14 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1

14 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1
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VOLUME LXVII-NO. 145. RANDALL'S DEATH. Closing Hours of the Dead Statesman. In Event That Caused General Sorrow at the Capital. Preparations for the Funeral— The Remains to Be Taken to Philadelphia for Interment Special by the California Associated Press. Washington", April 13.— The death of Congressman Randall, although expected, caused general sorrow here to-day when it became known and especially among his colleagues and Senators. The half-masting of the flag on the Capitol gave the first in timation to the citizens' of the death, as only the family and Intimate friends and a little band of newspaper, men on guard knew it earlier. As soon as the patient had passed away Postmaster-General Wanamaker, who had remained at the bedside all night, came out and told the story of the end. THE LAST DOCKS. A Choking; Spasm nt 1 O'clock Followed by a Gradual Sinking. All of last night the patient was attacked frequently by sinking spoils. Fits of hic coughs followed. Though unconscious a greater part of the night, he was able to Just whisper his wants. Plum preserves appeared to relieve him. Just after 1 o'clock Mr. Kandall was seized with a vio lent choking spasm. The Postmaster-Gen eral sat beside him at the time and Dr. Mallan hastened to his aid. The physician removed a large piece of phlegm from his throat with his fingers alal the patient was thus enabled to toreutic more freely. »Vom this hour on his strength gradually failed, Mrs. Ran dall, her two Bisters, Sirs. Hyatt aud Mrs. Bwann, the ex-Spt-aker'g brother, Robert Randall, his daughters, Mrs. Lancaster and Miss Susie Randall, his son, Samuel J. Raudall Jr., and son-in-law, C. C. Lancas ter, and the Postina3ter-General, gathered about the death-bed. Just before 5 o'clock the patient convulsively seized Mr. Wana maker's hand and pressed it with all the strength he possessed. Mrs. Randall, completely overcome by grief, knelt at the bedside and sobbed as if her heart would break. Suddenly, Mr. Randall gasped, and his devoted wife looked up, and the dying husband and father for the hist time recog nized his beloved life partner. lie whis pered the single word "-mother," and .in an instant his spirit had fled. Mrs. Randall, who. until a few minutes before all was over, had borne up with the exfremest for titude, fell back into the arms of the Post master-General and had to be carried from the room. SENDEES OF SVSirAXHY. The rretident and Mrs. Harrison Visit ■ th« Afflicted Family. So soon as the news of the Ead event had reached the Capitol the Stars and Stripes were placed at half-mast on the roof of the house. Early in the morning President and Mrs. Harrison drove to the Randall residence, and both did what they could to comfort the afflicted family. The Vice- President and Mrs. Morton, Secretary and Mrs. Blame, Secretary Tracy (who but a little over two months ago was robbed by fire of his wife and daughter) and other members of the Cabinet, as well as Sena tors and Representatives, flocked to the house. But few were admitted, and those who were not simply left messages of sym pathy. The greatest sorrow is manifested, not only by Democrats but by Republicans, be cause of the departuie of the Keystone statesman, and telegrams of sympathy have been pouring in throughout the day and evening. FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS. The Remains to lie Taken to Philadel phia for Burial. The arrangements for the burial will probably be completed to-morrow. Deputy Sergeant-at-Arms of the House Cavanaugh has them in charge. The funeral services will, in ail probability, be public, and the remains, it is understood, will be taken to Walllngford, a Philadelphia suburb, for in terment, li<,th the Senate and House will probably adjourn to-morrow, out of respect to Mr. Kandall. Speaker Reed, ex-Speaker Carlisle, Mr. Mills, Major McKinley, Major Butterworth, Mr. Cannon, Senators Allison, Sherman, Ingalls, and indeed every leader in both House and Senate, regardless of party, re gard Mr. Randall's demise as they would the loss of a brother. However much they have differed from him in politics or upon any great issue, all are united in speaking of him as one of the grandest Lien of the Vint teenth