13 Haziran 1900 Tarihli New York Tribune Gazetesi Sayfa 1

13 Haziran 1900 Tarihli New York Tribune Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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fi^s^ MmmAA^ V -LX---.N°-19.5G8. BRITISH GAIN GROUND. VICTORS OVER BOERS IX THE FREE STATE. FILLER FORCES BURGHERS FROM UJ3XFB NEK -A NEW CAPE OOV ERNMENT—BRABANT'S CAPT URE OF DUTCH. [Copyright; 1000: By The New-York Tribune.] [by CABLE TO the TBißrjrs.l London, June 13, S a. m.— "The Daily Mail" publishes a message from Bloemfontein this morning, stating that General Hunter, coming up rapidly from the northwest, severely defeat ed the Boers who had swooped down and de stroyed the railway line north of Kroonstad. The railway is in possession of the British again, and telegraphic communication with Lord Roberts is expected to be restored to-day. General Hunter's force is apparently the one from the north referred to by General Kelly- Kenny la his official message. Hunter must have crossed the Vaal from the north in the di rection of Potchefstroom — a really brilliant march from Machadodorp. "The Express" hears that the Boer commanders have been offered £10,000 a year to lay down their arms, and that President Kriiger expects a similar offer to be made to himself and Mr. Steyn. I. X. F. CLEARING THE LINES. EOBERTS TARTLY OPENS COMMUNICA TION WITH THE SOUTH. I Copyright; 1000: By The New-York Tribune.l [BY CAHL2 TO THE TRIBrXE.I London. June 13, 1 a. m.— defeat of the Boers at Honingsspruit by forces from the north has partly cleared the situation between Kroon- Etad and Pretoria, while Sir Redvers Buller has carried the last defile at Charlestown. and has completed the deliverance of Natal from an in vasion, precisely eight months after the out-, break of the war. These are official results, and there are press reports that fifteen hundred Boers have surrendered to General Brabant near Ficksburg; that Commandant Olivier was killed and that De Villiers was mortally wounded at Kooikrantz, and the Transvaal's Consul at Lourenco Marques has announced that Presi dent Pteyn has re-entered Bloemfontein in tri umph — a highly imaginative story, which has been refuted by the date line of General Kelly- Kenny's bulletin. There are also reports ihat General Hunter has captured pixty Johannesburg "Zarps," with a Maxim, at LJchtenburgr: that the Free State forces are massed at Bethlehem; that President Bteyn is at Reltz. near Lindley. and that the British prisoners recently captured are now con fined at Vrede. This full sheaf of war intelligence is capped oy the resignation of Mr. Schreiner. the Cape Premier, and the elearage of the Bond Ministry cv&t the question of the trial of rebels by a spe cial court and their dlefrarichisement after con viction. Mr. Pchreiner remains in office for a few days until the Ministry can be reorganized with the assurances of support from the op position. Sir Alfred Milner clearly prefers to end the war with the Dutch Premier in Cape Colony since he has had the tact and patience to get on during a critical period with the Bond Ministry. The most definite war news is from Sir Red vers Buller. who has completed his turning movement over difficult gTound, and has com pelled the Boers to evacuate Laing's Nek and Majuba Hill. He deserves the same credit which Lord Roberts has freely received for turn ing the Boers out of their strong positions with out running up a heavy butcher's bill. He would receive this credit more generously if his bulle tins were not badly written, and If he had not granted an armistice when, according to the version given, the enemy was surrounded. The Baal attack was led by the 2d Dorset Regiment and the cavalry under General Hiidyard. and there was a gallant bayonet charge. H-ildyard's division encamped beyond Volksrust and Gen eral Clery'e troops rushed through Laing's Nek. General Buller is now free either to advance toward Standerton and Pretoria or to operate against Vrede and to co-operate with' General Rundle, Lord Methuen and General Colvile in running down the Free State's forces. The situation in the Free State was not clear •when the War Office closed at 11 o'clock. The force from the north had reached Honingsspruit, had defeated the Boers and was expecting to arrive at America Station this morning, while General Knox's troops had gone north from Kroonstad. It was uncertain whether Lord Robms had sent General French south from the Transvaal or had ordered other troops to move down the railway from the Vaal. It could only be surmised that General De Wet's rear guard had been dispersed and that the bulk of his force, with the prisoners, had moved east v nd There had been no news from Lord Methuen, ■aho as fighting on Thursday at Vecht Kop. and It was within the range of possibilities that his force had Joined General Colvi!e at Heil broa and that the united columns had marched thirty miles to Roodeval. There was no official confirmation of the re ports from Maseru that General Brabant had captured fifteen hundred prisoners north of Ficksburg, but there Were semi-official assur ances that the news was probably correct. There wap nothing from General Clements, at Seneka!, nor from the garrison at Llndley. which was on the probable line of retreat of General De V»'et's force eastward. Communications with Lord Roberts will prob a-bi/ be reopened to-day, and the British cam paign a^-afn brought under the direction of the master mind. I. h. f. THE OFFICIAL DISPATCHES. SELLER REPORTS SUCCESS-FEW" CASU ALTIES—BOERS BEATEN AT HONINGSPRUIT. London, June 12.