10 Aralık 1890 Tarihli Portland Daily Press Gazetesi Sayfa 1

10 Aralık 1890 Tarihli Portland Daily Press Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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PORTLAND DAILY PRESS. ESTABLISHED JUNE 23, 1862-VOL. 29. PORTLAND, MAINE, WEDNESDAY MORN IN O. DECEMBER >0. 1BS0._j i PRICE Vi A fEAft, fflUN PAID L\ ADFMCK NOTIfgH. <*l** ,* *.»»<.< FOR FAMILY USE w, i, ft, aoo to ll> (>au« ano 10 (t c.,oi, ala; PURE LARD by the tierce, barren bait barrels eno mbs; Is for sale by every first^la?' ^^roce* and provl ■ion iealer -all air<i rer.uereo by in tree from all Uottoi. Seed Oil Tallow Soet and i®1 Iterations at :*om monly a sea and WARRANTED STRICTLY PURE None gene Ine without our name stamped upon the package John P. Squire & Go., BOSTON, MASS febl7 «n««* ASSIGNEE’S SALE! One of the Finest Slocks of PIAKTOB In New England, to be gold ot once at GREATLY REDUCED PRICES, to close out the business of WOO D WARD. Th«se PIANOS are new and of the following makes: Steinway, Hardman, CHICKERINC, LINDEMAN, Fischer, a ud other well known make*, in every variety of style and finish. Also, afiue line of Piano Chairs, Stools and Covers. Any one contemplating buying a Piano within the next iwo years, cannot afford to miss this op portunity. The sa.e begins To-Day, Dec. 6tb, at the former Wareroom of H. A. Woodward, No. 540 Congress St." anti will continue for two weeks, or ;uniil the stock is closed out. The store will be open from 8 a. m. until Op iu. Th.- well knnwn salesman, Mr. T. C. McGOULD BIC, will be in attendance to show goods. «E HI. LARRABEE, Assignee. decs dtf It you think of buying her a watch come and see the Watch I am selling for $25.00. A Diamond ring would please her, and ynu will be surprised to see what a Ring I ean sell yon r- r $15 00. If you don’t want to pay as mnch, I hare all kinds from $2.50 up. Perhaps yon may want something in S>-lid Silver or Plated ware. I know I can please you, (or I have the goods, and my prices are right. BOYNTON, The Jeweler. dec9 <ltjan2 23,000 Yards OP GLOVE FINISH Lining; Cambric In colors, 5, 7 and 10 yards in piece, 4 CENTS PER YARD, This Morning. LIBBY & LARRABEE. dec.8 dtf Holiday Line of Watches; Chains, Charms. Rings, Bracelets, Clocks and Stiver Ware. Ladles’ Solid Gold Watches from *23.00 up wards; Gold filled Watches *12.00 to *25 0<>. Call and examine before p rchasing elsewhere. O, H. LAMSON, New Store, hut still on Middle St., No. 203, near decCTemple St.3w WE HAVE placed the remaining lot of our stock of LADIES’ White Cotton Underwear on (he First Centre Counter, and fihall close (he balance in 25 per cent less than (he actual cost. FOR THIS THREE DAY’S SALE. LIBBY & LARRABEE. dec* dtf About Bird Cages! Why look'so sad? Lost your bird? How? Bottom dropped lout of cage? Then It wasn't a HBNDRYX. That has a securely fastened bot tom, Is riveted, solid brass, free from vermin and dirt. Sold by KENDALL & WHITNEY. decodlw GRINDING. We nre now pr» pared to grind ai| kinds of edge tools at slioit no tice. Diamond Wrench & Tool Co. Uecl d2w THAT LAKGE SIZE LINEN DAMASK TuWEL, Knotted Fringe, size 23x50. Put on sale this morning at 25 cent* each. tdgBY aTarrabeje. LEWISTON MiIl co. STOCK, Lewiston, .Hisinr. 60 Shares for sale at S9<3.oo Per Share. Address A. C. B., decleodlm X’. O. Box 1340, Boston, Mass. USB $11VI SON’S Cough Cure! dSK0"10 warraated> ** ®*"“ 2eod3m' OFFICE «F DR. BENNETT F. DAVENPORT. STATE ANALYST. BOSTON, Mass., June 12th, 1890. When first opened, in the test made by me, “THE PURE” Baking Powder was found to be the strongest, yielding 8.33 per cent more than the Royal, and 3.62 per cent than Cleveland’s. At the last test “THE PURE” was 13.39 per cent stronger than the Royal and 2.92 per cent than Cleveland’s. BENNETT F. DAVENPORT. Grand Opening — OF-i:r HOLIDAY GOODS, Friday, Dec. 5th. All llic novelties of the season In fancy goods, also Down Comfort* ♦•rs, Wrapper and Bed Blankets. Embroidered Handkerchiefs and Aprons. Colored and White Em broidered Flannel, shopping Bags, Children’s Dancing school Bags, China Silk, hiitin and Flu-hes for fancy work. Silk and Gioiin Uuibieilns for Gents and Cadies, Fancy Tabic Covers, Scarfs and Tidies. J. M. DYER & GO.. 511 Congress St. dec5 _dlw CHRISTMAS — is — COMING! 2 And we are ready for it with a Fall Line — OF — Holiday Goods, Purchased in New York, Boston and Portland, at the lowest Cash Prices and selling at a Small Margin. Comprising—t Large Variety of Plush , GnoUx, Plated Ware Toys and Games, All the latest Novelties in Japanese, China aud Glass Ware, Table, Library Lamps and Fixtures. 1 W'e have a large assortment of Dregs Goods, Bibbons, Velvets, Plushes, Stamped Goods, Ladies’, Gent’s and j Children’s Underwear, Fancy Goods and Notions, etc., etc. W, N. RICHARDS, Yarmouth, Me. dec3d3w» Holiday Goods - ABE NOW Ready fo [Inspection Our line is new and fresh, and consists of Books, Photograph Al bums, Bibles, Leather and Metal Fan cy Goods. [BRING, gHGRT & |f ABMQN. nov26 eodtf ANNOUNCEMENT ! Having soon lo arrive a large lot of Pianos, Organs, Stools, Scarfs, Covers, lflusic Cabinets, ordered for the Holiday trade, I propose to sell my piesent stock at grvut advantage to Immediate buyers. Best goods In the mar. ket. Open Saturday evenings un> til further notice. TUNINC TO ORDER. SAMUEL THURSTON, 3 Free Street Block, no29dtf PlIRTliANI), RE. PORTLAND SLEICHS. We have on hand a few single sleighs of onr own mal e. The; are in different st; leg and are all well made. > hose In need of a good g elgh at a reasonable price'will Qud it to their advantage to give ns a call. Algo one Travetso Runner Pung with curved dasher. ADAMS, CLARK & LOCKE, CORNER CUMBERLAND & CASCO STS. dec9_dtf_ THE NEW TARIFF BILL" obliged us Nov. 1st, to make a rise of Ore dollars per thousand on Black stone and two dollars on Jnniors. All genuine will be plainly stamped “WAITT & BOND” We shall also make a new Black stone, with a domestic wrapper, which will be stamped W. & B. BLACKSTONE, and will be sold at the old price. WAITT & bond, 53 Biackstone Street. Boston. jau31FM&W lvurm 1mm pl\e Timber, Plank and Flooring Boards. Largest Assortment ano Lowest Prices PEERING, WINSLOW & CO., PORTLAND. ME.. - HEAD BROWN’S WHARF. ,a l«w,“ One of the best ways of helping yourself Is to support home Insti tutlonss, success in life being far easier to attain in a thriving than a standstill community. Citizens ox Maine should recognize this fact and place their Life Insurance in meir homo company* febllTT&Btf THE IRWIN 10c. Cigar. Made from the choicest Havana tobacco grown In Cuba, strictly band-made, lone filler and never artificially Savored. None genuine unless the name '‘Irwin" only Is branded on each cigar. Tills Is the btgnest grade cigar for the money ever placed on the market. Hen-are of Imi tations. For sale by D. IV. Haseltlne &|Co,, Geo. C. Frye, C. Way & Co., E. L. Foss, H. F. Folsom & Co., Simmons & Hammond, S. Hamilton, and dealers generally, and manufactured only by IRWIN CIGAR CO., Itt5 Milk Street, . • . Boston, Maes. mania diylstpnrm THE PORTLAND DAILY PRESS, Published every day (Sundays excepted) by the PORTLAND PUBLISHING COMPANY, At 97 Exchange street. Portland, me THE MAINE STATE PRESS. Published every Thursday Morning, at $8.60 a year; if paid In advance, $2.00 a yeai. Advertisements Inserted In the “Maine State Press” (which has a large circulation In every part of the State) for 81.00 per square for first In sertion. and 60 cents per square for acb subse quent insertion Terms: Seven Dollars a Year. Wi en payment Is made strictly In advance the price svlU be Six Dollars. Rates Of Advertising—Oue Licit space of the length of column, or twel ones nonpareil constitutes a “square.” $1.60 per square, oally, first week; 76 cents per week after; three Insertions or less, $1.00; con tinuing every other day after flrsi week, 60 cents. Half square, three Insertions or less, 76 cents, one week, $1.00; 60cents per week after. Special Notices, one-third additional. Uuder head of "Amusements” aud “Auction Sales,” $2.00 per square per week; three Inser tions or less. $1.60. THE TIGHT MONEY MARKET. Responsible for Calamities to Two Lareo Boston Concerns. Boston, December 9.—Whitten, Burdett & Young, wholesale clothing merchants, as signed today. It Is thought the liabilities will be over a million. Tbe assets are un known. Tbe failure was caused partially by the failure of Potter, Lovell & Co. aud R. Gardner, Chase & Co. and the tight money market. G. W Ingalls & Co., shoe dealers, with some 20 stores in Boston, New England and New York, assigned today. The liabilities are said to be $200,000; assets unknown. The cause is tbe stringent money market. A Kansas Bank Suspends. Abkansas City, Kan*., December 9.— The American National Bank of this city closed its doors this morning for lack of funds to meet its obligations. Tbe strin gency of tbe times aud inability to collect money loaned, are assigned as causes of the failure, Tie bank claims it will pay all Its obligations in a very few days. The amount of liabilities and assets cannot be obtained. In the R'gnt Direction. New' Yobk, December 9.—The board of directors of the National Bank of Com merce of New York, at a meeting today, took action, “with a view to relieving the present financial depression, and keeping the commercial machinery of the country in healthy activity”authorizing the purchase of a large amount of sterling exchange and the taking out of such clearing house certificates as may be necessary to carry the resolution into effect. Bullion from England. London, December 9.—Bullion to the amount of 477,000 pounds was withdrawn from the Bank of England today for ship ment to New York. Liabilities $400,000. Pattebson. N. J., December 9.—The lia bilities of Nighingale Brothers & Knight, silk manufacturers, of this place, who as signed yesterday, are stated as not less than $400,000. The assets, it is believed, will amount to about half that sum. The Sawtell Case. Doveb, N. H., December 9.—Venires to draw 93 jurors for the Sawtell murder trial were sent out this morning, Rochester ex cluded. Chief Justice Doe and Judge Bing ham will try the case. THE WEATHER. Warmer and Fair. Kollo wing is the iorecast of the weather for New Englaud: Wanner; fair; southerly winds; warmer Thursday. Local Weatne' Report. Pohtland, Me., December 9, 1800. « v x • if. Barometer.. . 29 921 29.740 Tnermometer. ,8. . 27. Dew Point. 6 i20 Humidity. . ..87 i74. Wiud. NW |W Velocity. . 4 3 Weather. cloudy'Cl’dles Mean daily ther.18.6 Max. vel. wiud. ...16SW Maximum ther.30.4 Total precip.0 Minimum ther. C.G Weather Observations. Tha fnll.-rurirify orn fho TTnifa^ Siftifna Silirnsl Service observations for yesterday, Decem ber 9th, taken at 8 ,'p. m., 75th meridian time the observations for each station being given in this order: Temperature, direction of the wind, state of the weather: Boston, 32°, W, cloudless; New York, 32°, SW, cloudy; Philadelphia, 32°, SW, cloud less; Washington. 8G°, SW, cloudv; Albany, 20°, S, cloudy; Buffalo, 30°, SW, clou.y; Cleveland, 28°, SW, cloudless; Detroit, 28°, SW, cloudv; Chicago, 32°, SW, cloudless; St Paul, 32°, SW, cloudless; Duluth, 38\ SW, cloudy; St. Vincent, 40*, VV, cloudv; Bismarck, 44°. NW, cloudless; Jacksonville, 40°, NW, cloudless. _ Pretty Cold Weather. The following are rmoDg the reports of temperature in various places yesterday morning: Lyndonvllle, Vt—Thirty degrees below zero. North Monmouth, Me.—Twenty degrees below zero. Livermore Falls—Fifteen below. Otis Falls—Eighteen below. North Jay—Nineteen below. Danville Junction-Seventeen below, Skowhegan— Eighteen below. ltumforu Centre—Nineteen below. GENERAL NEWS. Four persons were killed by a tornado In Walton county, Georgia, Monday. The Crow Indians have agreed to sell the government 2,000,000 acres of tlieir reserva tion. Professor T. Whiting Baucroft, of Brown University, is missing from his home, aud his friends ate apprehensive for bis safety. The {Charleston, Cincinnati & Chicago rallrond and the Massachusetts & Southern Construction Company, which was buildiDg it, are in the bands of a receiver. The will of the late August Belmont pro viiies for the sale of all his racing horses. His vast estate is all bequeathed to his family. No legacies for charity are made hut certain old servants are remembered. Mrs. Leona de Fritzs and her five-year-old daughter, missing since Saturday night were found In Forsdike woods near Elizabeth, N. J ., Monday. The child was frozen stiff, hut the mother is still a'ive though badly frozen. It is supposed they lust their way in return ing to Hallway Saturday night. Mrs. de Frieze is still unconscious. Jocko Kelley an escaped convict from Mbs9 aehusetts where ho was serving a term of twenty-live years, was arrested yesterday af ternoon on an incoming National line steam er at New York, lie escaped October 3d last and went to Eugland aud was on his way back when captured. A Kansas City paper says a company com posed of American and English capitalists, known as the American Type Fc undry com pany are negotiating for the purchase of all the foundries in the United States. The re presentatives of the company have twenty million dollars at their disposal. FACTS VERSUS DEMOCRATIC ORATORY. Statement of the Provisions of the Elections Bill. A Measure Framed to Secure an Honest Suffrage. The “Bayonets” and "Force” Exist Only in Opposition Speeches. [Special to tlie Press.] Washington, December 9.—In view of the violent party passions that 'are likely to be aroused during tbe discussion which has begun on the federal election bill, it is of the highest Importance that this much misrep resented measure be fnily understood. Prob ably eight men out of ten in this country, Republicans as well as Democrats, regard the measure as entirely different from what it really is. The cry of "force bill” and the shout of “bayonets” has moulded opinion among a large class of voters who do not have time to enter into a study of a question necessarily complicated. It is now time for every candid Republican and Democrat to look at the measure as it is, not as it is mis represented by partisan paragraphs in pa pers that oppose it because it is a Republi can measure. Suppose it be conceded to the Democrats that the elections bill as original ly proposed embodied too wide departures from old methods to be adopted at tbe pres ent time; then there remains a common ground for approaching the present exami nation in the fact that the bill now before the Senate is a mocn different bill from the rough and unformed plan put forth in the early part of last session. The opponents of tne bill pitched the key of their opposi tion by that early draft, and they have nev er changed it, although the bill now before the Senate is modified in important particu lars. During tbe discussion in the House it received at Republican hands important amendments. i> The machinery by which the new election system would be operated claims first atten tion. This machinery is not new in whole or in greater t art. Since 1871 the United States government has asserted and exer cised the right ol supervising the election of Congressmen, and the present elections bill asserts no further rights. The United States officers required by the Lodge bill are (1) a chief supervisor of elec tions for each judicial district, (2) local su pervisors lor each polling place, (3) United States deputy marshals to aid the local supervisors if necessary, (4) a board of United States canvas sers in each state where the election law mav be applied to a congressional district. Of these four classes of officers only the fourth Is new. The United States election laws in operation fur 20 years have employed the chlel supervisors, the local supervisors and the deputy ^marshals. No one, either Derno ciat or Republican calls for the repeal of the present law, which has made congressional elections In the great city of New York so fair that elections for Congressmen are nev er contested there. A cnief supervisor of elections i3 appoint ed in each judicial district of tbe country by the judge of the United States Circuit Court for tbat district. For the New England dis trict Judge Colt would appoint. He Papons to be a Republican. In a,large section of the South and West, Judge Jackson of Tennes see would appoint. He happens to be a Democrat. The local supervisors for the variou i poll ing places are to be appointed also by the circuit court, upon recommendation of the chief supervisor. Rut if necessary the court may disregard the chief supervisor’s nomi nees and appoint other men. Tnree super visors, not more than two of whom shall be of the same political party, are to be ap pointed for each polling place. The present law makes the number two. The deputy marshals are appointed as at present by the marshal, who consults tbe chief supervisor as to the number required. The board of canvassers does not exist un der the present law. There is to be such a board for each state wherein there may be United States suoervison for one or more congressional districts. The board is to con sist of three citizens of the state, not more than two of whom shall belong to one politi cal party. One or the three shall be chair man of tbe board, and a clerk is provided. These officials constitute the machinery of the elections bill. It is an amplification of the present machinery, not a new machine, n. In the operation of the machinery are to be found the important changes effected by the new law. The old law makes the supervisors spectators of an election, ami in places where public sentiment is strung their presence has a deterring effect'upon criminals. By the Lodge bill the fed sraLsupervlsors are made as important and as powerful as the state in spectors of election who occupy with them the space by the ballot box. Not so much to the chief supervisor, how ever, as to the local supervisors are addition al powers given. Tbe chief supervisor has a general oversight of his judicial district re commending suitable men to the circuit court for appointment as supervisors, con sulting with the United States marshal as to the use of deputy marshals and receiving the returns made up by the local supervisors and transmittingthem to the board of canvassers. This last duty of receiving the returns is the only important addition to tbe preset t pre rogatives of the chief supervisor. He as signs the local supervisors to the polling places where they are to serve, and has cer tain powers of removal, etc., over them. With the local supervisors, three for A»f>h nnllincr hIhpp is fn hp fnnnri t.hp frrpnt est enlargement of power. From mere spec tators of the election they are elevated to a place of power equal to that held by state inspectors of election. These men must be able to speak and write the English lan guage, and must be residents of the congres sional district in which they are to serve. They cannot be all of the same political par ty ; at each polling place not more than two 01 the three being of the same political par ty. These three local supervisors are entitled under the Lodge bill, iu the first place, to at tend upon the registrations for congressional elections, wherever under the state laws a registration is required. As the state offi cers proceed with the registration, the Unit ed States supervisors are entitled to examine the books, challenge any person whom they believe not entitled to vote, require the statutory oaths to be administered to any person, and in cities of 20,000 inhabitants and upwards, make, with the aid of deputy marsh .Is, a house to house canvass, iu order to see that no fictitious names are put upon the registration lists. This portion of the urnrnaotivoa nf tlui stinpruianre in nmimih _ edly designed especially to prevent fraudu lent registration in the Urge cities of the North. The other duties of the supervisors relate to election day. The first duty in the morning is to see that the jallot-box, which the state inspectors have, is empty before it s locked; 01, in case the state officers do not appear to open the polls, to do so In accord ance with the provisions of the state law. During the day they are to stand with the state officers at the ballot boxes, inform the voters of the proper boxes in which to put their ballots, keep a list of all persons voting, and in case the state officers may reluse to receive the votes of certain persons, to receive those ballots and forward them with the names of those casting them and a statement of the circumstances to the chief supervisor. Fi nally, when the polls are closed, the United States supervisors are to join with the state inspectors in counting the ballots in the boxes. As the state and the United States officers count the ballots for the various offices they shall compare the results of their count. If there be any discrepancies the Uni ted States officials shall make a memoran dum of these differences for transmission to the chief supervisor. When the count is completed the state officers make up their returns for transmission to their governor or secretary of state according to tho state laws. With this return the United States supervisors have nothing to do. But on their part they make up returns in duplicate, oue set of which shall he sent to the chief supervisor of elections for the district and the other to the clerk of the United States Circuit Court. Thus there are two kinds of returns made, the state returns and the Uni ted States returns. When they agree every one must be satisfied; when they disagree a way has been arranged, as will he shown further on, for an equitable settlement of the differences. The deputy marshals must be men who can read and write English. Their duties are to preserve order at the polls and assist the supervisors in making the canvasses in the large cities. To use deputy marshals at the polls is no innovation, as they have been used uuder tho present election law lor twenty years. It is a new application of them to make them assistants of the super visors in the house to house canvass for the purpose of detecting fraudulent registration iu cities of more than twenty thousand in hsbitants. HI. We have now come to the point where the Dnited states boaid of canvassers for the state has a duty to perform. When the chief supervisor receives the returns from the local supervisors for all the polling places iu a congressional district he tabu lates these returns, keeping all the original documents, aud preserves them for trans mission to the state board of canvassers, which must meet on November 15th, after the election. This board of canvassers is composed of three citizens of the state, not more than two of whom shall be of the same political party. The place and hour of the meeting of the board must be made public In time for all Interested persons to attend, and upon meeting the board must proceed to can vass openly the vote and decla're and certify the result. Having declared the result open ly the board must then make out a certificate of the result in quadruplicate, and transmit these four copies, one to the office of the chief supervisor of elections for the district, another to the person found to have been elected, another to the clerk ot the National House of Representatives, and the fourth to the Secretary of State at Washington. Meanwhile the returns made out by the state inspectors have been received by tho governor and tabulated, and in due time the governor of the state sends to the clerk of the National House a certificate of the elec tion. At the present time the governor’s certificate Is a member’s only title to a seat, a nd If the governor Issues a certificate to a person declared elected on a fraudulent count the aggrieved candidate’s only re course Is an expensive contest before the next House of Representatives. If the ma jority of that House happens to be of the op opposite party the aggrieved candidate will not generally feel that It will be profitable to contest, however righteous bis cause may be. Uuder the Lodge bill the governor’s certi ficate will not be fiual, for the cldrk of the House will also have the certificate trans mitted by the United States board of can va-sers. Hut neither Is the canvassers’ cer tificate to be final, nor will it necessarily en title the man whom it declares to be elected to be put upon the roll of the House. This brings us to an Important portion of the bill, and a portion which the Democrats studioue ly throw into the background. IV. It has been widely represented that the return of the United States canvassers would be the prima facie authorization of the member returned as elected to have bis name placed upon the rolls of the House. It has therefore been urged, not without force, that the United States returns might be as bad one way as the state returns are accused of being the other; that it was merely tak ing the alleged opportunity to manipulate returns from the state authorities and giv incr it. tn til a TTnitAii Staff's nnthnrir.iAd T r. lias been urged that United States election officials are ho more likely to be bonest than state election officials. There has been force in this argument when applied to the imagi nary elections bill. When applied to the real bill now before the Senate, the argu ment has no force whatever, as will be seen readily by examining section 14. •‘So soon as the certificate of said board [board of United States canvassers] has been issued," says this section oi the bill, “any person who was at said election a candidate for representative or delegate in Congress ano who deems himself aggrieved by the ac tion of said board may pre^ut to the cir cuit court of the United States having juris diction in the district where said election was held bis petition which shall be duly sworn to. and shall setjforth that he believes himself to nave been duly elected and the gruund or grounds upon which he insists that the action of said board in Issuing said certificate is erroneous. Thereupon the circuit court must examine into the election and decide who was elected. Thus, If the Uuited States supervisors count one candi date in and the state inspectors another, tbo court will determine which caudidate has been rightfully elected. Until this appeal to the court shall have been decided the clerk of tbetUnlted States House of Repiesenta tives cannot place either candidate upon the roll of the House, and after the court shall have decided the clerk must proceed in ac cordance with the decision. If such a plan is not safe and fair no propo sition in government ever wa- safe and fair. Moreover it would remove from the House ot llepresentatives the decision of a large number of contested election cases with all the attendant charges and suspicions of par tisanship and unfairness. But this provision of the bill is studiously ignored, and there are probably not a hundred men in all New Eogland who read Democratic papers ex clusively who know that there is any such provision in the bill. T. This principle of judicial determination of election contests is carried still further by another section of the bill. Section 28 pro vides that ‘ whenever it shall appear by pe tition under oath that errors have occurred in the determination of any board of can vassers, either national, state, territorial, county, or other local board In any state or territory in the matter of the votes cast for a representative or delegate in Congress, the Circuit Court of the United States in the judicial distiict in which any such board of canvassers shall have met and ac.ed in re spect thereto may, by order, require any such board to correct such errors or show cause why such correction should not be made, and, In the event of the failuie of any such board to make such correction or show cause as aforesaid, the said court may com pel any such board, by writ of mandamus, to correct such errors; and if any such board of canvassers shall have made its de termination and dissolved, such court may compel it to re-convene for the purpose of making such corrections.’’ This, of course, gives additional opportunities of arriviug at a judicial determination of election quarrels without awaiting the decision of the House of Representatives. TI. The penalty clauses of the bill have been' loudly decried as oppressive. An enumera tion of these penalties will disclose how much reason there is in this cry. For the bribery of voters or of election officers there is a penalty of not more than $1000 flue or imprisonment for not more than three years, or both; for false entries on registra tion books or wilfully putting on names of persons not entitled to vote or keeping off the names of persons entitled to vote, or for wilfully keeping a false poll list, or for wil fully excluding from the ballot box, or for wilfully admitting to the ballot box any vote not entitled to go there, or for altering, mu tilating or stealing ballots there is a penalty of not more than $1C00 fine or imprisonment of not over three years or both. Perhaps these penalties would not be comfortable, but they will not be imposed upon any peo ple who do not do the prohibited things. vii. Like the present law the elections bill does not apply to every congressional dis trict, but only to such as may demand it. Under the present law two voters in any city of over 20.000 Inhabitants, or 10 voters in any county or parish of a congressional district, may peiittou for United States su pervision aod it will be granted. Under the Lodge bill it would be somewhat more diffi cult to set the machinery of supervision into operation, as the petition of 100 legal voters in a city of over 20,000 inhabitants would be required, and the petition of 50 voters In par ishes, counties, etc. Districts may be super vised in whole or in part, as the law would apply as follows: First, in any entire Con gressional district; second, in any entire city or town having 20,000 inhabitants or up wards bv the last preceding census of the United States, whether such city or town contain one or more congressional districts or part only of one or more congressional districts; third, In any parish, county, city, town, or election precinct in any congress ional district. ▼II. This is the bill against which the epithets of “force bill” and "bayonets” are hurled. There is no more fores in it than in every other law that has the majesty of the United States back of it. As the last resort every Uni ted States law has "bayonets” behind it, and were it not so this nation would crum ble. In the present debate in the Senate these epithets have been supplemented by another argument which thoughtful men will do well to consider. Senators like Tur pie of ludiana and Pugh of Alabama, have first laid down the proposition that the suf frage is free and fair in the South Then they have proceeded to argue that the negro is inferior to the white race and cannot rule. Then they proceed to urge that the nendlne bill will enable nun to rule. The> admit that the Constitution of the United States guar antees to every citizen the rights of the franchise Irrespective of race or color, but they deduce from their argument of race in feriority an argument sustaining a “higher law” than the Constitution. It is plain that f the suffrage in the South is already free and fair there is no pertinency in the other arguments; and if the suffrage is not fair then the Southern gentlemen must mean to override the Constitution of the United States in deference to a “higher law.” __ ROCKLAND NEWS. A Corner in Potatoos-The City’s Crack Militia Company. [Special to the Press.} Rockland, December 9.—Company U, Tillson Light Infantry was inspected at the

armory last night by Brigade Inspector, Major R. H. Barnaul. The company made an excellent showing. A large number of luvited guests were present. The inspec tion was followed by a grand ball. Local parties are buying up large quanti ties of potatoes with an eye to speculation. They are very scarce in this section and command high prices. In the article en Knox couoty officers which appeared the Piikss Monday, the county attorney was omitted. This office lias been held for the past term by II. u. Uewett of Thomaston, who will be succeed ed by Washington Prescott of this city a Republican aud rising young lawer. Nine Drowned Under the Ice. London, December 9.—Six children broke through the Ice and were drowned to day at Tipton. Holyoke, Mass., December 9.—Charles, aged 16, sou of Henry Windier of tills city, aud two unknown French boys, were drowned in the the Connecticut river this evening by breaking through the ice while skating. FOR PUBLIC BUILDINGS IN MAINE Bills Passed Appropriating $75,000 for Lewiston and Bar Harbor. A Veto May Deprive the Summer Re sort of Its Building. Maine State College Coming In for a Share of Government Money. [Special to the Press.] Washington, December 9.—Today in the House, according to an ordei of business voted by the House yesterday, those public building bills which passed the committee of the whole last session but were not acted on by the House, came up for con. slderation. Among these bills were those for erecting new buildings at Lewiston and Bar Harbor, in Maiue, both of which passed the Senate last ses-ion. The Lewiston bill passed today by a viva-voce vote. It appro priates 875,000, which is none too large a sum for a city with the population and busi ness of Lewiston. The Bar Harbor bill ap propriates also 875,000. As the bill passed the Senate it appropriated 8150,000, but the House committee cut it down to 875,000. This sum for a mere village, which has a very small population for half the year, seemed extravagant and there was a call foi the yeas and nays, but, like most public building bills that get into the drive. It passed, there being 103 votes for it, to C9 against. In the last Congress a bill for a building at Bar Harbor passed, and President Cleveland vetoed it on the ground that the business of the office did not warrant it. The postal business probably is no larger there now than it was then. President Har rison has vetoed public building bills just as meritorious as is this Bar Har bor bill ana intimated in his message that he was willing to vetoo.thers.Of course a 875,000 building will make bar Harbor real estate more valuable, but this is hardly a reason for giving to a village a post office as good as is given to a thriv ingjand growing city like XJv W ISliUUi The apportionment of a portion of the proceeds of tbe sales of public lauds for tbe more completo endowment and mainten ance of colleges for tbe benefit of agriculture and mechanic arts in the various states and territories has about been eompleted by the Secretary of the Interior. Under the pro visions of the art approved August 30th last, the sum of 815,000 was appropriated for an institution ot this character in each state and territory, and for 10 years to come this ap propriation is to be increased each year by $1000. Thus far the names of institutions i . 27 states and territories have been sent to the Treasury Department with certificates that they are entitled to tbe money. Among them is tbe Maine State College at OroDO. Tbe money as provided by law is to be paid theltreasurers of different states and territo ries and by those officials turned over to the institutions. THE NEW APPORTIONMENT. A Bill Fixing the Number of Repre sentatives at 356. Washington, December 9.—Representa tive Dannell, chairman of the House com mittee on the eleventh census, today intro duced in tbe House a bill making an appor tionment of representatives In Congress un der the census. The bill was introduced af ter an informal agreement upon its provis I ions by the Republican members of the cen sus committee and the party leapers on tbe floor. It provides that after March 3, 1863, the House of Representatives shall be com posed of 356 members, apportioned as fol lows: Alabama. 9 Montana . 1 Arkansas. 7 Nebraska. O California. 7 Nevada. X Colorado. 2 New Hampshire. 2 Connecticut. 4 N-w Jersey. 8 Dataware. 1 New York.84 Florida. 2 North Carolina. 9 Georgia.11 North Dakota. 1 Idaho. l Ohio. .21 Illinois.22 Oregon. 2 Indiana.13 Pennsylvania.30 Iowa.11 Rhode Island. 2 Kansas. 8 South Carolina. 7 Kentucky.11 South Dakota. 2 Louisiana. O Tennessee.10 Maine. 4 Texas.13 Maryland. 0 Vermont. 2 Massachusetts.13 Virginia.10 Michigan.12 Washington. 2 Minnesota. 7 West Virgtuta. 4 Mississippi. 7 Wisconsin.10 Missouri.15 Wyoming. 1 A Tale of Two Houses. Washington, December u.—In the Senate today Messrs. Berry and Daniel spoke in op position to the elections bill the former de claring that it equalled, if it did not surpass, the evils of the constitutional amendment conferring the rights of suffrage upon the negro. Mr. Plumb introduced a bill to re duce tbe amount of United States bonds to be required of national banks and to replace tbelr surrendered notes, and to provide for tbe free coinage of silver; referred to the committee on finance. Mr. McPherson of fered a resolution, which was agreed to, calling on the secretary of the treasury for a certified copy of the accounts of John I. Davenport, chief supervisor of elections for the southern district of New York, for the elections of 1884,1880 and 1888, together with reports. The House today, after discussion, de feated tbe resolution directing the President to request Mrs. U. S. Grant to allow the re moval of tbe remains of ber illustrious bus band to Arlington. Maine Matters. Washington, December 9.—The follow ing patents have been granted to Maine peo ple: A. H. Wilson, Readfleld, halter F. L. Shaw, llockland, clock winding arbor. 1. H. Simpson, Brunswick, high water alarm, F. E. Putuam, Clinton, wreucn. H. If. Momoe, Rockland, rotary harrow. K. C. Irish, Augusta, loom temple. C. W. Bradford, Thorndike, station indicator. F. U. Burnham, Bridgton, sheet metal cutter guide attachment. Tho following Maine pensions were granted today: ORIGINAL. Matthew Cosgrove. National Military Homo. Cornelius Lane, lslaud Falls. Gilbert H. Bailey. Auburn. James Allen, Bowdoiubam. Henry J. Hosrner, Bangor. Edward Flinn, Calais. Joseph N. Curtis, Soutli Brewer. Montana Man To Bo Postmaster. Washington, December 9 —The Republi can members of the House held a short cau cus alter adjournment today to select a post; master to succeed Mr. Wheat of Wisconsin. Seventy-tbree votes were cast for James W. Hathaway of Montana, against 39 for the other four candidates. IN CROWDED BERLIN. Kocn and His Meihods as Scon by a New York Doctor. New York, December 9 —One of the first of New York’s medical men to bring back ocular evidence of the merits of Dr. Koch’s lymph cure Is Dr. Goffe of No. 29 West For ty-sixth street, who happened to be in Eu rope when Koch’s discovery was announced, and at ones proceeded to Berlin, where he Joined the crowds of doctors who visited the clinics where the ljmph was being tried. To a reporter he said: "I reached home on the Saale Sunday, having come direct from Ber lin, where I passed some time itt the clinics of Drs. Bergman and Comet, pupils and representatives of Dr. Koch. These clinics present a strange appearance. So great is the luterest that the lecture rooms are usual ly crowded to the doors, and even in the halls and aorridors the physicians were struggling to get in. Dr. Koch does not di rectly experiment on patients, lie spends all his time manufacturing the lymph, which is a delicate work, and demands his constant supervision. There are always crowds of physicians awaiting to talk to him, but after an audience with a few he slips away to his work. ‘‘When a patient is taken to the clinic a diagnosis of his case is read aloud aud re peated aiter each treatment so that tne phy sicians may get an accurate idea of the ef fect of the lymph. There is a pathetic side to tile scenes at these clinics. Many pa tients in advanced stages of consumption go there from all over the world, but none of the advanced cases are received. Berlin Is filled with eonsumptives. .The impression among the physicians at the clinics is that a great discovery has been made, but the ex citement In the cure must be t iued down to reach the exact limitations of Its use. ‘•After the 15th of this month the lymph is to be sold in small bottles at #ti.35 each, which, being capable of great dilutions, will be sufficient for one hundred injections. At present Dr. Koch will dispose of none of it for private use. It must go to some hospital or public institution. Opinion is divided as to whether it is a chemical compound, a form of bacillus or a kind of virus vacciue. Some thiuk it to be a ptmnaln—a secretion found in tissue where bacilli have been se creted." The lymph expected by Dr. Jacobi, who was to experiment on a consumptive at Mount Sinai Hospital, has not yet arrived. A COMPLETE OVERTURN AT THE HUB Matthews Is Mayor and Is Backec by a Democratic Council. How the Boston Women Cast Thel Votes In Yesterday’s Battle. The Result of tho Fray In Other Ba] State Cities. Boston, December 9.—Six cities in the Commonwealth elected municipal officers to day. in this city there were three mayoralty candidates in the field: Nathan Matthews, Jr., .the regular Democratic caudidate: Moody Merrill, Republican, endorsed by the citizens’ convention; Stephen B. Shapleigb, Prohibitionist. Matthews proved a very strong candidate and received the votes oi many Republicans. Mr. Merrill was unfor tunate in having been connected some years a6o with William A. Simmons in certain transactions with the city regarding the Tremont water meters. The belief ;that his actions at that time were not entirely blame less caused mauy Republicans to reject his candidacy. The total vote was about 2900 less than last year, when Hart, Republican and Citizens, was elected by 6460 plurality. Complete returns from the city give: Matthews . 32,307 Merrill.19,988 Shapleigb. 1,937 In the board of aldermen, the latest fig ores give the Republicans four to the Demo crats eight. One Republican and one Demo crat are on both tickets. The tickets for al dermen, councilraeu and school committee were badly split up aud caused much delay in ascertaining the results. For school com mittee, tickets were presented by the Repub licans, Democrats, Prohibitionists, the “Loy al Women,” Committee of 100 and Inde pendent woman voters. Later—Results follow, a portion of Ward 24, yet to be heard from, on councilmeu aud scool committee probably not affecting the result. For mayor: Matthews, Dem.32,418 . nil Clt.19,852 . 2,020 Hugh E. Brady, Republican and Democrat Is elected street commissioner practically by a unanimous vote. The aldermen stand, seven Democrats to five Republibans against seven Republicans to five Democrats last year. The common council is forty-two Democrats and thirty-one Republicans, against forty-six Republicans and twenty seven Democrats last year. The license vote is: Yes, 28,058; no, 13,790. Theetfen of educational advantages upon the women of Boston was clearly Illustrated at the polls. Between Washington street and Columbus avenue and Dover and Essex streets, the women did not turn out In as large numbers as those on the other side of Columbus avenue, where they have bad bet ter chauces of learning. Here they walked up to the polls as if they had always been accustomed to doing so on election days, and they marked their ballots according to what they believed to be for the best interest of the city; they did not have to be told what they were to do and how to do it. On the other hand in those precincts east of Columbus avenue the women bad ,t great deal of Double and made hard work of It; they have not been' trained; they bave not attended meetings where everything was explained to them. Some of these women could not understand a thing until it had been explained a dozen times. It took one colored woman over half an bout to find out wliat she was to do. In Justice to the women, however. It may be said that there were some ineu who were just as Ignorant, if not more so. A young fellow, whose true name was un known, was arrested by Patrolman Ilill of division ten for attempted illegal voting in ward nineteen, precinct two. He entered the booth shortly after the polls opened, and marking bis ballot, marched up to the box, where he announced himself in a satisfied wav as “Anthony Atwood." The gentleman who owns mat name and has the right to vote in precinct two is a boilermaker, about sixty years old, while his double is but twenty-five, but Patrolman Hill standing near by knew Mr. Atwood and challenged the vote Mr. Atwood 2d. The young fellow protested that he was the person he pretended to be until Officer dill proposed to take bim to Mr. Atwuod’s house at 149 Sterling street and get him Iden tified. Then he said that he did not, care to go. Nevertheless he was given a free ride in the patrol wagon to the house, where Mrs. Atwood aud the family repudiated the rela tionship. Before Judge Bolster in the Roxbury court 41,:..-« . t. „ __ i iiar. than Matthews," and under that distin guished title was put under §300 bonds to appear in court next Thursday. OTHER MASSACHUSETTS CITIES. An Overwhelming Victory for the Republicans of Worcester. Worcester, December 9. — The Re pubiicaus won an overwhelming victory In this city today, electing Francis A. llarrlug ton mayor aud all tbelr candidates for aider men. Tbo Democrats elected three candi dates for council and school committee in three wards and tho Republicans won the remaining five. The city voted for ltceme, reversing the result of la-t year. Only Local Issues. Salem, December, 9. Mayor Rautouliwas re-elected today. The city voted for license Politics did not enter into tne campaign, the nominations being made by citizens’ conven tion. There were contests upon local is sues. Mayer Dodge Re-Elected. Newburyport, December 9.—Mayor E. P. D.ulge, Republic,nr, was re-elected today. The alder men are t.vn Democrats and four Republican-1. Tw.i-thirds of the c runcilmen are Republican- License was carried by a large majority. Wan ed a Change. Lowell, December 9.—George W. Fifield, Democrat, was elected mayor today defeat ing Charles D. Palmer, Republican, nomi nated for the fourth time. The Democrats elected seven of the eight aldermen. The council is a tie, twelve to twelve. Tho city voted for license. Still Counting In Lynn. Boston, December 9.—The vote In the city election at Lvnn is not yet counted, ft is understood Fogg, Rep., i< elected mayor and license is voted by a large majority. Tho Hews From Keene. Keene, N. II., December 9 — tloratio Kimball, Democrat, was today electeil may or. The Democrats elect officers in Wards. The Republicans carry the other wards INDIANS KILLED According to an Unconfirmed Re port From Custer. Omaua, Neb., December 9.—A special from Rapid City. S. D.says: A baud of Indians from Little Wound’s camp Is camped about 10 miles east of the Cheyenne river, between tho mouths of French aud Battle cteeks. They have been raiding de serted raucues, Killing anu running oil stock, burning hay and grain and stealing household goods. Yesterday 20 armed men, well-mounted left Rapid City for the Indian camp. They will be j lined by a number of ranchmeD, and if they are not Intercepted by tbe troops will attack the Indians. A special from Custer says that not far from Buffalo Gap, T. M. Warren, a ranchman, with four of his men, attacked a raiding party of Indians and killed four. This story is not verified. In tho Bad Land9. Omaha, Neb., December 9.-The Bee’s special correspondent sends tbe following from Pine Ridge: A scout came lu tonight (Monday), and reported that no soon-r bad the hostile chiefs returned home from the council held Suudaj, than they proceeded to move camp several miles deeper into the bad lands Instead of counselling a more there from, as advised by Gen. Brook-*. RAILROAD MATTERS. Boston A Maine. Tl.e Boston & Maine will hold its annual meeting at Lawrence on Weduesdav. In ad ditlon to the electiou of directors, stockhol ders will be called upon to empower tile di rectors to issue stock from lime to time, as authorized by section 3, chapter 183. Acts o' 1890, to empower them to guarantee bonds ol the St. Jobnsbury A Lake Champlain rail ir^ -’„ll.S,1a!ltllorlzt‘i1 by c!l*Pler 407. Acts oi 18j0, and to accept the assignment to the Boston & Maine of the lease of the Wilton railroad by the Lowell. Boston A Maine Directors Res’en. Doyeb, N. H., December 9.—Directors Lord and Stevens of the Boston & Maine road, have resigned. It is rumored that Charles Sinclair of Pcrtsmouth, N. IJ-, “id ■ be elected ton^;?o;f. '^eneld, »• ^ will Canadian Pacific Prosperous* Months a j., December 9 —The resnier * meeting of the board of directors of ufifcm dian Pacific railroad d«cu5*?£Sptom.nta: ry dividend of one per cent for the half vear to be paid with the guaranteed half yearly payment of one and one-half per cent, mak , ing a total payment of two and one-half per cent for the half year. It U estimated the surplus earning i or the year, after paying two supplementary dividends, will leave 9925,000 to be added to the dividend reserve account. Atchison has a Surplus. Boston, December 9.—The annual report of the Atchison to the stockholders shows a surplus after all charges for nine months ending June 30, 1890. obituary. Mrs. Jane Crabtree Crlffin. Mrs, Jane Crabtree, wife of Mr. CbaridS S. D. Grifflo, of this city, died yesterday, aged 83 years and seven months. Everett Clackln. New Yoke, December 9.—Everett Glack io, a well-known and prominent member of Typographical Union, No. 6, died at his home, 1,254 Herkimer street, Brooklyn, yes terday of kidney disease. His Illness bad been of several months’ duration. An oper tlon was performed at St. Luke’s Hospital He was born In Portland, Maine, in 1853, and came to this city In 1865. About five years afteward be en tered a printing office In this city and learned his trade as printer. Uls last place of employment was at Harper Brothers’, He was elected president of No. 6 In 1886 and he served two years with general satis faction to its members. In 1889 he was elect ed secretary of the organization and served efficiently bis term of one year. In 1887 he ran for state senator in the Eighth district a, the candidate of the United Labor party, opposing John Swtnton, the nominee of the Socialistic Labor party. He was a strong advocate of tne single tax Idea, and be stumped the state tor Henry George when he ran for secretary of state. He al ways opposed hasty legislation in the affairs of the organization of which he was one of the leaders. His wife survives him. nwi VMMO W( «*ll »■ Rev. Aurelius S. Swift, who died at Went Randolph, Mass., Friday, aged about 83, was a natlvo of Falrlee. a graduate of the Bangor Theological Seminary, class of 1837, and bad been a pastor in the numerous towns of Maine, New Hampshire and Massa chusetts. Obituary Notes. Word was received In Biddeford, Tuesday, of the death at Pasadena, Cal, of the wife of Rev. Thomas N. Lord, a former Bidde ford Baptist pastor. Hon. Ellphalet Trask of Springfield, Mass., who was lieutenant governor when Hen. Banks was governor of Massachusetts In 1838, 1839 and 1860, died yesterday. MAINE. Fire at Turner. Lewiston, December 9.—The dwelliug of Edwin Fernald at Turner, burned last night. The fire caught about the stove pipe. Loss. $1000; insured for $600 on the house and $200 on the furniture. A. H. Nickerson Elected. Augusta, December 9.—A hearing before the council committee on Irregularity in elec* tion returns was held today. The case of Andrew H. Nickerson, Democratic candi date for the legislature, was decided. Some votes were cast for A. H. Nickerson, but it was proved that there was only one A. U. Nickerson In that class and he was decided elected. 13SB Scarlet Fever In Dexter. Dexteb, December 9 —There Is some lit tle excitement In Dexter over an outbreak of scarlet fever In town. The first cases ap peared about three weeks ago and the local board of health at once quarantined the children affected. There was some dispute of physicians, however, and in spite of the strict Inunctions of the board of health some regulations were disregarded. Other chil dren were exposed to infection and at pres ent three more children are down with the disease. Skowheggn’a Postoffice Located. Skowheoan, December 9.—A private let ter received here from E. F. Goodwin at Washington, states that the postoftice it Skow began has been located in the Grllfin A> Wentworth Block and that the official docu ments from the postoffice department will te forwarded at an early day. Another Slaughter Houso Burned. Cabibou, December 9.—C. E. Prescott's slaughter house at Caribou, with Its ccn unis, including 20 or 30 nogs, pressed be*I, hides, etc., was destroyed by fire Sunday. Loss, 81000; no insurance. Tha Woodland House in Ashes. Bangor, December 9.—Fire broke ont in the ell of the Woodland House at Phillips Lake, about 10 miles from this city, today. The fire was soon beyond control and tbe house was laid in ruins. Some of the furni ture was saved. Tbe stable and mill weie • wed. Tbe building was three stories high. It was owned by J. Fred Webster and E. N. Erery of this city, and valued at 80000; in sured for nbout 81500. C. B. Goodwin wis landlord. Newspaper Men Entertained Gardiner, December 9.—The Gardiner newspaper men entertained about 30 news, paper men from places on the Kennebec river today. This morning at 11 o’clock the visitors took the Kennebee Central railroad for the Soldiers' Home at Togus. At 2 p. m. a banquet was served at the Evans House, a*, which several speeches were made. W. J. Linders of Gardiner, presided. A com mittee was appointed to prepare by-laws for organization at a future meeting io bo held in Augusta. STAi E TOPICS OF INTEREST. Twenty of la°t summer’s table girls at the Poland Spring House have gone to Los An geles, Cal., t« act In a similar capacity in tbe great hotel, “ The KaymonJ,” at that place. There was a narrow escape from a big fire In Brunswick Monday noon, when Mr. Cof fin, janitor of Brunswick’s 870,000 town building found several barrels of paper stored away in the basement blazing away merrily. It took twenty minutes’ work with the hose to put the fire out. Mr. Hudson, of tbe Bangor Theological Seminary, is making a strong effort to estab lish a regular mission at Brownville Junc tion, in connection with the seminary, and hAH nrpnrhftl thf»r« a numh«r of SundAvn. It Is bis intention to soon commence build ing a place lu which he can carry on bis work to better advantage. The St. Stephen, N. B., and the Calais fire departments work together, and there is an intense rivalry between them. It is said that at a recent fire In Calais the rivals en gaged in a lively struggle to gat possession of the nearest hydrant, and before they had settled the contest the burning buiiiiiug came ueatly being entirely destroyed. The lime manufacturers of Rockland, Tbomasten amt Camden have a mutual lime insurance organization called the Knox County Lime Insurance Association. Every member of tbe association agrees to lusnre every cargo of lime that he ships under deck, and pays the established rate of premium to the secretary of the company, who, upon ap plication, issues a certificate of insurance. The manufacturers iiud this form of insur ance cheaper than the regular method, and at a meeting Monday voted to continue tbe orgamzttien another year. A large vein of quartz rock,,bearing both gold and sliver, has beeu found ou tbe farm of Mr. L. A. Pendleton in Plttston. 'l’bis ratm was formerly known a9 the old Jona than Reed farm, and tbe deposit has been known fot two or three years. This fall sev eral blasts were made In the ledge, wnlcn runs Southweet and northeast, ana >s m a wideveiu. Quartz taken surface contain both gold ami, ,«ea«1)h seen with a small pocket micro-and old mining experts have in.orined Mr. 1 en dleton that these precious metals are found iX^ar.zm^sJfflcient quant.ty to make its mining a paying operation. A Music Sox. The Young Women’s Christian Temper auce Union are caring for a little sick girl who has nearly lost the use of her eyes. She Is very fond of music. Uas not someone a music box to give her? It so, please leave It at the W. C. T. U. headquatters, 51J Ex I change street. The giver may he sure that I the gift will be well cared for and Ibrlghten 1 many hours for tbe little sufferer. A GOOD SHIP'S ILL-FATED VOYAGE. Steward Clark’s Story of the Loss of the St. Mary. A Cowardly British Skipper Sailed Away After Collision. And the Maine Vessel Struck While Trying to Make Port. Boston, December 9.-The story of the loss of tbe new Bath ship St. Mary on the Falkland Islands and the death of ber captain will be remembered. The St. Mwy before striking on the rocks where she finally STIlt to pieces bad been In collision with an u nkSvlvn vessel. Tbe collision took place on the mornfha' of August C, when the ship was 290 miles w terday O. M. Clark o the steward of the 11 wife who accompanl' were It this city. M.. of the collision as follows: The Si. Mary bad been going along under small sail, for It had been blowing somewhat and tbe gale had not abated sufficiently to allow the furled sails to be ret again. The night was sUrlit. Suddenly, about one bell In the middle watch, tbe lookout on tbe top gallant forecastle of the St Mary saw a light on tbe port bow. Ue Immediately hailed the quarter deck and informed the officer of the deck of Ids discovery. Tbe ship came near er and soon tbe lookout could see the Iron hull and painted parts of what was evidently a British vessel. She was evidently running free and therefore It was her place to look out for the St. Mary. But as she came near er and did not offer to change her course tbe lookout thought be had better ball the stranger and warn him to bear off. He brought a lantern and swung it over bis head to emphasize his request to shove over tbe helm and avoid a collision. Then the stranger beard. Ue threw over ihft tillrtr an:? Iipotn fn Imue fF it too late. The vessels came together and the stranger shoved her jlbboom between the main and mlzzen masts ol the St. Mary. It broke short mi. Then the vessels came to Rether. The St. Mary’s spanker mast and oom crashed off short, her cross-jack yard came down on deck, her mlzzen top gallant mast carried away with a crash ana brought the light yards down with It. The mlzzen chain plates were torn off and the shrouds carried away. The main yard sprung Itself In the middle, the after rail was brushed out of sight and altogether there was quite a maze of soars and rigging on the quarter deck of the St. Mary. Then the ships tore themselves apart. The stiaoger spoke to none of the St. Mary’s crew. As she drifted astern the heavy Iron anchor stock from her cat head fell on the quarter deck of the St- Mary, snapped off short. It was the only clew to the British er’s Identity. She bore off without ascertain ing to what extent the St. Mary was dam aged and evidently did not care whether the American sank »r not. Captain Carver, finding It Impossible to reach Valparaiso to make repairs, ran for the Falkland Islands. On the 10th, about 8 o’clock, the carpenter who bad taken the place of the second mate, who was sick In his bunk, went aloft to look for land. Wheu he got on the fore-royal-yard he saw some breakers, which fact he communicated to the mate, who was In charge of the deck. The carpenter th«n went below, supposing that the mate would regulate the ship’s course properly. About an hour or so alter the S . Mary, under good sail with a fair breeze blowing, struck on the rocks. The crew reached land all right, but the captain fell dead from heart disease the same even ing, worn out by his misfortunes and the hardships he had undergone. Steward Clark’s story puts an enck to the theory per sistently advanced In some quarters that the ship Magellan was the ono that collided with the St. Mary. The Magellan was In the vicinity of the Horn at the time of the collision, aud has since been seen dismantled and abandoned, but she was an American ship, black painted, and never had painted ports. The broken anchor stock on the deck of the St. Mary may yet give a clue to the ship that caused so much damage, ami wnose cowardly master abandoned the yea sel be had struck. THOUGHT THEY WERE LOST. Oil on the Raging Waters Saved the Steamer Nlvranda. [Special to the Press. 1 Halifax, V. S. December 9.—Said Csp tain l.eeemon of tbe steamer Myrauda of tbe Red Cross line, today, when standing on the deck of bis Ice-covered steamer: “Had 1 not used ot), the ship would have found ered." When docked the steamer presented the appearanco of an iceberg. She was cov. ered with ice from the water-mark close to the mast-tops. She left St. Johns, Novem ber 29th and when not an hour out, a storm was eDCountered which soon developed into a hurricane accompanied by a blinding snow storm. On tbe evening of tbe first, a pecu liar leaden darkness suddenly setthddown and the wind Increased In violence. Rails, parts ot tbe bridge, settees, and the gar boards pipe covering the ventilators were washed away. The water Hooded tbe sa loon and second cabin and the engine room, extinguishing the fires. All hands gave themselves up for lost. As a last resort the captain used oil bags, placing them close along tbe water’s edge. The effect was marvellous. The waves, which threat ened to break over the vessel and engulf her, when they came lh contact with the oil be came subdued, and Captain Lesemau de clares that the use of oil saved tbe steamer. Several of tbe crew narrowly escaped. Third Officer Connolly was carried from the wheel, dashed against the rails and serious ly Injured. Two seamen, who were with Connolly, were washed along the deck away forwird, and found In-enslble. Tuesday morning, 90 miles WNIV of Lou’sburg, the engineer reported the coal running short. The captain decided to make St. 1’lerre, and succeeded In reaching port the next morning, not a moment too soon, as all loose pieces of wood had been gathered together for fuel. An hour later tbe steamer would have boon In a helpless condition. Schooner Fred E. Cox, from New York, arrived this evening. Captain Cooke re ports that his vessel was throwu on her beam ends five times. She lost her foresail and boom, and experienced difficulty In reaching port. Steamer Toronto, the weekly boat for Portland, Is hourly expected. St. John, N. F., December 9.—The Nor wegian bark Uarjnelde was wrecked at Codroy, Sunday night, during a heavy snow storm. Thirteen lives were lost, but two of tbe crew being saved. PARNELL IN IRELAND. Hostility to Cladstone Will Ba the Burden of Hla Speeches. Dublin, December 9.—Mr. Parnell has ar rived in Dublin. He is the guest of the Lord Mayor at the Mansion House. He In tends to reorganize the National League In Dublin. London, December 9.—Mr. John E. Red mond, tepresentiug Wexford In Parliament, the orator par excellence of the non-seceding Irish members, and Dr. Joseph E. Kenny, Mr. Parnell’s colleague from Cork, left for Dublin last night. They will arrauge meet ings, at wMch their chlel will speak In that city, Cork, Limerick, Waterford and other I'llMJCB Mr. Parnell finds that candidates (or Par liament to be paid out of tho fund are as plenty as blackberries, hundreds havlng^al ready applied fur the twenty vacancies cre ated by Saturday’s secession, and eaah post bringing fresh offers of patriotic services. The lund that so many are willing to assist In distributing Is at present kept In Paris It being largely Invested in French “Rentes.” It will however, probably become a bone of contentlcn, and prospective litigation Is al ready reported. lu his approaching cam paign. Mr. Purnell will make hostility to Mr. Gladstone the keynote of his addresses. in an Interview today, Mr. Davltt ex piessed himself as still cheerful regarding tho situation. Foreign Notes. Great Britain and Portugal have conclud ed a modus vlvendl in regard to their Afri can possessions. A bark which has arrived at Hamburg re ports that July 31st. near Cape Horn she spoke bark Manta Marguerite, commanded by Captain Johann Ortb, formerly Archduke John of Austria, which was supposed to have been lost while bound fruui Buenos Ayres for Valparaiso. Henty M. Stanley lias cabled a long letter to the London Times in defeuce of England from foreign states, arising irom disclosures in connection with the Euiln relief expedi tion. Tbe priests on the Achilles Islands have appealed to Mr. Ballour (or aid (or 400 (ami lies, who are reduced to distress by tbe (ail ure of the potato crop there. They are com pelted to eat diseased potatoes to keep from Starvation. Mr. Gladstone has written a letterregard ng the crisis In the Irish Nationalist party, lu which he bays them appear-* to t>enu question utlecliui; himself, but only unex plained contradictions betwern the Parnell of November. 185)0, and the Parnell of all for mer dates since the II a warden latervlew.

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