c«ntory. SERVICES IN WASHINGTON. g> Mrs. Kaudall Does Not Desire an Impos ing Funeral. It has virtually been decided to bury Mr. R-mdall in Philadelphia on Thursday next. At the request of Mrs. Randall the funeral will not be an imposing one. The remains will be taken to the Metropolitan Church here Thursday morning, where services will be conducted by Rev. Dr. Chester. The cortege will then proceed to the depot and take a special train on the Pennsylvania Railroad for Philadelphia. Speaker Reed and Vice-President Morton will to-morrow appoint committees to attend the funeral. TO NEW QUARTEKS. Cfficer« in the M-.dical Department to Ec Traniferred. ■Washington, April 13.— The following changes of stations of the officers of the Medical Department are ordered: Major John W. Landerdale, surgeon, from Fort Davis, Tex., to Fort Ontario, N. V. ; Cap taiu John O. Skinner, assistant surgeon Irom Fort Ontario, N. V., to Fort Davis. Tex. ; Captain IJarry A. Perley, assistant surgeon, from Fort Wayne, Mich., to Fort Mason, Cal. ; Captain Henry G. Burton, as sistant surgeon, from Davids Island, >'. V., to Vancouver; Hopkins, assistant burgeon, from Fort Mason, Cal., to Fort Columbus, New York Harbor; Captain William Ste- Phenson, assistant surgeon, from Fort Verde, Ariz., to Davids Island, N. V. ; Lieutenant Charles Wilcox from Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, to Fort Bowie, Ariz. The dates of their relief from their present stations will be fixed by the several divitlon commanders. INDIAN SOLDIERS. Proposition to Baisa a Beginunt for th- Begultr Army. Washington, April la-Secretary Proc tor has under consideration a plan tor rais ing a regiment in the regular army which ■ball be composed of Indian soldiers, with Indiana as non-commissioned officers and commissioned officers from the regular army. Ho has asked the views of depart ment commanders, and the only objection raised is that it would have the effect of re ducing the present regular lorce of the army. The law now limits the army to 25,000 wan, including not to exceed 1000 In The Morning Call. dian scouts. Indian Commissioner Morgan is in favor of the plan, and it is probable that Congress will be asked to make an ap propriation for such a regiment. ALGER'S ASPIRATIONS. The Commander-in-chief Charged With Electioneering. St. Louis (Mo.), April 13.— General R. A. Alger, Coinuiander-iu-Chief of the G. A. EL, left this evening for the West The party will stop at Kansas City and Omaha aud then continue their trip across the conti nent. The Commander was royally enter tained by the Missouri Veterans, but now that lie is gone, aud in fact even while he was here, the political phases of his great "swing arouud the circle" were commented upon. It is so manifest that he is engaged in a hurrah campaign for the Presidency that there is no escapiug comment. One feature of his canvass is especially condemned, and tiiat is the employment of the widow of the late General John A. Logan, the idol of the Grand Army, to fur ther his political ambition. At his invita tion Mrs. Logan joined the party here, and there was a reception at which the ad mirers of "Black Jack" lashed themselves into a very frenzy of enthusiasm, all of which is expected to redound to the credit and glory of the Commander-in-Chief with the Presidential bee iv his bonnet Meantime it is said strong opposition has developed within the Grand Army to Gen eral Alger's scheme, and at the State En campment of Missouri, just closed at Jef ferson City, were three or more veterans from Kansas for the express purpose of op posiug the Alger boom. These men and ottiers will lollow him and direct all their energies toward counteracting the Influ ence of the comrade's presence by express ing what they and those behind them de nounce as "double dealing." It is charged that with the lank and file Alger talks iv flittering generalities iv favor of pensions and unlimited good things for the soldiers, while in private councils and with the. poli ticians he talks quite differently, nud, in fact, is on record as squarely opposing pen sions based solely on service, and in favor of measures that restrict the granting of pensions. Iv short, they charge him with demagogenry and carrying water in both shoulders. These aeents of Alger's oppo nents in the Grand Army have certamly done most elfective work in this State,. THE