— The War Office has issued the following- Buller to the Secretary of War: Joubert's Farm, June 12, 5:05 p. in. Encamped four miles north of Volksrust. Laing"B Nek and Majuba were completely evacu ated by the Boers last night. General Clery, • rom Ingogo, Is now coming over the Nek. I nave had to camp here for want of water. A correct list of yesterday's casualties rill be sent «s soon as received. The War Office to-day also posted the follow <rg dispatch from General Buller: Headquarters in Natal. June 11.— We forced A.mond's Nek to-day. It is not marked on the "J«P, but Is the last defile to Charleston Flat*. The enemy were In considerable force, with sev eral guns in position. The brunt of the fighting When Colds come, fly to the remedy— JAYNE'S EXPECTORANT.-Advt. fell upi n the 2d Dorsets. who carried the posi tion at the point of the bayonet, and the Third Cavalry Brigade, who were heavily attacked on our riirht from very broken country around Iketinl Mountain. I hope our casualties are. less than a hundred, which, considering the extreme length of the position, Is much l*>ss than I expected. The whole attack was directed by Hiidyard. whose dispositions were extremely good. The artillery. Tenth Brigade und Third Cavalry Brigade did most of the wi rk. The War Office has received the following dis patch from General Kelly-Kenny: Bloemfontein. June 12.— Our troops from the north are at Honingspruit (south of Roodeval, where the Boers cut the British lines of com munication), having defeated the enemy. They will be at America Siding to-morrow at 8 a. m. General Knox moves out from Kroonstad to intercept the enemy. Fuller particulars later. The following dispatch has been received at the War Office from General Forestier- Walker, in command of the lines of communication in South Africa: Cape Town. June 12— The following is from Kelly-Kenny: June 11. — No communication from Methuen Bince June 7. He was fighting June G to the north of Vetchkop. Steyn is near Reitz. The British prisoners sent to Vrede are well treated. A probable explanation of the reports that a British force is moving through Swaziland comes in a dispatch from Port Elizabeth, dated June 11, announcing the return there of the British cruiser Doris from Kosi Bay, whither she had taken a number of whaleboats, with the object of landing an armed force, presumably part of a plan to penetrate into Swaziland. The Boers, however, got news of the expedition and the force was not landed. Among the members of the Yeomanry killed at Lindley was W. T. Power, proprietor of the Canyon Ranch, in North Texas, and son of Sir W. T. Power RULE OVER SOUTH AFRICA. OUTLINE OF THE POLICY OF THE BRIT ISH GOVERNMENT. London, June 12. — It is learned that the Gov ernment has at last decided upon a plan for the civil settlement of South Africa. The details are kept secret, but it can safely be said that the Orange River Colony and the Transvaal will become Crown colonies, the latter probably bein? renamed the Transvaal Colony. Sir Al fred Milner, it is declared, is to be High Com missioner of South Africa, in spite of the oppo sition he has incurred. The Crown colony form of government can best be understood by reference to the system in vogue in the West Indies. Sierra Leone and Ceylon. Emleavura will be ma.de to put this in force as soon as possible in the Transvaal and Orange River colonies, though it is scarcely expected that the details will be announced or parts of the work be begun for a few months. While the civil settlement will be drawn up so as to be eventually independent of military en forcement, it is realized that the first work must be effected with the co-operation of the troops. Sir Alfred Milner appears to believe that civil reorganization and military pacifica tion can proceed simultaneously, and that a possible scattered rising will not seriously re tard the progress of reorganization, once it Is begun. The Colonial Office is said to be of the opinion, however, that the maintenance of good sized garrisons at such centres as Bloemfontein, ICroojißtad, Johannesburg and Pretoria will be necesssary for a long time after the Crown colony system gets in working order. For thia reason and others put forward by Sir Alfred Milner the idea of granting an autonomous form of government has been abandoned. It is believed, though it cannot be verified, that a part of the Transvaal will be partitioned off to Natal. The whole arrangement may be roughly de scribed as coinciding with the views advanced by the Progressives as opposed to those held by the Bondites. The final steps in this decision have been taken in the last few days. Mr. Chamberlain sent for J. P. Fitzpatrick, author of "The Transvaal from Within." who is well known in connection with South African affairs, and spent a day in consultation with him. Mr. Fitzpatrick will sail for Cape Town on June 16 to join the Advisory Committee which Sir Alfred Milner is forming. REPAIRING RAILROAD LINES. KKWB FROM LORP ROBERTS EXPECTED TO-DAY— BULLER'S MOVEMENTS. London. June 13. — Telegraphic communication with Lord Roberta is expected to be restored to day, as a dispatch from Bloemfontein, dated yesterday, says that the railway is in British possession again, and that the work of repair ing the line is going on rapidly with the abun dant material at Bloemfontein. From the following telegram it would appear that General Hunter was in command of the troops referred to by General K»Hy- Kenny in his dispatr-h from Bloemfontein: Bloemfontein, June 12.— General Hunter is coming up rapidly from the northwest, having severely defeated a large commando of Boers, who had destroyed two miles of railway north of Kroonstad. The Boer Government is also issuing news cheering to its sympathizers. The following bulletin, the Boer version of the disaster to the Derbyshires. was posted by President Krtiger on Sunday at Machadodorp: On June 7 four divisions of burghers, com manded by Bteenkamp, Froneman, Duploy, Fourie and Nel, attacked thr> British at Roode val. killed two hundred, took seven hundred prisoners and captured immense stores of food and ammunition, a Maxim gun and one thousand lyddite shells. Some food was taken by the Boer farmers, and the rest was burned. The English icai: waa taken. The burghers attacked from the open veldt and gay.» evidence of unpre cedented bravery General De Wet was also fighting on June 2, whether at Roodeval or elsewhere is not clear, but the Boer War Office gives it out that he captured three thousand suits of clothing, blan kets, gloves, boots, etc. Being unable to carry them with him in his rapid sweep through the country, according to the Transvaal War Office, he burned the whole mass. General De Wet has also reported that he put one thousand British out of action and destroyed property valued at £100,000. As Lord Methuen Is ofticlally described as fighting on June 7. it is possible that he was engaging General tv Wet. A dispatch from Lourenc,o Marques says that fifteen thousand Boers are reported to he retir ing on Middleburg from various quarters, ani that after weeding out the faint hearted twenty thousand steadfast men are still left. General Buller was unable on Monday to fol low up the Boers, from lack of cavalry as well as water. The dispatches describe him as fight ir.g a spirited advance action over a rugged field und-.-r prolonged rifle fire. The Boer* had two guns, which they got away. Few dead or wounded Boers were found. It stems probable t'/it the major portion of the Boers had wlth cjTawn before the advance began. Lord Methut-n. General Rundle and General Brabant are reported to have 35,000 men and fifty guns engaged in inclosing the Boers in the eastern part of Orange River Colony. The War Office casualty returns up to June 9 .. ..u-.i 28,664, ii'-side.s 7!C officers and 12,355 men sent home ss invalids, but not including th.« sick in South African h. spitals. REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION. Pennsylvania Railroad Company will sell tickets to Philadelphia at rate of 12.50 for the round trip from June 15 to 21 Inclusive, good to return until Chfl Sfcth in«t.— CAdvu NEW-YORK. WEDNESDAY. JUNE 13. 1900.-FOUBTEEN • PAG!B.-,^rawau* THREE PERISH BY FIRE ELEVEN OTHERS INJURED IN COOPER AGE PLANT BLAZE IN BROOKLYN. Three men dead and eleven others badly hurt is the result of a fire that broke out at r.:4." o'clock yesterday afternoon in the Weidmann Cooperage, North Eleventh-st. and Wythe-ave., Brooklyn. The building was burned out. It was a four story brick structure, where a hundred men were employed at the time of the fire. It extended from No. (5.1 to No. 7.'1 North Eleventh st., back to North Twelfth-st., and from Wythe ave. halfway to Kent-aye. Following is the list of dead and injured: DEAD. BENEDICT. August, fifty-nine years old. of No 64 MagK-st.. burned over his entire body, with com pound fracture of tho leg; died last evening at the Kastwri District Hospital. LOCKWOOD. JOHN M , Mxty-alx years old of No 73 Devoe-Et ; died in the Eastern District Hospital at 11 o'clock last night. A man too badly burned to be identified. The body was taken to the police station at North First-st. and Bedford-aye. THE INJURED. BROWN". James, of No. 49 Kent-aye. COCOMA, Frank, thirteen years old, of No. 40 Have meyer-st., burns on face and arms. COLWELL. Charles, fifty-three years old. of No. 61 North Ninth- St., a cooper, supposed to have been on the top doer when the lire broke out; he Is the father of twelve children. DONIFIA. John, fifteen years old. of No. 76 Froat-st.. hands burned. FEE. Joseph, fireman of Hook and Ladder No. &S. con tuslona of the body; treated at the engine house. HA3LETT. James, thirty-four years old, of No. 49 Kent-aye., scalp wound"; went home. HEML.INO. Georse. thirty-five years old. of No. 557 Cen tral-aye.. contusions of the leg and back. LEAMAX, Georpe. twenty-nine yesra old, of No. 248 Montrose-ave., fireman of Hook and Ladder No Lb broken leg. £ % £. OOD ' John M - jr., twenty-four years old. of No. 73 Devoe-st., contusions. SMITH, Augustus, no address, burns. TRAVEKS. John, of No. 49 Kent-aye. Boy, burnt; sent to St. Catherine's Hospital. The injured not otherwise noted above were taken to the Eastern District Hospital. The fire broke out on the third floor of the building, and when the engines arrived the building was enveloped in names. The first alarm was sent in by telephone by an employe, and three other alarms were turned in quickly by the police when It was seen how rapidly the inflammable material in the building— about ten thousand barrels — was being attacked by the flames. Engines Nos. 12 and 21 responded to the first alarm. Eight engines and three trucks in all answered to the different alarms. A water tower also arrived, but was not used. Owing to the rapid spread of the flames the escape of many of the employes in the building seemed for a time to be cut off. There was a one story extension at North Eleventh-st. ana "Wythe-ave., and there the firemen on the roof spread a net, into which many of the employes leaped and escaped serious injury. " The heat, however, soon became too intense, and the fire men had to abandon their posts. Other men Jumped from the first and second story windows, in most Instances receiving injuries, which in some cases, as stated, were treated at the hos pital, and in others they were able to go home after treatment on the spot by the ambulance surgeons. When the wall fell in North Eleventh-st., about 7 o'clock, there was thrown out into the road way the body of a man so terribly burned that It could not be identified. This body was taken to the Bedford-aye. police station. James Haslett, of No. 49 Kent-aye., climbed up the firo escape to rl.e first story, whe-e several of the employes were hanging out of the upper windows, apparently panic stricken and scream ing for help. He rescued two men, and when he reached the ground an old man, with clothes ablaze, jumped out of the first story and landed on Haslett, cutting his head and face. The fire men of Engine No. 12 rescued several men whose clothes were on fire from the second and third floors. A big tank of the Standard Oil works in the rear of the building was carefully looked after by the fireman, who constantly kept streams of water playing upon it. Two frame dwelling houges at Nos. 59 and fil North Eleventh-st. were damaged by water and partly burned. The ten families occupying thpm got out in safety. The damage by fire and water was estimated by the police at |T5.000. Tho cooperage is owned by Louis and Paul Weidmann and their mother. Louis Weidmann refused last night to give any estimate of the losp. The property was Insured. Thousands of spectators gathered to pee the blazo. The fire lines were in charge of Captain Short, Sergeants Reardon and Bunce and Roundsmen Brennan and Halloran, with the re porves from tho Fifty-ninth, Sixty-second. Sixty-third and Sixty-fifth precincts. Private Woodford. of the Ambulance Corps at Gov ernor's Island, gave valuable volunteer aid to the ambulance physicians in caring for the in jured. FILIPfXO STROXGHOLD TAKEN. GENERAL GRANT'S FORCES PURSUING SCATTERED REBELS. Manila, June 12. — General Grant, who led re inforcements, with artillery, against the in purgents in the mountains east of Samiguet, re ports the capture of the rebel stronghold after four hours' fighting. The rebels were scattered, and the Americans are pursuing them. General Grant's column had no casualties. TWO REBEL LEADERS CAPTURED. Washington, June 12. — General Mac Arthur sent the following dispatch to the War Depart ment to-day: Report capture Generals Hizon, near Mexico, and Cavestany, at Alcala; both important; lat tery very important leader of guerillas in Pan gaFinan Province (Luzon). General Corbin attaches considerable impor tance to these captures. In his opinion they are more nearly in the nature of surrenders than captures, and indicate that the principal lead ers of the Insurrection are abandoning that cause, and are coming into Manila to accept American supremacy. FELL EIGHTY-FIVE FEET IXTO A RIVER. ONE MAN KILLED AND EIGHT INJURED— TWO NOT EXPECTED TO LIVE Tallassee, Ala.. June 12.— While nine men in a basket cable line, suspended eight y-flve feet above the Tallapoosa River nere, were crossing th« river yesterday afternoon one of the cables broke and the men fell Into the river below. On« was kiiied and two are reported not likely to live. All the others re ceived Injuries. The basket cable line wns utilized for carrying rock und other material for the con struction of a. railroad near here on which the men had been working. THE KEXTUCKY OFF FOR NEWPORT. Newport News. Va., June 12 (Special).— The United States battleship Kentucky sailed this morning from Lynn Haven Bay for Newport. R. 1., to Join the North Atlantic Squadron. The orders vvru unexpected, aa the ship was due to remain In tho bay nt pra.~tir<' work for several days, then return to Hampton Roads for coal and proceed »o New port. RHODODENDRON NOW IN BLOOM. Pocono Mountains are now fairly ablare with color Lackawanna trains reach the leading re sorts Special mountain train at 12:4* Saturdays. -Advt. RELY UPON PLATT'S CHLORIDES for household disinfection. Odorless and cheap.— Advt.

A PRETENCE OF REFORM. CHINA'S BULER ISSUES ANOTHER EDICT —REPORT OF SETTLEMENT. [Copyright ; 1900: By The New-York Tribunal [by cable to the TninrNE.l London. June 1?<, <> a. m. — Telegrams from China disclose no particular change in the sit uation. "The Post's" correspondent at Peking states that a new Imperial edict has been issued condemning the Boxers. Seventy-five foreigners and four hundred natives, under guard of twenty Americans, have congregated at Peking and are forming for defence. The Anglo-Amorican force which left Tifii-T-sin on Sunday is at Laofa, thirty-one miles distant, having been delayed by damaged bridges. The Shanghai correspondent of "The Times" states that Russia is about to bring a large force to Peking, and the Shanghai cor respondent of "The Mail" understands that the trouble has been practically settled by the Powers. i. x. F. EMPRESS JOINS BOXERS. RADICAL CHANGES MADE IN CHINESE FOREIGN OFFICE. [Copyright; 1900: By The New-York Tribime.l [by cable to the tribune.] London, June 13, 1 a. m.— The news from China has been vague and untrustworthy for the last twenty-four hours, but there is a general feeling in diplomatic circles that the European Powers have been united by the dismissal of Prince Chin?, and that !n the purging of the Tsung-11- Yamen of all its moderate men the Empress Dowager has gone over to the Boxers, bag and baggage, and that the Powers have been forced to co-operate In the restoration of order at Peking, even if the services of Russian troops are required. Talleyrand's "good Europeans" have reap peared upon the scene and have dropped their Jealousies and suspicions. A mixed force of two thousand marines will be Inadequate if Peking should be in the possession of the Boxers and if the insurrection spreads from province to prov ince. The Russians will go in with a European mandate, and probably will have as many reasons for remaining there as the English have found useful and necessary in Egypt. I. N. F. CIIIXESE SITFATIOX DISCUSSED. THE CABINET ADHERES TO ITS ANNOUNCED POLICY— THE CONSUL AT CHIN-KIANG ASKS FOR A CRUISER. Washington, June 12. — The Cabinet meeting to-day was attended by Secretaries Hay, Hitch cock, Long and Gage, and Postmaster-General Smith. It was devoted largely to discussion of the Chinese situation. Secretary Hay laid be fore the Cabinet dispatches from consular offi cials in China which indicated that the situation Is more critical. Secretary Long had no late dispatches. The steps thai hay? been taken to reinforce Admiral Kempff were discussed, and it was decided to stand by the policy of pushing measures for the protection of the lives and property of American citizens and of acting in dependently so far as possible. It is possible that, in the accomplishment of this result, the forces of the Powers will be obliged to act In unison for the protection of all foreign residents in the disturbed districts, but this is to be the extent of American activity. It Is to be con fined solely to the protection and safeguarding of American interests. The Chinese Govern ment will be looked to, under the general laws of the comity of the nations, to restore order and to make such reparation as is proper. From all political schemes Jn which any of the Powers may become involved, the United States is to hold aloof. This is the general policy hereto fore outlined, and it will be adhered to. The Navy Department has cabled directly to Rear-Admiral Kempff, at Taku, to inform him that marine reinforcements have been ordered to him from Manila. Thus the Admiral will be In a position to act with greater freedom In sending relief expeditions to Peking and other places, knowing that he will soon be able to replace the marines diverted from Taku. CONSUL MARTIN ASKS PROTECTION. The following dispatch was received at the State Department to-day: Chin-Kiang, June 12. Secretary of State: Large numbers natives organized secret so ciety. Halted here. People very apprehensive. No protection. Want cruiser. MARTIN. Mr. Martin is the United States Consul at Chln-Kiang, and his telegram is the first news received here to indicate the spread of the Boxer agitation in that section of China. Chin-Kiang is one of the most important treaty ports in China. It is on the Yang-tse-Kiang. a little over one hundred miles above the point where the Wo-Sung enters, and is about one hundred and twenty-five miles from Shanghai. At the latter port the United States gunboats Yorktown and Castlne are now lying, undergoing some repairs. The extent of these is not known at the Navy Department, but it Is said that one or both of the vessels might be sent to Chin-,Klajig In the course of a day or two. However, no orders have gone forward to either of the vessels or to Admiral Remey. There is an intimation at the State Department that the Consul at Chln-Kiang has exaggerated the danger of the situation, and that the mere halting near the town of a num ber of Boxers is not evidence that they have any hostile intentions against the American con sulate. It is probable, therefore, that in the absence of more serious developments no ship will be sent to Chin-Klang. The town is nearly three hundred miles southeast of Peking, but fortunately is much more accessible to foreign warships, and vessels drawing as much aa twenty-five feet of water can work up the river to that point. One of the dispatches received at the Sjaite Department this morning was from another con sular officer in China, but It was said that it conveyed no news of Importance, and Its con tents were not made public. MORE BRITISH TROOPS LANDED. RUSSIANS HAMPERED BY LACK OF TRANS PORT—BOXERS ATTACK PAO-TING-FU. Tien-Tsin, June 12. — One hundred and sixty three British were landed last evening. An ad ditional twenty men of the British troops have been sent to Fong-Shan. This morning a special train left Tlen-Tsln for Yang-Tsun to bring General Nleh to consult with the Viceroy. Telegraphic communication with Peking Is ntlll interrupted The Russian warships Petropaulovakl and NORTH AMERJCAN TUR f NFEST a GYMNASTIC Pennsylvania Railroad Company will sell tickets to Philadelphia and return at rate of $2 .V) for the round trip from Juno 15 to 21. good to return until June 28.— tAdvt. Komtloff are at Taku Far, an! th" Russian tor pedo boats Nos. MS and lOT are In the Ri ->r Taku. Want -">f transport prevents the Russians from landing troops. The Russians are very active here to-day. It is rumored that General Fung-Fah-Siang. with many thousand troops, is at Feng-Tal. The latest news from Pao-Ting-Fu is that th- Bmnrat six thousand strong, are attacking tru» Roman Catholic convent there. The situation' Id critical, and the officials are evidently Inactive. The United States warships Nashville and M nocacy are expected at Taku. JAPANESE OFFICIAL KILLED. CHANCELLOR OF THE LEGATION MUR DERED RY EMPRESS'S BODYGUARD. London, June 13.— The Times." In an extra edition, publishes the following dispatch from Peking, dated June 12. 2 p. m. : The Chancellor of the Japanese Legation, Sugiyama Akira, whiU- proceeding alone and unprotected on official duty, was brutally mur dered by soldiers of the Tung-Fuh-Siang. the favorite bodyguard of the Empress, at the Manigate railroad station yesterday. The foreign reinforcements are daily expected. The present isolated position of Peking, the destruction of foreign property in the country and the insecurity of life are directly attrib utable to the treachery of the Chinese Gov ernment. JAPAN PREPARES FOR ACTION. FOUR MORE WARSHIPS ORDERED TO TAKU —MEN TO DISEMARK. London, June 13. — A telegram from Yoko hama, dated Tuesday evening, says that the Japanese Government has ordered four more warships to proceed to Taku. and four thou sand men of all arms are under orders to be in immediate readiness for embarkation. The dis patch says the Japanese Government "trusts the Powers" will not misconstrue this action. The Japanese press urges vigorous methods. BRITISH MARINES IN ACTION. TWO THOUSAND BOXERS PUT TO FLIGHT HOME OF BRITISH MINISTER BURNED. London, June 13.— Sixteen British marines, In advance of the international column marching to Peking, fought and chased two thousand Boxers on Monday, killing twenty or thirty. The correspondent accompanying the column, in a dispatch dated Tien-Tsin, June 12, [by way of Shanghai, June 13, says: While the working parties, accompanied by a patrol of sixteen British marines, commanded by Major Johnson, were repairing the line on Mon day afternoon, eight miles beyond Lofa, they encountered small parties of Boxers who were destroying the line. The Boxers moved away from the advanced marines and apparently dis persed into the country, leaving the rails moved and the 6leepers burning. The marines, when two miles in advance of the first train, near Lang-Fang, suddenly per ceived Boxers streaming from a village on their left. It was estimated that they numbered two thousand, some of them being mounted, and they were trying to get between the marines and the train Most of them were armed with spears and swords. A few had firearms, which they handled awkwardly. The marines retreated, keeping up a running fight for over a mile and killing between twenty and thirty. The Boxers pursued the British for some dis tance. Seeing more marines from the train coining to their assistance. Major Johnson's six teen halted and poured., a .heavy, _co;u>nuQ.us. fire into the crowd, driving them across the front of the reinforcing bluejackets, who pun ished the Boxers severely with Maxims. The Boxers fled, and the Europeans, following: up their success, cleared out two villages. The total loss of the Boxers Is estimated at forty killed and wounded. Seven of their wounded were attended by British surgeons. The Brit ish loss was nothing. Unless their loss causes the Boxers to lose heart, the international column will have much, trouble before it reaches Peking. The railway is so much damaged that the column only cov ered thirty-four miles on Sunday and Monday, and there is reason to fear that the road beyond is more badly damaged. Evidence of General Nieh's operations were found In headless bodies. The whole country presents a desolate aspect, entire villages having been deserted. The expedition numbers 2.044 men. as follows: British. 1>15; German. 250: Russian. 300; French. 128; Americans, 104; Japanese, f»2; Italian. 40, and Austrian. 25. The Shanghai correspondent of "The Times." telegraphing on Tuesday, says: The Japanese Minister is pressing for recog nition of a Japanese sphere of influence to in clude the provinces of Che-Kiang. Fo-Kien ami Klang--Sl. The Hong Kong correspondent of "Th^ Times'" says: The Admiralty has engaged a transport to take nine hundred troops to Tang-Ku. The sailing date has not been fixed. The only bit of information which the British War Office has made public regarding the situa tion, since it became important, wns the admis sion yesterday that the summer residence of the British Minister in Faking. Sir Claude Macdor ald, had been burned. Large contracts for the Chinese have been placed with the Birmingham arms factories, though whether for the Chinese Government or for the Boxers is not disclosed. RUSSIAN ACTIVITY IN THE FAR EAST. ENORMOUS MOVEMENT OF MCNITION? OF WAR BIG C.fNS AT PORT ARTH'R. San Francisco, June 12 <Special>.— Yokohama newspapers received by steamer to-day give some Interesting details of the enormous move ment of munitions of war, arms and men by the Russian Government to its possessions in the Far East. The Japanese who publish a news paper at Port Arthur recently interviewed the captain of the big Norwegian steamer N'orman nia. which landed arms at that port. The cap tain said the Normannia was only one of many ships engaged by the Russian Government to bring over arms and men. She landed at Port Arthur ten big guns and an enormous quantity of Iron materials for fortification. At Vladlvos tock sha also discharged stores and provisions. Port Arthur Is now completely fortified, but many other places alone the coast are being put In condition for an emergency. Russian troops were being poured Into Eastern China at the rate of elev ?n hundred meri weekly. The captain of the Normannia also said the Russian War Office is carrying troops and military stores to Pt-rsia and the Far East, which bears out re ports recently cent to "The London Times" by its Odessa correspondent. iflXFit* STRIKE IW XFWFOrXDLAyD. TROL'BLE EXPECTED AT THE BELLE ISLAND WORKS— POLICE SENT FROM ST. JOHN'S. St. John's. N. F.. June 12.— A serious strike has taken place at the Belle Island mines, a few miles from St. John's, where two thousand men are employed. The Dominion Iron and Steel Com t>anv recently purchased large hematite deposits there to supply the iron for the new smelting work- at Sydney. The Nova Scotia Steel Company has a mine In the same locality, and the miners emnloved by both companies have made a demand for 15 cents an hour, their present pay being 10 ce -j?hß ringleaders are believed to be Canadians holding subordinate places. Twenty policemen started for the scene- of the disturbance to-day, it is feared that the mining plants have been dam aged. ' ' EQUINOX HOUSE. MANCHESTER. VERMONT/ finfcial through parlor car Saturday, June l>sth fon?v> S'ls a. '■■■ . Hudson River R, R. (regular tick eta) reaching Manchester about 2 o'clock. Check LaKKase-eacae train.— AdvC PRICE THREE CENTO PLATT'S GAME MAT FAIL. NOT ENCOURAGED BY POWBKF! I. AD MCUUBATMKt IXFU k\' f:s. NOMINATION OF ROOSEVELT FOR VlC** - PRESIDENT APPARENTLY NOT NOW IN FAVOR-NAMES OF ALLISON AND BLISS CONSIDERED. [BT TEI.Er.RAPH TO THE TKIBCXK.] Washington, June What some of the shrewd politicians call "Tom Platfs deep garnej* to force the nomination of Theodore Roosevelt for the Vice-Presidency in order to eliminate him as an active factor in New- York State poll tics would stand a better chance of success If It met with greater encouragement from influences which are powerful in the inner circles of the Administration. There was a time when theee Influences were distinctly and heartily In favor of the Governor's nomination, but indications are not wanting that that time has passed This may not mean that the President or his close friends and more ardent supporters would look with disfavor on such an outcome of the situa tion, but they now seem to realize more keenly than they did two months ago that it might not be wise or expedient openly to countenance or encourage Senator Plan's "deep game," an 1 be sides some of them at least seem to have be come convinced that Mr. Roosevelt means what he says when he declares that he doesn't want the nomination and wouldn't accept it If It were offered to him. It may be that some of them feel a degree of resentment toward him on that account, but, If so, it is pretty care fully concealed, although they may not be able to realize why the Governor should not show a higher appreciation of the great honor which it was proposed to bestow upon him. Among the things which also appear to be somewhat apparent is that the Administration leaders realize more clearly the nearer the day of the nomination approaches that the situation and prospect are not such as to tolerate any mistake in the choice of President McKlnley*s "running mate," and the relative strength and availability of the men whose names have been suggested for the nomination are more carefully canvassed and seriously weighed than ever. The Idea that the National ticket is to be carried to victory with a "hurrah" or without the hardest kind of work and the most hearty co-operation among Republicans of all shades of opinion is not as obtrusive as it was several months ago, :i:d this fact may have an untoward Influence ■ii Mr. Platt's "deep game." which to many does not appear so "deep" after all. TALK OF ALLISON AND BLJ33. There is good reason to believe that the men nearest the President, and probably he also, would feel reason to rejoice if a man could be found whom the Convention would nominate by acclamation and whose personality and caw acter would add strength to the National ticket — such a man, for example, as Allison or Spooner in the West, or Frye In New-England. or Bliss in New- York, each of whom has been In turn approached without obtaining bis con sent.