April 7, 1903 Tarihli New York Tribune Gazetesi Sayfa 1

April 7, 1903 Tarihli New York Tribune Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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_^_ VO!V O! LXIT ... N°- iUr>!Hl. TRUST TO CONTROL TARS. PORT Sill ERS ALSO. Stringent Laics Needed for Ship ping and Boarding House Masters. . The publicity given by The Tribune to the • abuses of the employment office business con tinues to develop new pha«es of the evil. The pcandals attending- the operation of intelligence offices which swindle poor men out of money on the pretence of getting work for them, of ship ping agencies which send ir.cn in search of a passage to Europe to distant ports and leave them destitute, are rivalled, if not exceeded, by a third method of running ther-e offices for fraudu lent purposes, namely, that of robbing deep pea sailors, charging them illegal fees, and in pome instance brutally maltreating them. So out rageous ha? this business sane in pome in- Ftancrs that. sailors are dealt in as a commodity, poid like slaves, and the v.hole d?ep sea shlp p!r.g cf the port brought ur.der The ban of a trust of boarding house and shipping masters, •which controls the market. The twenty-five or thtrty shipping agencies of this pert annually supply thirty thousand men for ships. Under the law the business of chip ping ■anatcra and hsswiksg masters is distinct. no 2icer.se for both being Issued to any one man. In point of fact, the business Hi conducted on Fhares by the tw.-> classes. The boarding hous« master keeps the sailor until the shipping mas ter has ■ vessel, then .turns him over to the shirring master. - ho puts the seaman on the vessel. According to the United States Shipping law the ship's captain is obliged to pay a fee for the men supplied him. but the sailor cannot be charred. But despite the law the money Is dragged from the sailor. Every sailor who goes to deep water sicr.s an allotment note which three days after fcis vessel has left port entities the boarding ir.3st*r to any sum up to one month's -wages. This month's allotment usually covers a small debt for board, and in return for it the sailor also receives a few necessaries for the voyage •uch as soap, tobacco and marches; perhaps he is lacky enough to get a little cash, besides. The balance is taken by the boarding bouse xn&ster, and $2 of this amount is paid to the shipping master for getting a berth for the man. Ir many instances no attempt is made to dis guise from the sailor that he is obliged to pay a part of his first month's -wages to the shipping ir.a=tcr seed, when the boarding house mas ter goes over his accounts with the seaman the latter is usually told ■*- must be rut aside for the shipping master. An example of the actual working of the scheme is shown in an affidavit by Charles Arcerdo. -who keeps a sailors' boarding house at No. Co Osuis st . and -who turned State's eviaence in a case taken to court. He put six eearr.er. on the steemshlp Adler, to make a trip tc> The West Indies and return. "The shipping master," says the affidavit, •'William T. Jones, ar.d Henry A- Collins de ducted from the wages of the six seamen $-i~<; $10 each from the wages cf Mlnlar. Charles James and Bruse, sailors, and $5 apiece from xhe wages cf Manuel Se!ve. Juan Pores and another. There v.as charged In shipping papers £12 -Vf ard there was palS'tn* ire $32 SO for the cix men before the voyage began." A second and even greater evil arises from the fact that the shipping' master Is frequently E'-thorized to pay off the men from a vessel. The seilor is turned over bo a boarding house ■^s^-per by the shipping master. He is reduced to a drunken condition, robbed of his wages end all his valuables, and finally, after he has been thoroughly cleaned he is shipped on another ship, after being charged a fee for his epw place. The third evil -which calls for the action of the Bureau of Licenses concerns not individuals. btrt the general prosperity of the port. The shipping and boarding masters have formed a ---•■• shipping- interests of the port. So complete is the hold they have on the supply of sailors- that they are able to de mand and collect $15 a head for the sailors rapplied to the captains of shipping calling here. Yesterday the British four-masted snip Keiat signed twenty-four men. The agent of the ship. C. P. Stunner, paid £10 for every man. and all were taken from boarding houses. Som* years ago the combination of shipping masters was so strong that it demanded fW for each sailor, and held up the shipping in the harbor for a month. The final expense falls on the sailor, out of whose wages the shipping bonus, paid by the ship's agent, in nearly every case comes. - In