7 Nisan 1903 Tarihli Omaha Daily Bee Gazetesi Sayfa 1

7 Nisan 1903 Tarihli Omaha Daily Bee Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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1 HK UMAHA U. DEE. ' J:STAIILIS1IED JUNE 19, 1871. OMAHA, TUESDAY MORNING, f APRIL 7, 1903-TEN PAGES. SINGLE COPY THREE CENTS. A JL JL jL LABOR LAWS SEEDED Pre Ident Wishes to r3ee ChiH Worten Pro tec'.edby Prohibitcry Lfgidttioo. CONGRESS MIGHT FRAME MODEL CODE District of Columbia Ehonll Set Pice for States to Follow. UNCHANGING FARMER GETS ASSISTANCE repayment of AgTionltnn Shows How to Improve Methods. SPECIAL SPEEDS THROUGH DAKOTAS Roosevelt Begins Labor with Early Mornlnar S perch Before Leaving (or Fara-o had Interme diate Stations. ABERDEEN, S. D.. April . President Roosevelt today traversed South Dakota and mad mora speeches than In any one day since his tour began. Ha began with two speeches at Sioux Falls this morning and ended hla twelfth speech thla evening at Aberdeen. He was accorded a cordial welcome at his different stopping places and at many sta tions where the train did not stop crowds gathered and cheered as It sped by. One feature of the day was the large number of children In the various audiences, and the president referred to them several times, eaylng that he was glad to sae that the stock was not dying out. The president had as his guests during the day Senators Klttredge and Gamble and Representatives Martin and Burke, the South Dakota delegation In congress. They left the train at Aberdeen. At Tulare the president departed from 'his usual custom and, descending from his cr, shook, hands with the people gathered at the station. Other stops of the day were made at Woonsocket, Scotland, Tripp, Parkston, Al pena and RedDeld. There Is a possibility of his spending a day In Dead wood, S. D. He has promised Captain Bullock that If the snow Is too deep In the Yellowstone park he will leave thnro one day earlier. A do preniueui vuufuuivu 10 arrive ki Fargo, N. D., at 4:40 tomorrow, but will oqi leave nis car uum o;ou. n win ipeaa the day in North Dakota and will enter the Tellowatone park on Wednesday afternoon. Begins Bright and Karly. SIOUX FALLS, S. D., April .Presi dent Roosevelt began the second week of his tour In a Strenuous way. He rose early feeling much refreshed from yester ' day's rest and at 7:50 started on a drive with Secretary Loeb, Senator Klttrldge and Mayor Burnalde. Despite the early hour and dreary weather the streets were lined with people. The president arrived at the big auditor ium, where he addressed 4,000 people. VI believe la work ssd I believe tn play," said the president. "I would be sorry sot to see you enjoy yourselves, but do not let play interfere wljh.w.qrXJpo things -quickly and cheerfully." Boys, remember the roan Iter you wish to be the nicer you can af ford to be at home. I would be ashamed of a boy who was a bully to the weak. When you play be" fair, but play hard and then work hard at your studies. If you get hurt keep on playing. Work with your whole heart In all things." As ' the ' president left the auditorium he was greeted with tremendous applause, He was driven rapidly to the stand which had been erected, where a crowd of 6.000 people had assembled. The president sopke on "The Wage Worker and the Tiller of the Soil." He was frequently Interrupted by applause. During his speech snow began to fall, but the president was clad in a heavy overcoat and was well pro tected. He said he was glad to be again In the "banana belt," which created laugh l ter. I Complex Industrial Problems. V The president said: There are many, many teaser problems which go to make up In their entirety the huge and complex problems of our modern Industrial Ufa. Each of these problems Is, moreover, connected with miinv of thai nth. ers. Few indeed are simple or eland only by themselves. , The most Important art those connected with the relation of the farmers, tne stock growers and soli tillers to the community at larae. and those af. feeling the relations between employer and 1 employed. In a country like ours It Is sunaameiitally true that the well-being of f the tiller of the soil and the wage-worker I Is the well-being of the state. If they are well off, then we need concern ourselves nut little as to how other clttHses stand lor they will Inevitably be well off. too and, on the other hand, there can be no real general protperlty unless based on the Ruuuuuun oi me prosperity or tne wage- vturarr ana me liner OI tne soil. Nerds of Classes Different. But the needs ot these two classes are often Hot the same. The tiller nf th .nil h been of all our citizens tha one on the wnoio tne least a reeled in Ms ways of life ami meinoiia or industry oy the giant In dustrial changes of the last half centurv There has been change with him, too. of course, lis also can work- In. Leaf a ,uu n tuke If h- keeps In close touch with his fellow; and the success of the national De partment of Agriculture has shown how much can be done for him bv rational ac tion of the government. Neither Is It only through the department that the govern ment can act. one of the greatest and most beneficent measures paaxeu by the last con gress, or Indeed by any congress In recent years, la the Irrigation act, which will do for the states of the great plains and the Hocky mountain region at least as much as ever has been done for the states of the humid n ylon