- There have been some indications to day that two or these names have again been considered— those of- Senator Allison an.i Cor nelius N. Bliss. Respecting the latter, "The Washington Star" to-night has this paragraph: Mr. Bliss and the Vice- Presidency.— lt was freely declared in usually well informed political circles this morning that the question of select ing a running mate for President McKmley in the November race, which 13 to be finally settled at Philadelphia next week, was now in the keep ing of Mr. Cornelius N. Bliss, of • f-Torfc. former Secretary of the Interior. It was stated with much emphasis that Mr. Bliss haJ been urged in the last day or two to consent to accept the nomination, and to sacrifice any personal disinclinations to re-enter active public life which he. as is well known, cherishes, in order to assure the carrying of the Empire State for the Republican ticket in the Presidential elec tion It was also stated that Mr. Bliss was again considering the matter, and that hopes were strongly entertained that he would over come his scruples and agree to accept the nomi nation. , - „. On the other hand, intimate friends of Mr. Bliss insist that public life such as a Vice-Presi dent is expected to lead would be too repugnant to him to permit him to accept, even if It were in his opinion a party .necessity to do so. and. that regarding the latter proposition, Mr. Bliss considered the possibility of the Democrats* carrying New- York next fall as too remote to be the cause for any uneasiness. Those who in cline to the belief that Mr. Bliss may accept the nomination are of the opinion that Senator Platt's opposition to him would not be so vigor ous as to counteract the wishes of the other party managers in the premises, and point out that geographical considerations demand a mart from the East and from what Is recognized as a pivotal State. Secretary Long and Secretary Smith, whose names have been so favorably mentioned, are from States which do not come ■within the latter category- The natural can didate was admittedly Governor Roosevelt, but his positive refusal to consider the nomination brings the question up to Mr. Bliss, Lieutenant- Governor Woodruff not being considered as a factor of consequence. THE "BOOMS" IN WASHINGTON. The same paper pays: Senator Hanna was reported as having: to day declared in conversation that he was op posed to the nomination of Mr. Roosevelt. The reason assigned for his opposition was that the Republican party could not ajjord to be put In the attitude of soliciting a candidate against his repeated declinations, when there was so much available timber at hand. In the same talk Mr Hanna discussed the Dolllver boom, but without either indorsing or opposing it. He did not express a choice for any candidate. Senator Hanna was one of the earliest arrivals at the White House this morning. He was ac companied by Thomas Lowry and Hugh Harri ■on, of Minneapolis, both representative men of the Western metropolis In the highest sense, ilr. L. wry is the electric street railway magnate of Minneapolis and St. Paul, as well as a promi nent factor in the "Soo" Railroad. He 13 an ardent Republican and a liberal contributor to campaign coffers and a delegate-at-larse to tha Philadelphia Convention. Mr Lowry is an en thusiastic advocate of the nomination of ex- Senator W. D. Washburn. of Minnesota, as Vice-President on the ticket with the President. Mr. Harrison and Mr. Lowry merely paid their respects and departed, but Senator Hanna re mained until the Cabinet meeting begao. con versing over the political outlook with Secretary Hitchcock, Secretary Gage and other ear':- Cab inet comers previous thereto. The Washburn "boom' does not seem to ex cite enthusiasm among Republican politicians here. MR SCOTT'S NAM P. WELL RECEIVED. The suggestion of the name oi Irv:: .-.- v of California, is favorably received, especially among those who kno.v something of the valu* of his services In the building of the new Navy, and also of hin energetic and generous eff I behalf of the Repul •:■. . . •■• ; but he is not 30 widely or well known among the poli'.. ' ma who will compose the Philadelphia C^n.-ntion. Th-- DsUtvsi noom" Is apparently increaatag; In force, and barring accidents will make itself THE LAKE SHORE LIMIT An up to dat* train in every respect, between New-York ami Chicago every day at r>::>o p. in., via New-York Central. Pullman Sleeping Cars from New-York to Chlcaco. via Lake Shore Ttoute. ami to St Loots, via Rle Four Route, making close connection for Kansas City. No excess fare to St. Louis.— Advt. West Point will be at Its gayest during n.&xt two weeks. Round trip. via Day Line, $1. Music— JUhrt,

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