an effort to rescue the sailors from the control of the inhuman and dishonest boarding house and shipping masters, two charitable crgan:zations-the Free Shipping Office, at No. 3 Btate-et-. and the Seaman's Rest, at No. 3i»l> %V*-=--Et — have established free shipping agen c>s Frank P. Hughes, the director of the of fice at Statist., which is conducted under the auspices of the Protestant Episcopal Missionary Eociety. said yesterday: i»?»faB arts SSSSs Sreta taJarttaS houses I cannot «t hoW let -f^m kM SSr^n^er. went ,««« h^ti^ •Bt-^ks ago. On Jas-wr} o » '-fc hsrk rhetls w.t.oj- «K«-,r#d and for every man p,ve a meas Bay took a cr<>w^ f X« doirg"tV* work for Th« fhippir.g master who was doing t. & the totrid *»«££*£s "l . eV5?y found them buw without a bona^flr »». they R. C Bing^alt of the Legal Aid Society. rtlch has been investigating the ««kpg *S^cy abuse as It affects the shipping and boardinr house masters, said yesterday: Fro^nW «perienc ; i^M-o^e I haven't the I^^^the Bureau SStf&S^ISi^SSiSSK^ charitable so- SSei^S baLr.ce l^f&gg l^ of Trad, re go mentis! doe* Tl '' r .' -t r *-cu!re* all sWpptaß paM tl.*ir reg-jlation th*t " r^"* b y officials dl b tbe United Kir.gdom W» «*^couatry. too. the rertlv ur.a^r its ontrrl t^teen felt. The city beedTXor strict relation .J* i*«^ . ■ a cf Brunswick. Oa £*i*"sS£ engaged in *=hip cf COO ic.T every nnn or x>er»-. hrh <>r Z'.tf. ard r^'J ior e\ery *^ n \ nat th * fame dr> pawn tinws as crea^ ""ZTTviCETO ATLANTIC THROUGH TRAIN' pYr? »-_ vn-k via Pennsyl fceave X7eit =M/ireet *«kV" »•• week days, rania Railroad. •^-fc.^tnVTleave Atlantic :CIJ. :« a. m. .Sundays. 536 p- "iSSSBi ■ : The new 35111 V V-* <*>or* doe* th.s *\\ T * _*<, Tork Cental and te*%££ to the busy man wao Ud effect, a er«-*t SJiitofl Wesv-Adn. irkveli Utwcea tH»_E^ — * PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT SPEAKING OX IBS VIRTUE OF <;OOD CITIZENSHIP AT LA CROSSE. WIS, LAST SATIT.I'W. HORSES DASH IXTO RIVER. Valuable Team Drowned — Narrowly Misses Car and "Auto." A handsome team of horses, valued at $1,200 and attached to a brougham, ran away from in front of the Lambs clubhouse, No. 70 West Thirty-slxth-st.. last night, and, after bolting through the streets to the East River, knock ing down and slightly injuring a woman, dashed into the river off the pier. Both horses were drowned. The team belonged to a liveryman at Lexlng ton-ave. and Thirty-third-Ft. Samuel Springer had driven a patron to the Lambs clubhouse, and as waiting for him to come out. The horses were spirited and restless. An auto mobile whizzed by and the team bolted. As the horses sprang forward Springer made an effort to climb to his seat from the side walk, where he had been standing. He was thrown to the pavement and received a slight scalp • ound. At Fifth-aye. there was an au tomobile, in which were seated four people, speeding uptown. The team and brougham just missed striking the machine as they dashed acros3. Th* horses continued through Thirty-sixth-st., and at Third-aye. ran so close to a trolley car that the motorman had all he could do to bring his car to a stop. As it was. the brougham just grazed the front of the car. With nothing to check their career, the ani mals ran on toward the Bast River. At the end of Thfrty-sixth-st. there hi a long pier. Onto this the horses bolted. One wheel of the brougham, a stoutly built vehicle, caught against one of the piles at the end and held fast. The jar almost threw the horses from their feet, but they kept on. the harness snap ping in half a dozen places and freeing them from the carriage. . .;. =sL-i*. Free from the weight of the vehicle the team seemed to start forward faster than ever, and ■without checking- the least or seemingly trying to avoid going off the pier the two animals dashed into the river. One of the ferryboats plying between Forty-second-st., Manhattan, and Broadway, Brooklyn, was passing at the time, and was just off the pier. The swells caused by the boat are supposed to have swept the two horses under. Policemen Kahlin and Goldner. of the East Thirty-flfth-st. station, got a row boat and went out to search for the ani mals. They rowed about for some time, but found no trace of them. At the livery stable it was said the horses were valued at $1,200 and the vehicle at $1,000, the latter being little damaged. It could not be learned who had engaged the team and driver. FLEISCHMA NN ELECTED. j Republicans Again Carry Cincinnati — Johnson Wins in Cleveland. Cleveland, April The municipal elections in J this State to-day are of special interest, be j cause of the bearing they have on State and j national affairs. The elections are under a new code recently enacted by the legislature, and