7 Nisan 1903 Tarihli The San Francisco Call Gazetesi Sayfa 1

7 Nisan 1903 Tarihli The San Francisco Call Gazetesi Sayfa 1
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SAN FRANCISCO/TUESDAY, APRIL 7, 1903. VOLUME XCIII— NO. 128. PRICE FIVE CENTS. Continued on Page 7, Column 4. The appropriation fdr all grades was made Jn a lump sum.- it appears r that this manipulation of the salary fund was Congress authorized a definite number of clerks in each grade,' ranging from $C0O to $l"00 a year. It has been discov ered by Waters that the number of clerks in the higher grades is much In excess of the authorized number. Those in charge of the salary fund go controlled t*h.3 bituation that only as many clerks were employed in the ..lower grades as there was money enough to pay after the .fav ored ones in the higher grades had been paid. covered that the affairs . of the division of salaries and allowances have been so manipulated that there are many more high salaried clerks on the rolls of the Postoffice Department than Congress ever Intended there should be and not nearly so many low salaried clerks em ployed as Congress has made appropria tions for. In the Chamber of Deputies yesterday Premier Combes took occasion to declare the whole story to be false and charac terized it as an infamous accusation like all of those made since he had become head of the Government. M. Combes also has , written to this -morning's papers to th« sa.ma affect. . ; . . . .V ; . " . . .,:'-. - PARIS, April ".— The opposition papers recently have been hinting that a person or persons in close relations with the Government had offered to secure an authorization to remain In France for the monastery of the Grand Chartreuse if the latter. paid $200,000. ' The editor of a paper, Le Petit Dau pinols. alluding to this allegation, recently asserted that two persons whom he named had made him this offer on behalf of a personage whom he called "Mon sieur X." ¦ Opposition Press Hints at Corruption in High Government Circles. PREMIER OF FRANCE DENOUNCES RUMORS By the acceptance of the formal peti tion for the opening of bids by the Town Trustees of San Mateo last night a pro ject for uniting three of the cities of San Mateo County by an electric car line and of establishing a pleasure ground on the bay shore of proportions to rival '*Coney Island is definitely inaugurated. Charles W. Clark, son of the millionaire Senator of Montana, at present residing in San Francis J. Carolan and Henry i P. Bowie, two capitalists of the same town, are behind the scheme with unlim ited funds. It Is the purpose of the three promoters | of the monumental, trolley scheme to establish a car line at San. Mateo first, and then to extend branches up to Bur llngame and over the mountains to Half moon Bay. At Coyote Point, a lofty point of land jutting into the bay two miles distant from San Mateo, • extensive pleas ure grounds are to be located calculated to be a stronsr attraction to San Fran cisco's pleasure seekers. No intimations of the extensive scheme of the three San Mateo capitalists escaped them until last night when they present ed their petition for a franchise giving a right of way for an aggregate of about four and a half miles of track within the town limits. The petition created a stir among the Trustees, but a motion to advertise for bids w-as passed- without a dissenting vote. June 1 is the day named for the opening of bids. As it Is ¦ understood that no bids other Millionaire Charles W. Clark Is Behind Enterprise. Anxious to Settle Indebtedness In curred by Them During Epidemic at Cornell University. ITHACA. N. Y., April 6,-Presidenf Schurman of Cornell University to-day announced that he had received from An drew Carnegie, who is a trustee of the University, a communication in which Carnegie begged to be allowed to pay all bills incurred by students of Cornell Uni versity on account of sickness during the recent epidemic, in all cases where the students or their parents will permit it.' made. that 'favored clerks would receive higher salaries, although there were no vacancies in the superior grades. In the $1000 grade there are 500 clerks in- excess of the, number provided for by law. in higher grades than $1000, the exce** is not so large. CARNEGIE OFFERS TO PAY STUDENTS' MEDICAL BILLS Newlands, a delay was caused by the necessity of gaining Fred Sharon's con sent to the sale of the stock. Mr. Shardh resides in Paris.', John C. Kirkpatrlck, manager of the Sharon estate, adjusted affairs on behalf of the absent owner. Tho English stockholders were also apprised of the negotiation and after inquiry con cluded to sell their holdings. GAINS AN ADVANTAGE. Barry Coleman, as the executor of the estate of Evan J. Coleman, deceased, yes terday filed in the probate court of San Francisco a petition for the confirmation of the sale of certain shares of the stock of the San Gabriel Wine Company to H. E. Huntington for $60 per share. It is presumed that the same price was paid to the representatives of the Sharon estate. In conducting the negotiations Mr. Hell man requested a deposit of the stock on the condition that if it was not returned within ten days a sum equal to $60 a share should be sent to the owners. Last Thursday the stockholders received the money Instead of the stock, and H. E Huntington is now the king of San Ga briel Valley. In his contest for railway supremacy In the region of country adja cent to Los Angeles and Pasadena the ownership of this vast tract of land will give him many advantages over his ad versaries. A few months ago II. E. Huntington, who had surveyed the beautiful valley of the San Gabriel, determined to acquire this tract of 1100 acres. I. W. Hellman of the Nevada National Bank of 'Ian Francisco and the Farmers' and Mer chants' Bank of Los Angeles was author ized to conduct the .negotiations for the acquisition of a majority " of the, 5000 shares of stock. The Sharon estate was found to be the owner of a considerate number of shares. After prices had been adjusted to the satisfaction of Frank O. The British investors, however, declined to sell, believing that the price would go to $200 a share. In due time the company decided to establish' a winery on the premises. Investment of $250,000 in build ings and general equipment was the next step. The business of winemakinu was not as successful as the promoters pre dicted. The land, fair .to behold, was found unsuitable for the growth of wine producing grapes. The stock began to de cline in value. During the languishing season, or the period of reaction following the overspeculation in land, the stock continued to decline. BRITISHERS HOLD SHARES. scntative of the corporation and disposed of 1200 shares at par to English investors. The Los Angeles boom followed and the stock advanced in value to $150 a shaie. i.AI.L BUREAU. J406 O STREET, N. V.'., WASHINGTON, April 6.— Direct vio lations of the law were to-day unearthed in the salaries and allowances division of the pustofiice department, the chief of which. George W. Beavers, recently re signed under fire. As a result of this dla- j covery hundreds of postoffice clerks throughout the (Jolted States may suffer at reduction of *1 ( j0 in thfir annual sala ries. Other developments ct the investi gation of postoffice affairs now in pro gress indicate that irregularities border ing on the criminal will be proved. Of ficial scalps are sure to pay the penalty. Postoffice Inspector Water?, who has temporarily" succeeded Beavers, has dls- FUNDS ARE MISAPPLIED IN POSTAL DEPARTMENT Inquiry Reveals Frauds in the Em ployment of Too Many High- Salaried Clerks. A history of the San Gabriel Wine Cora pa r.y, together with a review of the nt collations which culminated In the trans fer of the etock of the corporation to Mr. Hur.tir.gten. cannot fall to engage the at tention of Californians. When the wine company was established the shares, numbering 5000, were placed on ihe mar ket at the par value of $100 a sharp. Evan J. Coleman, who died recently in this c*y, v.ag one of the promoters of the enter prise. He went to London as the repre- HE. HUNTINGTON has Just added 1100 acres of land to his immense holdings In the su burbs of Los Ange-les and Pas edena. The tract recently purchased by the magnate belonged to the San Gabriel "Wine Company, a corporation founded by 3. de Barth Shorb and his associates at the beginning of the great boom in South ern California property twenty years ago. The tract originally belonged to the Shorb ranch, in the 'San Gabriel Valley. It al most adjoins the Raymond Hotel grounds, ri*ar Pasadena, and is regarded as of vronderful beauty ar.d of great value. The eura paid for the tract was slightly in ex cess of $300,000. Huntlngton truly owns a principality in the suburban region of Los Ange'.es. He owned a vast domain before this last tract was acquired. PROJECT ROAD TO RUN BETWEEN THREE TOWNS STREET RAILWAY MAGNATE WHO HAS PURCHASED A VAST DOMAIN ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF LOS AN GELES, ONE OF THE ORIGINAL OWNERS OF THE TRACT AND SOME OF THE ATTRACTIVE SPOT* CONTAINED WITHIN ITS LIMITS. " ( The Cabinet has decided to refrain from calling out the reserves until the neces sity for strengthening the frontier guards becomes more apparent. BELGRADE, Scrvia, April 6.— The gen darmes had to be called out to suppress the rioting which took place here yester day as the outcome of a demonstration against an objectionable police regula tion. In the riot two rioters and two gen darmes were killed and' many wounded on both sides. One hundred and thirty arrests were made. LONDON, April 7.— The correspondent of the Daily Mail at Constantinople tele graphs that a serious disturbance has broken out among the Catholics at Dur azo, fifty-two miles south of Scutari, on the rocky peninsula of Pelia, in the Adriatic, as a result of Turkish exactions. Several houses have been burned and some persons killed. A general insurrec tion in the valley is feared. RISING OF CHRISTIANS. The Albanians, on the other hand, arc determined to fight for their ancient privileges, which are more valuable to them than any bribe the Sultan can offer their chiefs. Even the presence of In spector General Hilmi Pasha has failed to tranqullize the country. Ills intentions

are excellent, lie is a reformer, but not a free agent, and receives his orders from the Yildiz Kiosk. He is convinced of the inefficiency of the reforms. LONDON, April 6.-A dispatch to the Times from Sofia declares that the Mace donian Bulgarians have got out of hand and that no foreign Influence will avail to arrest the progress of the revolutionary movement. The Bulgarian population no longer listens to the counsels of the Rus sian representative. The correspondent quotes an informant, who has just re turned from visiting the districts of Mon astir, Uskub and Istib. as saying that there is the utmost exasperation among the Bulgarians. Greatly as the people have suffered from the extortion and tyranny of the committees there is still strong sympathy for the insurgent bands, which, but for the aid they obtain from the peasants, could not maintain their ground. BULGARIANS WANT WAR. Numerous insurgent bands are operat ing in the vilayet. One band after a con flict with Turkish troops burned the vil lage of Jubriel and then escaped to ihe mountains. • . A fight which lasted three days is re ported to have occurred In the Melnlte district between Stoyanoffs band of In surgents and a Turkish force which was accompanied by German officers. The bond lost heavily. Matters are daily becoming more seri ous in tha-yllayetVof'Adn^nQpIe, where the situation threatens to rival the state of affairs in. Macedonia. SOFIA, April 6.— A newspaper here as serts that large numbers of Albanians have attacked the town of Okhrida and rcassacred the Christian inhabitants. The statement cannot be confirmed. - PARIS, April 6'.— A dis patch from , Mon astir, Macedonia, to the Paris Nouvelles Agency, an nounces that the Revolu tionary Committee will proclaim a general insur rection in the vilayets be tween April 25 and 29, when 100,000 men armed with rifles and dynamite bombs will be under the flag of independence. . A similar report has. come from Constantinople. Special Dispatch to The Call. All Bulgaria Eager for War. Turks Defeat Stoyanoffs Band. Christians of OkhfidaAre Slain. ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND MACEDONIANS WILL TAKE UP ARMS AND PROCLAIM A WAR OF INDEPENDENCE AGAINST THE TURKS HUNTINGTON ADDS TO HIS IMMENSE LANDED ESTATE NEAR LOS ANGELES Eleven Hundred Acres Bought by the Active Railway Magnate From San Gabriel Wine Company. PASTOR OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY SAID TO HAVE RESIGNED HIS POST Report Astonishes Faculty and Students^ and Dr. Newton Declines to Give an Explanation. STANFORD UNIVERSITY. April 6.— The students and a l3rge per centage of the faculty of the university believe that Dr. R. Heber Newton has resigned the pastorate of Memorial Church which he accepted only a few months ago, yet those In a position to know refuse posi tively to discuss the matter at present. The rumor most current as to the rea son for the supposed resignation i3 that when the eminent divine resigned the pulpit cf All Souls Church of New York, which he had occupied for' more than a score of years, to accept his present posi tion, he did so with the understanding that be was to be supreme In the con trol of the church and its policy, anil that being thwarted in this has caused his resignation. Dr. Newton had expect ed to make this his life work and had entered . heart and soul Into a field of great possibilities. Another rumor, with less foundation than the first, is to the effect that Dr. Newton had resigned because of adverse criticism from Father Yorke of San Fran cisco and of some of the San Jose clergy men. Dr. Newton, however, is a man of such a high type that it Is altogether im probable that either he or Mrs. Stanford would have been influenced in the slight est degree by foolish and virulent attacks. Dr. Newton when seen to-night would neither deny nor affirm the report that he had resigned. He said simply: "I do not care to discuss this matter for the newspaper*." He was deeply moved by the fact that the students were so much interested in the matter, and stated that if the rumor were true his resignation would not take effect immediately. Mrs. Stanford was equally reticent and declined positively to discuss the matter. Chaplain D. Charles Gardner stated that he had nothing to say in regard to the report, and that if the report were true It was a matter in which only Mrs. Stan ford and Dr. Newton were concerned. Professor J. M. Stillman, acting president of the university In the absence of Pre3l dent Jordan and Vice President Branner, said the report did not concern his office, as Dr.- Newton- is not a professor in the university, and that if the pastor had re signed it was for purely personal reasons', which concerned only Mrs. Stanford and the Rev. Dr. Newton. DISTINGUISHED STANFORD PAS TOR WHOSE REPORTED RESIG NATION EXCITES INTEREST. YAQU1S CROWN THEIR CRIMES BY MASSACRE Five Prospecting Ital ians and Guide Are Killed. MRS. TOWNSEND'S SUICIDE DUE TO RELIGIOUS MANIA Unfortunate Woman Was About to Be Tried in Court for Al leged Assault. LONDON, April 6.— The police, who are in possession of the room and effects of Mrs. Mabel Townsend, the former San Franclscp actress -who committed suicide on the doorstep of her sister's home here yesterday, say that Mrs. Townsend re cently returned from a visit to the United States and has since been living alone in a single room over a baker's shop in Fitzroy street, a squalid neigh borhood, though it is said she was not destitute. Mr3. Townsend ia <>aid to have been suffering from religious mania, and re cently had a disagreement with her sister, Mrs. Rowe. An inquest on the body will be held to-morrow. Mrs. Townsend had been summoned to appear at Marlborough street Police Co#rt to-day to answer to the charge of alleged assault on her brother-m-law, William Rowe. and when the case was called in court her suicide was an nounced. The dead weman executed a will five days ago. leaving her property to her two nephew?. STBIKE WILL SPREAD TO CUMBERLAND MINES Determination of Dunsmuir Not to Recognize Federation Prom ises More Trouble. VANCOUVER. B. C, April «.— The coal miners' trouble on Vancouver Island is extending to Cumberland. When the 100O or more miners employed at the ex tension mines voted to Join the Western Federation of Miners, James Dunsmulr, the owner, closed the mines. On Sunday Baker, organizer of the federation who came to Laitysmith in consequence of that action went to the Union mines and or ganized a branch of the federation there. About 100 men have joined. These men will undoubtedly be dl3charg?d, as Puns muir is determined not to recognize the federation. There are 500 men employed there. If the other men join the federa tion the mines will be closed down as have those at Ladysmlth. Then the two horrified men escaped to Medano, a small town on the Yaqui River, where they told their story and were brought into Torin. The Indians in the mountains north of the Yaqui River have been committing many depredations of late and some de termined step will have to be taken to check them. The murderers of Alvardo were never captured and since that time several parties of travelers and miners have been attacked, but succeeded in es caping with their lives. These parties of murderous Indians are different from the ordinary Yaqui who works on the ranches and in the mined. It Is these men who Instigate the peace ful members of their tribe to take to the war path and they are a remnant of ¦the bands who escaped from the last re bellion and took refuge In the mountains. They are a last vestige of the Yaqui war riors who refuse to be subdued. In other parts of Sonora the Indians ar« more auict than In years- Special Dispatch to The Call NOGALES, Ariz., April 6.— A dispatch from Torin, Sonora, states that the mur derous Yaquls have been committing more of- their deadly work in that vicinity. On Saturday, near Corcorlt, a small place in the Yaqui River country, five prospectors and a Mexican guide were surprised and murdered by the Indians. The murdered men were well-to-do Italians who had come to Sonora to engage in mining and had organized an exploration party at Guaymas. The party was composed of seven Ital ians and a Mexican guide. They were well equipped and started out to hunt for valuable mineral deposits in some of the remote and unexplored sections. The entire party was J camped In a deserted hut, some distance from Corcorit. when the assault was committed. They were not many miles from the spot where Fliberto Alvardo and his family were at tacked and murdered by the hostile In dians a short time ago. The prospecting party and its guide were taken by surprise shortly after day break when the Indians fell upon them and began their work of slaughter. The two men who escaped were a little dis tance oft at the time the assault was committed, and being unarmed could not go to the assistance of their brethren, nor did they dare to reveal their pres ence. There were not more than ten In dians in the attacking band, but the small party in the hut was not able to withstand the onslaught. Although sur prised, the white, men rushed to their arms and made some defense, but were soon overwhelmed. The report says that the Indians, not content with killing them and . purloining their effects, mu tilated their bodies in a horrible manner. The survivors succeeded In keeping their presence a secret until the Indians had ridden away with their blunder. The San Francisco Call.

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