7 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1

7 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

VOLUME LXVII-NO. 138. TWELVE DROWNED. Result of a Mississippi Flood Casualty. Accident Caused by a Land-Slide on the Best Shore Road. I Banter Carried Over Niagara Falls. Sequel to the Newman Murder. Ihurman's Illness. Special by the California Associated Press. MExtruis, April 6.— Reports from the lower Mississippi indicate a rise more or less heavy. The river is falling rapidly at Cairo to-day, and it is expected to fall rap idly from now on. Intelligence from Arkansas City is to the effect that a party of armed men went down from the Bed Fork district and cut the levee at Boggy Bayou at Possum Forks, La., causing a dangerous crevasse. The guards on patrol were removed several days ago. The State authorities will try to close the gap. A party of negroes lately arrived in Louisiana' from North Carolina, got on an improvised raft to escape the overflow in the Bogue Yolaya, and, being unused to navigation, they ran against a stump and wrecked the raft. Twelve women and children were drowned. THE RESCUED SAILORS. Thrilling Story of the Suffering of the Wrecked Marines. New .York, April 6.— The crew of the German bark Lydia Anna, whose rescue was reported in yesterday's dispatches, tell a thrilling story of their experiences. For ten days starvation stared them in the face. The only f cod available was water soaked crackers. Bain fell incessantly while they were on Sandy Island and a hurricane prevailed, making It impossible to start a fire. As days passed some of the crew became desperate and threatened to commit suicide. The captain was ill with bronchial troubles, and to increase the hardship an ice floe blocked the passage to what remained of the wrecked vessel. Ou the ninth day every bit of food and the last drop of water was gone. At noon on the tenth day the Grade was sighted, saw their signals and rescued them. They will be sent home by the Ger man Consul. WILL STRIKE. The Carpenters of Chicago Decide to Quit Work To-D&y. Chicago, April 6.— The question of a carpenters' strike is no longer a matter of doubt The strike will take place Monday morning, and building operations will prac ti.-ailv be brought to a standstill thereby. The final order for a strike was promul gated at a meeting of the United Carpen ters' Council at midnight. The meeting was attended by representatives of all the carpenters' unions in the city, including the United Brotherhood, Amalgamated Union, International Union and Knights of Labor, and the decision was arrived at unanimously. Three thousand to 4000 men will he directly affected by the strike, and there is every probability that it will be a bitterly contested fight from tbe very out- FOUR KILLED. A Sheriff and ' Three Negroes Shot at Bir mingham, Ala. Birmingham (Ala.), April 7.— City Mar shal England of Irondale was fatally wound ed and three negroes were killed last even ing. Further trouble is expected. War rants were issued against the negroes for larceny, and Marshal England, ac companied by Deputy Sheriff Fonten berry started to their cabin for the i urpose of making the arrffst The negroes saw the officers and ran. The officers called to the negroes, when Bait, one of the negroes, fired. England fell mortally wounded. Fontenberry returned the fire and killed three negroes. ' The killing was not political, but the causes leading to it were. POISONED CORN. Emms Starke. Newman's Domestic, Charged W th Murder. Chicago, April Emma Starke, the domestic that placed poison in a can of corn that caused the death of Mr. and Mrs. Newman, was arrested last night at the Park Theater, a low resort. She denied that her name was Starke, or that she had worked for the Newmans, but she was pos itively identified by young Newman and t • matron of the Anchorage Mission, who had sent her to Newman's. The girl told a number of improbable stories, and was locked up on a charge of murder. Mr. Newman's son has fully recovered, but the daughter is still low, and fears are enter tained for her recovery. OVER NIAGARA FALLS. Supposed Fate of William A. Welch a Well- Known Hunter. La Salle (N. V.), April William A. Welch, well known as a Niagara River hunter, is believed to have been carried over Niagara Cataract. He has been miss ing a week. Sunday last he went hunting nm-k rats with a step-son. The two sepa rated at 4 o'clock in the afternoon, when W-lch was rowing toward the Canadian shore. Soon after a hurricane arose, and th.re is little doubt that Welch, unable to make the shore or land on Goats island, went over the falls. One of the oars of bis boat has been picked up below the falls. RAILROAD ACCIDENT. An Engineer and Two Trainmen Buried in a Lind-S-lide. Trot, April 6.— A big land-slide occurred on the tracks of the West Shore Road at Diefendorf Hill and both tracks are blocked. The east-bound freight train ran into a mass of rock. Engineer Potter and three trainmen were buried in the slide. Two were rescued badiy injured and lue oilier will die. ' ALLEN G. THURMAN. The 0 d Senat-r Reported to Be Seri ously 11. Columbus, April 6.— Ex-Senator Allen G. Thurinan is seriously ill at his residence. He has been confined to his bed for several days, and on account of his age his family are anxious as to the outcome. Star Tips. New York, April 7.-Star tips for the races at Clifton are— Slumber or Rudolph, Ayala or Planter, Little Jake or Romp, In sight or Glory. Carnegie or St John, Addle Tor Harrison. At Washington— Patrocles or San Jose, Beck or Mamie Hay, Best Boy or C.-rise colt, Sliotover or Ball Mall, Jim Murphy or Bassanio. Chicago Defeats Cleve St. Louis, April 6.— The Chicago and Cleveland Brotherhood teams played another exhibition game to-day. Chicago won by a score of 7 to 6. - Old Sign* In Favor. The latest trick of some tradesmen is shown In a desire to display old-looking signs at their business places. "It's sur prising, said a sign-painter to a reporter the other day, "to note row anxious some newly establish d firms are to purchase signs that have seen service. A sign that is exposed to the elements for a number of tears Is bound to assume that weather beaten front that is the pride and draw ing card of the old and successful merchant I have had twenty odd years' experience at outdoor advertising, and i never saw this old-sign craze so rampant as at the present lime. To meet the de mand 1 have worked hard of late months, and I have hit upon a plan by which I can construct at a lew days' notice a sign that will have all the appearances of having been through the water. The \ mixture which I use requires great care in forming, and its ingredients are very expensive, so ____9Sbt_____W______& » The Morning Call. that, workmanship and material consid ered, a 'new-old' sign costs a great deal more than would a sign in fresh, bright gilt."