the successful candidates will be in control for two years, with no holdovers. It Is expected that they will be able to exercise a large influence in i the contest next autumn, when a fall State I ticket will be elected. Including a legislature ' which will choose a successor to Senator Hanna, i so that Mr. Hanna's return to the Senate is i thought to depend somewhat on the result to- I day. In addition to this, Tom Johnson, who Is run i ning for Mayor here on the Democratic ticket, i and M. E. togalls. who Is running on a fusion i ticket, in Cincinnati, are both out for the Demo ' cratic nomination for Governor in th«= autumn, I and it is believed that each will be a candidate '■ f ( .T that party's nomination for President next ! year Apparently Mr. Johnson will have a large ! advantage over Mr. EngaHs. as his re-election ' fTf.«rrs assured. Eighty-five precincts out of : two hundred give him 14..V*. while Mr. Goulden. ! the Republican candidate, has only '.».:'..-. and I Johnson has made steady gains since the count ' ing began. la Cincinnati, on the other hand, with only a i Fcore of precincts to be heard from. Mayor I Fleischmann. Republican, who is a candidate for i re-election, has 36.883 votes, to Mr. Ingallss i 22 \~ Columbus. Ohio, April 6.-Robert H. Jeffrv (Ren) is elected Mayor over John N. Htakle ( Dem.Vthe present incumbent. b>> about l.*o. Hamilton. Ohio. April -Mayor Bosch and th * Democratic city ticket were re-elected by an average of "400. making no material change in the local political situation. Warren. Ohio. April 6.-M. J. Sloan. Republi can, for Mayor, and the entire Republican ticket are elected. Dayton. Ohio.- April G.-Wlth a heavy vote, due "to the change of official tenure under the a» tH« city will re-elect Mayor Snyder new code SSiSyfeOO majority, and th- great ,l,eir. . , V,f the remainder of the Democratic tTcSTbr i narrow majority. The city Is nor mally Democratic. BOTH PARTIES CLAIM CHICAGO ELECTION .^^f c —Estimates by Republican and Chicago April^ € t asanssTsra aa the result of to- DWa ° C^ !c,« TX* are SS vot«i apart. Chalr . morrow » CUT .., Democratic CNtv Committee de : man Care> ° v r Harrison is certain of re-election ! cla.-"* that a >° r fl , rmftn " Revell of the Republican ;b y W.OM. and cha that GraeJM . wart wili have j committee asserw i ( Da niel J. Crulce, the inde a plurality 01 candidate, also cx D re S w«> himself as ■ pendent bY a*>out **» VlnraMy. CGI*. *- t . .^viiVT OF FLORIDA LIMITKD 1 , 1S <- NT.N A ijwjjj3« SERVICE. I v- - V rfc f -!<i Florida Special, Southt-rnß The >**« J or * the ft- Augustine equipment of j palm "° ! "5 d J?,"^ i .." umired via the Pennsylvania. UilrST and SgglW "«• ?■ * d^^tinued I Jiter April •.-*<»»:. „ - NEW- YORK. TUESDAY. APRIL 7. 1903 -FOURTEEN PAGES-^^S^^SSb*** IERROR IN MONASTIR. ,17,7. JJ7/O C^JV, GET OUT. Fleeing Even to America — Mace donian Agents Active. (Special (a The Mjew-Tarii Tribune by French Cable.) <Copvrlcht: 1903: By The Tribune Association.) Monastir. Macedonia, April 6. — A veritable reign of terror exists here. The ♦own is filled With Turkish troops — infantry, cavalry and artillery — and the entire population- which, is not Bulgarian is armed for self-protection. The Bulgarians would be arrested if they carried arms openly, but many are secretly armed. Emissaries from Macedonian bands, after meet ing with little success in their attempts to enroll recruits here for a general uprising, have adopt ed drastic measures. Their committees come into town, despite the presence of the Turkish troops, in strong force, and they cannot be kept out. Their expedients for annmg the sympa thizers whom they secretly enlist are remarkably ingenious. There was a funeral procession, for instance, from the country with a priest at the head, and mourners and boys burning incense behind him. The coffin was buried, but at night the grave was robbed by the raw recruits of the committee, and in place of a corpse was a sup 1 ly of nrins and ammunition. Secret conscript officers visit the Bulgarians who have not enlisted and demand their signa tures to an oath to rise at the appointed time and also an ammunition tax is levied on general principles on every man. according to hfs ability to pay. Those who refused, under the obliga tion of loyalty to the Sultan, were shot down if the emissaries could readily escape, or otherwise were mark- out for secret assassination at long range by sharpshooters. Money is exacted In this way not only from Bulgarians, but also from Turkish and Greek residents of Monas'ir for the purchase of ammunition, with which the 1 evolutionists are inadequately supplied for a general uprising, a large consignment from France and Germany having been recently dis covered and confiscated by the Bulgarian Gov ernment at the Macedonian border. The Bulgarians being proportionately weaker in number than the Turks. Greeks and Al banians in Monastir nave tried to remain loyal to the Sultan, but they are completely terrorized and paralyzed, with the revolutionists threat ening them with death unless they consent to arm themselves and with Turkish soldiers ready to shoot or imprison them if caught with arms in their possession. All who can pay the heavy charges for permits to leave the country, after giving bonds for their return, are deserting the town. Many refugees, under advice of the American missionaries, are heading for the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Tsilka. with the famous brigand baby, have already started for Ne^-York with a number of fugitives. I talked with them here, and learred that they exj return ultimately %22SSS2S2SZ work Mr Tsilka Is a reformed Albanian, but his wife' is a Bulgarian, and her brother is now ?n a Turkish prison, having been arrested as a suspect. . TO RISE ON APRIL Dote for General Insurrection in European Turkey. London, April fi. -According to an agency dis patch from Constantinople, advices had been received there from Monastir that the Mace donian Revolutionary Committee Intends to pro 2S a general Insurrection in tje European ESS ElTMSrtliwll be .ore than «Se hundred thousand men armed with rifles and dynamite bombs in the field. WOODBTJKY KANE MADE ILL. Drank Disinfectant. Thinking It Was Dis tilled Water. Bristol R. L, April G.-It became known here to-day that Captain Woodbury Kan-, who to a guest of C. Oliver Iselin. on the tender sunbeam, had an unpleasant experience with «**-*» fectant which he drank by mistake for distilled water on Saturday night, and physicians ser vices were needed to relieve his distress. To nigS Captain Kane had recovered "is usual *£& ■ . -,, re he realized that it was r.ot comatose sia.e^ ; pr aT _ treaVi£nt To-day he recovered rapidly, and "Int to Newport to-night with Mr. Iselin s party. __, MORE GOOD NAVAL GUNNERY Admiral Evans- Reports Great Improvement in the Asiatic Fleet. Washington. April 6 -Rear Admiral Evans com manding the Asiatic Station, ha* reported to the ; Navy Iv rtm,..t the records made by his fleet in recent target practice. Taking Into consideration the fact that 30 per cent of the gunners were fresh material, the scores are considered excellent Ad ' miral Evans calls attention to the increased Inter est shown by the men in target practice, especially In sub-calibre shooting-, which has come to be ' known H "pine-pong" practice. Practice with ! th,?! Wich battery showed the' greatest Increase In lffl-1 • v from 1.33 hit* prr sun a minute, to M 4. Tt?«e was little wild shotting, and few of the ihotM wer.t wide 4 the target. LOW RATES TO THE PACIFIC COAST. The Sew York Central will sell any day until An"l SSth tickets to the Pacific Coast st from ISO to»ia Colonist fleepln* cars from Albany. Inquire fit Ticket _A*eats.— AdvU v— — — ~ - UDELL URGES ACTION. MORTGA GE TA X A 111 ?SES. Legislature Asked to Devise Some Suitable Plan: [bt teleohaph to the TKinrsE 1 Albany. April •>.— Governor Odell sent a m? able message to the legislature to-night re garding the taxation of mortgages. Its open ing sentence: "The necessity for a more e<-jui table system of taxing mortgages, rr for tK«>ir total exemption from taxation. Is perhaps more apparent to-day than ever before in the history of the State.'" Instantly attracted the attention of the Senators and Assemblymen, and tv tently listened to the reading of the dr--ument. It can reasonably be suspected that the Gov ernor took all his spare time between the ad journment of the legislature last Friday and its meeting again to-night in the preparation of the message. In effect, the message is an appeal to the legislature not to adjourn without passing some act amending the Mortgage Tax law. He declares that there can be no doubt that mort gages arc now unjustiy taxed in some-locali ties and permitted to escape taxation in others He reviews his own recommendations to the legislatures of 1901, 1902 and 1988 concerning mortgage taxation, and says frankly that he considers his recommendation of the present year, that a tax of four mills be impon mortgages, a? the least meritorious of the three mortgage tax propositions he h.is made, although

this proposition was adopted b] a. majority of the Republican Senators and Assemblymen in caucus. Yet. from the recent act. on of the Republicans of the Assembly, it would seem that "this proposed legislation was again lo be bandon* d, and that the same unfair, inequita ble and unjust discrimination was to be con tinued during the next year." The Republican leaders ;n rh» Senate and As sembly, when asked late this < vning if any measure had yet been drawn to r,i-ry out the Governor's recommendation in his message that some action be t.-ik"p. to sutrect evils in the present system, sa'.d they were not aware that any such measure was in existence. The -■ t..rs were still considering the bill which was rejected by the AasemUlfineu last week, while the Assemblymen were debating the mci a real estate conveyance tax measure, which was submitted to them last week, which it «as said would place .< !.."»(.« •,<_* «"• m the State Treas ury. It wns dear that the Governor's mess.-.ge was a surprise, and that few <<t the Repub lican leaders in the legislature knew that he had any int-ntlon of sending in such a meSr ta^e. Any measure which may be framed to carry out the Governor's suggestions In his message will probably, therefore, not be made public before to-morrow. The Republican Assemblymen were to have held a caucus to-night upon the proposed real estate conveyance tax bill, but while the was held it was only a nominal one. After a moment's session an adjournment was : and the motion adopted. No day was set for another caucus on a taxation measure. The Republican Sena* de cided last week to hold a caucus upon the bills to-morrow. To-day may bring forward some new mortgage tax bill, perhaps a tax on mort gages when they are recorded. The Governor's message follows: State of New-York. Executive Chamber. Albany, April C, 1903. To the Legislature: The necessity for a more equitable system of tax ing mortgages, or for their total exemption from taxation. Is perhaps more apparent to-day than ever before in the history of the State. The discus sion which has followed the introduction of the measure which proposes to lay a tribute of four mills per annum upon all mortgages, while it may rot produce the result? desired, should at least •lead the legislature prior to Its adjournment to formulate a statute which will correct existing in equalities and give the color of law and authority of the legislature to such exemptions as are now only secured through open evasion of the law of failure of the assessors to perform the duties for which they were chosen. • Whether mortgages should be taxei or not Is an open question, considered either from the point of view of those who borrow or of those who lend. That they ar? now unjustly taxed in some locali ties and permitted to escape entirely in other? 13 a conclusion beyond th* peradventure of a doubt. Fither all mortgages should he taxed or none. Mortgages are th* representatives of tangible prop erty and if tangible property were assessed at its full" valuation there could be no question that to a certain extent their taxation would be double taxa tion Whatever the percentage of valuation the real' estate is or may be in a given locality, such additional value beyond the valuation of like un incumbered property is to that extent double valu ation and an inequitable system, which must neces ?arl!v become a burden upon th* borrower The converse however, of this proposition Is equally true— that if the total assessed valuation on a piver. locality should b* increased by including mort c-aees "subject to taxation, he who does not borrow would receive a corresponding benefit as well as the borrower himself, through a lower tax rate. PREVIOUS PROPOSED LEGISLATION. A «tudy of this situation led me in my first an nuarme«sase. under date, of January 1, IML to sug cest the exemption of all mortgages from taxation. The discussion which followed in the legislature led however, to the uncovering of facts which made the enactment of that recommendation into law a matter of extreme doubt, because in certain localities the burden upon both incumbered and unlncumbered real estate would have been In- P r*.a«<ed In my second annual message, recos ,.'•»'< re the force of this objection, and with the mbm dfslre to relieve those who were thus un rußtlv taxed. I suggested a recording tax. applying rm'lv to future mortgages, and In return for this recording tax an exemption from nil other forms of taxation This was opposed ry those who not orlv saw that it would lead to a lessening of the PHteanient rolls, but also an Identic! burden upon building operations in the greater cities. These objections were not overcome by a suggestion to ','.:„ over to the localities the full amount of the :"' a - i t whs alleged that In a certain few of the counties of the State even this revenue would not be «qual to that which they for*go under the pre*. lunllnnr.l on fourth |i*«r. F3tv to button and unbutton. Star buttoned. Jferer break. ICiil— nil One-Piece Collar Bonos*. — Advt. # Hone 41 NMM St.. offers Rich. High Cost Easter Teg* made of silk and fine porcelain. Nothing like £feia'thi3 Sid* cf Parts.— AdvU ANGMT CUBANS. Duel Man Follow Quarrel of Congressmen. [BT CAKt-E TO TITE TKIBTT«.I (Ccpyrisht; 1I»<13 : By Tfce Trltmn* Awc>c:<its-n > Havana, April CL— While th* House of Repre sentatives was awaiting President Falm.Vs mes .■age this afternoon. Congrrssmen Villuendas and . usMsdla exchanged angr>' word? a^->ut a question of order. Villuendas called C.armetidia a "little, rude, ugly person and a clown." ' ■• mendia challenged VUtaendaa to into the street and f.ght. Vi!lu-n las sr*rii« up and ran tov\L -1 C.armcndla. but ■••■"" men before rkey g^t x geth*r. ' sjassfsi named Congressmen Bor,:--* and Castillo as his seconds, and it ■ believed a lu-I wffl be fought to-night or to-morrow. CUBAN CONGRESS REASSEMBLES President Palma Sends in a 12.000 Word Message. Havana. April I — Congress reassembl*d at '. o'clock this afternoon and will probably con tinue in session for three extra months on ac count of the necessity for the enactment of many laws before all the departments of the government get thoroughly under way. These measures include approval of th* naval station agreement and ■ permanent treaty covering Cuba's political relations with th<> United States; laws dealing with municipal government and defining the duty and authority of Cabinet of ficers, both the latter laws including the Ques tion as to how far the general government shall continue to supersede the local governments in matters of sanitation and other public works; laws concerning gold and silver coinage, divorce and revision or the court system and ■■". tariffs. A message from President Palma contain tag 12.000 words was read at the opening ses sion. The President congratulates th* coun try on the maintenance of peace and order since the strikes .last November. He says that the scheme of reorganization of the rural guard has been begun, and advises a reform of the military laws', which, he says, are not adapted to a republican form of government, especially with reference to the Jurisdiction over soldiers guilty of penal offences. The President says that negotiations have been completed providing for the entrance of Cuba in the Postal Union and for special arrangements with the United States and Mexico, and he advises an entire re construction of the postal and telegraph s>s terns The majority of the municipalities, continues President Palma. exist with difficulty, because th. <r revenues are inadequate. Th.- guvernm^nt feels that further iis.«istan< * to the muni<Mpal ....... rases Is unauthorized beyond pay- Ing the expense* of charities, s« -hools ar.d pris ons, and the obligations of the municipalities cannot continue to be met unless Congress spe- Ciflttilly authorizes the government to act in this mattter Th" work of sanitation, as at pres ent conducted by the government, is DOl In har mony with the constitution. Since the Platt amendment rnak^s the government responstb!* for sanitation, it i? urged that an art covering the work of sanitation be passed. Th* message states that Cuba has now rlv* diplomatic ar.d seventy-eight consular representatives and that the government is considering various extradi tion treaties and the commercial treaty pro posed by Great Britain. Th* message then says: Our relations with th* United States con tinue to be close and cordial. Much more grati fying is the noble and rt-solutely favorable atti tude of the President of that great republic. It Is enough to remember the obstacles which his stubborn will ha' overcome in ■ Hating the reciprocity treaty ard obtaining the ratifi cation thereof, ar.d his firm, purpose to summon a special session of Congress to definitely ap prove it. Besides the sympathy and respect which we inspire among the American people by our exemplary conduct as an independent people who realize th* duties and Abilities of citizenship. th*s* circumstances powerfully con tribtit" in solidifying th^ good understanding be tween both nations. It is in our interest to cultivate worthily these sentiments, and we cannot do so better than by carrying OUt our obligations to the Washington Government, expeditiously. frankly and correct ly whether it be by granting what we ought to grant or fusing what we consider ourselves justified in refusing. It is" unnecessary to re call the fact that In the r.aval station agree mont which is in th* hands of the Senate, the United States has obtained sites at Ouantanamo and Bahia Honda, after siting all for Nipe and C'ienfuegos. It being Impossible to elude carry ing out our duty In accordance with th* Platt amendment, the executive belicvep that the con vention has been made the ri'jst favorable pos sible, and recommend? a speedy approbation, so that' it may be possible to negotiate an addi tional agreement to establish th* rric* " f the leases and other conditions ar-d details regulat ing the possession of th- stipulated areas of land and water. . _ The government is at present occupied with th" Isle of Pines matter, and It has reason Is rope that the settlement thereof will be satis factory to Cuba. President Palma further expresses the hope that the question of incorporating into th* treaty all the provisions of the Platt amend ment will soon be settled, and adds that after this has been done It will seem unnecessary that the Platt amendment should remain any longer a part of the constitution. It la therefore neces sirv to hasten the permanent dennement of Cuba's relations with the United States so as to eliminate the Platt amendment problem. President Palma points out that the fash b*l snre at the Treasury amounts to $2,»w!i\O *». and advise- that it should always be k*pt at ci -,(■>(»■«• to prepare for ».mergenc!es. He rec ommends 'overcoming the scarcity of silver by the coinage of silver or any measure that Con gress may consider opportune. AJ> L WESTERN HEALTH RESORTS «-» „- or reached via the Rock Island ■ ; '' m - rvJtnrado California. Hot Springs. Ark ni -vet*' and berths at uptown office. Jsth St. and Filth Aye.. al=o at ''- Broadway.— Advi. THROUGH TRAINS TO THE WEST. Eight dally, via Pennsylvania Railroad, connect ing for all Points a* far a* the Pacific Coast Cssr «uit tliaa tables.— Advu PRirK THREE CENTS. PRESIDENT SPEEI»S rt\. ACMOSS SOI Til I) IK< >T I. He Makes Thrive Speeches, and Is Warmly lVelco'med. Aberdeen S. D. April 6.— President Roosevelt to-day traversed Pouth Dakota and mad* more speeches than on any other day of Mi present trip. He be^an with two addrt—es at Sioux Falls this morning and made the twelfth speech this evening at Aberdeen. He confined himself for the most part to the tariff an.l the r.en*.-al prosperity of the country, follow ir.«; *!osHy th* lines of his former addresses on these subjects. He was cordially welcomed at all the stopping places, and at many stations where tn» train did not stop crowds gathered ar.fl cheered. One feature of "the day was th» larife i ssssssi at children in the audiences, and the President re ferred to them several times, saying that ha was) (tl.id to see that the stock was not d '-.«; out- He had as h1» puests during the ! ••• Senator* Klttredsre ami Gamble, and Representative* Martin and Bnrke. the South Dakota d»l-c^tlon in ConsT»!«« They left th» train at Aberdeen. At Tulare the President d*rart»>i from ■■■ usual custom, »nd. leaving his cir. shook hands with th» people at th* 1 station. Ql-'ALITIES OF GOOD CITIZENSHIP. Yanktnn was th* first stop aft*r the tr^in left Blosil Falls. To the m iltltud* th*re the Presi dent spoke on th* tart.T. and the Qualities of Rood citizenship, saying: It has be?n a real pleasure tr» «••-• you and I c»n sum up all 1 ha\# to say to you tn Just % coup!* of phrases. You re»-l v»t»f "a-.v«. i** 1 * that you j;et them. You n«^d.hon*st administra tion of the laws. Fee that >"a h*\* It. Hut «1<» not make the mistake of tonkin* that any law (it nr.y administration of th* law can t«4ke th* pl.ir»» of fundam*ntai qua!ltl<r-* that make a r^vl Individual citizenship and make a &**% nation. the qualities of honesty, of cotxra«e and of c«xx* common sense. At MltchfU the Present m»d» th«* !"ncr*t Mbsm of the <!ay. Ills audience «as :«•;• and his sf>e«-h *»■)■ fr^juently interrupted by apptati**. ll»r» he discussed th« w<rlt of •,"■;. vtduals and th» important parr thej rlay In 1710 upbuilding if the nation. •"You can It ft up a> man If hi *tarr.t.>." h* *ald. "hut if he Da d*>+ r\ you cannot carry MSB. If you try to d"> ■» It wIH not help him. and U win not help f«t*?9ow fundamentally. It mtm rest upon your*»lf to win ... I «a!d. taw ran do »nme:hin*: wise l»$)»!atlon. wise admlr.l«tratkT. of th» 50V »rnm»nt, can do semethtnc If >■ v ha%« had laws badly administered, thpy will spoil any prosperity. It Is easy enough t>> ct a f>i»J la*, but to «f( a good law It I* not tasy. It :- *a«y to «It outside and My h«>« the man \nmUtm should run th» machine, but It Is not »o eaay to go Inside and run the machine yourself. PROSPERITY AND THE TARIFF. "This prosperity to »h!ch we have attained has been reach I under a ?ert«-» of economic moves included In a system, through a carry lnjf out of certain ideas In th.> « urr-»a y and in the tariff. We cannot afford to revers* the system. Improvement tan be made In It la the tariff, for Instance. *fhr<iuies are not sa cred, and as th» needs of the nation «har.«« ar.4 shift It will be necessary to change ccrtala schedules to meet those shiftir.g needs." The other stops of the clay vere. ma2e at \Voonso. ket. Scotland. Trlpp. Parkston. \; ■ • 1. and Rvdfield. There is a possibility of the President's *p*nd inK a day in Deadwood. S. D. He h.is m-nlc * conditional promise to Taptaln Seth Bullixrlt. who will travel with hsm h^ f^r as H'lMnir*, Mont., that If th" snow is too cW-p in Yellow stone Park he wiu leavt there un» day earlier than he h.id Intended ami spend a day at Dead wood. Bullock has promised the President a> Rood time and is p!ai nir.g a r^suUr cowboy Jol lification. The Pr*s!t!»nt is scheduled to arrive at FarK<\ N I. ;,:••■• o'clock tomorrow mornlns. but h* will not leave his car until t» »» «.«lwk- At Fargo he will deliver one of the longest npe*<-r.«"» of his tour. H<* will sper.d To-morrow in North Dakota and will ent«>r the Yellowstone Paris Wednesday tttmoon. I \ Dt'STRI.U. riiOHLEMS. President Speaks to the Wage Worker and the Farmer. Pioux Falls. S. D., April «.— President r.~.«* v*lt spoke h*re this morning on 'The Was* Worker and the Tiller of th* SoiL" He said: Fellow citiz*ns: There ar* many, many Ir#» ser problems whUh g<» to make up in their en tirety the hug* ami complex problem! of our modern Industrial life. Each of these problems Is. moreover, ton lift Xi with many of the oth ers. Few ind*-»d ar* simple or t>tand only by themselves. The most important ar* th»>*e. CO&nected with the relation c >t ttm farmers. the stock growers and soil tillers v the com munity at large, and thos»- aff-cting th.- rela tions between employer and employed. In a country like ours it la fundamentally tru* that th* well being "f the tiller of th* soil and the wagework'-r is tb* w*ll being of the Stat*. If they ar«- well off. th»-n »* n»-*d con ■ em ourselves but little as to how oth»?r classes stand, for they will inevitably be w«0 off. too; and. on the oth»-r hand. th»*r* can be no r«*iil genet prosperity unifss bas*d on th»- f>Wlß»t>* tion of th» prosperity of the wageworkrr and the tiller of th<- ?oiL THE NEEDS OF THE FARMER But the needs of th«>s* two cl.i^m »r» oftrn not the sam*. Th" ti!l-*r of th<» soil has of all our citizens th<- on- on the wholfl th* l».i.*t affected in hi" ways »T life ard method* of in dustry by the giant rndustria! dUUtgej of the last half century. Th"r- ha* b*en change with him. too, of course. He also ran work to best advantage if he ke*>is in clos* tourh with his fellows: and th** suriess »>f th* n;itional De partment cf Agriculture has «hown how much can b* don* f<ir him by rational action of the government. Nor is it only through th* d*- I>artment that th«> govrrnm*>pt can act. On* of the greatest and most b*nerU-f-nt measures passed by th* !ast Cor.gre*.«. or lnd*M by any Congress In recent years, is the Irrigation act. which will do for the States of th» great plains and the Rocky Mountain region at !e3st as much a* ever has been done for the States «.. the humid region by river and harbor improve ments. Few measures that hay* N»*n put upon the statute books cf th* nation hay* done ■en for th* people than this law wffl. I rtrm!y believe, directly and indirectly accomplish for the States in question. AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT WORK. Th» Department of Agriculture devotes Its whol- energy to working for the welfare of farmers and stock growers. In every section of our country it aids them in their constantly increasing search for a better agricultural edu cation. It helps not only them, but all the na tion in seeing that our exports of meats ha»» clean bills of health, and that there is a rigid inspection of all meats that enter into inter -tate commerce Thirty-eight million carcasses were Inspected during the last (Wai year. Our stock growers sell $43hfiO0t!0OO worth of livestock annually, and these animal* must be kept healthy, or else our people will lorn their trade. Oar export of plant products to foreign coun tries amounts to over ?»>»>.<rj«>.««.»> a year, and there Is no branch of its work to which the Department of Agriculture devotes more care. Thus the department has bevii successfully In troducing a macaroni wheat from the head waters of the Volga, which grows successfully in ten inches of rainfall, and by this means wheat growing has been successfully extended westward Into the semi-arid region. T»o mill ion bushels of this wheat were grown last year, and. belns suited to dry condition*, it i-aa t« used for forage as well as for food for cnan. The Department of Agriculture has be«n belp- THE PEN* OF THE CRITIC ran find no fault with the Mu:pm»« of the !*■■■ «yrvania Limited. Leaves 2*e*-Xoxk tor Caic*« *ad St. Uovlß.—

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