13 Haziran 1900 Tarihli Portland Daily Press Gazetesi Sayfa 1

13 Haziran 1900 Tarihli Portland Daily Press Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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S PORTLAND DAILY PRESS. OS jmt] M |n_ rn-w-r-M-T11M,^.. | |M|| -t—-Ti|M-B-n-rnf--Triri— ESTABLISHED JUNE 23, 1862-VOL. 38. PORTLAND, MAINE, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 13, 1900 ISLyK.tVSSS) PRICE THREE CENTS. F"""-J | Prospective jj i| Purchaser! ij ij Stearns jj ii Bicycles jj I * —will stand the closest criticism , | (• and the moat careful iuveatiga- | (• 'ion. > II Look thoroughly Into all wheels < 0 and you’ll hotter appreciate the . i Stearns. I [ ’, Probably the Stearns Chainless (I *! and Cushion Krame models arc, (I 1 ’ this year, getting more than their I) | • share ol praise. Haro you seen |) 11 them? You'll simply bubble en- ^ ( I thusiasm. J I | chainless, $75. Cushion Frame, ' , | *00, f ij OREN | HOOPERS \ ii SONS. \ _S Ic o H B H. H. HAY & SON, | middle SI. I ' ■ — ^_ Travelling Bay a good Suit ! Case, one that j Car will stand the rUI wear o( long and hard usage. Our BUSinCSS special (ire dollar Case Is full 24 QP inch length, hand somely made and warranted In ev Pleasure ery way. Other good salt cases— two to ten dollars. Coe, THE HATTER, I: 107 Middle Bt. Qeo. A. CorriN M'o’r. * JUNE WEDDINGS. Scarcely anything more appropriate than Cut Class or Haviland A Co. China In both ot which we have a larger stock than usual. New shapes and decorations In Cake Plates, Salads, A. D. Coffees, Bread and But ter, Tea and Breakfast Plates. Havi land A Co. China Dinner Sets of 113 pieces $23,00, 127 pieces $30.00, with five other patterns of greater value. French China Ice Cream Sets, 12 Plates and Tray, $2.50. Burbank, Douglass & Cu. ♦-♦ CHAPMAN NATIONAL BANK ot Portland, Maine. CAPITAL. $100,000.00 Sorpltts and Undiilded Protits, $29,000.00 Solicits the accounts of Banks.Mer cantile Firms, Corporations and Individuals, and la prepared to fur nish its patrons the best facilities and liberul accommodations. Interest Paid on Deposits. SPECIAL DEPARTMENT FOR SAVINGS, latonlews and Correspondence Initad. CCI.LEN C. CHAPMAN, • Presldenl. THOMAS H. EATON, • • Cashier. —— DIRECTORS: - CULLEN C. CHAPMAN. SETH L. LARRABEE, E. M. STEADMAN, PERLEY P. BURNHAM, BRICE M. EDWARDS, JAMES F. HAWKES HENRY S. OSBOOO WILLIAM M. MARKS „ ADAM f. LEIGHTON. ^ BILLER RASTER. His Forces Hare Occupied Laiog’s Nek. Boers Evacuate an Im portant Position. Roberts’ Commonieations To Be Mended. British Now in Possess, ion of Railroad. British Casualty List Aggregates 24,000 Men. London, June IS—3 30 a. m.—Two piece, of new. encouraging to the Brlt tnh in the official despatches are that the broken communication, of Ixird Hebert, are in a fair way to lie mended by the force, moving northward, and south ward. and driving off the roving oom mandoes, and that Sir Heaver. Duller Is at last master of Ixilng. Nek. xciegrapnic coimutmiunuou wim wm Huberts Is expected |to be reetoml today, as a despatch from Bloemfontein, yester day, says that the railway Is In British possession again and that the work of repairing the line Is going on rapidly with the abundant material warehoused at Bloemfontein. From the subjoined telegram It would appear that Gen. Hunter was in com mand of the troops ref't rod to liy Gen. Kelly-Kenay In his despatch from Bloem fontein: 3" Bloemfontein, June 18.—Gen. Hun ter Is coming up rapidly from the north west. having severely defeated a large commando of Boers who had destroyed two miles of railway north of Kroon stad.” The Boer government Is also Issuing news cheering to Its sympathizers. The following bulletin, the Boer ver sion of the' disaster to the Derby shires, was posted by President Kruger Sun day at Machadodorp: ~ "On June 7, four divisions of burghers commanded by Steenkamp, Froneiunn, Duploy, Fourie and Xel, attacked the British at Uoodeval, killed 800, took 700 prisoners and captured Immense stores of food and ammunition, a Maxim* gun and 1000 lyddite shells. Some food was taken by the Boer farmers, and the rest was burned. The English mull was tak en. The burghers attacked from the open veldt und gave evidence of unprecedented bravery.” Uen. DeWet was also fighting on June 8, whether at Boodeval or elsewhere, is not dear; but the Boer war office gives It out that he captured 3000 suits of clothing, blankets, gloves and boots. Being unable to carry them with him In hls rapid sweep through the country, according to the Transvoul war office, he burned the whole mass. Gen. De Wet has also reported that he put 1000 British out of action and de stroyed property valued at 100,030 pounds. As Lord Methuen Is officially described as lighting on June 7, it Is possible that he was engaging Gen. De Wet. ZllAA/1 Uillg WV u uvepumu w «uv Express from Maohadodorp, dated June 10, via Lorenzo Marques, those around President Kruger say that Louis Botha and Delarey have been offered indirectly 10,000 pounds a year to lay down their arms, and President Kruger expects the same offer to be inode to himself, Presi dent .Steyn uni De Wet. President Kruger believes that the British make these offers to close the war on the principal that it will cost less than to tight is out. A despatch ^from Lorenzo Marques says that 15,000 Boers are reported to bo re tiring on Middleburg from various quar ters and after weeding out the faint hearted, 20,000 steadfast men are still left. Gen. Buller was unable on Monday to follow up the Boers from luck of caval ry as well as water. The despatches de scribe him as fighting a spirited advance over a rugged field under prolonged rifle fire. The Boers had two guns.which they got away. Few dead or wounded Boors were found. It seems probable that the major portion of the Boers had withdrawn before the advance was be gun. Lord Methuen, Gen. Rundlo and Gen. Brabant are reported to have 35,000 men and 50 guns engaged in dosing the Boers in the eastern part of Orange River colo ny. The .war office casualty returns up to Juns 9 aggregate 33,001, besides 7U3 offi cers and 13,363 men ssnt home as invalids, i bat notJ|1 Deluding the elek la South African hosnltal*. LAIIfl’S HEIL EVACUATED. Boers Leave Their Eatreaehed Po sitions. London, Juae 19.—9.18 p. m.—The war office ha* Issued the following: "Buller to the Secretory of War: “Jonbert’s Farm, June 19.—6.08 p. m. —Encamped four miles north of Volks rust. Isilngs Nek and Majnoa were com pletely evacuated hy the Boers last night. General Clery, from Ingngo, Is now com ing over the Nek. I have had to oamp here for want of water. A correct list of yesterday's casualties will be sent as soon os received.” - AS CROWN COLONIES. Idea af Asloaesim Gaveraaient la Traaavaal Abaudoned. London, June 19.—10.80 p. m.—It Is learned by the Associated Press that the government has at last decided upon a plan for the civil settlement of South Africa. The details are kept most secret but It can be safely said that the Orange ltlver oolony and the Transvaal will be oome Crown colonies, the latter prolmbly bolngjrc-nnuied the Transvaal oolony. Sir Alfred Milner, It Is declared, Is to be high commissioner of South Africa In spite of the opposition he has tnourred. The Crown oolony form of government can be best understood by reference to the sys tem in vogue In the West Indies, Hlwre Leone and Ceylon. Endeavors will be made to put this In force as soon as pos sible In the Transvaal and Orange river colonies though It Is scarcely expected that the details will be announced or some parts of the work be begun for a few months. While the civil settlement will be drawn up so as to be eventually Inde pendent of military enforcement, It Is realised that the Initial work must be effected with the cooperation of the troops. Sir Alfred Milner appears to believe that civil anil military nacifi cation oan proceed simultaneously and that a possible scattered rising will nut seriously retard the progress of re-organl zatlon onoe It Is begun. The oolonial office Is said to be of the opinion, how ever, that the maintenance of good sized garrisons at such centres as Bloemfon tein,JKroonstad, Johannesburg and Pre toria will be necessary for a long time af ter the Crown oolony system gets In working order. For this reason and others put forward by Sir Alfred Milner, the Idea of granting an autonomous form of government has been abandoned. It Is believed though It cannot be verified, that a portion of the Transvaal will be partitioned oil to Xata 1. The whole arrangement may be roughly described as coinciding with the views advanced by the progressives os opposed to those held by the hondttes. The final steps In this decision have been taken during the last few days. Mr. Chamberlain sent for Mr. J. P. ' Fitzpatrick, author of "The Transvaal from Within," who Is well known In connection with South African affairs and spent a whole day in consultation with him. Mr. Fitzpatrick wlil sail for Cape Town June 16 to join the advisory comm lttee which Sir Alfred Milner Is forming. CAPK COLONY CABINET. Cape Town, June 19.—Premier Schrein er 1b engaged In reforming the cabinet, owing to the resignation of Messrs. J. X. Merrlman, treasurer; J. W. Sauer, com missioner of public works and Dr. Te Water, minister without portfolio. At the recent bond caucus the premier's policy was generally oondemned. The chief point of difference relates to the treatment of the rebels. The bond, led by Messrs, lloffmeyer and Te Water, de - sired general amnesty. Mr. Schreiner urged a scheme recommended from the Imperial government under which a special tribunal will try the rebels, con victed leaders will be Imprisoned and per petually disfranchised and the rank and file will be disfranchised for a period. It la understood Mr. Schreiner’s policy will be supported by the entire Loyalist party which Is endorsed by the loyal public opinion of South Africa. GOING TO JOHANNESBURG. London, June 12.—The colonial office has received a telegram from Sir Alfred Milner dated June 8, saying that the chamber of mines at Cap) Town has agreed upon 580 representatives of 1131 leading mining and other companies who will proceed to Johannesburg as soon as Lord Roberts decides that it Is practica ble to receive them. Sir Alfred Milner asserts that he Is doing all that Is pos sible to reopen business, but Is discourag ing the return of the Ultlanders until the question of transportation and food supply Is more settled. *■* GEN. BULLER FIGHTING. London, June 19.—10.10.—The war office posts the following despatch from General Buller: "Headquarters In Natal, June 11.—We forced Almond’s Nek today. It Is not marked on the map, but Is the last defile to Charleston Fla ts. The enemy were In considerable force with several guns In position. The brunt of the fighting fell upon the Second Dorse ts, who carried the position at the point of the bayonet, and the Third Cavalry brigade who were heavily attacked on our right from very broken country round Iketlnt mountain. I hope our casualties are less than one hundred,, which considering the extreme length of the position, Is much less than I expected. The whole attack was di rected by HUdyard, whose dispositions were; extremely good. The artillery, tents, brigade and third oayalry brigade did most of the work." HAVE DEFEATED BOERS. London, Jane U.—S 89 p. m.—The war office has received the following from Kelly-Kenny: “Bloemfontein, June 19.—Our troops from the north are at Honlngspralt (south of Hoodeval, where the Boers cut the British lines of communication), hav ing defeated the enemy. They will be at America skiing tomorrow at 8 a. m. General Knox moves out from Kroonstad to Intercept the enemy. Fuller particu lars later." CUBAN P08T0FF1CE SCANDAL Glvrs Mars Prominence Here Than la Havana* New York, June 19.—Senor Don Noco las lilvero, the editor of El Dlarto de la Marina, Havana, Is In the city on his way to Washington. Speaking of Cuban affairs he said: “Cuba's future Is one of great moment to us. The better or Influential element In Cuba wants security and order. They may be had under American auspices. 111th peace and order the Island can pros per and will prosper. ’' Concerning ths Irregularities In the Cuban postoffice he said that In Cuba the matter was not given the prominence that It had been here. Senor lilvero lntl mat*si that other I rre gu lari ties might be found If the Investi gation was extended. He referred to the expenses for health and engineering pro jects. He was of the opinion that If the United States In taking charge of the Island had respected the constitutional autonomy accorded It by Spain, modify ing It simply to meet the new conditions created by the American Intervention, neither the postal nor other scandals oould have obtained. CARS ARE RUNNING. St. Lou la Road Abla to Meet All Dcmanda of Traffic.

8t. Louis, June 19.—There were no Important developments in the Ktrike today. The Transit company claims to have the situation practically under con trol by reason of the protection ufforded by the police and the sheriff’s posse. The oompnny’s officials stated that oars were running on every line In the city, meet ing all the demands of traffic. More men are now employed by the company than there is work for them to do. a> wording To Manager Uaumhoff. Night cars ore running on all lines. Lines to the north and south are still guarded by police, bnt In the central and western portions the police have been In a great measure withdrawn from the cars. The Southern electric line Is In opera tion tonight for the first time since the strike began. The line is regarded in police circles as the most difficult of all the lines to protect. M’LEAN MEN IN CONTROL. Columbus, Ohio, June 12.—The Mc Lean men controlled the preliminary meetings of the Democratic state conven tion today, but they ore evidently playing for harmuny more than for places. John R McLean's friends are In the majority on the new state oentral com mittee Belts)ted this evening, and it will select the campaign committee and mem bers of the state executive committee. The McLean men are not opposing some aspirants for delegates to Kansas City, and for state nominations who heretofore have been strongly opposed to Mr. Mc Lean. THE WEATHE1L Boston, June 12.—Local forecast for Wednesday: Fair weather; Thursday nnpflv (•IaikI* til nlnnilv nnaalhlv ahnu’sira ■ variable winds. Washington, June 13.—Forecast for Wednesday and Thursday for Maine; Fair Wednesday and Thursday, variable winds shifting to fresh easterly. EOCAE WEATHK5 REPORT. Portland, June 12, 11)00. — The local weather bureau records the following: 8 a. m.—Barometer. 80.014; thermome ter, 01); dew point, 40; rel. humidity, 43; direction of the wind, N| velocity of the wind, 0; state of weather, p cloudy. 8 p. in.—Barometer. 30.1(M; thermome ter. 00; dew point, 43; rel. humidity, 40; direction of the wind, SW; velocity of the wind, 7; state of weather, p cloudy. Maximum temperature, ,0; minimum temperature, 02; mean temperature. 60; maximum wind velocity, 18; precipi tation—24 hours, 0. WEATHER OBSERVATIONS. The agricultural department weather bureau for yesterday, Juno 12, taken at 8 p. m., merldun time, the observation for his section being given In this order: Temperature, direction of wind, state of weather: Boston, 68 degrees, SE, cldy; New York, 46 degrees, SE, p cldy; Philadelphia, 74 degrees, SE. cldy: Washington, 72 de grees, NK, cldy; Albany, 68 degree*, N, clear; Buffalo, 66 degrees, NK, oleAr; De troit. 61 degrees, SK, clear; Chicago, 63 degrees, E, p oldv; St. Paul, 76 degrees, S, cldy; Huron, Dak , 62 degrees, NK, cldy; Btsmarok, 70 degrees, NW, oluSJ; Jacksonville, 78 degrees, SK, cloudy. HUNT FOR CHAMPION. Officers Searching Everywhere for Murderer of Goodwin Family. The Wenham Clue Turns Out To Be a False One. Evidence at Inquest Confirms Farm Hand’s Guilt. Authorities Seem to Be Completely at Sea as To His Whereabouts. tmcUL TO THE rim.) West Xewfleld, June 13.—When) is George Champion? That Is the <|uestlon which most interests the Investigators of the wholesale crime committed In this town Sunday night. It Isn’t now a ques tion of how It was done or who did It, but what has become of the murderer? There Is not a shadow of doubt that the murder of George W. Goodwin, his son, housekeeper and farm hand was com mitted by somebody thoroughly aqualnted with the habits of the household. The testimony before the Inquest today con clusively located George Champion at Goodwin's house late Sunday afternoon. He was missing after the buildings were burned, Monday morning and has not yet been located. Suspicion points to nobody else. County Attorney Matthews ex pressed himself, after the Inquest ad journed this afternoon, as satisfied that the officers are following up the right clues, and he added that he belleTcd they will be successful. All last night Deputy Sheriffs Miles of Saco and Spencer of Berwick were driv ing about the surrounding country, hunting for some trace of Champion. John Carlton, proprietor of the Carlton house, West Xewfleld, went with them. They called pe ople out of their beds to give a description of the missing man and to ask If he had been seen within twenty-four hours. The homes of two families with whom he was acquainted were visited, and two road houses be tween here and Union village were M'iuvuru 111 YOIU Early In the forenoon Carlton drove home, tired und discouraged, put up his home and started Into recover a little of hU lost sleep. But the two deputes, after a decidedly brief spell at napping, re sumed their quest. They were at work on a Dover clue when they got word that a man, thought to be Champion, had boarded the Boston bound train at Union, on the northern division of the Boston & Maine at 0.10, and got off at Wenham. Sheriff Thompson sent the two deputies to Wenham, but as soon as they reached there they became aware that they were on the wrong trail. The sus pected party was none other than the American express agent at Wenham, who had come down to the New Hampshire border on a brief visit, and whose board ing of the early train had so stirred up the dwellers at.Unlun. There are many who believe that Cham pion is In hiding within a few miles of the Uoudwln farm; others think that he Improved the tour hours start anti, being familiar with the woods, has been able to keep under cover and make rapid progress away from the scene of his crime. Coroner Moulton and his jury, assisted by County Attorney Matthews and Sheriff Thompson, were In session from nine till two o’clock today, with an hour's recess at noon. During that time they examined ten witnesses. The most important testimony was that of Dr. Leavitt of Effingham, N. IX., who described In detail the condition of the lx dies and stated that there was positive evidence of itumler. Two little girls, ltachel Wadlelgh and Ix-na Smart, testi fied that they called at the Goodwin house, late Sunday afternoon und saw George Champion there. Leon Moors/ son of Samuel O. Moors, repeated to the jury the statement pub lished this morning, that Scott Goodwin told him Sunday, that Champion had been at the Goodwin farm a week, was to work there hoeing, and didn’t want any body to know about It, for fears the tax collector would be after him. The other witnesses were George Reed, Mrs. Reed and Ida Reed, at whose home Frod Bertsh, the farm hand, spent the early part of Sunday evening; John Drew and Fred Reed, occupants of the form about a mile from the fire. Drew being the first to visit the scene of the tragedy i Ch arles Sanborn, who helped recover and Identify the bodies. At two o’clock the Inquest was ad journed, subject to the call of the coroner. This was done at the suggestion of the county attorney, who hopes to locate the murderer before the verdict of the inquest Is rendered. It is not regarded by the people of the town as at all strange that Uoodwln was keeping Champion In seclusion. It was not the first lime he had done It. About seven years ago Champion was arrested on a charge of tho laroeny of an overcoat, gave a New Hampshire deputy the slip, and sought refuge at Uoodwln s farm, be ing harbored there till the wrath of the prosecuting oflliers was exploded- Since then be lias often visited Uoodwln's. About every resident of the town, within two or three miles of the Uood wln place, has some story to tell al»ut Champion being a reckless, nervy, dissi pated, revengeful hot-tempered man. , Champion must have known Uoodwln's habit of keeping considerable money about the house; everybody with whom Uoodwln had business dealings knew It. Within a week a resident of a neighbor ing village asksd for a loan of ftjOd, and was told by Uoodwln that he always kept that much money on hand, nnd would be willing to loan it at six per cent on good security. The money had not changed hands when the tragedy put an end to the negotiations. The hasty description sent out last night by Sheriff Thompson was erroneous In several lmDortnnt details. Here Is u revision, authorized by the kh“rlff, and founded on Information obtained from Champion's two sisters and others who knew him Intimately: Height, about five feet, eleven Inches; weight, 170 pounds; swarthy complexion; black hair anl small black moustache; black, piercing eyes; one finger of left hand missing up to the seoond joint, but there Is a difference of recollection as to whether It Is the Index or little finger; walks In a loose-jointed, angular manner, and has a slight limp in left foot, occa sioned by an axe-wound received two years ago when dropping wood. Ills I clothing Is described as follows: Dark I frock coat, dark vest, trousers a mixture of brown and gray, and considerably worn; black derby hat, black shoes,white shirt and collar and blue necktie. MURDERER STILL AT LARGE. And Probably Far lu (hr Lead of the Poller. (By Associated Press.) West Xewfleld, June 13.—The tragt^ly at the Ueorge Goodwin place hits lost none of its terrible features in the lap?** of hours since the charred remains of four persons were taken from the smok ing ruins of the house and what is more deplorable still, the murderer Is at large and probably far in the lead of the po lice. Champion,the much wanted farmhand, has completely disappeared and the po lice despite their most careful precau tions to close avenues of escape, on main lines of travel and to semi out descrip tions of the fugitive, have accomplished nothing, although seating out on “Wild goos? chases.1 * Champion’s description has been given so accurately by those who knew him that the fugitive seemingly has turned up in many places at or about the some time. From Union, X. II., early this morning came the report that Cham pion had been seen to jump on a moving south-bound train, but although this mysterious passenger was practically chased to Wenham, Mass., by detectives, it was not until evening that the passen ger was proven to be an express agent of the town, who had been on a visit to Union and had gotten his train on the return by the merest chance and then rode all the way to Wenham In a Imggag* oar. The report that Champion wot headed towards Boston naturally stirred up police activity In many places. Ths best showing for his capture lies In th« work of Read Lang, a Senbornvllls officer, who had Champion In his hands no* long ago for a misdemeanor, and can Identify him on sight Mr, Lang ba* lleves that Champion will go hack to Malden, Mass., where he formerly be* longed, anil If so he will be caught them or In Boston. Lang accordingly, acting under Instructions from County Sheriff Thompson, left for Boston at 5.80. On the way np he told the Associated Press correspondent that he believed Champion spent Montlay night at the home of a niece, Mrs. Nat Heath, who lives on the outskirts of Union, and that he was within speaking distance of the officers several times when they went to the house, for twloe that night the officers searched tfle next house, that of lieonard Hill. Mr. d*nng also told df how a strung* er boarded a morning train and told Conductor Colhath that he “dlil not have time to get a ticket” paying hts fare ta Portsmouth from a roll of hills. This early morning passenger has proven to be John bounders of Wenham, according to the Intter's own statement. Matters at the Uoodwln place an- tin* i - — —J Carpets Cleaned, Dueled and Steamed, moths nnd microbes Killed. OREN HOOPER’S SONS. spr7Utf MAINE ARTIFICIAL STONE COT Manufacturers and dealers In all kinds of Portland Cement goods. Office 117 Kennebec* street, opposite P. & K. depot. Estimates glv en on Ar Iflclal Slone Sidewalks, l>rivewavs. Floors, etc. Cement Carden Boners furnished and set: also Common Cement Cellar Floors. AM work done at lowest prices and satisfactlou guaranteed. A. W II Hit; I MS, HOBEHT LUCAS* mj22tMsp JUNE IS THE MERRY MONTH FOR WEDDINGS. £ The happy wedding hells will soon be riuging, and. of course, you will be properly clad for tin event. Your Fowl wear 1 < an Important thing. We have a Fine Line of Wedding slip* per* i prices fit the quality auJ style se lected, ranging from • 1.30 to $4-00 Excellent Trxd.i Id MIu.i’ „,i child,,o'. Oxford., ellh.r la Black or KUIMtU CENTER & MCDOWELL, 539 Congreu Street. BROWM BLOCK. Jun2dlf!S II You Really Have to Wait for fire to come up so as to Ret a ciianca at the moral u|r paper you uo not need Benson's (harronl as it kindles very much quickor than wood, and saves lots of time. Big Bag tOc at All Clrocera. (TALK No. 21K) THE PROOF. Quite1 often I hear people say that they cannot understand how eye strain causes headache. Yesterday I hail a proof. A lady who was wait ing in my office fur a friend, tried ua several pairs of glasses as a pastime. I presume a half dozen pairs were all she looked through, but in u few moments she hnd u headache. She said she believed her head would have almost split, if she had tried on any more. The trouble was that the glas ses did not lit her anu her eyes were strained. The strain brought on a head each, which only rest would relieve. If the eye strain would cause head ache in her case it will in thousand* of cases If you are subject to head aches and do not know the cause, have your eyes examin'd. I will do it for you and tell you honestly whak can be done. A. M. WENTWORTH, Practical Optician, HS 1-4 Congress St. Offico Hours,-Si £3

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