— New England Grocer. REAL ROMANCE. A Spanish Grandee Weds a Polish I'fUKiant. ". A Tery interesting wedding, which can not be aptly described as a marriage a la mode, or a love match, or even a mere mesalliance, but partakes of the nature of all three, has lately taken place in an obscure Polish village, says a St. Peters burg correspondent of the Boston Herald, the bridegroom being no less a personage than a Spanish grandee, the Governor of the Philippine Islands, aud the bride a charm ing, artless Polish peasant girl. The match was brought about in this way. A year ago the Spanish dignitary obtained leave of absence, and paid a visit to Paris for the sole pur pose of seeking for a suitable life partner in that International matrimonial mart. The qualifications required iv the bride were few, but important: she should profess the Koman Catholic faith, and should have something more valuable than her face for her fortune. His vigilant eyes soon fell upon a beautiful Polish maiden, who, though a peasant, could bQast of great worldly wealth, aud was blessed with good looks, which were over and above the conditions. The Spaniard cultivated the acquaintance of this Slavonic maiden, talked with her father, proposed, and was accepted. Shortly before the mar riage of a Polish prince, the owner of the village of Sandomir, was induced to confer by adoption upon the young lady the title ox i rincess. After this the Governor of tne Philippine Islands journeyed to Rus sian Poland, to the government of Kelets, where, a few days ago, lie was united in wedlock to the lady of his— heart The marriage ceremony was performed by the Bishop of Sandomir in the rural church of au obscure village, according to the rites of the Roman Catholic church. The little chapel was filled with peasants of every age, among whom w »re many of the lonyer playmates of the blushing bride. THE CITY OF PARIS. Passengers Still Relating Incidents of Their Memonble Trip. London-. April The passengers of the City of Paris have not yet got through talk ing about their experience on the water logged steamer. The actual danger they were in does not seem any less when con sidered from terra firma. A score of pas sengers say they heard nothing of any offer on the part of the captain of the Adriatic to carry them back to New York. K. F. Downing, a Custom-house broker of New York, said: "li the captain of the Adriatic made such an offer. Captain Wat kins never told of it, or almost every m*. would have gone. I know a New Yort man who would have offered $1000 to the captain of the Adriatic to take him back. Why, most of tho passengers would have gone on a boat bound for San Francisco around the Horn rather than have stayed on ttie sinking City of Paris. The coolest man ou hoard," Downing says, "was Hol mau. the liver-pad man. lloluiau was playing poker when the explosion occurred, and all the rest of the players dropped everything and rushed to the deck. Hol man, who was banking, remained to stack up the chips and see how things stood be fore he left the table or inquired what was the matter." Oue man came to the purser at the mo ment when hope was darkest and informed him that he had got bis name wrong on the passenger list. "It should be," he said, " Japhet Hirsch, it is printed here Jacob Hirsch. 1 wish you would see that the correction is made, so that if the steamer .-inks my people will know that it is I that is drowned." Just before the wrecked steamer reached Queenstown, the passengers held a meeting and formed a "Passengers of City of Paris Association." Tlie object of the associa tion is to have a b'g dinner in New York between Christmas and New Year, and the passengers have promised to come on from places as far away as the City of Mexico, Denver aud San Francisco to attend the banquet. "THANKS, GO AHEAD." An Explanation From Captain Roberts of the Steara-r Adriatic. New York, April 6.— Captain Roberts if the Adriatic explains the City of Paris affair as follows: "We were out two days when I saw signals of distress from the City of Paris. A boat in charge of the chief officer came alongside saying Captain Watkins desired to be towed into Queens town. lie theu told me the condition of the ship. 1 declined to do as requested, but told him I would go to her to save life. While they were talk ing another steamer hove in sight. She was bound west ami I thought she was the City of Chester of the same line. We sent up rockets, but she kept right on and paid no attention to our signals. The chief officer then repeated his re quest. . 1 again told him I would go to the City of Paris to save life, if neces sary, but would not tow her into Queens town. We then started to go to the City of Paris when we sighted a steamship bound east, which afterward proved to be the Aldersgate. I signalled her and when she responded I sent my chief officer in a boat. He boarded the steamer and asked her commander if he would go to the assistance of the City of Paris and take the passengers from her. He consented to do this and we proceeded in company in case of emergency. The commander of the Aldersgate and Captain Watkins had a consultation. The City of Paris hoisted a signal saying, "Thanks, go ahead." In conclusion Captain Roberts said, had there been any danger, lie would not have thought of leaving the City of Paris, but would have taken her in tow, mails or no mails." The City of Chester arrived to-day. Her officers denied seeing signals sent up by the Adriatic, and stated that they did not see either vessel. PENNSYLVANIA POLITICS. Congressman Dalzell Openly Declares War Against Senator Quay. Washington, April 6.— The Sunday Herald says: "Congressman Dalzell has at last declared war against Senator Quay, and yesterday the Pittsburg representative came out flat-footed in an Interview and announced that he was for any man for Governor who was anti-Quay. This de claration is not a surprise to Pennsylvania Republicans, for it has been antic! ■ ated for some time. The wonder has been that Dalzell did not throw down the gauntlet ere this, but now that he has expressed himself, the country may prepare for some lively Keystone State politics. Mr. Dalzell is an ardent Republican aud not given to kicking over the party traces, but in this instance it will be found that he is with the best element of the Pennsylvania Republi cans, who are bent on strangling the ma chine of which Senator Quay is the ac knowledged boss." Jo urn all it* 1. .liel in • iii«.-I ,-.—,. The St. Peter-burg journalists, Russian and otherwise, who are admitted to court festivities, have just sent a curious petition to the Czar. They asked to be allowed to wear on their dress-coals some small orna ment with the name of the paper they represent inscribed on it, by which they might be recognized as representatives of the press, The Czar has at oi.Co granted the request, and at the next court ball all the bona fide journalists will appear adorned « itb their new badge. No one but an accredited representative of a paper will be allowed to wear the badge, the raison d'etre for which appears to lie the fact that not unfrcquently a number of gentlemen had gained admittance as press men who were much better acquainted with the art of blacking boots than with that of fur nishing newspaper reports. The M J i sue. .The companion ship to the Teutonic, called the : Majestic, will be 2000 horse power stronger than her sister. Captain IVarsall, now in charge of the Teutonic, the senior captain of the While Star Line, is to be in charge of her, and to be promoted to the rank of the commodore of the fleet The Majestic*! first trip from New York will he ou Wednesday, the lltli of June. — Ex.:.' an Opportune Fkiknd will be found In Dr. 1). Jayne's Expecioraut, when racked by a Severe Cold, and the many Lung or Throat Affections wnlcli sometime-. follow. . This old remedy has met the approval of two generations, and is to day as popular, sate and effective as ever. . .-. • : SAN FRANCISCO, MONDAY MORNING; APRIL 7, IS9O-EIQHT PAGES. THE TARIFF. The Bill Ready to Be Reported to the House. Carlisle Engaged in Preparing a Democratic Minority Report. Senator Chandler on tbe Proposition to Establish Reciprocity Treaties With South America. 4 -____-____--—_________. Special by the California, Associated Press. Washington, April 6.— A tariff bill will be reported to the House next week, prob ably as early as Wednesday or Thursday. Accompanying this Dill is a report of the majority of the Ways and Means Com mittee, which is now ready, and by Monday or Tuesday the report of the Democratic minority of the committee will be ready. Mr. Carlisle is now engaged in drawing it up. At one time there had been some in tention of submitting a minority bill on the lines of the Mills bill, which passed the House in the last Cougress; but that inten tion has been abandoned. A majority of the Democrats on the committee and three fourths of the Democrats in the House re gard that as bad politics, and altogether inadvisable. They hold that it is not the function of a minority to construct a bill, and it is bad policy fur the opposition to create unnecessary embarrassments for itself. This is the view which the majority of the Democrats take. It is this view which the minority of the House has usually taken, and their action will be in accordance with it. Some of the leading Democrats regard the MeKinley bill as so bad that they cannot believe it is intended to stand alone. They believe that Secre tary Blame has had a hand in preparing it, and that high duties have been put upon raw hides and some other things in order to facilitate a dicker looking to free trade with South and Central America. SOUTH AMERICAN TRADE. New England Senators Interested in the Pro posed Reciprocity Treaty. , Washington, April The proposition to establish a reciprocity treaty with the South American countries as an offset to the proposed duty on hides is one to which the New England Senators and Representa tives are giving a great deal of attention. "1 have not given the subject an extended consideration," said Senator Chandler yes terday, "and I would not care to pass judg ment upon it without careful considera tion. I should be inclined to say though that we could well establish reciprocal re lations with any of the countries of the Western Hemisphere which would adopt our tariff system and schedules. I am quite inclined to believe that it would be wise to establish these re lations with all countries between the bor ders of Canada and the Isthmus of Panama. It would not be in any sense au abandon ment of any part of our system of protec tion and it would guarantee to us the almost exclusive traJe of these countries. In ex tending the boundaries of our tariff system along so much more of coast line we would, of course, have to undertake the added re sponsibility of protecting ourselves from smuggling, but I am inclined to think that we would reap great advantage from such relation." ' REPUBLICAN CONFERENCE. The Silver Coinage sod National Election Laws Under Consideration. Washington, April About two-thirds of the Republican Senators met in confer ence last night at the residence of Senator Chandler to discuss the silver question. The Western Senators, known as silver men. had. the floor at first and explained tneir views at length, and then the repre sentatives of other sections expressed them selves. No marked preference for the Windom bill as against the Jones bill (re ported by the Senate Committee on Fi nance) was shown. It was the final opinion that Republican Congressmen should har monize upon some measure of legislation ou the silver question and press it to a pass age at as early a date as possible. The action of the Republican members of the Committee on Privileges and Elections iv requesting Chairman Hoar to prepare a national election law is understood to have met the approval of the conference. When it is reported back from the Judiciary Com mittee Senator Edmunds said be would call it up immediately after the Montana case was concluded. GERMAN RIFLEMEN. Three Monthly Shoots at Harbor View Yi'in-rrlriy, Three German shooting clubs held their monthly medal competitions at Harbor View shooting range yesterday and the merry crack of rifles resounded over the bay all day long. Though the breeze was rather string for accurate shooting the scores were on the whole good. In the shoot of the San Francisco Gruetli Shooting Section the result was as follows: First class medal— A. Rahwyler. 300 rings. Second class— J. Hugenin, .'195 rings. Third class— J. Hauser, 319 rings. The Eiritrnclit Schuetzen Club contest resulted as follows: Champion medal— F. A. Kuhls 408 rings. First class— A. Wirtner,. rings. Second class— B. Overmohle, 367 rings. Third class — O. Nagel, 335 rings. The first best center was made by A. Stamer and the last best center by L. H. 11. Kaii flung. The California Schuetzen Club also held its stated medal shoot, with the following result: Champion clas3— A. Sticker, 446 rings. First class— Dr. Rogers, 423 rings. Second, class— William Glindeman, 385 rings. Third class— A. Utehlg, 401 rings. Fourth class— F. C. Miller, 374 rings. The well-known veteran riflemen I'hilo Jacoby, Captain F. A. Kuhls, William Ehrenpfort and George Hoaf will soon leave for Berlin, where they will take part in the great German Bundes shooting festival. This is the greatest shoot of the year, and marksmen from all over the world will be in attendance. The local experts are ex pected to make a creditable showing. The Eintracht Society, of which Captain Kuhls is a member, will escort the great marksmen to the ferry in a body, and the California Schuetzen Club, of which Mr. Jacoby is President, will probably do the same for him. ■ . SAN BRUNO ROAD. Regular Sleeting of the Improvement Club— The Petition. The regular meeting of the San Bruno Road Improvement Club was held yester day afternoon at the Guadeloupe Dairy, on the San Bruno road, L. A. Hay ward pre siding. John Reynolds, for the Executive Com mittee, reported that the petitions for the improvement of the road were duly pre sented' to the Board of Supervisors, nnd were referred to tho Street Committee and came up at the last meeting of. that body. On the following Monday it ' came before the Supervisors again and was referred back to the Street Committee, which met last Thursday. At that time it was thought best to recommend to the Board to appro priate the SUM) asked for, this amount to be added to the next tax levy. This will come up before the Supervisors to-night to be acted upon. George 11. Reynolds moved, and it was carried, that a vote of thanks be given Mr. L. J. Ewell for his success in securing signers to the petition just presented. £ A bill amounting to B*4, for work on the San Bruno road, near Army street, was re ported paid by private subscriptions. A Yi.nnir In-.brlr.te. A fourteen-year-old Italian lad was brought to the Central Station last evening stupified with liquor and booked on a charge of drunkenness. The -officer saw tho boy ' staggering along Dupont . street near Pacific, iv an aimless manner and ■ ques- i tioned bin] as to his - name aud residence. Ho was unable to tell his name or where he lived. A youth . who accompanied the of ficer to the prison stated that the young inebriate was a bootblack and lived on Fil bert street, near Kearny. The arrested lad could i not tell where he obtained the liquor, but it is supposed that he got a quantity of cheap wine somewhere in the Latin quarter and drank enough to stupify himself. STRIKE IN A HOTEL. Daring the Confusion Thieves and Swindlers Heap a Rich Harvest. London, April 6.— There has been a sin gular strike at the Savoy Hotel. The new manager, recently appointed, was unlucky enough to offend the chef, and the latter struck. Sixty cooks followed the chef. Then the waiters joined the strike, and next came the maids and por ters, the hotel being completely upset Meanwhile thieves and swindlers are reap ing a harvest among the excursionists. The room of the American Consul at Plauen was entered by burglars and a jewel casket valued at $5000 stolen. The casket was found but the contents had been abstracted. FOG-SIGNAL EXPLOSION. Dome of Belle Bock Light-House Shattered and Licht Extinguished. London, April 7.— The fog-signal prema turely exploded last night at the famous Belle Bock Light-house, off the east coast of Scotland. The dome was shattered by the explosion and the light extinguished, the first time since it was built in 1811. After the explosion a passing steamer had a narrow escape from being wrecked, owing to the absence of the light. TO ISOLATE RUSSIA. Emperor William's Marked Departure From Bismarck's Policy. Berlin, April 6.— A Hamburg corre spondent says that in contrast with Bis marck's policy Emperor William intends to pave the way to an entente with France and thus isolate Russia. The Austrian al liance, he adds, will remain unchanged. THE JRIOTOUS STUDENTS. Only Those Implicated la the Disorders of 1888 to Be Expelled. St. Petersburg, April The student disorders have practically ended, the holi days having taken a majority of the students to the country. It has been decided that only those shall be expelled who were im plicated in the disorders of 1888. The Czar, Czarina and family, and the Queen of Greece attended the fete of mounted guards to-day. London, April 6. -—A dispatch from St. Petersburg to the Daily Telegraph says: The Minister of Education nnd Professor Mendeliff of the University have both re signed after having bad a quarrel. The disorders among the students continue and the prisons are overflowing with Inmates. CREW MISSING. A Chicago Yacht Found Capsized With No One Aboard. Toronto, April The yacht Idler, belonging to ex-Commodore Fisher of the Chicago Yacht Club, was found capsized a few miles off this city. There was no trace of life aboard and the crew are supposed to have perished. No News of the Southgate. Halifax, April Nothing further has been heard of the disabled steamer South gate, spoken south of George's Bank by the brig Aiejo. She was supposed to be mak ing for Halifax. Bern Pedro Improving. Cannes, April 6.— Dom Pedro is much better and dined with his family to-day. He remains indoors. ITEMS OF INTEREST, A Florida paper appeared In green ink on St. Patrick's day. " The use of electric lights is increasing with great rapidity among the London shop men. In Edinburgh a wholesome meal of vege table broth and bread can be had for one cent. There are six women police officers in the Loudon police force, all employed as de tectives. The greatest body of silver ore in Mon tana lias been discovered at the Mountain Lion Mine, near Cooke City. A parrot in a hospital at Pittsburg, Pa., got drunk on some alcohol left within her reach, aud shocked the inmates by her pro fanity. Ben lie gun, the ex-prize fighter and evangelist lost $1000 worth of stereopticon views and paraphernalia in a fire iv New castle, Pa. Georgetown girls wear one yellow and one black garter, because they think the wearer will receive a marriage proposal before the close of the year. The Hudson River peach crop has been ruined by the alternate warm and freezing weather, but there is promise of an abund ant yield of grapes. Bears and wolves have committed such depredations in the department of Orel, in Russia, that the soldiers have been em ployed to exterminate them. Two hundred and fifty battalions will take part in the Russian maneuvers to be held in the presence of the Bmperor in the province of Volbynia next autumn. All of the bank-note currency of the Ital ian Government is engraved and printed in the United States. The notes are neat, but small, resembling somewhat the fractional notes issued iv war times. Thomas Seymour Denton has invented the word "munuprint," verb, adjective and noun, for work done with the type-writer, It is at once more accurate and suggestive than "manuscript" for such work. The Alniauach de Gotha is over a century and a quarter old. When it was first issued there were only three republics, Switzer land, San Marino aud Andorra, while to day there are t\fenty-six republics. The prisoners in the jail at Mooltan, In dia, celebrated their New Year's by cuttiug off the nose of their jailer. It was from this same jail that several prisoners recent ly escaped, but soon came back voluntarily. The largest plate of glass ever cast, meas uring 145x195 inches and weighing 2000 pounds, was drawn from the annealing fur naces at the Diamond Plate Glass Works, Kokomo, lint., on March 20th. It is per fect J. E. Lewis, living a few miles from Cul pepper, Va., has a mule which for sagacity and agility "takes the cake." Mr. Lewis found the mule in the hayloft the other morning. The only mode of ingress to the loft is by a ladder. How sad it is to think that seventy-five men were compelled to seek other means of livelihood by the closing of pool-rooms in Baltimore. The majority of tho men im mediately packed their collar-boxes and started for Washington, D. C. In a prehistoric cemetery, lately uncov ered near Moutpelier, in the south of France, were two skulls, evidently belong ing '. to the Aryan race, and some human bones that, judged from their proportions, must have belonged to a man at least 10 feet in height. , The number of applications to the Quebec Government from fathers of twelve chil dren for the offered free grant of 100 acres of land is exciting surprise, notwithstand ing French-Canadians are proverbial for large families. Up to the present time 145 such applications have been received. An interesting aerial contest was wit nessed at St. Augustine, Fla., between an eagle and a fish-hawk. Tho fish-hawk was being pursued by the eagle, aud in order to make its escape had to dron its burden, which proved to be a large flounder. The fish tell in a yard aud was taken in and a meal made out of it. Bismarck's Boots. Prince Bismarck taught a Berlin shoe maker, who was proverbial for making promises which he did not keep, how to be punctual. The man, after many promises, had failed to keep them. When this again occurred, the shoemaker was aroused at 6 o'clock the next morning by a messenger, with the simple question: . "Are Heir Bismarck's boots ready yet?". ■ When- the shoemaker said "No,' be re tired; but in ten minutes another messen ger arrived. -Loud rang the bell. • .."Are Uerr Bismarck s boots ready yet?" was the inquiry. rr •: --"No," was the reply. : ..And so it went on every ten minutes until the boots were ready in ■ the I evening.'! The shoemaker was more cautious in mak ing promises - after : that— Harper's Young i'eople.JßßßßMßngjdteKßfSßHnd SAN JOSE RACES. The Entries for Events on To-Day's Programme. Horses at Work on the Agricultural Park Track. Promising Two and Three Year Olds Whose Names Aro Likely to Become Famous. Special by the California Associated Press. Sax Jose, April Last night's and this morning's light showers have not af

fected the Agricultural Park track in tho least injuriously, but in reality have bene fited it, and with the present strong sun and a good harrowing to-morrow, it will be faster than ever for the second day's sport. A visit to the track this morning showed i most of the horses at work. The inside i track was used to prevent the holing of the regular course. Manager Van Gorden and Trainer Do- I nation, of the Hearst stable, had out some j of their two-year-olds, lead by Sacramento (3), and all were given lively exercise, Sac ramento especially. Sacramento is a hand some, big-furnished bay colt, by Joe Hook er, dam Ada C. Last year he did not show up prominently, but now. if looks go for anything, lie will certainly make his mark. He may start possibly to-morrow aud by j the time he comes to the post at the Bay . -District he should be in good order. LIKELY TWO-YEAK-OLDS. Of the Hearst two-year-olds the best lookers are i'osetnite, b. c., by Hyder All, dam Nellie Collier; Anarchist, eh. c, by Joe Hooker, dam Chestnut Belle, and Snowball, eh. c, by Joe Hooker, dam Laura Winston. These three are particularly well developed fine colts, and in looks are I equal to anybody's. Yosemite displays the Hyder Ali traits strongly; his coat is ticked with the Hyder Ali white hairs, and the great family type, the hunch of gray hairs at the root of the tail, is remarkably noticeably. He is a very taking colt. An archist is a stockier colt than Yosemite and very powerfully developed, lv many ways he resembles the Czar as a two-year-old. Both these colts have worked well here, though they will not start at this meeting, being reserved for their bay engagements. Anarchist has had a little cold, but is all over it now. The pair worked a quarter yesterday in 24%. Snowball has made no fast moves yet, but he is a line, big, slash ing youngster, and will no doubt be heard from. On looks. Anarchist, Yo semite, Snowball would be the order of classification. Prlmero, eh. c, by Powbat tan, dam Speed, and J. 8., b. c, by War wick, dam Maria are two likely young ster!;. Aliuont and Miss Gertrude (4) in tin: same stable, are doing well and may start at the Bay. Taking the string all through it is a Hue looking one, aud with a little more work the two-year-olds, especially, will bear close attention. Unfortunately the stable has made no engagement-! for the Sacramento meeting, though it is well entered tor the Bay races. After Sacra mento the stable will ship Bast, probably commencing at Chicago, though it is possi ble that they may go right on to the East ern tracks aud then return to Chicago. Tom Hazlett had Jubilee (4) out and gave him some steady work. The horse looked in Cue older and went its strong as a steam engine, nearly pulliug Hazlett out of the saddle. If Jubilee would run as well in a race as in work, he would add many a bracket to his name. Jubilee is in the Owner's handicap here. He is not entered at the Bay. THE ELM WOOD STABLES. It looks and breeding count for anything the Elmwood Stables two-year-old br. c. Duke of Milpltas, dam Gypsy, by imp. Hercules, aud tracing way back to the Nor folk blood, ought to be as gilt-edged as the best. This colt is a remarkably well-made blood bay, with black points. He is big and well developed. So far he lias only done light work aud will not make his debut on the Coast. He is in the Futurity and goes Bast soon. The stable expects great things from this colt. Another likely two-year-old in this stable is Sir Walter, brown colt by. Nathan Coombs, dam by imported Hercules. This young gentleman lias done some good work and starts at the Bay. Ho is not as big as some of the other two-year-olds at the track, but is liable to prove a useful one later on. Kelly and Samuel's two-year-old eh. filly Lizette by Hyder Ali, dam Kate Fletcher, is a good-looking youngster and has been doing good work. She will start at the Bay. Bd McGinuis aud Welcome (5) iv the same stable, are lookiug well. A HANDSOME COLT. Flambeau, the Palo Alto crack colt, has developed into the finest three-year-old that has ever been seen on the Pacific Coast, the Biimeror of Norfolk and all the others not excepted. A grander, belter muscled, i eifect specimen of the thoroughbred it is impossible to imagine. He has deepened and furnished out wonderfully. He looks the picture of health aud is as playful as a kitten. Since he came to this track he has gone a mile and a quarter with his shoes en iv 2:12. While Racine lias improved wonderfully also, and is a beauty, taking the two to gether. Flambeau is bis superior in every way. The Hearst stables are indeed in luck' to get such a colt as Flambeau, even if it is only for his racing quality. If this sou of Wildidle and Flirt has good luck in stand ing the change to the Bast, there is not a colt in the country, the great El Bio Key not excepted, that should beat him with weight up, any distance, from a mile to a mile and a quarter. When the Palo Alto horses come to the Bay District horsemen will be given a treat by a chance to look this great colt over. TIIE PALO ALTO TWO-YEAR-OLDS. The Palo Alto stable's two-year-olds are good ones. Binfax showed - his quality yesterday by winning hands down, and in the description of the race Binfax was also described. Tearless, a two-year-old eh. f. by Wildidle, dam Teardrop, is a likely young lady, but is not as forward as Bin fax, who may possibly prove the best of the regular Palo Alto lot. which includes Scamper and Jackson. These two latter have no engagements either here or at the Bay. There is considerable talk, however, about a colt belonging to the Undine stable, in which T. li. Williams, Jr.. is Interested, which is down here with the Palo Alto horses. This coll is reported to be a wonder and one that will bear keeping in mind. It is possible that tbe Palo Alto horses will go to the Bay District after to morrow's races. EJJTKIES FOB TO-DAY'S .RACES. The entries for to-day's races, declara tions closing at 10 o'clock, are as follows: First race, seven-eighths of a mile—Pain killer, Eaindr op, Daisy D, Oro, Plicy, Bes sie Shannon, Jubilee, Del Mar. Second race, one und au eighth miles— Faustiue, Welcome, Jack Brady. 'third race, one mile— Muta, Pliny, Bag gage, Sacramento. - Fourth race, half-mile heats— Painkiller, Carmen, Jou Jou, Alfaretta, Sunday, ltoso berry. - Weights will be assigned iv the morning. No pools have been sold. .;-_ NEWS FROM HONOLULU. The B.irkeutine Kiln Wrecked Daring » Severe Gale. The barkentlne Planter yesterday brought the following news from Honolulu: The barkentlne Ella went ashore at Mabukona at 3 o'clock on the morning of March tith, during a southwest gale, and became a total loss. .At the time of \ the disaster she had a cargo of 1400 bags of sugar, of which but 300 bags were saved. , - The list of whalers that ■ had ' arrived .'. at Honolulu March lOlh is as follows: Bark Northern Light, clean ; bark Alice Kuowles, 110 barrels sperm ; bark Helen I Mar, clean ; , bark _ Alaska, - clean ; - steamer 7_ Belvedere, clean; bark Lydia, clean; .brigvßeindeer, -clean; - bark !,' Andrew Hicks, 25 . barrels sperm oil; bark James Allen, clean. lt..nrd of Erin. : The Executive Committee of the Ancient Order of I Hibernians,*; Board of i Eriu, met at.- Irish-American Hall ■' yesterday v ' to settle up the affairs of their St. Patrick's day celebration. All committees made their reports, which showed that the day's celebration was a grand success and leaves $1670 to be sent to the Parnell Fund in Ire land. The money will be sent direct to Mr. Parnell the coming week. The con vention adjourned to meet on the first Sun day in January. 1891. _ BOYCOTTS. Key. Dr. Hnrcoart Discourses on Trades Unions and Capital. I At Howard-street Methodist Episcopal Church last evening Dr. Harcourt delivered a lecture on the subject "The Boycott of Confederation." The text was taken from John viii:32, "And ye shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free." "Slavery," said the preacher, "has had a large place in the history of the world and has confronted us in three forms— spiritual, mental and physical. Christ came to set the captive free and .to inaugurate new measures for the amelioration of the race." I lii| speaking of the boycott of trades unions, the doctor said: "Tradesmen have a right to organize for self-protection. This is the first law of our being, and under ex isting circumstances it becomes a necessity. " Hardly a day passes without bringing Its quota of news with regard to some strike or lock-out, either threatened or in pro cress, and the question arises, When will this end? This slate of affairs is brought about by capitalists scheming to secure con trol of great enterprises so as to give them a practical monopoly of the particular line of business in which they are engaged. By this means both those who work tor them and the public who are compelled to deal with thorn are at the mercy of greedy monopo lies. "What is wanted to adjust all these wrongs? I answer. The spirit of true Christianity; and nowhere is so much gos pel needed, and that of the right sort, as where the men of millions and the men cf muscle face each other with the question. Who shall have the right of way? The gospel of Jesus Christ alone will make all men brothers and neighbors. "Boycotting must be replaced by arbitra tion, and with the New Testament in hand aud the golden rule iv the heart the suc cesses of men must be wedded together. Money must wait on labor. New Stephen sens, Fultons and Morses must answer the call as well as the humbler workers un known to fame and wealth. Duty must be made a delight and labor must cease to be slavery." __________ TRINITY SHOCKED. A Little Old Man Makes an Ad dress to the Rector. He Calls Himself John -Bailey, the Converted Collier Boy— He Does Not Approve Pastor Bead's Preaching. . A little old man, with closely-cropped gray hair, made his way into Trinity Church last night and created a sensation there. He had a handkerchief knotted around bis neck and white roses in three of the button holes of his lime-worn vest He took a seat near the middle of the edifice and found the places in his prayer-book and hymnal with a readiness that proclaimed him to be one well acquainted with the contents of the volume. The rector prefaced his sermon with the announcement that £510 had been collected at the morning service for the expenses of the parish. This was $100 more than had been requested, and Mr. Reed thanked the members for their generosity. His sermon was one of a series which he is preaching on the labor problem. He quoted the appeal of the young man to the Savior to use his influence in inducing a brother to divide the patrimony with him and the apt reply of the Savior. .-,.-._» labor troubles. The speaker held that the troubles of the laboring classes are caused by their im morality, ignorance and indolence, and -by r the covetousness of the capitalists. He did not believe that an equal distribution of wealth, single tax or . Nationalism would solve the great question of labor. Christ, the laborer's best friend, the omniscient one, had never declared that the laud should belong to no oue aud the product of the laud to all. Christ has declared that covetousness was the root of much evil. It caused the trust to make itself a trip hammer to crush competition and take the labor which is their life, from a million men. Covetous ness it was that made men employ women and children at $3 pet: week to take the places of men and demoralize society. Covetousness it was that makes men com pel clerks to work fifteen hours per day for $4 per week In their stores, and until covetousness and injustice and immorality are overthrown, poverty will live. A VOICE FROM THE CONGREGATION. The little old iran in his seat not far from the pulpit apparently listened with all his ears to the eloquent preacher. At times he nodded approval, and at times he sol emnly shook his head, drew his under lip over its companion aud frowned in con demnation of the orator's opinions. At the close of one of the rector's most brilliant paragraphs be arose in his pew, and to the astonishment of the congrega tion, shouted in a piping voice: "Brother, I would like to say something." The rector turned from his manuscript with amazement written on every line of his face. . > "Just one word," squeaked the proprie tor of the roses and white neck-cloth. The rector folded his hands with an air of resignation and waited for what was to come. "This thing is all wrong," said the little limn. " I am born of the spirit. Mary Mag dalen was born of the spirit, but Thomas was a doubter. He wanted to put his hands into the point of the nails before he would believe. The people here are not born of the spirit." REMOVED FROM THE CHURCH. He rambled on for several minutes in a voice pitched at a very high key telling how he had been redeemed, and was telling the rector to make a close study of the twenti eth chapter of St. John, when the sexton extinguished him. The rector made no reference to the in terruption and calmly concluded his dis course. The disturber was the cynosure of all eves as he passed out of the church. . "He ought to be given to the police," said a member of the congregation. "Oh, no. He's harmless," another re plied. "He's been coming here for years." To a representative of The Call the lit tle man said : "lam John Bailey, the converted collier boy. I live nt 705 Chestnut street, and have been born of the spirit. I've been a clergyman several years, I'm 72 years old, and 1 would advise you to read the twen tieth chapter of St. John. You ought to know all about it, but I don't think you do." "Why did you interrupt the rector?" "Because he isn't preaching the gospel. He's always talking about Lazarus and Dives, and throwing stones at Joseph." Then the "Collier Boy" went on his way. Single-Tax Society. - . At the meeting "of the Single-tax Society last evening the programme consisted, of music, songs and recitations by Mrs. Mul limer, Mr. liashuo and Miss Currle. An address was made by A. Cridge on "Ballot Reform," setting forth that the present system was unjust aud admitted of fraud. It was announced that Mr. James W. Barry would speak at the next meeting. Flgeon-Shootlng. . 1 . , , -_.: -_-_._.- t.l j A number oi local pigeon shots assembled at Oakland Trotting Park grounds yester day . morning and • whiled away several hours in pool shooting. The wind was heavy most of tho time, making the birds hard to hit, and consequently no phenom enal scores were made. A Broken Leg. Luzi Spinas, a man employed by 'C. Schroeder, a contractor, tell from a wagon-, load of hay on Townsend street, near Sixth, yesterday, -and broke his right leg. His injury was attended to at the Receiving Hospital. ...... m . Y. M. C. A. Lecturb.— Kev. J. A. Cruzan dellveied yesterday afternoon, at the rooms of the Y. M. 0. A., his lecture, " The Comer Statue, ' or ihe Devil's Ueuciiuieu." Theatleudauce was good. em - Church Election.— An election for wardens of the vestry will be held at Trinity Church to day betweeuu 12 and 1 o'clock. - -,-..- ■ '.. Get the best and the cheapest. Salvation Oil re lieves In the twinkling of an eye.' '_.& cents. • : * A million Americana uso Or. nulls Cough Syrup. Other nations lv proportion. 25 cents. -.- CROSSED THE BORDER The Chinese Invasion via Mex ico. One Band of Thirteen Captured Near Tia Jnana. All Bat Two of Them Landed a Few Days Ago From the Steamer Newbern at Ensenada. Special by tbe California Associated Press. San Diego. April 6.— The first train from Tia Juatia brought up from the line thirteen Chinese who were caught about 3 o'clock this morning entering this country from below the line. They were all males, three of them being boys from 8 to 15 years of age. On receipt of information from Ensenada of the landing at that place of over eighty Chinamen from the steamer Newborn the Custom-house officers imme diately began to lay plans to guard the line, with a view to catching the Mongolians if they attempted to cross. The constable who was patrolling the river-bank near the wagon bridge to the west of the railroad track about 11 o'clock came across a Chinaman sneaking along toward the Mexican line and immediately brought him into camp. He then went back to his station and about two hours afterward along came the entire band from the other side. He immediately dropped his revolver on the crowd and took them into custody and they are now in the County Jail. All but two of the men landed a few days ago from the steamer Newbern at Ensenada and are a part of a consignment brought from China by the City of Peking. Two Chinamen, who acted as guides for the party, will be prosecuted. THE LODI TRACK. Arrangements Being Made for Winter • Races. Lodi, April 6. The Lodi races closed yesterday, the last of two days' contest The leading event was a match between C. H. Corson's Sleepy Tom, 'Bully's Nino and Taylor's Old Tom. Sleepy Tom won in three straight heats. Best time, 2:57. To the astonishment of the sports the short end got away with the proceeds of the pool box, the same thing occurring the day pre vious. it is the purpose of the management to have races each month. One is now being arranged for the 25th inst, with three en tries, Dougherty's Eva D, Peirano's Fred and Smith's Rosa S. The Lodi Trotting Park Association was incorporated in Jan uary of this year by the election of L. M. Morse President and C. H. Corson Secre tary, with S. Ferdun, B. F. Langford, J. ii. Pope, P. Armstrong and J. W. Dougherty Directors. The grounds cost $7000 aud the improvements already made, with the con tracts let, represent au additional outlay of $2000. . Several leading horsemen from Sacra mento, Stockton and Oakland have made application" for stalls for next winter, it be ing their intention to continue training through the winter months, as this point is the only available place In the State for winter races. At the next race an effort will be made by a colt of Dexter Prince to capture the first premium, offered by L. M. Morse, the owner of that great stallion. * * SANTA ROSA. The Destructionists Making the City of Bases Their Refuge. Santa Rosa, April 6.— A number of re ligious enthusiast-!, who believe that Oak land will be deluged with water, are flock ing to this city. One real estate agent, who is a devotee of Mrs. Woodworth, has leased all bouses in his hands' to the refugees un til the fatal 14th inst. is over. Easter Sunday was generally observed here to-day. Bey. J. P. Fay, Secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association, oc cupied a pulpit. The rain. and wet grounds prevented the game between the E. T. Aliens and Daily Reports of the State Amateur League to day. ..-■■• CITRUS FLOTSAM. What Vessel Has Lost Part of Her Deck- Load? Yaquina, April 6.— Yesterday morning several hundred boxes of oranges came ashore about two miles south of Newport. Many of the boxes bore the mark "C, C, Tacoma." The weather having been fairly good in this vicinity for some days, and no wreckage having been discovered, the ap pearance of such fruit is quite unaccounta ble on any other hypothesis than that they might have been part of a deck-load on some passing vessel, and have been washed overboard from some cause or other. SACRAMENTO. Easter Services— Confirmation of Young Peo ple at the Cathedral. Sacramento, April 6.— Easier Sunday was ' generally observed in the churches here to-day by special services in the Cathedral. Bishop Mauogue administered confirmation to an immense number of young people. No coursing matches took place to-day as announced. THE RAILROADS. The Reported Sale of the Cuyamaca Line De nied. Sacramento, April 6.— Governor Water man denies that his Cuyamaca Railroad in San Diego County has been sold. April Showers. Grass Vallet, April 6.— Heavy show ers have fallen since 10 o'clock last night. There are indications of another shower and that it will clear up to-night Merced, April After a week of warm and pleasant weather the rain commenced to fall at 4 o'clock this morning and con tinued to fail in warm showers until about noon, when the wind changed and the sun shone out. The fruit trees are loaded with blossoms, and it is thought that more fruit and better will be raised this year than ever before In Merced County. Santa Rosa, April 6.— lt commenced raining yesterday afternoon and rained all last night, the result being that half an inch of water fell for the storm. This aft ernoon the sky was clear, with a strong breeze from the west. It may rain again in a few hours. Idaho Real Estate. Boise City (Idaho), April 6.— The capitol of Idaho having been permanently located at Boise City, real estate is active. The Boise City Statesman shows an aggregate of transfers of $300,000 for the week ending April 6th. New York, St. Louis, Denver, Salt Bake and San Francisco capitalists are heavy investors. : Knights Templar Services. Ukiaii, April 6.— Ukiali was visited to day by 250 excursionists from Santa Rosa, among them being Santa Rosa Cominandery of the order of Knights Templar. The Knights Templar held services at the Pavilion of the Agricultural Fair, an im mense crowd being present "•--*: Not Long at Liberty. San Quentin, April 6.— A Deputy Sheriff from San Bernardino, : armed with a war- rant, arrested Charles Harris on his release this morning from prison. Harris served three months for burglary in the second degree from the same county. Ihs Visiting Explorers. Modesto, April Frank Leslie's and the Government Alaskan Exploration Ex pedition will arrive at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco, this evening at 9:30 o'clock. A Chimney Fire. Th alarm from Box 45 at 8:30 o'clock last night was for a chimney fire in the three story building, 625 Geary street No damage. Or. O'Donneir* Address. - Dr. C. C. O'Dotmell delivered his usual Sunday address on City Hall avenue yester day alternoon. - He advised , bis hearers to prepare themselves for the coming election PRICE FIVE CENTS. and see that they secure an honest count of the votes cast. If elected Mayor he re newed his promises to remove the Chinese outside the city limits and also to see that every worklngman had something to do. . WILL STANFORD RESIGN? C. P. on ti iigtoii Talks About Kailroad Affairs. That the rumor that Senator Stanford will resign the Presidency of the Central Pacific Railroad is well founded is now a well-established fact For reasons best known to himself Mr. Stanford declines to make any statement that he contemplates any such action, but it is generally under stood that he will refuse a re-election on Tuesday. .; Mr. C. P. Huntington is In the city, and spent yesterday in arranging for the new deal. Of course, he said that he didn't know of any reason why Mr. Stanford should resign. "In fact," he said, "I have heard nothing about it before. As for my visit, I come every year to California; I like the country and have an' Interest of many millions of dollars in property on this Coast 1 have sold 140 ' shares of Chesapeake and Ohio stock in the last year, but would have held on to it had it been on tbe Coast. It is a mag nificent property, however, and nothing would induce me to part with it except that I am concentrating my interests out here." Mr. Huntington likes California and will not sell his interests here at any price. He calls this his annual business trip, the Southern Pacific, Central Pa-ific and Cali fornia and Oregon being the roads in which he is interested. In the Southern Pacific he holds more shares than any other indi vidual stockholder, and he is a very large owner in the Ceutral Pacific and California and Oregon. In regard to the latter road, Messrs. Hubbard, Stillman and others will confer with Mr. Huntington to-day. i Senator Stanford, Mr. Huntington, Mr. Crocker, Mr. Stillman, Mr. Miller, Mr. Hubbard and the New York interests of the Southern Pacific will be represented at the conference at the Tuesday meeting. CALVARY SUNDAY-SCHOOL. Thirty-fifth Annual Iteport of This Society and a Kindred One. The Superintendent of the Sunday-school of Calvary Church read the thirty-fifth annual report of the school for the year ending March 30th last. The following favorable state of affairs was reported: Receipts— Balance cash on hand, $93 93; school collections, $338 39; foreign ' mis sionary collections, $119 37; anniversary, collection, $S8; Banduria concert, $135; children's day collection, $1335; picnic re turns, $237 50; dingier concert (June), $197 cyclorama exhibition, $36; Jingier concert (September), $225 55; Christmas, 1883, $286 20; interest, San Francisco Sav ings Union, $3 04. Total, $1774 08. Disbursements— School suoolies, $100 65; anniversary expenses, $92 80; Bauduria concert expenses, $135; picnic expenses, $343 95; Children's day expenses, $18; Children's day donation to board, $13 35; Jingier concert expenses (June), $137 05; cyclorama exhibition expenses, $23 50; Jingier concert expenses (September), $159 15; Christmas, 1889, $300 GO; music. $117; Primary Department, $06; new hymn books, $15; Calvary Sabbath-school Mis- ' sionary Society, account of missionary col lections, $119 37; Thanksgiving-day pro grammer, $7; sundries, $13 80; balance on hand, $112 80. Primary department: Receipts— Balance cash on hand, $20 24; general collections, $35 10; jug collections, $27 25; $82 59. Disbursements— School supplies, $34 70;.= balance on baud, $47 89. Financial statement of Calvary Presby terian Missionary Society: Receipts cial collection by Calvary Sabbath School, $58 26; amount received from former mis sionary society, $7 40; amount received from Calvary Sunday-school, account mis sionary school, $158 31; general collections of the society, $55 65; $279 62. . g Disbursements — Support Chinese girl," $93 75; donations to Punditi Ramabai, $100; sundries, 70 cents; balance ou hand, $85 17. . • • THE HEBREW HOME. A Successful Entertainment at the Bald win Theater. The entertainment given last evening at the Baldwin Theater for the benefit of tbe Hebrew Home for the Aged-disabled was a decided success. Before 8 o'clock the house was crowded to overflowing with a fashionable and criti cal audience, and late comers were glad to find standing room in tbe aisles. The programme had been composed with great care, . and the best amateur talent in the city engaged for the occasion. It con sisted of vocal and instrumental music and concluded with acomedy by Thomas and J. M. Morton, entitled "All That Glitters Is Not Gold." Miss Rose Adler, in her vocal solo, was loudly applauded, and received several floral pieces. For an encore she sang "The Swiss Echo." by Eckert Mr. J. H. Rosflwald, as a violinist, re ceived much well-earned praise for his highly creditable performance, and was three times recalled. • The programme was as follows: ' Vocal solo (selected). Miss Alvlns Heuer; piano solo, "Hochzeil's Marscl." (Mendelssohn), ■•EKenreigeu" (Liszt), S. Monroe Fabian; vocal solo, alia, "La Sonnambula," Miss Hose Adler (pupil of Mme. Fabbil-Muller); violin solo. "Valse de Coucetl" (Hume), Mr. J. H. Bu«e- Wald; Mr. Abe Sicliel, accompanist. It was fol lowed by the comedy, -'All That Glitters Is Not Gold," by linearis and J. M. Morton. Casta! characters— Stephen Hum, Mr. M. H. Wasser wltz; Jasper Hum, Mr. Sol. reiser; Sir Arthur Lassel, Mr. Bert Kalin: Frederick Plum, Mr. S. Mayer; Toby Twinkle, Mr. Slg. Rosenthal; Harris, Mr. George K.iium; Servant, Mr. F. Gray; Martha Gibbs, Miss Salliia Cuban; Lady Leailierbiiilge, Miss Eveline Levlson; Lady Valeria Westendleigb, Miss Nettle Brodek. THE STRIKERS. Anxiously Awaiting the Arrival of a -Load of Non-Unionists. The Strikers' Executive Committee re- ports that it has already received $5000 from the International Molders' Union and from the labor unions of this city. The commuiittee late yesterday afternoon received a dispatch from one of the pickets at New-hall to the effect that a train-load of Philadelphia "scabs" bad passed through that city at 3 o'clock. They also learned that the captains of the tugs Alert and Re lief had received orders to meet the men across the bay. . It was said by the strikers that the new-comers would be divided among the National, City and Occidental Iron works. A member of the Executive Committee, when asked whether the men were coming, replied that the strikers had made a mis take and positively declared that no men. were on the way to this city. The North Pole. Norwegian navigators still cling to the idea of discovering the North Pole. Their hopes are based upon the fact that various j articles from the Pacific are occasionally found stranded on the coast of Greenland, having been carried there by some current. A notable instance of this is the finding there of a pair of oilskin trousers, marked with the name of one of the crew of a vessel, that bad been wrecked on the Pacific side of tieliring Straits. It is argued that where a pair of trousers can go a properly con structed vessel ought to be able to follow, by virtue of a supposed current between the two oceans, via the Arctic pole. — Catarrhal Dangers. To be freed from the dangers of suffocation while lying down; to breathe freely, sleep soundly and un- disturbed; to rise refreshed, bead . clear, h_raia ' active and free from pain or ache: to know that no poisonous, pntrid matter defiles the breath and rots away the delicate machinery of smell, taste and hearing; to feel that the system does not, through its veins and arteries, suck up the poison that is sure to undermine and destroy, is Indeed a blessing be. yond ail other human enjoyments. . To purchase Im- munity from such a fate should be the object of all afflicted. But those who have tried many remedies and physicians despair of relief or cure. * :■;". Sanvobd's Radical Cobb meets every phase at Catarrh, from a simple head cold to the most loath- some and destructive stages. It is local and const; . tutloual. Instant In relieving, permanent In curing, safe, economical and never-falling. Sanfobd's Radical Cube consists of one battle of the Radical Cube, one box of Catabbhal Bob vent, and one Impboveo Ij-IH__i.be, all wrapped la* one package, with treatise and directions, and said by all druggists for »1. • ; Pottkb I) Boa * Chemical Cobfobatiok, Bortoa A. HOW MY SIDE ACHES! £§g\ Aching Sides and Back, Hip, Kidney and f'fcKl Uterine Pains, Rheumatic, Sciatic, Neural- nSS\glc, Sharp and Shooting Pains, relieved I I v*ligin one minute by the Cutleura Anti- Pain Plaster. The first and only palo-klutng taster, A perfect, instantaneous, never-railing an- idote to pain, lntlammatlon and weakness. : Espe- . daily adapted to relieve female pains and weaknesses. At all druggists, '25 cents; or of Pottkb Dana aud Chemical CuaroHATioN. Boston, Mass. . ocii If ly .-/v.:

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler