2 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1

2 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

VOLUME LX VII— NO. 1337 HERBERT'S ROMANCE Count Bismarck Weds the Prin . cess Carolath-Beutlien. in Old Scandal That Bronghf About the c > ; Lady's Divorce. o 7x°° J the Ex-Cbancelior Besieged With Visitors Upon His Birthday Anniversary. ' ■ -. : Costly Presents. . " ■_<. -°° ' I'"°/ , Special by the California Associated Press. •"' '. Berlin, April Count Herbert = Bis marck is married to Princess yon Carolath j Beuthen, with whom his peculiar relations caused such a scandal in Berlin cine years ago, and brought about her divorce. * * \ The. Cai.i. of recent dale contained the following account of J Count Herbert Bis marck's love affair, which created such a sensation at the time of ."the'iiCcdrrencfS. "There have been some disgraceful epi sodes in Herbert's life. Once he became, •enamored 'with the charms of Princess °vop Cnrolath-Beuthen, wife of a German' 1 Dnrchlancht and daughter of Prince yon ■ Hatzfeldt. In ISSI, front Berlin and an in* dignant husband;- the couple fled to Switzer land.- • • •■- . --..•■. . . . . "■•::•'-.• "For .Weeks their whereabouts was -not. . discovered and the aged Chancellor, who had never been known to allow the escape of a criminal, could not find his own son.' "With lovers the- despot rims- no sympathy, 1 , and uever did he show greater hardness of heart than when Count Herbert wished to marry the woman who had sacrificed hus band, position, reputation, everything, be cause of her love for him. An attack from the European Powers could not have made 'Germany's strongest son inure agitated, more. lnflexible, than did this insolent re quest' from his own heir. Threats and promises succeeded, however. Herbert re turned to Berlin and the Princess journeyed to Florence. What a contrast in their lives; She thrust dowg from a high posi tion to live in solitude and obscurity; in raised by the Kaiser to high rank in the empire- the equal of his father in the Minis- J.tetial Council, the possible successor of the oue who holds iv his hand the destiny of all Europe." , *' • . ' -_-. o* "■■ ■_ c PRINCE- HIsMAI-CK. Subscriptions^ Bjlicited to Er.ct a Monument •■t X. in His Honor. ; Berlin, April 1. — A committee headed by President yon Levetz . of the B^ich ' stag, embracing jail shades of political opin ion, has issued an invitation for public sub ° scriptions to build a national monument at Berlin in honor.of Prince Bismarck. Bismarck., at . Friedrichsruhe to-day re „. ceived numerous visitors who congratulated him on ' his -birthday. - A vast number of gifts were received from all parts of Ger ,llls and some from foreign lands. There were- many' scenes of enthusiasm. Con-' J gratulatory messages were received from all the crowned heads of Euro' • • ■ New.;. York, April I.— Bismarck's birth-. • day ; was celebrated by the. German Club. this evening with a banquet. A congratu latory cablegram was- sent to the ex-Chan- ■ cellor. ■' . ' „ '"■ ' : — *-' . ■■ '.. . . WILL BE rOWIlli TO LIVEIU'OOL. Ihe Hole in the Steamship City J, of: .Paris' Finally Located. .-: -„ • .;-■•• 7. J■■ Queesstowj.,;.. April : I.— The '■: hole has \ been located In the bottom of the City of '; '.Paris caused by the broken machinery, and, the water has been: pumped out She will be towed to Liverpool;' The loss will be ■very heavy to the..' underwriters as well as -the owners, as tire .'damage to J the vessel must not only be repaired but salvage paid; .-•This amount, shipping men in Glasgow Say, : ../will be between 850,000 and $100,000.' . _a: V ...Loxdon', April l.— The agents of the In-° '•• man line send out a report from Queen 'stown that the bottom of the City of Pari! is uninjured. The steamer will leave fur Liveriool under her own steam.-" "Incur ' judgment the vessel was throughout per fectly safe. Everything indicates that she would have continued to float indefinitely as she was without further submersion or . .risk after the original disaster occurred." •' SEALING NEGOTIATIONS.' But Little ■ Progress. Made— Poachers H_p:-fu' - for the Coming Season. *" V. Ni'.w Y(ii:k. April L— The* nerald's Ottawa correspondent says the I.ehring Sea negotiations have pot advanced beyond the tacit understanding that Behring 'Sea is a part of the high seas. The free pursuit of sealing can c only J, be o restrained by International action, and compensation must be made by the United States for dis turbing British sealers. There is divergence of opinion respecting the limit of restric tiob. ' Russian and American Govern ments are disposed to make the regulations .highly restrictive in order to enhance t_e value of their rookeries. The Canadians appreciate the fact that ° the American - islands are controlled by a monopoly, but hope for an early settlement. They yet be lieve the coming season promises well for .Poachers. * ?. .,- = "°- X'" X SYBIL. DID NOT SING. -. An-" Aged 'Woman Creates a Sensation at a '..'" . X „° o Concert in Paris. -, • New York, April 1.-A special cable from Paris to the Mail and Express says: . At a -concert of American vocalists last evening Sybil Sanderson was unable to sing at the last moment through indisposition, and Mine. Alb.ni volunieered to fill San derson's place. She is iii years old and ■ was applauded to , the echo. The people were enthusiastic. ,A LOTIEKY SWINDLE. Severe Pnniihm°nt Inflicted Upon Several '-:'-..: '• °° ° Austrian Offmdefs. .' ;•".';. li -in, April l.— The outcome of the con spiracy by which a prize of 1,000,000 florins was fraudulently drawn in the lottery at Temesvar, Hungary, is a sentence of eight • rears to penal , servitude for the holder of the ticket which drew theorize: the same sentence for the two lottery officers" impli , cated; two years fur the woman who drew , the ticket disguised as a man, and three years for another official. . A cNOK.iEMA.VS DISGRACE. H-. Prefer, Grinding an 0 gin to a Clerkship ''" in the So Exchange. London-, April I.— A scene occurred in the Strand this afternoon. -i Viscount nin ton, the lit r of Karl: I'.uilett, who T made himself i.iii.ii- in playing the clown in paiit-iHinit ■_, and has also undergone ; im prisonment for robbery, was griuding an The Morning Call. organ, accompanied by his wife. -, A gentle man endeavored to persuade the Viscount to desist, offering him a clerkship in the Stock Exchange. The offer was loudly de clined in the presence of 500 people. ; : Hin ton swore he would never alter the course of his life till the Earl dies. During this exhibition Lady Hintou passed around the' hat to collect coppers. ■ o; ; rer. ._ ; lUCKTHALIiS RETURN-? He Denies Any Connection With the Harder , 0% of Benwell. ° 8 °°° *_ » „ Woodstock (OntJ), April!.— Neville Hi Piekthall, who mysteriously disappeared c< about the time that Burchell and his party arrived in this country, and who was sup posed to be conuected with ; Burchell, ar rived here to-day. He says he started for, San Francisco via New York and JJ was' robbed at De= ing. He therefore returned. He was dissatistied with farming and re pudiates any connection with the Benwell murder.;,,,, - ' - *. ;.-„=*■ 'A, STEAMSHIP TRUST. English and German Owners Want to Advance '.f» B'%.8 '%. °7 • Passenger Bates. _° .-.-;7° ;•. .-Loxiu-X, April I.— The recent confer ences betweeu German and English steam sliipmen are understood to mean that an endeavor 'is afoot to create a 'steamship trust and advance passenger^ rates. Little money is now being made on" passengers,, and 'freight, rates 'are unlikely- to be ad vanced ii the pool is formed, = owing to the vast number of" tramp steam _rs. '-.J:-.-. '"%.- °-7..- British : Gr_in Irt_&e. : . 'y..°. °_ '; London, April l.— The Mark Lane Ex .':pr_.s,'.'in; its J review eofc of tlio -.British grain 'tradeMqr* the past week, says: -English' wheat is quiet and unchanged. Flour is .'weak; Foreign wheats aro dull. 'The best = •Russian and American command -.the old- .■price,.,-.American corn, under enormous import., has fallen 3d. " Oats are weak. = At. ,to-day'§ ".{market' English wheat c was lid : clteape_v- Foreign was slightly lower. .!..', Emti.rnr and Czar. V'ySTiS'V-kj .fiß&iiuitG, _ April - - 1.— Arranger •ments have been m.ide Jot the meeting of l'Jiiipeior William and the Czar during, th* coming summer. The Emperor will attend "-.Uie^'inaneUvflisJ. -.'of the Italian 0 army at KraSuee^'SzeloJ' "'J'"- „.•*, '.- °° „ '%° i \-- » ■f_ _•_.•. -— — __. :i£-t2i; : .■'.■•/. •"•ThJe;'Fi.hi-ri. a Bill." 1 '" » o o„ L i'-OrcAjy.i," Aprii'l. — C. H.a'upti_r purposes . to amend thgjElSlje rie,s 'Bill, making it a • misdemeanor to kith "seals, poriioises, whales OC.fish .1 any kind With rockets, explosives" or any cueuifcalslldriigs or pui. . no as mate rial. . ■=.■,".•-• 2' ' -.". .' ° "_"'-. ° ■'_ \° _ r"7X" -;j'.-..'.:Kard!fed :-n. bb:-d. '_■ °°. V _ v-..;PS-BLi^-Apr}l.'vl.— J. ILCftildalVCotinty ..fteasurei-,- wils-.tniirdered^ant! robbed on the. real between tiie enmity ■ seat and his lii'ine to-night. •There „is . no' clew tv thejj murderers, '.'•• „'J °V_° • :"- 3*- "' '...•:. ' '■:-,:'-'':7; v: lifpr"s.y in NrW'"'Pai§dti_iia.-'-';'':.j.V°; '• Paris*. April l. — Tlie, Dix - Neuvieme Steele' stales that hoOO mil of 40.0<j0-C_-t{ak. •natives 61 New Caledonia are afflicted with leprosy ami the disease is spreading. V . '° "••: ... / „ ■-— — -•- ■ " " „=■ '". .. Rus.ii- Officials Imprisoned. • St. Peteßsburoi, April Several high officials -in the mining districts, including two owners of gold mines, have been im prisoned fur peculation and bribery. •°o :::.'.y.Tict' ria's Movement _ Paws April A.— The Figaro says that Queen Victoria will visi ..Darmstadt and be met by the Emperor William for confer ence. .-•"**. -' : •>•--" THE SUPREME COURT. A Proposed Bill to Relieve It of Some of Its Duties. Wxßnnsraroit, April I.— A siib-cnjiimitt. o of the House Judiciary Committee baa been at work for some time on a measure that proposes to relieve the Supreme Court of the United States of a large amount of work with which it has been constantly overwhelmed. A large number ol bills for this purpose have been Introduced and these have been considered, and a rough draft if a measure lias been practically agreed upon, lioth the House and Senate committees have gone over the subject to a considerable extent, and it is thought that the bill reported by the House Committee will meet with no opposition. The plan to increase the number of Su preme Court Justices to twenty-one and provide for their practical division into three courts was rejected. The bill, al ready roughly drafted, proposes to increase the Circuit Courts by tne addition of one Judge in each court Writs of error and -appeal may be taken from the District to the Circuit Courts substantially as at pres ent. District Courts alone are/ to have original jurisdiction, and appeals "are to be from the Circuit to the Supreme Court in eases involving at least $10,000, or constitu : tional or treaty Questions-; .legal .questions ,w = sufficient importance to rein a final decision by the. Supremo Court, a ted in pat ent and copyright cases in equity- , This is in -addition, to the usual constitutional and •.a-Lmlia-ty questions, in which the". Supreme -.Court of the United States now lias original 'jurisdiction. : . " •■_-"•■.. c °: "'• RAILROAD TOPICS. -. •; •••" : - - 7-v •.'. : „° Work to Be Pushed -as Soon as Terminal Facilities. Are Granted; „. Seattle, April I.— Vice-President 1 Hoi.; comb of the Union Pacific sent a communi cation to the Chamber of Commerce to-day, to tlie effect that should' that bod v assure the road of a right-of-way into the city and thirty acres of land fur a terminal, he was confident the company would build into the city and have the road running by Decem ber, i-'d. ..<-.<. - \ ■ iJi.;.i.\-i;i i:<,, April I.— is reported that $100,000 has arrived here to toe used in fin ishing up the road-lied of the Ellensburg and Northeastern Kailroad, and that more money is on the way. IV ILL FACE JOHN L. Carb3tt Agrees to Meet Sullivan ; in a Four- Rund Contest New York, April I.— Pugilist Corbett was interviewed- this evening. He said he had a proposition to meet Sullivan in a four round glove contest near New York within three weeks, which he would accept if permission was granted by the Olym pic Club of San Francisco. He says he doe. ■ not expect an easy time of it as he knows Sullivan is a different man than Kilrain. He doubts that any pugilist can defeat Sullivan with gloves. The articles of -agreement are unsigned, but >he understands that lie will get a favorable verdict if he manages to stay four rounds. The police will prob ably not allow smaller than three-<>unce gloves. " Corbett wired the club this evening requesting permission to fight Sullivan. He modestly says he will endeavor, to do him self justice, but makes no boasts. Sullivan expects: to arrive from Boston to-morrow, when the match will probably be arranged. The contest will undoubtedly create great; interest. Corbett Is due back lv Sau Fran cisco April 29th. * NEBRASKA CITY ELECTIONS. License Candidates Elected in a Majority of X' J the TV.wni. A Omaha, April I.— Municipal elections were held in a number of towns throughout the Stale to-day. In nearly every case ; the principal issue was the license question. Out of twenty-seven towns heard from up to 11:30" o'clock to-night twenty voted for license and four against, while in three of them candidates from both license and anti license tickets were elected. : A number of the wet towns this year went dry at the previous election. Indictment of a Bank-Wrecker. New York, April l.— Peter J." Classen, the bank-wrecker, has been indicted by the Federal Grand Jury. The Indictment Is fur embezzlement and abstracting and misap plying the funds of the Sixth National Bank and making false entries, The amount which Classen is alleged to have embezzled 1 jS „ 0.3, 000. , ' ' '.' -...-.-. -.■':.".. . Dr. Schlicmani of ■ ancient Troy fame has commenced -a- new book on ' archaeology, which wid be the most important of all his works. The doctor is one of the greatest living authorities on this subject. - SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 2, 1890-EiaHT PAGES. '■ : GREAT DISTRESS. Mississippi Floods Increasing x7> : 1 in 1 Extent. VaX Sv".fi '.'■?■}. XX ° G 7 Negroes Encamped on the Levees With : °°; out Any Shelter From the Rain. Urgent Need of Relief-Boats to Aid in Res cuing Life and Properly— The , - Ty: 7 Situation at New Orleans. 0 = ,° ■7° ° j .. _ : o._.v.'. Special by the California Associated Press. 7 Memphis, ; r April Information from "down tlie river this morning is of the most distressing character. The crevasses are constantly widening, and thousands of acres, heretofore untouched/ are being sub merged. Reports of loss of life are coining in. as well as of -various casualties. ° ■ At Greenville below here there is great destitution, as well "as, at i Laconia Circle, .'some distance this side. For several ' days the n-'groes who live In tlio bend 3 between, Pleasants and Mounds Landing have been" camping on the" levee with whatJJ little stock and supplies they saved from the water. AH of last night a boating rain came down upon them, and as they, are In many in stances even without tents to protect them. J they must have suffered greatly. They are appealing to every passenger-boat for help. „ The Government boats are rendering; all 'the assistance possible, but there" tiro only two ot them there, and they cannot relieve all tiie distress that exists. What is needed is a relief boat to.take the people and what little they have succeeded in saving to a ° place- of safety. The loss sustained by the, people in Mississippi cannot be easily esti- ° mated. Steamboat men say it will be fully a week before the crevasse, forty-live miles below, Memphis, can affect the Tallahatchee or Yazoo river?, and that planters' will be able to save their slock with little trouble J, or expense, having had timely warning. VTick_burg and vicinity is full of stock from , t-i'-Joverrlowed regions. - The Government steamer Titan, Cap tain Smith S. Leach in command, is at work in the relief of the . devas tated districts down ■? the^Mississippi.; The actual suffering, want and distress which confronts the hapless, water-bound natives is appalling. The havoc of the furi ous waters Is almost complete. Devastation, 1 annihilation and starvation expresses the situation. The demand for assistance and succor Is imperative, and every hour it is withheld adds intensity to the horrors which the brave people have to face and are heroically battling: against. The whole country Is covered with water from eight to twenty feet deep, rushing relentlessly on to the sea, carrying life and property whirling and crashing through the mad torreut. The boat carries four barges capable of holding 100 head of stock and any amount of storage each/ two flats for ferrying pur poses and five substantial skiffs on which to send out into the country relief stores. The boat also carries a fair supply of pro visions consisting of crackers, biscuit aud corned beef. All along down on the Mississippi side. where tin- levee could bo seen by the aid of glasses, It was discernible that it was hold ing its own against the heavy pressure, with from a foot to two feet of good broad sodded crown to spire. Here and there could bo .seen where the costly barriers had been sloughed off. At Anderson's Landing the levee is strong und can apparently withstand two feel more of water. At Mattapan the levee still holds out, but a few bouses in front of the levee are submerged and deserted. Across from Mattapan. below Ludlow, Ark., everything is overflowed. People are up in lie- second stories of their houses, and horses, mules and cows are on illy con structed "stomps," over which the water is running a foot or inure deep. At Australia all the town lying between tlie river and levee is under water, and many of the houses are deserted. At St. Louis and below Olivers Point, on the Arkansas side, at the head of Island Sixty-six, little was to be seen except the roofs of the houses. Malones is almost washed away; so is Wililwoiel. and Koiiertsville is just above water. This place is a large one, aud the destruction seems to be about complete. 'I he people, or those who remain, have been forced almost to the roofs of their houses and the. stock, of which there is a large number, arc on "stomps" that are well under water. Tlie "stomps," wherever they are to be seen, though filled with .stock, seem to be poorly improvised; they have slender foundations, being stilted up on auy kiud if posts that were convenient to be had in a moment of danger. At Laconia Circle desolation and anni hilation may well be added to the picture, The houses _, are all submerged, and Many of ; them goue. Near the main „ business house stands gan im mense gin and mill structure, on high stout posts, and the water nearly" readies to the floor. Tins lug house is filled with colored people, 150 or more, all crowded and "huddled together. >c A broad scaf fold . work is constructed in front of it, and on this scaffold. when the Titan came up these darkies, all looking smiling enough, were out sunning. In front of the stores, on similarly constructed high scaffolds, were numbers of other people, whites and blacks mingled together, there were cows, big and little, mules and horses, most of them knee-deep In water and im patient to getaway, but instinct told them that they could not swim the sea, and they stamped about and dared not venture be yond the little land they temporarily held. Stretching far down over the watery waste was a settlement resembling a small vil lage, and in the center of which stood Zion's - Chapel, the colored Baptist Church, large and spacious, where 250 people had been driven by the flood, and for miles about them the water- was from . teu to twenty feet deep. These people, too, were in sore need of food aud anxious to get away from the church. ;■-.; ._.__--- _■ at new ORLEANS. Nkw Orleans. April I.— The situation to-day along the front of the Yazoo district is desperate. It looks as if the greater part of the Yazoo Delta will be flooded. The water Irom the breaks up the river is mov ing southward rapidly, and the country for many miles inland -is submerged. -The work on the New Orleans aad Northwest ern Railroad has been stopped by the over flow from tic- Pecan Grove crevasse. ■■ The Vicksburg, Shreveport and Pacific Kailroad is also in danger from this break. It lias been found utterly impossible :to close the crevasses except below this city.- Those above continue to grow larger. The losses as yet are not very large except to stock. Many refugees nave come here from the Hooded districts. Ihe river is falling here and is now fourteen inches below the high est mark. ,It is believed the Louisiana levees below lied Kiver will h./Ji*, SURROUNDED BY WATER. St. Louis, April I.— Terrible suffering is reported among the people at Laconia Cir cle. The tract of country between Helena and Arkansas City Is practically sur rounded by the Mississippi - and White rivers. The Waters have poured over the levees and flooded the entire peninsula to a depth ' of - eight feet. , Houses have been swept away, and live stock drowned. No loss of life is yet reported.'^Mßnraa U-.N-N NOT ALARMED. New YOKK, April l.— When told that the New Orleans Board of Trade I Intended to ask for his resignation for prophesying the present flood there. Sergeant Dunn of the Weather Bureau said: - - 0 ■■_■. .-:" I think the New Orleans people are act ing foolishly in the face of the present danger. No matter, what ; they • say, they will have their hands full looking after their city. They may have my head if they want it, but I think they had better protect. their people. The; only portion of the , report that has been misrepresented is that which states that I said tbe flood would be as dis astrous as that at Johnstown. What I did si, was that districts all through I the Mis- . sissippi -.Valley, from S Cairo •to i the Gulf, would be flooded.'! mentioned no particular : place. -The flood Is no ; respecter of - cities, and I hardly see why the New ' Orleans people should take offense lat my prophecy. There are busy times ahead for the people of New Orleans, and they should know it." LOUISVILLE SUFFERERS. The Work of Relieving; Thnr Needs Proceed o' ,p ing Vigorously. * Louisville, April I.— The work of re lieving the sufferers by the tornado Is pro ceeding systematically. • Contributions con tinue to be liberal. The removal of J the debris of the Falls City Hall has been abandoned. There are probably no more bodies in the ruins. o : V« r The chief danger now is from a water famine. Even at reduced consumption only three days' supply is left, and -there is no immediate prospect of more owing to the wrecked condition of the.pumping-worltV Ottawa, April . I.— Regarding the 1 tor nado in Kentucky, Professor E. Stone Wig gin says it was caused by the peculiar re lation of the planets to the' earth, which rocked the North Atlantic like the rock ing of a ship iv a storm. The same effect was produced upon the "atmosphere. He says that the sun aud moon keep two currents always in motion, but when other heavenly bodies unite with the former the velocity of these currents is increased, and when their speed is sufficient they break into whirlpools which we call cyclones. . When the sun is smith of the equator the Atlantic current keeps off shore aud is very dangerous to shipping. .When, however,' the. sun and moon happen to be on the equator and moving northward, this cur rent is deflected: upon the continent' mid breaks into cyclones. The professor says he = knew that -. if the northern and southern currents united over Nova Scotia without previously breaking into cyclr there would be a disastrous tidal wave along the coast of New England. To Wiggin's' prediction of this great storm is said to be due the fact that not a single Canadian.ves sel was lost, all being in harbor. ♦- * ■■' ARCHBISHOP Hi-ISS. large Attendance at the Impressive Funeral c Services at Mnwnk-te. .y_ _ Milwaukee, April l.— The funeral of Archbishop Heiss, which occurred to-day, was the largest ever held in this city, cm the morning pontifical high mass was cele brated by Cardinal Gibbons. 3 The funeral sermon was delivered in English by Bishop Henessy of Dubuque, and in German by Bishop Katzer of, Green Hay. The inter-' ment will lake place at St. Frauds Seminar} to-morrow morning. The cortege was re ceived at, the entrance to the . seminary grounds by the professors and students, and the body will lie in state there during the night. In the morning mass for the dead will be celebrated in that institution, after which the remains will be placed in the vault beside those of his old friend and companion, Dr. Salzmann. : ; .-', r-X' A (.(.1.1.1t DETECTED. ■>, A Traveler Bound for California ArresteJ'in N.wTork. c >g"'" : New Yokk, April I.— Michael M. Co loma. a cabiu passenger on the steamer La Nnnnandie, was arrested by Custom-house Inspectors to-day on a charge of smuggling. The passenger, who was going to stop at the Victoria Hotel preparatory to going to California, told the inspectors that his trunks were in bond. The man's maimer awoke the suspicion of the inspectors, who ui.ide an examination of his person. In his boots were found five gold watches, and strapped around his waist was a leather belt containing over $4000 worth of dia monds. He was brought before United Stales Commissioner Shields and. held for examination in $3000 bonds. IRRIGATION. The Question Receiving Much Attention in Both Branches of Congress. Washington-, April I.— ln both the House and Senate to-day the subject of irrigation was largely advanced by the con sideration of bills looking to the survey of the necessary sites for reservoirs and. the examination of watersheds by which It is proposed to supply the canals of the arid regions. Mr. Vandever. Chairman of the committee on the subject in the House, has been in his committee most of the time, giving his attention to formulatiug a meas ure which shall meet the needs of both the fruit-growers of the West and Southwest,, and the irrigation of the vast arid plains that have heretofore constituted the desert lands of Arizona, New Mexico and Colo rado, and In some sections of the North west. '1 he Senate Committee on Irrigation this morning considered Senator Plumb's bill on this subject, and afterward authorized Senator Moody to report it with some amendments favorably to the Senate, which he afterward did. The bill authorizes tlie Secretary of Agriculture to cause to be made all the necessary field examinations, surveys and experiments for the boring of artesian wells, which question is the only point of disagreement on the urgent deficiency bill in the Senate, for the purpose of demon strating the extent, character and value with reference to tie irrigation of all the underwater flows within the settled areas in that region if country lying between the ninety-seventh degree of longitude and the foothills o: the western slopes of the Rooky Mountains. An appropriation of 5350.000 for this pur pose is made. This is for the preliminary work, after which the details lor Senator Plumb's bill wiil probably be adopted. This lull declaies that all the natural waters not otherwise appropriated within the pub lic lands of the United States west of the ninety-eighth degree of longitude shall be public property, and they are placed under authority of the State or Territory in winch they are located. The right of way over the public domain Is granted to any' State or Territory for the purpose of permitting or aiding in the construction of reservoirs or irrigation canals. Access to the natural waters which may be necessary to direct the support of man or domestic animals shall never be denied. . A Commissioner of Irrigation is provided lor, who shall, under the Secretary of Agriculture, have the supervision of all ir rigation matters with a salary of .4300 a .year. The bill also provides a sufficient number of engineers, clerks and other em ployes sufficient to execute the laws. A SCKPUISE. All Telegraph Instruments Removed From the Chicago Board of Trade. Chicago, April I.— The Board of Trade Directors to-day notified all the telegraph companies to remove their wires frcm tho Board of Trade Building. 11. A. Tuttle, the Superintendent of the North American Telegraph Company, said: "The order to remove all instruments from the floor of the Board of Trade was a per fect surprise party to the telegraph com panies, and we do not know much about it. To-day being a holiday, but very few mem bers were around the board. What the ef fect will be cannot he told until later. There may be some new developments in the morning. As it is, there is not now au instrument of any company on the floor of the Exchange. As for the bucket-shops, 1 see no way of their getting any quotations except by private messages, tiled at outside offices." _ CONDENSED TELEGRAMS. Madrid, April I.— The universal suf frage law lias passed the Cortes. Paris, April L— The Prince of Wales is here. He goes to Cannes to-morrow. Chicago, April I.— The Board of Trade is closed to-day on account of city elec tions. ;- N'i.\v York. April I.— The Commercial Cable Company declares a quarterly divi dend of 1% per cent. Chicago, April I.— Louis Metzolel, the tenth victim of the Chicago suaar-relinery explosion, died at the hospital to-day. Paris, April . I.— A verdict of . 1,018, damages aud costs of action '-. was . returned in the suit of Gibbs & Sons against the So ciete de* Metaux. Cincinnati, April I.— As a result of the action of the Chicago Board of- Trade, all ' the bucket-shops in this city, but one have been compelled to suspend business. Washington. April The funeral of Viae- Admiral Rowan will take place to morrow - at '2 -, o'clock ' from St. Joseph's. Episcopal Church.. The ceremonies will be simple and unostentatious. -.- Mrs. A astasia Pnrsellcs of -Bayonne.'N. J., turned 104 last Sunday. "* She claims lhat .Washington took her upon his knee iv Fed eral Hall and kissed her. . It would be well :if ; Mother I'arsells filed " a caveat • on . this, thereby estopping less honest old ladies from setting up this claim. ff^a__SS_____- ANTI-TRUST BILLS. The Question Seriously Con sidered in tiie House. Numerous Measures Laid Before the Com * '; T mittee .on Mi clary. .\ < \ Views of Members of Both Branches of 7 Congress on the Subject— The Cox 77 ; Memorial^ Services. 7 0 : D _■ " '?,'_ ' oo- 7° ° '- .Special by the California Associated Press. ; : Washington, April I.— The question of trusts is beginning to be given serious con sideration in the House despite the fate of

Senator Sherman's Anti-Trust Bill iv : the Senate, which was, as will be remembered,? returned to the Judiciary Committee of the Senate. A like committee of the House has begun the consideration of the various measures which have been introduced, this session. There is a good deal of buncombe and rant in this trust business, and it was. ably demonstrated in the debate before the Senate upon Sherman's bill. The benefit derived by the agricultural, laboring aud general consuming classes pitted against that of the producing and manufacturing classes has to oe considered, and it is con-" sidered by some of the best men in the House and Senate that it is doubtful if these matters should not in the end equalize themselves without legislation. '' " °~ The House Committee "on "Judiciary, 0 whose " Chairman, Ezra !B. Taylor, is Garfield's -successor from the .Nineteenth Ohio District, one of the, most careful and conservative, and, at the same time, radical men in the house, cynical by nature, but honest in all of hi. expressions of views to the extreme, is apt to promptly curtail all demagofeisiii in the hills which' may be re ported from his committee. Coming from J a district that has five times renominated' him, and will from its traditions be likely to keep him in Congress for tlie remainder' of his life with a majority of 2000 at his' back, lie is not likely at any time to attempt to cater to unhealthy sentiments, although his district is largely made up of agri cultural people, a class which is claimed to be the most likely to suffer from monopolies. Congress has been fully instructed upon the subject of trusts and corporative mo nopolies, aud it is doubtful if it needs much more information irom the outside, should it read aud consume the testimony that has already been laid before it at previous ses sions, It is claimed that the evident efforts of the monopolies to. institute trusts are largely offset by a large amount of legisla tion in the interests of the agricultural and laboring classes, made during each Presi dential year, and it is the evident determi nation of these classes to impel Congress iv the direction of those socialistic views and rather crude " theories which look to a division of the interests of capital among the populace at large. => These are the chief objections to the con sideration of any legislation to control cap ital, aud it is doubtful if lv the end any bill of more thorough durability than the Inter state Commerce Bill, which lias not proved a blooming success, will be finally formu lated into a law by the present Congress. These are the views of member* of both the House and Senate as stated to the Cali fornia Associated Press agent. CHINESE CEKTIEICATES. Senate Amendments to the House Census Enumeration Bill Washington, April I.— At a meeting of the Senate Committee on the Census to-day the House bill providing for furnishing cer tificates to Chinese residents on June 1. 1890, by the enumerators of the census with a view to prohibiting the further immigration of Chinese to the United States, was con sidered and amended. As reported to the Senate the bill, in addition, makes the pro visions of the act apply only to those Chinese who refuse to give the information required by the census enumerators at the time of taking the census in June, when so called upon, and who shall then fail or re fuse to obtain the certificate of Identifica tion provided for. In its present shape the bill, it is elated, will be wholly unaccepta ble to the Representatives of the Pacific Coast. By another amendment Chinese mer chants, tourists and students are exempted from the operations of the act, provided they have the certificates required by the act of July 5, 1884. . An additional section enables a Chinese resident who fails to obtain the required certificate of identification to prove by com petent testimony his right to one, which is his sole evidence of being lawfully in the United States. lt is made a misdemeanor for the census enumerator to willfully neglect or refuse to give the required certificate. "WANTS HIS TITLES. A Washington Lawyer Claims Several Estates in Great Britain. Washington, April I.— A man by the name of John Z. Hudntitt, who has claimed for some time to be the attorney for the workingmen of the District, for which lie has a large claim for compensation before Congress, has sent to tho Senate a peculiar petition, which was to-day referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations. It con tains some very curious statements. Hud nutt asks the American Government to act as arbiter between himself and the En glish Government for the recovery of his estates In, England, , Ireland, Scotland and Wales, and also his titles in the English, Irish, Scotch and Welsh peerage. Hudnutt claims that the property of his ancestors in these divisions, which was held for over six hundred years, was confiscated by an act of William aud Mary in 1091. His loss is claimed to in clude the earldoms of March and Shrews bury, the dukedoms of Buckingham- and York in England, and , the dukedoms of Leicester aud Clarence, the earldoms of Claire, Belfast and Cork in Ireland. The petition will bo something in the nature of a surprise to the gentlemen who at present occupy in Burkes Peerage these positions and are at present enjoying their revenues. • A WASHINGTON DINNER. President Soto of Costa Rica Entertains! by Oeneral Alexia. Washington, April I.— General Mexia, one bf the Mexican delegates to the Pan- American Congress, gave a dinner this = afternoon at his home in honor of General Bernardo Soto, President of Costa Kica, who has been in this city for some little time. There were invited to meet him Minister Aragon of Costa Kica, Minister Romero - of Mexico, Senor Hurtndo of Colombia, Senor Zegarra of Peru, Seuor Decoud of Paraguay, Seuor Meudonca of Brazil, Seuor Velarde of Bolivia and Gen eral John B. Henderson, United' States _ delegate to tho Pau-American Congress. The house was handsomely decorated. THE LATE S. S. COX. Memorial Services to Be Held in the Heme ; o ." Thursday Evening. X Washington,' April 1 I.— Memorial serv ices in respect ' to = tho : memory of , ; the late Samuel S. Cox of New. York will be held in the ■' House ". Thursday evening. Addresses will be delivered by Messrs.' Cummiugs of New • York,' Buckalew of Pennsylvania, Holman -of :■ Indiana, O'Donnell of Michi gan, Grosvenor : of Ohio, Covert of - New York, Outhwalte of Ohio, Gifford of South Dakota, McAdoo, of . New Jersey, Marsh of Pennsylvania, Stone of Missouri, Sherman of New York, Washington •of Tennessee, Reilly of Pennsylvania, Voder of Ohio, Clamuiy of North Carolina . and Turner ; of New Vork,^r_^KVqnftEK_B_____|aß| I .•'•■ :■*-'--'::_.*■"-■'_■■■*■ - — '" m ' - 1 PENSION . CERTIFICATES. A F.ivorab'.o Report Ordered on the Bill to ■ Prevent Summary Cancellation. §7 Washington, April I.— Tlie Senate Com j mittee on l'eusions this morning- ordered a' favorable report upon Senator Mauderson's J bill," to prevent the summary cancellation of ; pension : certificate.. ■■ Ii provides ' that ; the Secretary of the Interior or Commis sioner of Pensions, before canceling the pension certificate or suspending payment thereon, or striking the name of any living pensioner from the rolls,- shall give notice to the person or persons that will he affected by such action, ■ and giving such pensioner an opportunity to show cause against such action . before the United States Commissioner or Special Agent nearest the abode of the pensioner. 0 Senator Mitchell's bill, providing pension^ certificates for old soldiers of the Indian wars, was discussed and referred to a sub committee, consisting of Senators Blair, Paddock and Faulkner. Favorable reports were ordered on the hills to give the widow of General Hart ranft a pension of $100 a month and to in crease the pensions of the widows of Com mander Fabius Stanemey and of Charles S. Boggs, late of the navy, from $30 to (50 a mouth. B_e___-M».iii_^e»afcfr'oSi THE ARMY. A Resignation Accepted— Chaplain Wilson En . „ „ tired— Ordered to Vancouver. 6. ? o Washington, April I.— The President has accepted the resignation of First Lieu tenant Harvey D. Reed, 'lwentv-iifth In fantry, to take effect June 30, 1890. " i Post Chaplain David Wilson, has been plated on the retired list of the army. '= .' Assistant Surgeon H. P. Birmingham has been ordered to temporary duty at Van-, couver Barracks, Wash. c° °° "» Q ; Jo o California I ° ° ' ° ° _ Washington', April- 1. — Patents 0 have been granted to the following' California inventors: George A. and C. __.. Fleming and G. T. McLaughlin. San Jose, fruit pit ting and spreading" machine; Edward S. Geron, Lafayette, assignor of half interest to J.. Eva, San Francisco," reversible plow; Elani Harter, San Diego, step-ladder; John L. Heald, Crockett, steam boiler; John Ueilrath, Plymouth, two- wheeled vehicle; same, adjustable vehicle seat; Ernest L. liansome, San Francisco, mold for molding concrete continuously; Daniel S. ltegan, San Francisco, gas engine; John C. 11. Slut, San Francisco, automatic cable-lifter- for cable railway . same, automatic tension de vice for cabin railway; Lewis A.Turner, assignor of half interest to W. D. Babcuck, Los Angeles, rail climber for vehicle wheels; Louis Zander, Oakland, lamp burner. o " ■ .-. — - — a — r_ ." X ° " The" Pension List. o°S o „°° c w° w Washington, April I.— Tho ° following pensions have been granted to Calif ornians: Original— Nathan JL. Erarv, University; Silas D. Frost," Selma; W. E. Keeb, Los Angeles. Increase— Erank Mannarick, San Francisco ; . c Joel ____. S Shackelford, Los An geles; James H. Euson, Wilmington ; "John IcElhenny, Eleito. Keissue-rlsaac Onyon, San Erancisco. Original widows, etc.— Eliza A. J., widow of Thomas H. Watson, Los Angeles ; minor heir of Charles 11. - Scam in'in, Davisville; Mlnda Y. McClure, t for the widow of Charles H. Scainmon, Sacra mento ; ( minor hoir of Henry C. Coleman; Los 'Angeles.- Mexican survivor— Albert Keep, Kich liar. „ . "S 000 7 ""- The national Debt. Washington, April I.— The public debt statement issued to-night shows a total of debt of . $1,699,382,5-5 G7 and a net debt of $1,023,157,072. This is a reduction of $11,3. 9. 837 4. during March and of $53, --488,949 -Jo since June 30th last. The re ceipts of the Government during March were $34, 778,180 89 and the expenditures were 517,-34.737 '.'7. Treasurer Houston's statement shows a surplus, exclusive of fractional coins, of $32,615,842 71. "Af*."?. Free Postal Delivery. Washington*, April I.— The House Com mittee on Postoffices and Postroads has agreed to report favorably the bill to extend the free-delivery system to cities of 5000 in habitants, or in which the gross postal revenue amounts to §7 000 per year. It is said this will embrace about 200 more cities and will increase the cost of postal delivery 5350.000. CONGKESS: THE SENATE. - Stewart's Bill Regulating the Manufacture and Sale of Lager Beer. Washington, April I.— The Senate con vened at 11 o'clock, with but three Senators present. No quorum raised, and two calls of the Senate only brought in thirty three, making thirty-six, or six less than a quorum. Plumb moved to take a recess till 12 o'clock, but the motion was declared out of order. Butler moved to adjourn, and on that Al lison demanded the ayes and noes. The motion was defeated by a ayes to 34 noes. : . A quorum then being present, business was proceeded with. Allison presented numerous petitions for the free coinage of silver. Hale reported back the House bill for taking the census of the Chinese with the Senate committee's amendments, and gave notice that he should call the bill up to- morrow. Hale introduced an order to return to the 12 o'clock meeting hour after Monday next. Plumb moved that when the Senate ad journed to-day it bo to meet at 12 o'clock to-morrow. On an aye and no vote the motion was de feated. The House bill authorizing the Mississippi River Commission to purchase or hire such boats as are immediately necessary for tho rescue of the Inhabitants of the overflowed districts was laid before the Senate and passed immediately. Stewart introduced a bill regulating the manufacture, sale and Importation of lager beer. For the purpose of the act lager beer is defined to be a beverage made exclu sively from hops, malt and water. Any other fluid is designated as adulterated lager beer. The bill imposes taxes upon brewers of and dealers in adulterated lager beer, with heavy penalties for a failure to take out a license. All packages containing the beverage shall be branded "adulterated." Adulterated lager beer imported shall pay the duty imposed on lager beer. o The Senate then went iuto executive ses sion. THE HOUSE The Army Appropriation Bill— Seport From the Judiciary Committee. Washington, March 31.— A bill was passed depriving Uuited States Judges of the authority to give an opinion on ques tions of fact. The House then went into committee of the whole on the Army Appropriation Bill. After unimportant actiou the committee rose and reported the bill to the House. - ° The action of the committee in adopting ah amendment providing that no intoxi cating liquors shall be sold at any canteen was reversed by the House. The bill was then passed. The Committee on Judiciary reported a resolution reciting that it is alleged by the Attorney-General that in many of the United States District Courts tlie practice of suspending sentence in criminal cases prevails without the warrant of law. • The resolution alleges that iv some parts of the country the United States District Attorneys, Marshals and Deputies and United States Commissioners have been guilty of maladministration and corruption in office. It directs the Committee on Ju diciary to inquire into the extent, cause and effect of such illegal practice. The resolution was adopted. , Springer introduced a joint resolution to retire ,N. P. Banks with the rank of Major- General. Referred. The House then adjourned. A ; DESPONDENT SUICIDE. Deserted by. Hit Wife, He Bcc.mes Desperate and Takes His Life. X' ; New • York, . April Morris Marks, a silk merchant, committed suicide to-day by, shooting himself through the head with a revolver. J He J- was despondent, and J being deserted by. his 'wife her ; repeated - re fusals ito return ' made • him desperate. Early this evening, after undressing, he put on a night robe, on which he pinned a white rose which had been sent to him the day before by His wife. He lay down on a bed in the back parlor and fired the fatal shot. 7,7- ■■"- • Star Tips. a, Nkw York, April I.— Star tips: At Clif ton—First race,'-, Chapman [for; Freedom ; second, J: Savage ;or St. Mary ; third, Spar ling or St. Paris ; fourth, ■ Bonnie | S or Gri maldi; fifth, -J Enola "or Lizzie; sixth,' Ford ham or Is. aqueena filly. ■_..-*■, -j >'■■■ At Washington— First race, Parthian or Consignee ; - second. Pall - Mall >or ■' Little Ellle : i third,; Sarah * Hall or ; Margherita ; fourth, Iceberg or ; Frank Ward; fifth, My Own or Carrie G. v - MANY STRIKES. A ° General Move Among New Il \ England Trades. '°M. ' " ° 5»-^'7..7^itS' Employers Succeed in Inducing Somil^ : 7 Their Men to' Conlinne at Wort Vx Two Thousand Carpenters? Go Out at' Chicago. ? °° o - The Nine-Hour Movement the •'■:!■/}'?.:. ° \»° T'j Principal Cause. ' %''?■■■'?')._:■ \„ Special oby the' California "Associated Pre__.';7'... I 0 809t0.x, April I. — To-day, was ; : th'e time set for o tho inauguration. "'-of 'Alii]'. ' nine-hour system fof the % labor:' -bodies, . but" success met with .;wa3-j;nbt; .as ° encouraging as was "°ftntJlci{.atWii. % All over JNew England the move was 1 "made, 1 and it has been looked, forward to 0 with c atlifch' dread,' by."*;manijf jte.* j turers . and contractors that they success fully temporized -.-with their employes to : postpone final" action until May Ist, and this brought distention in the labor ranks r and prevented the movement from being unanimous. "„ Most of ".the organizations made the. stand, however, and numerous' strikes are the result. „•.'-"•»' ..•' '•°.°"_'.' o '': , In Boston most of the trades put the de-.J maud off for one month, but the. journey men lathers; f plasterers ; andj-larg'e numbers;' of carpenters', held out and were promptly"^ discharged, . the result being an almost total . cessation of a work on buildings. Be sides nine hours, the lathers want fifty cents a day more pay." £?_'_■ * . •"•°- .:•/."'. XX ' ° In Haverhill the carpenters held off till May, but all the painters ".struck- iot'.morel pay also, 0 ,' . ,y ° °_ °°. °'f-'.'-2''. : y- '.';. .'v i-.' : '. o Jit" Providence carpenters and ; painters, are out and 500 --at n ' Portland,. 200 Lowell, the same 'in,. Lawrence, -'. and iioO at Springfield, and in most cases., " "demand for some increase in pay made with that for less hours. 'Employers of all kinds are making a determined stand against them. Claiming it an extortipn. :: V Throughout, New England -fully 8000 men have struck, but double that number have deferred °J action.;.; The "•*'.• result has al-, ready been 1 bitter recriminations among the. various labor ° assemblies, -and-, the leaders ' are fearful that a lack of unanimity has • ruined all chances of success. =•/ ..-:•-. ; . _':.-c2 X i Chicago, Aril I.— Nearly 1000 J plumbers, J employed throughout the city, went on a strike:; this .'morning.* for ;%an« increase, of wages. ,= o o c oo 0 c _ ' „y ;•- = ... ■>*;< _ '-.. ; \ --.- . • .The labor situation seems to go from bad to worse. , Besides the plumbers, who went out to-day, the carpenters are becoming more restless, and a number struck to-day. The cigar-makers formally declared a strike at Goldsmith J Brothers' factory, and the shoemakers and sbirtmakers have taken up the : matter of eight hours' work, aud will strike if their demands are not acceded to. / Elizabeth (St. J.), April I.— Fifteen hun dred masons and brick-layers here struck this morning for S3 50 per day and nine hours, o- ,_ -. '- Gloucester (Mas?.), April I.— Fifty ship painters connected with the Marine Bail way struck for an advance of cents per hour. J 0~, ,**■-.- ■ Whitman (Mass.), April The Carpen ters' Union, this morning began work on ten hours' pay for nine hours' Work. -• London, April 1. — The shoemakers' strike is extending to all parts of England. Thirty thousand men are out and some dis orderly scenes have occurred. The Liver pool police have been forced t. interfere with public demonstrations in order to Keep peace among the workmen. Behlin, April The miners in the two coal-pits at Dartmund have joined the strike. Work is proceeding quietly in the' Essen District. » Vienna, April The masons and other workmen in this city have struck for higher' wages and fewer hours of labor. t- Trouble Among Knights of Libit. » o St. Louis, April I.— War has broken out afresh among the Knights of Labor, and District Assembly 191, including all the German assemblies in the city, has re turned its charter to the Powderly head quarters, in. Philadelphia. The trouble, grows out of old jealousies betweeu En glish and German assemblies. . A CHINESE "KICK." New York Mongolian. Start an Attempt to Secure _7_turali_ ition. ... New York, April L— A big poster on a°' bill-board in front of 16 Mott street con tains the following in Chinese characters:. We, J the undersigned committee, re spectfully inform you t that the principal, cause of our continued persecution by races who differ from us in civilization and lan guage is due to the fact that we have no voting power, that power having been un justly denied us by reason of partisan legis lation through political rascality.- ..'-.-: ■. .- '■■ " This unjust legislation against us has been discovered by us recently to be un constitutional, and it is our sincere belief also that such unjust dealings with the Chinese do not represent the true senti ments of = blue-blooded .Americans, i We now desire our fellow-countrymen to unite with us in an effort to present our many grievances in a proper manner before the American people. This is an important' movement. It is a movement that needs not only good words, but good money to. back it. o„ 0 - . "Let all those who .wish to enter i this matter with heart and money report at 9 Do.ver street." •-■; ",: c- _ i',. Wong Gong, the head of the committee which signs the document, said to a re porter: "I have been living here as an American citizen sixteen yea rs, and lived like an alderman, too. When - 1 went to get my full naturalization papers the other day the official at the court laughed at me. a He 3 told me that had 1 been born over again right here in New York, if my parents were Chinese, I could not become a citizen. v I got mad and have been working hard ever since to get vengeance, lf all the Chinese whose rights are denied them will me we can obtain what we want."- „ ■— - COMPELLED TO LEAVE. An American Citizen Ordered to Depart From Austria Within Three Days. .-■--. G New YOBS, April I.— Stephen Zarro, a naturalized American, was given three days' notice to leave 'Austria by the authorities. He told a J reporter to-day that neither the American Consul at Tiiest nor Minister Grant at Vienna J afforded him any satisfaction. When he complained Zarro was visiting his mother at Bobowsche, when the peremptory not ice from the Governor of balm, tia was re ceived. . He Is. twenty-six years old, and came to this country eleven years ago. An older brother owns a restaurant at Santa Cruz, Cal. Zarro says be was charged with no Infraction of the law. Zarro, who is educated, will start to morrow for home. It is his intention,' as soon as he reaches California, to seek legal advice without delay, and have the case officially called -to the attention of ,- Mr. Blame. There is no mistake about Zarro's citizenship. He showed the reporter not only his citizenship papers, issued in Santa Cruz, but also a passport which he obtained when he returned temporarily to his na- ; tive town iv Austria. HOSIER BHOAVN. A Seattle Man Whi mysteriously Disappeared Heard From. ,: Minneapolis, April I.— Homer Brown, whose disappearance from Seattle has ex cited so much interest, is with his brother, H. D. Brown, at Albert Lea,' Minn., where he arrived last week of bis own accord. He is under no restraint, and says that he was flad to get away from Seattle and John 'airchild, the lawyer who had interested himself in . his case. - Homer Brown has been Insane for years, and was at one time confined in a lunatic asylum ,in New York. NO CASE. The Falser 'of J a Worthless ' Check Arrested ?7»4^®___i and I gg|^H_@gg " New York, April ,1.— George W. ; Fargo, y who is related ito a member of the firm of Wells, Fargo & Co., is charged . with [ pass ing a worthless check for .50 upon G. Pons, proprietor of the Hotel dv Louvre, in payment of a bill. ' It was drawn upon Wells, Fargo & Co., who refused payment for the PRICE FIVE CENTS. reason that G. W. Fargo had no authority -" to draw on them for money. Pons admit ted that he got the check on January .15:11,. dated five days ahead. He knew at the J time that Fargo had no money in the 'bane . to meet it. The Justice said Pons had no J case and discharged Fargo. y.-'X '•* .-' •"■ -•--.,' — • •■-'• WINTER WHEAT. Outside of Kansas the Condition 7ls Re- 40g$ ported {DisconragiD^:- '7 ' Chicago, April I.— The Farmers' Review gives" the condition: of winter wheat as fol- lows: Outside of ', Kansas : the condition of . winter wheat is very discouraging. In 111 --, inois and Indiana the average for the State Will fall as low as that of .'Wisconsin. •• Six 1 ' counties only in Illinois estimate the pre*- -" ent condition of winter wheat at ; 100 per • j cent. . All the other , counties report dam- .-' age ranging from 10 to 00 per cent. -'The . • same state of affairs prevails. In- Indiana, • but seven counties reporting it in good con dition. The per cent of J. damage is the same, being -estimated at about 60 v per J' cent. Ohio ".makes "a-, better,'' average,';. fifteen Counties reporting the condition, at ; . 1.0 per cent or over. Other counties report ' : the da-mage ran_ine from 10;tnJ40 per cent - ''.'Kentucky, shows a falling off ; of 12 percent; , Missouri, (i/4 per Cent; Michigan and Wis- •. < I cousin; . from lo.to 50 percent. Kansas J alone hoi .lie" : own. '< We -snmmarize''- tha 7 reports as follows: -Illinois', 70 per cent;Ta diana, : -.76 ; ..' Ohio, US.;'- .Missouri, 84; -Ken-"-: tucky, 87; Kansas, 92; Wisconsin, Ti, and Michigan, G7. ;:.■..-:'■'.'>: .-••:.: : .-;- i . '."• ■:' --:- ; :- -' X •'.■■ k^-ftKi L LI) WIG WINDTHORST. ! Lender of tie Center Party Which Hold* . J'7 : -JJ'T- Hie Balance of Tow iirl ' . 1 DrJ'JLudw'is Windtliorst.whom the defeat ojf ..-T'iie.JJiCo'rtel or Government party has made ..conspicuous as thejl.eader.of the Ceater .. pjatty, which now holds the balance of power in the German JReichstag, was born in Hau- '■ .' L .. "■ 'xir. Zudivig ICindthortt. ,'*- *? c ""'i>. over in 1812. Having studied law at Heid elberg; he. 30011 rose to distinction, and was twice Minister of State in his native King dom- of. Hanover. . The 0 absorption of the, latter State by Prussia widened the sphere of his activity and be was elected to the Reichstag, • successively representing three districts and always, being re-elc-ted with out opposition. - He is a conspicuous fig ure among'- the deputies „ t aking per gonal interest iv all 'leading questions, and few care to. invite the attacks of his ready speech, 'bis:*. logical argument and biting sarcasm. ' Bismarck ''again " and again suc •cum.bed'to- his': attacks and is said feared o him as he feared no other man iv the em • pire. . Windthorst's ' struggle against the Kiilttirkampf ' at length forced Bismarck to abandon. c is "^anti-Catholic policy. The Center party, of which Windthorst ls the chief, was formed °iv 1801) to resist the at tacks of the majority in the Prussian Land tag upon the Catholic church, which attacks culminated in" January. 1870. " _ . ; '___—_* *.-a22_ - ■-*-_■__,-:■ s- * _ HAMILTON AND BURR. . Interesting jtemlulscences of Their Fatal o o Duel. ' ... The monograph 1 published some weeks ago by the Hamilton Bank of this city, ' presenting the story of the Burr-Hamilton duel as told in the newspaper accounts of 1804,° has attracted a degree of attention that illustrates the interest still felt in that tragic and lamentable event. {Several score of letters. have been received- at the bank asking for the pamphlet or "commenting, upon the facts therein presented. One writer, in the course O of his comments, says: <■ "A gentleman connected with the Schuy lers and Hamiltons closely by marriage, and with whose friendship I, was long hon ored, once told me, 'I am the only man liv ing who knows the real cause of- that duel, and 1 shall carry ray secret with me to the grave,' which : ho. 0 did. My • mother, only daughter,," of Nathaniel , Pendle ,ton ■ (Hamilton's second", in', the duel), often -told, .me, 'Father, ' did not, : •I;/ think;- wish General *. Hamilton' to fight Willi Burr. He felt certain' that Burr would.kill him. Burr was a dead shot; the General was. a very poor one.'." Of Burr my mother -always-' spoke with- the most undis guisbed scorn aud. contempt. . She told me often :-T have seen him walking the streets of New .York, often— a little, decrepit, shabby', mean-looking man, too poor to pay his way across the- ferry; '.".'' '..'/ • Another venerable correspondent writes: "I was nine years old when the duel occur red, and remember the event very 'well. The country was 'greatly excited, threaten ing to hang Burr.. Tu. some respects he had., his' deserts.' He was despised, an outcast " from ' society. .-.I- have seen, hint' .twice, the last time the •morning after his last mar riage. He and his wife went =on the New J Haven steamboat iii New York.Jo He was J a very small .man. c but every person would 1 notice- his remarkably .bright black eyes." : Says anothe'r - writer: "My great-grand father, Theodore B. o Vall'eah,, signed as a witness to General. Hamilton's ..iii, aud his son was, at tliAt'.time a student at law in Hamilton's office..- To hiih the General is. said to have, given' his last words', of direc- - tions '-. about his " business affairs •on . the § afternoon previous cto r liis "meeting with Colonel Burr. , Of o course, no intimation, was then given of what was to follow." - . In Parton's "Life of Aaron Burr" a state ment is made that the marble monument erected by the St. Andrew's Society of New York, of which Hamilton was -President, on I the spot in Weehawken where he, fell, was I broken down • and carried off by vandal hands, and that "the slab which bore v inscription was preserved until recently," J but "upon _ searching for it" it was disco.-' ered "that" even i that last relic bad disap peared lv the same mysterious manner as the rest." The publication of this mono- ?• graph has thrown light upon that mystery, J for one of the letters above referred to- is from a member of the family to ' which that historic spot belongs, who says : "The duel was fought on my father's property, and he . now has in his bouse the slab that the St, ° Andrew's - Society erected, to mark tha spot."— N. Y. Times. 0 ° o ° . ;- Cheap Clothing. ° The other day a seedy gentleman dropped Into a cheap clothing establishment. Ha nosed around awhile, and liaally laid bis hands upon a coat and vest of a loud color . and coarse texture. • c o - _ '-. " How much?" he said, laconically. . *> c.' Dree dollars." " ° '" ° ,*„ "Three dollars 1 That's too mu :h." -° "Dot vas Bheap, mem freuud. Dot was *_ gootgoat und vest." •.,;.« 0 ». "Are they wool?" „ :; ° X.. c - The proprietor held up his hands, 0 _ " Are they vool he repeated. 0 "Sohelnp me gracious, meia re und, day vas all voll except the buttonholes I"— Detroit Tribune. W. H. Thornburg of Turlock. Merced County, gathered in $16 last Friday by shooting a female coyote and then digging out seven pups that were not able to see. Ie put the whole outfit into a gunny sack J and exchanged them with the County Treasurer for good coin of the realm. -..-..■. '-, JSPAC©BS©II ._ CURES PERMANENTLY™ RHEUMATISM. Sn_r.j-.il for Nearly 30 Tear*. 7. ■ 1-7 N. Chester gl., Baltimore. Hd. . ■■• For nearly so rears 1 miff-fed with rheuraa. turn in ana and iho-Jdot; could not lifts)! - ir_S. T/bis than two battles Of iSt, Jacobs Oil • -UT-d fa*. ,W. H. HK___o_-. „ Of Many Tears' Standing. - '.:;.--■ Gad-don, Crocltelt Co., Term. *' lily cos. was rneuinauin. or many yew ttanalng, oautra^tua during the war; tried Snort evo'irwhwi without relief. 6t. Jacob!' . Oil Anally CUMI ma, KitED. ROGGE. ' At Dat'.oisTa .ASP Dli-BM.' .X. :"7 IK. QHdfLMM >. ¥OO,L 5 a „ 00^ , B *.ifl?iif«»g__ _■ oc_.ino_ol.ts_.

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler