 do 102* 200 do blO 62* 1C(0 N Y On RK ba 92 * 360 do 62* M aha Cbi A R I RR 98 200 da b30 63 60 do b30 98* 100 do a20 62* ICO Can ton Co... too 28 60 do a3 62* 100 do 160 27 * 400 Readiog RR. .,a3 92* 100 Cum Coal Oo .adO 81* 2o0 do b30 92* 300 do b30 31* 600 do atbO 92* 1(0 do a80 31* 200 do b3 92* 200 do 31* 600 do a3 92* 17 do 31* 60 Panama KB..a00 102* loo do bfiO 31* CI IT IR&DE REPORT. Saturday, J una 23?8 P. M. Asm?.?Pales of 40 a 60 bbla. wero mada, including pearla, at ftc., and pot* at 6*c. BBKAUurrnra ? Hour?Tba market was lower and dull (or common brand*, and o)o?e<l at a decline ot 12*o. per bbl. The sales footed up about 7,000 a 8,000 bbla., ic eluding common to good State, at 98 60 a 99; Weatans do. do. at $9 a $9 50. Among the sal** ware about 1,000 bbla. common State, for all July, at 98 40. Cana dian (2,000 bbla.) at 910 a 911 for tba wbola range. Southern wax doll. About 1,600 a 1,000 bbla. were aold at 910 25 a 910 67 for common brands, and 911 a 912 tar fancy and extra branda Wheat?Salea of 1,600 bualMla prime nliita Canadian were ma *o at 92 45, and 600 Upper lake at 92 11. The range, bawerer, waa 92 * 92 06. Cora?The Ralee footed up about 60,000 a 80,000 buakaln Western mixed at 101c. a 104c. : the latter figure foe a cargo in good shipping order. White Southern waa at 115c. Rje waa dull and nominal Oata wera firmer, and heavy Chicago waa held at an advance, and pareaaaos wire said to have been made for export. Frkightb.?To Liverpool, some 1,000 a 1,2(0 balsa compressed eotton were taken at 3-18d. a 7 19d.; corm wax nominal at 6*d. a ?d. There waa nothing new to London or to the Continent To Cid.Ioraia, rates wera at abont 36c. per foot measurement. Cokkkk ?Safes of 2,000 bags Rio were made, 1,900 at which were on private term*, and the remainder at 9*e. a 10*c ; 200 mats Java, at 14 *e. Cotton.?The salea embraced about 1,500 a 2,906 balax, without further change in prices. Hat.?Small salsa were made at $1 08 a 9112. Ikon ?Market firm, but comparatively quiet. Mo Lies re.?70 bbl*. New Orleans were aold at 39c., and 50 hbds. Neuvitss at 31e. Natal Stork ?About 400 bbla. spirit turpentine sold at 41o. cash, in abipp'ng order; aud 800 bals. rosin, at $1 CO per 510 lbs., delivered. There were 1,090 bbla. tar reported sold, but we could net trace It. Provihions.?The pork market was again active and firm. The tales embraced about 2,000 bbla. included in which were 1,200 bbla. new prime, at 918, and the re mainder, eh'efly mw moaa, at 919 82* a 919 76; and ?mall sales old mesa ware reported at about 919 a 919 26, and 100 bbla. aoft do. aold at 918, and a small lot of prim* mess aold at 917. Beef waa In goad demand, and tales of 4fa0 a 600 bbla. were made at 99 62 a 919 lor prime, and at 910 76 a 912 76 for oonmtcy mess. Cut maats?Sties 300 a 400 packagaa at 7 *o. a 8cs for shoulder*, aud at 9*c. a lo*c. for pickled bams. Bacon?We noticed a aale of 6,000 a 6,000 the. clear, boneless middles, at 10c. Lard waa atoady, witk tales of 400 a 500 bbla. at 10*c. a lt*c. Rica?Bales of about 100 bbla. wera mada without change in pricee. Si'gakh wen la good demand. Tba aalea reached abont 800 a 1,000 hhda. Cuba muscovado. WiiStKXY ?The aalea embraced about 300 a 400 bbla., at 37c. a 38c.; Utter figure for E. O. Ohio. Weekly Report of Death! In tbo city and county of New York, from the 10th daw of June to the 23d day of June, 1899. Men, 43; women, 80; boys, 116; firla, 107?Total, 322. Adults, 99, children, 223; mules, 189; famalea, 109; 00 lored persona, B. nana era. Albuminuria, and Bright'* Fracture, of the lag S disease of kidneys..... 1 Fracture, of th# skuU... 2 Anauri-m of the aorta, Heart, disease of 1 (abdominal) 1 Heart, disease of valvular I Apoplexy 3 Hooping cough 2 Bleeding from lnnga 2 Inflammation of bowels.. 9 Bronchitis 3 Inflammation of brain... 7 Burned or ? sal Jed 2 Inflammation of heart.. 1 Cancer 3 Inflammation of lungs... IS Cancer of the heart and Inflammation of stomach 2 stomach 1 Inflammation of throat.. I Cancer of tba testicles Inflammation of tonaUs.. I and liver 1 Inflammation of vaiaa... I Casualty, (run over by a Iaranity 1 borne) 1 Jaundice 2 Cholera 1 KUineys, diaeae* of 2 Cholera infantum 4 Killad or murdered, (by Cholera morbus 1 catting tlie throat)... 1 Compression of the brain Liver, disease of 1 (by a (ail) 1 Lockjaw 1 Concussion of the brain Lues venerea 1 (by a lall) 1 Lungs, disease of., I Congestion o( brain 1 Malformation of heart... 1 Congestion of liver 1 Malformation of head.... I Congestion of lungs 1 Marasmus, infantile 15 Consumption 38 Measles 10 Convulsions, adult 3 Mortification oi naval... 1 Convulsions, infantile...21 Old aga 2 Convulsions, puerperal.. 1 Palsy I Croup 9 Parturition, difficult.... I Debility, adult 2 Pleurisy I Debility, infantile 8 Premature birth 9 Delirium tremens 8 Retention of meneea 1 Diarrhoea 7 Rheumatism, (with lock Dronsy 1 Jaw)......... I Dropsy In tho head 20 Rupture, oI liver (nue Drowned 2 over) I Dysentery 7 Scrofula I Epilepsy 2 Smallpox 1 Eruption, (roserash)... 1 Stillborn 28 Erysipelas 6 Suffocation, (by explode* Fever 2 of fireworks) 1 Fsver, puerperal 3 Teething 1 Fever, scarlet 25 Unknown (notstated)... t Fever, typhoid 3 Varioloid 1 Fever, typhn* 4 ? Total to xscAfiTCLAnos?dduurrb clash*. Bones, joints, Ac 8 Stillborn and premature Brain and nervee 09 birth........... 87 generative organ* 0 9to? Heart and blood vesaals. 9 ot Lnnga, throat, Ao 70 Uncertain < Old ago 2 oral fever*.. .to? Skin, Ac., and eruptive Unknown I fever* 48 Urinary orgnaa 8 Total 322 ?Of which fourteen wera from violent < 07 tomach. bowels, and other digestive organs to in certain seat and gea AO*. Under 1 year 103 80to48y*are ? lto 2 years 60 40 to *0 year* '? 2 to ? years 41 10 te 90 12 9 to 10 years 18 to to 70 year* * 10 to 16 years 8 70 to 80 year* * 11 to 20 years 8 80 to 90 year a ? 20 to 26 yaara 10 ^ 26 to 80 years 18 total ? ???? I SSt3si::r.r..7.~J SSLd':?:.::::.." 5 t.w m prBi.ro mrtvtiom. _ ? o^nftaJ 6 Randl'a Isl. Nun Hasp'I. 9 Be.lerns H*P,UJ * ... 6 St. Vincent's HoapHeT .. 1 ? *7 Hospital.. 1 Smallpox hoes, ink's Ixl. t ftnirityl.Mk'fi'-I* 2 WhrdVlel'd Eml't Hosp. l? }.'fnnVy lloaf. B.k'11'a lsl 1 ? 6 13 1? 9 18 lit 4 3 14 H 4 22 16 ? ? 14 IT 29 ? 24 18 M T IT 19 Id ? 14 90 to ? 14 91 If 1 0 18 29 H 1 1 28 ? 1 2 91 total. THOMAS K. DOWNING, OKy Inspector. Ctty Inspectors Ofl^e, New fact, Jua* to, lltt.

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