by river and harbor Improve ments, lew meaajrea that huve been put upon the statute books of the nation have clone jnore for the people limn this law will, I firmly believe, directly and Indt l tctly accomplish for the states in oues tlon. The Department of Agriculture devotes Its whole energy to working for the wel fare ot farmers and stock growers. In every section of our country t aids them In their constantly Increasing search for btter agricultural education. It helps not only Hum, but all tha imiiun In seeing that our exports of meats huve clean bills of health, and that there l rigid inspection Of all aim I a that enter Into Interstate ,-nra. eioca growers sen w&.uou.omi worth of live stock annually, and these animals must be kept healthy or elxe our people will lje their trade. Our export of plant products to foreign countries amounts to over $ OOO.Ool a year Mini there la no branch of Its work to which the Department f Agricult ure devotes more car.. Thus the depart ment has been succtsf ully introducing a macaroni wheat from tha headwaters of the Volga, which arows sucieseruiiv in ten Inillea of rainfall, and bv thla in a na X wheat-growing has been successfully ex- lenutm wvaiwara into semi-aria region. Two million buxhels of this wheat were grown lat year, and lielutc suited to dry condition It can be used tor forags as wall as tor food for man. Aids Frnlt Mrs to Sell Abroad. The Department of Agriculture haa been helping our fruit men to eatahl sh markets abroad by studying methods of fruit pres ervation through refrigeration and through methods of handling and nacklna. tin th-. ?olhTOrtrn a'rl- t iltabla to the region was Imported from ICootlnued oa Second Page.) BIG TASKS BEF0RE CUBA Coasress Ft a a Three Months Extra Work atraift-htealBc Ont Gov eminent System. HAVANA, April - Congress reassembled this afternoon and will probably continue In session three er'" months on account of the necessity to "ng many lawa be fore an tne aepw '', t tne govern ment get their polity vy y. The measure Include.. J ' ' of the naval station agreement a O -anent treaty covering Cuba's politK ns with the United States; laws deav., municipal government and deflnliv , duties of cabinet officers; laws concertK.g gold and sliver coinage, divorce and re vision of the court system and customs tariffs. A message from President Palma was read at the opening session. He congratu lated the country on the maintenance of peace and order since the strike last No vember. The system of reorganisation, he said, had begun and advised a reform of the military laws, which were not adapted to a republican form of government, es pecially with reference to the Jurisdiction over soldiers guilty of penal offenses. The president says negotiations have been completed providing- tor the entrance of Cuba Into the postal union and for special arrangements with the United States and Mexico, and he advises an entire recon struction of the postal telegraph system. He codtlnues: The majority of the municipalities exist ith difficulty because their revenues are inadequate. The government feels that runner asnlstance In many cae Is un authorised, beyond paying the expenses of charities, schools and prions, but the ob ligation of thu municipalities cannot con tinue to oe met unless congress spec.ncnuy authorizes the aovernment to act. Tne work of sanitation, as at present conductei oy the government, is not in harmony with the constitution. Since the Piatt amendment makes the government reepon- siDie tor sanitation, it is urged tnat an act covering the work of sanitation be passed. It Is unnecessary to reoall the fact that In the naval station agreement which Is In the hands of the senate, the United State has obtained sites at Guantanamo and Bflhla Honda, after asking alr-o tor Nlpe and Clenfuegos. It being Impossible to evade carrying out our duty in accord ance with the Piatt amendment, the execu tive believes that tha convention has been made as favorable as possible, and recom mends a speedy approbation, so 'hut it may be pors.ble to negotiate an additional agreement to establish the price of the leases and otner conditions. It la necessary to hasten the permanent definition of Cuba's relations with the United States, so as to eliminate the Piatt amendment problem, which la keeping Cuba at present In a state of political un certainty. President Palma points out that the cash balance of the treasury amounts to $2,638,- 000, and advises that it should always he kept at $1,500,000 to prepare tor emer gencies. He recommends overcoming the scarcity of silver by the coinage of silver or any measure that congress may support. MRS. HORACE PORTER DEAD Wife of the American Amhaaaador to France Dies gaddenly of a Chill. PARIS, April 6. Mrs. Horace Porter, wife of the American ambassador here, died sud denly today. The death occurred at S o'clock of con gestion, following a chill. The death of Mrs. Porter came with great Suddenness, -making the -sturck ' to' th am bassador doubly severe. She returned from Switzerland only a few days ago after a stay of some weeks there for her health. Mrs. Porter appeared much Improved in health, but was still suffering from In fluenza, which finally brought on a chill. This tn turn developed into inflammation of the lungs, but it was not until today that her condition was regarded as serious. She gradually failed, however, until the end came. General Porter, Mrs. Porter's brother, General Wlnslow, and the at tending physicians were at the bedside. The ambassador Is completely prostrated. KINGS DON FOREIGN DRESS Edward Wears Portugese Uniform and Carlos British Military Clothes at Boll Fl(bt, LISBON. April 6. King Edward and King Carlos, accompanied by the Queen Dowager Maria Pla, Don Alfonso, the king's brother, and their suites attended a bull play called a "tourade" this afternoon. The performance was hlgHly spectacular and, unlike the Spanish bull fight, none ot the animals or men was seriously hurt. ' King Edward wore a Portuguese uniform, while the king ot Portugal was attired in an English uniform. The rich . costumes worn by spectators and performers and the brilliant trappings and decorations created a picturesque scene, recalling the medieval tournaments. WILL KEEP POLITICS CLEAN British Minister Abont to Realm Be. canse of Connection with Indicted Company, l ovnov Anrll g.Raeanaa he 1. a M. rector of a financial syndicate now before the courts, William Hays Fisher, M. P., financial secretary of the treasury, 'is ex pected to resign his portfolio. Will Not Call Oat Reserves. BELGRADE, Servla. April . The cab inet has decided to refrain from calling out the reserves until the necessity for strengthening the frontier guards becomes more apparent. WILL PACK ANGORA" GOATS Texas aad Chicago Capitalists Ar rauare to Give Kansns City New Industry. KANSAS CITY, April 6. The Times will say tomorrow: Plans are well under way for the establishment ot an angora goat packing house tn Kansas City. The men identlhed with the new venture live in charter from Texas. The plant will be . Unn.ng and th. skins of the animals will be made Into robes from the angora fleece, which will give the carcass sn additional value. The company will establish the Iscteal branch of Us business somewhere In Texas, where angora milk will be condensed.. EXTRA SESSION FOR COLORADO Hons and leasts Deadlocked Over Appropriation BUI When Time Is Called. DENVER. April 7. At midnight, when the limit of time of the present session ot i the legislature was exhausted, the sensta 1 .A "r. ,he 'eD' i r" appropriation bill, vnleas ibis bill Is passea aa extra session will be onsvold- I able. BA1NBRIDCE UPHOLDS CHINA Refuses to Believe Alarmist Reports of Boxer Outbreaks. MAJOR CRUSE ORDERED TO CAPITAL Quartermaster Believe from Daty la Omaha la Order to terve Tem porarily at Headoaartera la Washington. (From a Staff Correspondent.) WA8HINQTON, April 6. (Special Tele gram.) Major Thomas Cruse, quarter master, has been relieved from duty at Omaha and ordered to Washington for tem porary duty In the office of the quarter master general. W. E. Bainbrldge of Council Bluffs, American secretary of legation at Pekln, discounts reports of a serious uprising In China. He has Just received a letter from Minister Conger in which no reference is made to trouble In the Celestial empire. Mr. Bainbrldge does not believe that there will be a repetition of the Boxer uprisings of a few years ago, and he Is inclined to doubt that any trouble is brewing which will necessitate the presence of a large fleet of the powers. "All reports so far,',' said Mr. Bainbrldge, "come from alarm ist sources In Shanghai. If there was any serious trouble ahead In China the State de partment would be apprised of It by Min ister Conger, and he baa evidently not made a report of the subject." The omnibus public buildings bill, passed during the closing hours of the last con gress, authorized the secretary of the treas ury to purchase a tract of ground lying im mediately west of the ground now own. id by the government in Council Bluffs. The ground so authorized to be purchased is thirty feet wide- and extends south from Broadway to the first alley south of that street. The act authorises the secretary to secure this additional tract provided 'he can purchase it at a sum not to exceed $7,500. The property sought to be secured Is owned by E. A. WIckham of Council Bluffs and the secretary of the treasury Is now engaged In negotiations with Mr, WIckham to secure the property within the limit fixed by congress. Routine of Departments. The Postofflce department today author ized the following promotions of postofflce clerks: Iowa Charles City, one from $500 to $600; Marshalltown, two from $500 to $600, one from $600 to $700, one from $1,000 to $1,100. South Dakota Lead, two from $600 to $800, one from $800 to $900. Charles A. Lutz has been appointed reg ular and Ray Hall substitute rural free delivery carriers at Perry, la. The Second National bank of Dubuque has been approved, as reserve agent for - the Commercial National bank of Waterloo, la. The postmaster at Havelock, Neb., has been authorised to moe the postofflce to the building owned by Phillip Hunt and Lewis Anderson. Captain Walter C. Short, Thirteenth cav alry, and Veterinarian Charles D. McMurdo, Tenth cavalry, have been ordered to Craw ford, Neb.,, to Inspect ten polo ponies for the quartermaster department. ' Postmasters appointed: Nebraska Zeb edee M. ' 8tout, CeryJ, Gosper county, .vice J. . VanJOrhoot, resigned: 1C11 C. lleck fier, Ware, Butler county, vice W. Kllgore, resigned. -Iowa J. M. Cook, Farley, Du buque county; D. ,H. Van Kirk. Swaledale, Cerro Gordo county. "'' These Iowa rural free delivery routes will be established July 1: Donnellson, Lee county, three routes; area covered, fifty-six square miles; population, 1,460. Elkader, Clayton county, three routes; area covered, seventy-one square miles; population, 1,500. Washington, Washington county, two addi tional routes; area covered, thirty-eight square miles: populstlon, 975. Test Russia's Good Faith. It Is Tactically admitted here' that the new commercial treaty between the United States and China has been, to one phase, especially designed' to' test the soundness of Russia's promise to maintain the open door In Manchuria. ' Ever since Russian occupation tn 1900 the province has been practically governed by the Russians, who have regulated all external trade, American exports of great value have entered Manchuria and as the State department had no mind to lose that trade to any other nation, it challenged Russia' fe purposes! and received speciflo promises that the open door would be main tained. The provision In the treaty, now under negotiation, declaring Moukden and Its port, Taku Shan, at the mouth of the Yslu river, open to foreign trsde affords the opportunity for the test. Nebraska Photos 'for 8t. Loal Fair. The bureau of education has arranged a unique exhibit at the : St. Louis fair to consist ot photographs of every school in each of a large number ot counties to be selected from various sections ot the coun try. The exhibit Is designed to represent the actual conditions of the schools of the United States, the features ot the teachers Bna P"P"s, wieir claming aoa.oaages. jve- b.r"!ta: New York Pennsylvania. Maryland. Virginia, norm Carolina, nansaa, lexas and California are among the states from which counties have been selected. Conl la Kootenai. Discovery of a large area of coal and petroleum land In the southeast Kootenai has been reported to the State department. Two hundred and twenty miles of territory have been staked off, most ot the locators being Americans. Cadets to Practice on Battlefield. The secretary of war has directed the first class ot cadets at the military academy, numbering ninety-four, to proceed to the battlefield of Gettysburg, Pa., about April 20 for three days' instruction in strategy and tactics. Ynloe Work oa Caanl. Admiral Walker, General Haines and Ma jor Black, the two latter of the corps ot engineers, will leave New York next Thurs day for Colon to appraise the value of work now In progress on the canal, which j "l"? up to the moment when the property comes into the actual possession of the United St-.tes. When the agreement to sell the canal was signed by Secretary Hay and Mr. Cromwell, there being no stipulation to the contrary, the company was not bound to continue the heavy dally expenditure on acoount ot labor and material and superintendence In volved In the conttnustton of the work. It Is claimed that such a suspension would have worked harm and have reaulted In the loss of a number of canal workers, who now have become experienced and inured to the climate. -The caral tympany under took to keep the work In progress and now looks to the United States for com pensation. The subcommittee Is going to ! h l"h'u - j work from ths time the contract was signed I up to tha date the United States aasumes Inp ta tt oaolxmi. BUCKET SHOPS' WIN CASE Jsdg Thinks Quotations on Grain tha Pnhllo. ST. LOUIS, April C Injunctions sought by the Chleago Board' of Trade to establish ownership of tha quotsttons on the future prices of grain and othe commodities were denied by Judge Adsms n the United States district court today i id the dealing la futures condemned. The injunctions were asked for In June, 1901, against the Dnovn A Cells Commis sion company of St. Louis. In the applica tion for the Injunction the Board of Trade alleged that the quotatii na for futures were given to tha telegraphy companies by the Board of Trade under- a contract which prohibited their sale ti bucket shops and that the firms named as defendants were bucket shops and were .not entitled to the quotations, which -re then beta delivered to them by some sgenrr unknown. The two oases brought for the purpose of making a teat were dismissed by Judge Adams. f In the decision Judge Adama said: . The main question argued and the one which underlies the whole rause is, whether the property right, which every complain ant may have in the continuous quotations In question. Is so tainted with urtsavorlness as to preclude resort to a court of equity by the complainant for his protection. "I am satisfied," reads tha opinion, "that many of the so-called sales for future de liveries which furnish, tha basis of the quotations are . merely ( gambling transac tions. " "The right to monopolise the speed In dissemination , of Information instructing the public, the price at, which wagers are made on future delivery of grain and other commodities by members ot the Board of Trade is continued." , Says Judge Adamsv The Information as to the actual deliv eries, would be very valuable to the public, but Information as to the wagers, In my opinion, has not a legitimate tendency to promote the commerce of the country,, but on the contrary to efltej the gambling propensity of the public. CHICAGO. April ' . President Chandler of the. board of trade, said ' the United Statea court at Kansas City had made an injunction permanent, taking the opposite view of ownership in the quotations, ' and the bucket shops had - appealed. As the Kansas City case had precedence, and wae now on Its way- to the court of appeals, the decision of Judge Adams would not be appealed from. PENNELL SHORT IN ACCOUNTS Dead Lawyer la Said to Have Been Defanlter for a Largre BUFFALO, N. Y., April .The Commer cial this , afternoon " publishes a atory ' In

which. It is alleged that Arthur R. Pennell, who was killed In an automobile accident on March 10, was a defaulter to the extent of from $150,000 to $200,000. " The story, the Commercial says, leaked out es the result ot a legal dispute over' two life In surance policies. ;-: Pennell. tha paper alleged, induced friends in the east who had known bis family and the family of bis wife, to place money in .bis hands for 'investment. He acted. In fact, aa their flnanclal agent. Ha would Inform them If Jound an Invest menf,' which would pay an Mcellent rate of Interest) and they wwuld send htm money. The money thus, sent,- it la alleged, he spent, and when interest payments fell due made the payments cut of his own pocket. Wallace Thayer, who was Pennell's attor ney and Intimate friend, is referred to by the paper as saying he had suspected ir regularities, but that be had no proof of any such wrongdoing. Incidentally, it has been learned that Pennell - made provision for the payment to Mrs Edwin L. Burdlck of $25,000 out -ot his life insurance. Pennell carried over $200,000 life Insur ance in order, the Commercial says, that after his death the eastern estate to which he is alleged to have been a defaulter might be' able to recoup the losses which they sustained through him. In his will Pen nell named as administrator of his estate hla brother, J. Frederick Pennell. He left to his administrator sealed In structions that upon his death he should make good in full out of his estate all the losses which had been sustained through his defalcations. The Commercial adds that Pennell had contemplated suicide for two years. STRATTON CASE IS SETTLED on Accepts Three Hundred aad Fifty Thousand ana ills- . misses the Case. COLORADO SPRINGS. Colo.; April County Judge Orr Is considering a compromise that has been reached between the attorneys for I. Harry Stratton and those for the executors of his father's will. ' Young Stratton Is to receive $350,000 In J cash. This Includes his legacy of $50,000. The money will be paid immediately, the I Judge asserts, and all litigation over the ' qbI.I. a V. l.t. miilll.mlltlnnBlBA owner, Wlnfleld Scott Stratton, will cease. Mr. Stratton bequeathed the bulk ot his fortune, estimated at $15,000,000, for the establishment of a home for the poor in this city. CALLS RISK TC CATTLE NIL Kaasaa State Veterinarian Says Foot aad Month Dlseaao Does Not Exist. TOPEKA. Kas.; April . Dr. N. S. Mayo, state veterinarian, reported today to the state live stock commission that there were no cases of the foot and mouth disease in Cloud county. Dr. Mayo said the cattle were afflicted with a disease caused by eat ing rye pasturage, In which there was a tungua growth. The Nebraska authorities were talking last week of quarantining Kansss on ac count ot the prevalence ot the disease. IMMERSION BARS CONVERTS ; Baptlats Tarn to Congregational Faith to Avoid Ordenl by Water. STAMFORD, Conn., April (.The congre gation of the First Italian Baptist church I haa decided to change from the Baptist j faith to Congregationalism. 1 The church members say tha requirement ; of Immersion as an essential to church membership wss an obstacle which they could not overcome. Winter Wheat Looks Flae. ARAPAHOE, Neb.. April 6. (Special Tel- j egram.) Winter wheat is exceptionally fine and this section has never bad finer pros pects tor a email grain crop. REPUBLICANS MAKE GAINS neischmann Oarriei Cincinnati, . Johnson Cleveland and ' Jonei Toledo. KEOKUK STAYS BY GRAND OLD . PARTY Mlehlaa Eleets All ' Admlalstratloa Stat Ticket aad Local Elections Also Resnlt la Many . Gains. CINCINNATI, O., April a.whllo the re publicans had material galna In the muni cipal elections In Ohio today, the . mo notable exception was. at Columbus, where Mayor. John , N. Hlnkle, democrat, suc ceeded Herbert K. , Jeffrey, republican. Jeffrey's plurality is at lrast 1,500. The mayors . ot all the leading . cities, except Columbus, were .re-elected. The republicans retained control of Cin cinnati and the . democrats tot Cleveland, and Samuel M. Jonea was elected as an In dependent for. the fourth time as mayor at Toledo. a- ' The democrata ' re-elected their tickets at Dayton, Sandusky, Chllllcothe, Hamilton and t other cities normally democratic, and the ' republicans at Steubenville, Youngs town, Warren. Ironton, Portsmouth and other towns that they have heretofore con trolled. One ot the most notable gains of the republicans waa at Mansfield and of the democrats' at Springfield, where local Issues controlled results. ' Johnson Formidable for Governor. It Is" conceded that Mayor Tom L. John son of Cleveland will now. become a formid able candidate for the democratic nomina tion for governor a few years bence and the Ingalls organisation will be continued with a view of making Mr. Ingalls a can didate in opposition to Mr. Hanna for senator. . . There is much ' Interest here over the boom of Mayor Flelschmsnn for the nom ination for governor. It is conceded that the endorsement of his administration mainly produced the result in Cincinnati, the largest plurality of the largest total vote In the history of the city. Owing to hie large business Interests be had declined renomlnatlon, but after the fusionists nom inated Melville F. Ingalls, the nomination was forced upon Flelscbmann. The re publican gains In Cincinnati were not maintained In the. numerous suburbs, whero about the usual party results were re ported. Flelschmsnn, republican, polled 42.607; Ingalls, fusionists,' 26,287; Swing, socialist, 8.774; Martin, prohibitionist, 845. Total 73,813. " Flelschmann'a plurality 16,620; majority 12,001. The council, and school boards each stand twenty republicans to four democrats. The entire republican city ticket was elected by about the aame vote aa that' of Flelsch msnn. ' ' ' Chllllcothe elected Wallace D. Yaple, democrat, for mayor, and all the other democratic candidates except two for alder men. . t Steubenville and Irbnton elected ' the re publican ticket, Cosachtoa the straight democratic ticket and Sandusky re-elected a democratic mayor and six: out ot aevtn democratic aldermen. - Portsmouth re elected Captala Creed -MUstead,, republican tor. mayor, try a greatly reduced majority. Zanesvill.. elected Dexoo, republican, for mayor, and every candidate on- the repub lican ticket . excepting two aldermen . and two assessor. Flndlay elected Ruf us E. Taylor, . republican-candidate for mayor, and all the other republican candidates with the possible exception of-the candi date for auditor. Canton elected W. H. Smith, republican,, tor mayor. Akron elected Kempel, democrat, tor mayor. Youngstown elected the entire republican city and town ship ticket, .with, the exception ot William T. Gibson, democrat, for mayor. .Marietta elected a fusion ticket put up by demo crats, union labor and Independent repub licans, Hyde being elected mayor. Spring field probably elected Bowlus, democrat, over Poole, republican, for mayor. Dayton re-elected Mayor Snyder, democrat, and the major portion of the democratic ticket. CLEVELAND. April . One hundred pre cipcta out of 200 give Johnsop, democrat, for mayor, 17,616; Goulder, republican,. 11, 828. . , ' ' Keoknk Stays Republican.' ' KEOKUK. Ia., April . The city election today resulted in the election ot Andrew J. Diamond, republican, for mayor. Four re publican .and two democratic aldermen were' elected., ' . " . i Grand Old Party Sweeps Michigan. DETROIT. Mich., April 6. The repub licans of Michigan today elected their state ticket by a majority estimated at midnight aa between 35,000 and 40,000. Local issues determined the results in mort of the smaller cities in the state. At Battle Creek the socialist party made a strong campaign, but Mayor F. H. Webb, republican, was elected by 706 majority. The socialist party elected two aldermen, giving them four under ths present council. , At Escanaba the independent labor party's candidate, J. J. Sourweln, -was elected mayor. S. E. Dikeman was elected mayor of South Haven on a citizen's ticket. Id Lapere, 'Dr. Blake, republican, de feated Mayor Schlegel. democrat, who has carried the city by large majorities three times, and the republicans took all the other offices except one alderman. , J. R. Santo, citizen's candidate for mayor at Traverse City, was elected, the rest of the offices going to the republicans. ' , . The democrats gsined several members of the council at Marshall and re-elected Mayor F. M. Motte by an Increased major ity. For the first time in ten years the demo crats awept Muskegon . and elected their city ticket, beaded by Leonard Fyke, , for mayor. , ' Sam Fols, eltisen-democratlc candidate, was elected mayor ot Kalamazoo. , ' Marquette elected, Greene, the people's party candidate, for mayor. The republic ans carried Marquette county by 2,000 ma jority. Bay City elected all the republics! caadl dates tor city offices and nine out ot eleven republican - candidates for aldermen. Bault Ete. Mars elected a democratic mayor. Grand Rapids elected the entire repub lican city ticket. Arkansas: negro is lynched Assanlta White. Woman aad - Is Hangedi from Famans t Death Tree. 'I a.- i ' LITTLE ROCK. Ark., April 6. Job a j Turner,, colored,, was lynched at -Warren, Ark., last night for an attempted assault on Mrs. .W. H. Heely, a wbjte woman, , who resides about seven miles west ot town ' Shortly fter midnight a mob broke into the county Jail and, taking Turner . out, strung him' to the limb of a tree. in front of the courthouse, where several other se groos have been lynched at different Umea. CONDITION OF THE WEATHER Forecast for Nebraska Fslr Tuesdey and Wednesday. Temperature at Omaha Yesterdayi Roar. Drej. Hoar. De. S a. m'. . .... 4a 1 p. m 81 U a. m...;.. 41 S p. m M T a. m 41 8 p. m tlii H a. m. ..... 4 4 p. tn 6:i D I, a....t. 41 5 p. m...... 64 10 a. m...... 44 p. m R.I It a. 4(1 T p. m nJ 13 sn 4 H p. m BO p. an 4t WOMEN GET T0 HALL FIRST North Side improvement Clab There fore Walts oa the Stairway. A "lockout" occurred In North Omaha last evening. It was not the result of labor dissensions, but merely the collision of two organizations. When twenty members ot the North -Omaha .'Improvement club gathered on the stairway ot Magnolia ball, expect ing to enter and transact the regular weekly .routine, they found their entrance barred. Voices frost the Inside . showed that they had been cleverly outwitted. Thoughts Of aKlitlca! trick were harbored. An Investigation revealed that the wives ot the members of the club had taken pos session of the ball for a rehearsal for a fu ture entertainment. Making the best of the dilemma, the male members assembled' In an anteroom and shivered duringrMliscusslons or vainly en deavored to prevent the chattering ot teeth while awaiting an opportunity of gaining admittance to the well heated hall. With faces beaming with smiles the auxiliary members emerged from the room an hour and a half later and left, but not, however, until they had fully enjoyed the Joke which they bad perpetrated. After the Improvement club secured the hall the new constitution and bylaws were adopted. ' A heated discussion arose over the clause providing for the discussion of officers representing the ward in city posi tions, the objectors recalling the recent arraignment of Councilman Karr. The ma jority of the members present favored the criticizing of ward representatives, but to preserve harmony It waa voted that In the future party politics should be entirety elim inated. It was also voted to prevent fu ture "packing" of meetings by providing that all members four months in arrears tn dues sbotild not be entitled to vote. NORTHERN PACIFIC IS SUED Shareholders Seek Relief for Alleged lllearal Retirement of Pre ferred Stook. NEW ' YORK, April 6. Action against the Northern Pacific waa begun today In the United States ' court to declare null and void 'the retirement ot the preferred stock. The plaintiffs are George C. Hackett and Charles Chase of Philadelphia, and the firm of Wolf Bros., stook brokers ot this city. The Complaint alleges that the dlrectora were without, legal authority to retire the stock For another; cause of action the plain tiffs .charge that the defendant, issued 175, 000,060 negotiable bonds and gave the hold erj of commm. stock te right of subscrib ing for 1h bonds- at par. - Another advan tage waa offered to the holders of common stock to the detriment of preferred stock holders, through the offer made by the Northern Securities company. SNOW JUST SPARES FARGO ..' 1 Storm Sweeps gtate, bat Misses Preal- ' ' dent's Next Stopping; Place. GRAND FORKS, N. D., April 6. A fierce blizzard, the worst of the winter. Is raging here. The snow la wet and the wind blow ing a. gale. Seeding would have commenced this morning had it not been for the storm. CROOKSTON, Minn.. Aoril 6. A snow storm has been raging over North Dakota and Minnesota, leaving a strip from Fargo to Winnipeg. The snow fell here from 2 to 4 Inches. At Minot, N. D the tall waa 6 inches. It will delay seeding from a week to ten days. MORRIS, Minn., April 6. A heavy snow storm has prevailed ovr thla section alt day, stopping seeding, which begun last week. CHICAGO FIGHJ .IS ENDED Harrison, Stewart and Cralce All I Claim City Favors Them for Mayor, CHICAGO, April 6. Estimates by repub lican and democratic managers on the re sults of tomorrow's city election are 87,000 votes apart. Chairman Carey of the democratic city committee declares that Mayor Carter H. Harrison Is certain nf re-election by 50,000, and Chairman Revell of the republican committee asserts that Graeme Stewart will have a plurality of 47,000. Daniel J. Crulca, the Independent labor candidate, also. ex pressed himself as sure of election by about 30,000 plurality. BRYAN PROMISES TO TALK Aaaoaaces His Intention of stamping Eastern ' States Next Month. ' NEW YORK, April . W. J. Bryan has notified his New York friends that he will be In the east in Msy and will deliver a series ot addresses on political subjects In New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Mass achusetts and Maryland. DAKOTA EMBEZZLER CAUGHT Man Wanted for Misappropriating; 40,000 Arrested at Minneapolis. : MINNEAPOLIS. April 6. Wllard P. Mc Donsld was arrested today charged with embezzling 840,000 belonging to the Hunt-ers-Creem Mining and Milling company, a 8outh Dakota corporation. Movements of Ocenn Vessels April 0. At New York Arrived: Minneapolis, from London and Southampton: Southwark, from Antwerp; Ix Hretagne, from Havre. At Plymouth Hulled: Patricia, from Hamburg, for New York. At Genoa Arrived: Welmer, from New York via Naples- At Gibraltar Passed: Koenlg Albert, front Nw York, for Naples snd Genoa: Kehn, from Genoa and Naples, for New York. At Liverpool Arrived: Georglc, from ! At. Rotterdam Arrived: Ryndara, from New York via Boulogne. i At'Nsples Arrived: Phoenicia, from New York. At Southampton Sailed: Barbaroaaa, from Bremen, for New York. At Bremen Arrived: Grosser Kurfurst, from New lark. HOUSE TAKES THE BIT Killi All Bills Providing for Amendments to the Oooititntioi. VOTES FOR A CONVENTION INSTEAD Move Precipitate, a Hot fight, In Which Many Participate. MOVE CHARACTERIZED AS PETTY SPITE Ii a Joint Beeolnt:on aud Governor Oannet Veto the Measure, SEVERAL OF THE MEMBERS CHANGE FRONT Cnlmlnatlon of Contest Between Two Monies Over Sweesy Bill to Cnt tha Prlco ot Printing; Amendments. ' CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS nil killed by the house and joint resolution passed for a constitutional convention. SES8ION EXTENDED one day In order to allow of pwisage of bill to Increase state levy from I to 1 mills. SOl'TH OMAHA CHARTER bill signed by the governor, with emergency clause. APPROPRIATIONS cut IU7.W0 by the , senate from figures of bill as it passed the house. ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION appropriation bill carrying 135,000 passes senato aa It came ' from the house. (From a Staff Correspondent.) ' LINCOLN. April . (Special.) -With one stroke today the house swept away from the people of Nebraska the opportunity of voting on proposed constitutional amend ments at the general election In 1903, from the governor the opportunity of calling an extra aessien tor the consideration ot changes in the organic law and imposed upon the vofrs ' of the state the future necessity of passing on the proposition of holding a constitutional convention. Thla was the culmination of the fight nn the constitutional amendment proposition, precipitated by Sweezy Saturday night when be sought to fores the senate to recede from Its action In killing a bill of hie to cut tha prices of printing constitutional amendments and which caused the first clash of the two houses this session. After a bitter struggle this morning the house voted to indefinitely postpone air the senate files embodying proposed amendments and passed S. F. 114, providing for the holding of a convention for the reconstrnctlon of the constitution As S. F. 114 is a Joint resolution it cannot he vetoed by the gov ernor, who is notably In favor ot tha amendments aa against the convention, and the opportunity of the governor calling the extra session is therefore gone. . It required a tbree-flttbs vote to pass the Joint resolution calling for the constitu tional convention. Sixty-two ' votes two more than the necessary number were se cured, and twenty-nine were cast in the negative. -It. took soma time .nnd a great deal of rustling, however. , not a lirtle acrobatic performance and considerable en gineering on the part of the speaker, to bring about the result. . When the roll was first called at- least six votes , were -lacklpg to pass the Mil. The . speaker stepped do an to tho clerk's side and took In . the Jiltnatjan, Being with tbsj-est .of the; Lancaster delegation',' in favor ot the convention proposition, Mr. Mrckett de- layed . announcing the ' vote until he was assured that the. necessary number wt( a hand. There was hurrying 1p and fro, much time was spent in a confused effort to drag members over the line. . Fiaally'. these flopped and turned the tide: Gilbert and Ten Eyck of Douglas, Belden of Richard son, Caldwell of Clay, Harrison et Wash ington and Ramsey of Gage. One or two who had not voted were also pulled into line. ' ' i . Donirlas Men to Blame. All the Douglas county men present ex cept Koetter, Shelly nnd Kennedy, voted for the bill. Riggt was absent.- If Doug las county's Interests are made to suffer because 'of the action of the house in de priving the people of the desired privilege, of voting on constitutional amendments, therefore, it need not go further than Its own delegation to locate the blame. - Had the Omaha men ateod firmly against tha bill Its . defeat Would have been assured and the 'people would still havo had ths opportunity of voting on these questions, which must now be left entirely to the say-so of a few men who will be selected much on the same order as legislators are selected. Of the sixty-two affirmative votes, slxty ono were republicans, and of the negative votes, twenty-one were by fusionists. One tuslonlst, Mikesell, ' voted with the ma jority and three did not vote at all.' Eight republicans voted In the negative. ; The result of this struggle today seems to be s distinct triumph for the Burling ton ' railroad Interests. The prime motive for defeating ths constitutional amend ments was to kill that one which provided for an Increase. In the number of supreme court Judges and the ons providing for the abolition of the anpreme court com mission. And It is Intimated that the Bur lington was back of the movement, be cause It did not care to have the number of supreme court Judges incressed from three for obvious reasons, nor did it csre to have the commission wiped out. The adoption of the motion killing all these constitutional amendment bills, therefore, cinches the continuance of the supreme court commission, One constitutional smendment bill hss been saved, thus far at least, from the wreck. This Is H. R. 73, by Fries, provid ing for (he ssfe Investment of the perma nent school fund. It was over In the senste when this fight started and le still there. Sweezy offered a resolution to have It re turned, but the resolution was tabled. The senste has not taken final action on the bill as yet. Fight Starts Early. 6hortly after the bouse convened thla morning the fight on the constitutional amendments was renewed by a motion of fered by 8weezy that S. Fa 21. .68. 261, 266 and 269, providing respectively for the increase of state officers' salaries, Incrsase In legislators' terms from two to four years, empowering the ' legislature to' fix salaries of district aod supreme court Judges, the Investment of the permanent school fund and the creation of a supreme court bench with seven tnvmbere tor terms of seven yesn, be Indefinitely postponed. This opened up the whole question which wss fought over last Saturday, when the house adopted Sweezy's amendment not to pass any constitutional ameadroeota until the senate receded from Us action ta kill ing Sweezy's bill to cut down the printing prices of constitutional amendments.. Loomls of Dodge offered an amendment to the motion, providing that all these bills should go to the general Ilia. He spoks vigorously for the motion, saying that if the house concurred In the senate reso lution for a constitutions convention it would become necesssry to vote on at least two of these bills. House of Hail and Wllsoa ef Pawaaa

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