SACRAMEMO RIYKU. Prompt Action R-q'iired to Prevent the Close of Nav:ealioj. Sacramento, April 13. —An inspec tion of tho crevice iv the Solo levee muda last September, shows that two-thirds of tlie volume of the river was flowing through in the tules, «n4 that when the water recedes to the low mark there will still be a heavy volume going through the break, while the bar below will have but two feet. \V. F. Enox says the break can be closed now aud should tie while the river has a BCour- Ing capacity to clear out the bar below it. Wnen low water comes it will be too late, as there will not he water enough to cut out thr sand and slicl;ens deiiojit-. The Kecord-TTnion will suggest to-morrow ttirt the Government dredge out a deep channel tliroug'.i tiie liar funnel below tne break while the water is high aud thus divert a large volume from the crevasse, thus scouring out deposits that were formed while the water was heavily charged with slickens at tbe early stages of this winter* freshet. Tho engineers have a fund of $110,000 at their disposal, and whether they see tit to close tho break or not, the dredg ing c;u! be done aud much of the threat ened damage be averted. Something tnust be done, or navigation will be impossible iv a few moDths from now. PASADENA NEWS. Death of Ernei! Grimm— Church Dedication. Imp.- riant Election. Pasadena, April 13.— Ernest Grimm, a well-known contractor and builiier of this city, left home ou Friday, the 4th inst., to take a hunt alone the foothills. As hn did not return his friends became alarmed, end began a search for him, which has now bgfn continued a week. This morning the bo< --of Grimm was found in the highlands above the city, lying in awash fi^m the mountain canyon. Ills gun laid under him, aud it was believed thai tlie man died fr< in an accidental K"n-shot wound. Decompo sition had set in. A large party has gone to the scene of the sad necidpnt. The First Universalist Church, costing over 350,000, was dedicated with imposing ceremonies to-day by the Hey. Dr. Tuttle of Minneapolis, Minn. There was a large at tendance and many beautiful decorations. The church is dedicated free from all iu cuniberanoe. The municipal election in Pasadena to morrow is one ot great importance, as live Trustees, a City Clerk, Marshal and Treas urer are to be elected.. The issue of the day is prohibition or high license. There is much feeling over the matter, au<l it will be a close and exeiling election. TWO MEN DROWNED. But Five Months in This Country and No R'a'ions Here. Seattle, April 13.— Word reached this city this evening of the drowning yesterday afternoon at Braun's Brewery, eight miles south of this city on Duwainish River, of two Swedes, Aiort Hanson and Sigmnnd Johnson, aged -'4 and 'Jii ygars reflectively. The men were unloading lumber from a barge. Manson lost liis balance and fell into the river and Johnson heroically plunged in after his co-laborer, liis friend Manson grasped his re-sourer around the body, clincing to him until both men were carried down the rushiug current in the presence of their fellow workmen. The bodies have not yet been recnvere 1. Both men came here five months ago from Sweden and have no relatives in this country. SPOIIT AT SACRAMENTO. Coursing at Whitcomb Ranch— The Pacific Epor'smen's Club fhoot. Sacramento, April 13.— The postponed couising matches were concluded to-day it the Whitcomb ranch. Upson's Bell Boy beat Coughlin's Trick, and arterward de feated P. Carrol's Gladstone, thereby ter minating the contest held two weeks since, and giving Bell Boy lir.it place. The second race was between Xeary's Longfellow and Chance's Sywtish Chief for a wager of £40 against a riding horse of equal value. Lnngfellow won. At the shooting match of the Pacific Sportsmen's Club to-day Adam Damn won the gold medal and Joseph Maddox tl-e silver medal. The former killed ten out of twelve birds aud tbe latter niue. NAPA'S (iI'.AXD JURY. Recommendation to Have the Liquor License Raise*. Napa, April 13.— The Napa County Grand Jury filed its report and adjiiirned Saturday evening. The books of all the county offices were found to be in a satis factory condition. It is recommended that the county liquor license be raised to $40 per month. Two indictments were found. It was also found that the county had been put to unnecessary expense by the indis criminate arrest of tramps. Tiie Gr.inil Jury recommends that all incorporated cities have a special police system. Bangust at Bakersfield. BXKXaermLD, April i.i.-A banquet, given by tun Board of Trade in honor of Bernard Marks. Colonization Agent of the boutnern 1 acific Company, took place here last night. Mr. Marks has be«n very suc cessful in the course of the past few months in bringing to this viciniiy a large number of h superior clnes of settlers, and his work is highly appreciated by the people here. Fleeing From the Wrath. Santa Rosa, April 13.— Over 100 doom sealers will leave by private conveyance to-morrow morning for Taylor Mountain, to escape the predicted tidal wave. The Dfiiiij'iium Were Empty. All Hoy, a Chinese, was arrested yester day morning by Officer G. W. Bennett in the Fotrero and churned with petty larceny. Uoy. It seems, trieu to mnko a large haul before daylight from a saloon Beat Bulcuer town, but succeeded only in Retting nve empty demijohns, which were held as evidence against him. A . Deep-Bbatkd Cocgh cruelly tiles the Lung* and wanes Hie general strength. A urtl dent resort for I lie afflicted Is 10 Di-7 I) Jayue'a Kxpeetoraat, a remedy lor all troubled wltn Astuuia, Broucbllls.orauy l'ulmouary Affection • SAN FRAfICISCO, MONDAY MORNING, APRIL U, IS9O-EIGIIT PAGES." A PITCHED BATTLE. Conflict Between Laborers and Troops at Rome. Stanley and Emm Ventilate Their Dif ferences. Rival Colonial Interests In Africa That Threaten to Cause Trouble—Ger many's Aggressiveness. Special by the California Associated Press. Kome, April 13.— Idle laborers who beld a meotiug to-day liad a pitched battle with the military. I'reinier Crispi granted authority for the workers to hold the meeting, but insisted that it be held in the court-yard of the military barracks. A force of infantry and cavalry was on hand to preserve order. The workers, enraged at the instruc tions, attacked the troops, when the commander stopped the orators, who attacked the Government's policy. The mob made futile attempts to capture the finance building. Numbers were arrested, but afterwards released. The toilers de clare they will hold another meeting next Sunday. AFRICAN ENTERPRISES The Result of European Rivalry— The Shire Expedition. Zanzibar, April ia— lt is asserted that the Germans by threats have compelled the .Sultan to cancel the coucessiou of Manda aud I'atta to tlie British East African Coit pany. It is generally believed, however, that the matter is still subject to negotia tion!;. From Mozambique the advices are that Portugal has dispatched a large force up tUe Shire River, with tlie intention of at tacking Mpanda. The expedition is sup plied with artillery. STANLEY AND EMIN. Why the Litter Entered tha Service of Germany. New Vohk, April 13.— Stanley contra dicts tlie statements of Schinze. Schinze's party, he says, were half-nakt.'d aud half starved until he provided for them and p;iid their tribute on arriving at the coast. In regard to the ivory, lie says it was not be. iped up at Wadelai, but was widely scattered and would occupy at least a year of hard work to collect it, detracting much fmm its value. Regarding Emm Stanley said Emm was friendly enough until he fell into the hands of the Germans.. As to acquiring his province one of the first things shown him was his own offer to the British company. "Confound it," lie exclaimed, "they ought never iv have published that." Tho whole of Kmiu's nction, Stan ley continues, is on a par with Brazza'B who got King Leopold's money, and handed the result of his labors with it tc Fiance. Stanley is sur prised at Ktigland allowing VVlssuiann'a en terprise to proceed without protest, and says the exploits of Dr. Peters ought to be carefully watched. Stanley continues, to revise his books. Zanzibar, April IS.— Smin openly de clares Stanley's speeches and his own dis appointmeut wen- tin- principal causes of his entering the German serviiv. Bo starts fur tile interior next week. He expects to he absent niiitt months. Tippoo Tib la hurrying here treni Tavora in answer to a consular summons. PARIS. April 18.— The President of tbe French Geographical Sjeiety is cippo»ed to giving n puuiic reception to Stanley because his enterprise had r commercial object, and because he treated Brazza with disduiu. SCIENTISTS IN MEXICO. Discoveries Made by Representative! of the Philadelphia Academy o! Sciences. City of Mexico, April 13.— Professor Hillprin, Robert le Bantiller, J. C. Ives, Wilmer Ileone and frank C. Baker, representing the scientific expedition of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, have reached here. They made a geographical rec lunoissanee of the northern part of the peninsula of Yucatan, including the first mountain range, and discovered that the former sup position that the peninsula W as of coral origin was unfounded, material for illustrating the botany, geology and zoology was collected. The party made a critical examination of the region leading to the volcano at the Orizaba. This is the first ascent of the volcano by scientific men. Barometric measurements show the height of the vol cano to be 5200 feet, or about 8800 feet less than was generally supposed. Photographs of the mountain aud crater were taken. STICKS AM) STONES. Exception cf an Eviction Party in Ire lard. DUBLIU, April 13.— A riotous scene oc curred yesterday on the Clouroe estate, the property of James Byrne, nenr Xew Rom, County Wexfcird. A final batch of evictions was about being executed, and as the dis trict has recently been quiet, there was only a small body of police present. On the approach of the bailiff, the tenants' house was found tn be barricaded, with a defensive party inside. The evicting force w.is repulsed will) sticks and stones. The ringing of tlie chapel bell caused a hirne crowd to assemble, and several of tlie p .lire and bailiffs were severely tainted. The landlord's agent barely escaped with his life. Anotlier determined attempt will pos sibly be made to-morrow to execute the writs. THE CONGO FUEE STATE. Belgium Guarantee a Lartro Loan— Ger many's Off r D"c ined Brussels, April 13.— 1t is stated that Belgium guarantees a lean to the Congo Free of £i;,(XK),000. It is rumored that King L-opnld refused Germany's offer of .Ll.ukvw lor me Cengo region. Tl.e re port that King Leopold was desirous of selling the Coniro Free State, but that the French right of refusal and Stanley's re ports of rubber on the Aruwimi led to his indecision, is confirmed. A PUGILIST KILLED. Disaitrons Result of a Welih Prize-Fight Last Monday. London, April 13.— A prize-fight on Mon day last at a place in Wales cullfd Moun tain Ash. between Cornelius Collins and John Hopkins, resulted disastrously for the participants. Hopkins was so badly in jured that he died Tuesday. Collins has been arrested on a charge of murder, and seven men also arrested for complicity have been committed for trial. FRENCH ELECTIONS. Conteitt In Which Republican Cand dates Wrre Succeisful. Takts, April 13.— The elections for Sen ator of the districts of Eure, Fiuisterre and Ariege resulted in, the success of the Xie uul'licaii candidates. Lafont (K.) was elected to the Chamber of Deputies from liayouiie. From (C). whose election was quashed by the chamber, has been re-elected from Blnye. EUROPEAN STRIKES. The Tailors cf Manchester and Carpenter! of Munich. Loxnos, April 13.-AU the tailors of Manchester are on a strike in conjunction with a similar movement that will possibly become national. A strike of carpenters has occurred In Munich, aud nearly all the workmen of. this trade are idle in consequence. A Ministerial Crisis. BUKBOS Aykks, April l.x— The Argen tine Ministry has resigned. To Viiit Bt. Petersburg. St. rjSTEKSuuno, April 13.— Ameer ol Bokhara will visit St Petersburg in the autumn with his suite to install his son in the Czar's corps of pages. The Mih.ii Vanishes. Cairo, April 13.— Messengers at Omdur man declare that the Mahdi has vanished and a famine is raging throughout the Sou dan. O'Connor Matched. Sydney, April 13.— O'Connor and St»ns btiry have boen matched to row on the Paramatta ou June 23d. Bismarck's Last Days in Berlin. Berijx, April 13.— Bismarck is credited with describing his last days in Berlin as a first-class funeral. Squadron of Evolution. Cokfu, April 13.— The American Squad ron of Evolution has departed for Malta. COAST ITEMS. Brief Noloi From Fnciflc States and Territories. Bnise City, Idaho, is enjoying a real estate boom. Every rancher in Nevada is now busy sowing graiu. A nt inch is to have a new grain warehouse that will cost $25,000. Peggy Barnes, a colored woman at Peta lumo, is 105 years old. A. T. Hatch of Sonoma County says the alinoud crop this year will be very light. Captain C. E. Clancy, Superintendent of the Union Pacific Souud steamers, has re signed. An assessment of $10 a share has been levied by the San Joaquiu Land and Water Company. David Davis was thrown from his horse at Bigelow, Oregon, last Friday, aud he was fatally Injured. Farmer Reid of Dayton, Oregon, sold 2H,- W4 pounds of potatoes last week to a dealer lor J cents a pouud cash. E. Powers was instantly killed at Lathrop on Wednesday evening wnile trying to switch au engine in the yard. The towns of Whatcom aud Sehoino, Wash., are to be joined iv ono corporation With limits four miles square. The Los Angeles Herald protests aeainst tho iruportiug of orange trees from Florida as they will introduce new fruit pests. The wife of Jesus Martinez of Colton pre sented him recently with twins. The buy weighs 1 pound and 14 ounces, while the girl scales 2 pounds aud 14 ounces. That part of Tacoma known as "Tiie Gulch" will be spanned by a bridge .>SO feet long by sixteen feet wide. The highest bent will be 114 feet from the ground. The lumbermen of Portland have organ ized a Lumbermen's Exchange, which in cludes eight mills there, three at Vancouver mid six at other points ou the Columbia River. George Agncw, a brakeman at Modesto, While coupling- c-.irs on Wednesday morn ing, had his right hand caught aud mashed so that every linger and the thumb had to Ue amputated. The Walla Walla Statesman has secured the contract for printing 100.000 folders de scriptive cf Walla Wallanndits advantages. They will be distributed at all points on the transcontinental lines. More claims will be worked this year ou Tuba River than fer the past fifteen years, says the Grass Valley Telegraph. The greater part will be dune by Chiuese, who have secured leases of the ground. The total value of exports from Port Tewnsend in March was $3L336,4G1, uf which American vessels carried all but 867,340. The value of imports was s*7 ■■.(, aud the duty collected was $6991 22. Louis Holt/, and a friend went tishine at Anaheim Landing on Sunday. Their fust catch was a mau-cating shark, 18 feet lout?, that weighed 4'HKi pounds, followed by End ing a sUngaree that scaled iv.-i pounds, Peter Ah Foo, alias "China Pete," died In Oroville last Wednesday. He was a na tive son, and voted at every election since. be came of «ge. He knew the value of his vote, and picked up many a SO piece, says the Mercury. The sum of $58,000 in gold coin was sent from .Viu Bernardino to Siui Francisco by mnll a few <] a ys ago as second-class matter at one cent an ounce. An insurance com pany look a risk on tho coin aud the bank saved $100 oy using the mail. Tlie Portland Oregonlan says: Among the must interesting counties In Washing ton is that of Island County, which is com posed of Whidby, oue of the largost islands in the Puget Sound, being about forty miles long and one to leu miles wide, it briiiE ir regular in form. Tlie area ol Whidby Island is 104,380' acres. The sporting men of Pendleton, Or., love a dog-light better than anything in tho world, They own a prize bull pup that held the field against all comers until one day last week it tackled a yellow dog that strayed into towu alter its owner, a Chinese vegetnble peddler. He. backed his dog liberally and alter a lirief light tiie bull was dead and the Chiuese walked away with a pel of money. The Kico (Colo.) Kews says: With elec tric light, water works, a bottling-house, a Steam laundry, a three-story hotel aud two shoemakers hard at it, we await the arrival of a lallroad and Salvation Army to make us conspicuously metropolitan. Kico will soon discard tho plain attire of a village lass and snuggle into the becoming habili ment of the proud city belle. We are the 1 J>e..|ile. ( Tlie Seattle Press, In speaking nf the tin-, necessary number of clerks employed by tiie Legislature at Olympia, says that oue clerk drew •>-)'*> for attending three com mittee, meetings; another has drawn nearly £iiO;i for no more work ; several have drawu £■:« a week throughout the session who could not intelligently take notes uf the, proceedings of a committee or decently write out a report of tiie committee's action. PEOPLE TALKKD AIiOUT. The Sultan of Turkey has sent the Em peror of (jLTiiiany a haudsome copy of the Koran. Dr. Joachim, the great violinist, has given an annual series of concerts in Lon don for Die past ;hirty years. The Sultan of Morocco has thirty-seven wives. His domestic affair* are more trouble some than his foreign relations. William Dean llowells is at the Laurel House. Lakewood, X. J., building up his Byttein and incubating a new novel. The Czar of Kussia has promised to listen at Si. Petersburg to a glee club composed of Americans studying at German universi ties. Henry M. Stanley will receive 5150.000 for his lectures iv Eiiglaud. He. expects to make as much more iv this country. 11b will devote the next three years to tho ros trum. Edward Atkinson of Boston, the s-ientist who makes statistics so interesting, is a broad-shouldered man with white hair, who looks more like a farmer tuau a pro fessor. William Lloyd Garrison, sou of the great anti-slavery agitator, is very wealthy, bat ing amassed money from the wool business. He is literary in his tastes aud takes an ac tive interest in politics. A now factory will soon be built by Dr. Gatlinu, of machine-gun fame. His inven tion is now used by every Government of the world, and the doctor's purse Is pro portionately lengthened. Lord Randolph Churchill Is displeased with the way the press and public have re ceived his recent speech, anil will leave En gland for a time. Churchill has a thiuubr skin than certain public men in this coun try. Whenever William E.Gladstone catches cold he at once goes to bed. This has been his rule for fifteen years. Jit is an interest ing fact not generally known that he wrote his election address announcing the disso lution of Parliament in 1874 in bed. Sir William Hamilton, the popular Gov ernor of Tasmania, accompanied by Lady Hamilton, recently went for a four hundred mile coach trip through the country dis tricts. They enjoyed tlie trip as tlie roads and climate are said to be simply perfec tion. The most noted figure at the Putnam House »t Palntlm, Fla., is Mrs. Henry Ward Beecher, who has speut the past three sea sons in thatcity. She is begiuning to show her age. Ihough her hair is as white as snow, Mrs. Beocher's activity is quite re markable. A proposal to build a festival theater at Salzburg, the birth-place of Mozart, has taken root, and a 6lte has beeu purchased on the Monchsberg, a woi.detl hill overlook ing the town. It is hoped to couiplete the structure uext year in time to celebrate the centenary of Hunan's death. An Escape Captured. Thoir.as Roilgers, the Industrial School boy who run u*ay with the Superintend ent's buggy from the front of the new City Hall on Saturduy last, was captured last evening. Officer Leroux caught him on Eighteenth street and locked him up at the Seveuteeuth btruei Police Station, eu route to the school. SEVEN LIVES LOST. A River Steamer Runs Into a Bridge. Her Cabins and Passengers Swept Over board. Isaac Sawtelle Tells How His Brother Was Murdered— The Rhode Island Elections. Special by tne California Associated I'reis. Detroit, April 13.— The river-steamer Handy Boy, which started at noou to-day from Saginaw to Bay City, ran into the Flint aud Pocmaniuette Railroad bridge- Her two upper cabins were swept off aud a very large number of passengers were swept iuto the water. Seven are. known to be lost, aud it may be more. The only name knowu positively is that of Miss May Haight. The captain got ashore r>nd disap peared. The engineer and wheelman were orrestea. A MEAN MAN. A California Man Robs HU Prospective Brds. Boston, April 13.— George W. Shopard of Santa Barbara, (al., has been guilty of a U'eau trick here, and the police are hot after him. Last year, when East, he met here Christina McAskiel. a hard-working seamstress, aged 41 years and uot beautiful.

She was supposed to be well off, and he promised to marry her. She set Saturdayi April 12th, as the wedding day, and notified Sliepard. He came, arriving here April 4th, and has been stopping at Veith's hotel, at the bride's expense. Yesterday, after completing all arrange ments for the ceremony he persuaded Chris tina to draw all her savings, amounting to fsoo. from the bank and give it to him to send to California by express, insuring its safe arrival. She gave him the money and he lett for the express office, aud that is thu last that has been seen of him. The wed ding is indefinitely postponed, aud the would-be bride is ill in bed. The police are huuting lor Shepard. SAWIELLK CONFESSES. It Wai Not His Intention to Kill His Brother. Boston, April 13.— Isaac Sawtelle.the jus pected mutderer of his brother in the famous bawtelle murder mystery, has confessed. He did not intend a murder. His brother was killod while resisting two meu, a Dr. Charles Blood and a convict named Jack, two ex-jail-birds, whom Isaac hired to way lay his brother aud frighten him by threatening to kill him into sign ing papers transferring to Isaac some property in dispute. The men were paid SSOO for the job. When they found they had killed their victim they lt-il. Isaac, in despair, buried the remains. The crime was committed iv Maine, where hanging is abolished. HOPELESSLY INSANE. A Chicago Millionaire Afflicted With Soften ing of tho Br-tin. Little Rock, April 13.— E. 11. Lehman, ft well-known Chicago millionaire, who has been under treatment for the past week at the Hot Springs, passed through this city to-uight in his special car, en route home. Ho is now violently iosane. The train stopped at the depot for supper, and during the absence of his guards he escaped fmin the car, aud it was with great difficulty that ho was captured and returned to the train. He fought like a tiger, and his yells aud shriiks could be heard several blocks away. Two deputy sheriffs were added to his party shortly before leaving the city. Softening of the brain is the trouble and there is no htpe for his recovery. THE CHICAGO STRIKE. Aa Attempt to Be Made to Beiume Work To-Day. Chicago, April 13.— Several members of the Carpenters' and Builders' Association will attempt to commence work to-morrow, and will endeavor to complete their con tracts. The strikers claim, however, that they cannot get men to g" to work, but as the bosses have advertised widespread for men, it is believed that they will have a small forco at work in the morning. Tne .■-mailer bosses have virtually conceded the strikers' demands, and a committee is be ing appointed by both sides to arrange their slight differences. RHODE ISLAND POLITICS. The DemocraU Carry Providence and Elect Their Candidite fir Governor. Fi!ovii)KN( :e, April 13.— Governor Ladd will not succeed liimself as the Executive of Rhode Island, His successor will be "Hon est John" Davis, the. Deinociatic candidate. The supplementary elections in this city yesterday settled all doubts in the matter. The entire Democratic ticket, with the ex ceptiou of oue Representative, was elected. Increased majorities were received in many districts. The Australian ballot system worked smuothly, very lew voters requiring Instruction, aud all having ample lime to prepare their votes. ANOTHER STRIKE. The O:is Steel Wtrks Employes Oat Again. Cleveland, April 13.— Three hundred men employes of the Otis Steel Works are out on a strike again on account of a reduc tion in their wages. The Arbitration Com mittee will meet to-mnrrow to try and effect a settlement. The company is experiencing great difficulty in securing men to take the Dlaces of the strikers, and the men will probably be successful. marine: disaster. Schooner Wrecked and Crew of Five Suppojed to Bo L at. Jacksonville, April 13.— The schooner Ethel, hence for Nassau with an assorted cargo, was wrecked near (Jape Canaveral. The crew of five are probably lost, namely, Captain William D. G.irvin of Jackson ville, Dennis Starr and John Gibson (col ored), Gibson's wife, who was acting as cook, aud a colored bey named Charlie. BROKEN LEVEES. The Town of Simmospon, Li., Two Feet Un der Water. New Orleans, April I.'!.— The town of Siniiuesport, In Point Coupel Parish, is two feet under water from a brake in the Atcha kalayii levee. The Cason levee on thn west bank, seventeen miles north of Nelville, broke last night. Big Bend levee, eight miles west of Siuunesport, has also broken. DESERTED HER HUSBAND. A Merchant'! Wife Elopet With a Handsome Stenographer. Lockport. April 13.— Mrs. Frank Elli cott, the wife of a wealthy churn manufac turer, and her two children ore missing. It 16 thought she has eloped with Julian Diig nette, a handsome stenographer, who win a candidate for the State Assembly in ISM. Mrs. EMcott is 38 years of age. 'Her hus band threatens to kill Dugnette. OKIM.KI 1) OUT. A Strike in B-iston That Will Affect Two Thousand Mon. Boston, April 13.— The Building Coun cil to-night decided to call out nil the em ployes of Norcross. This will affect two thousand wen in this city and elsewhere. A HOTEL BURNED. Fire Canied by Careiessly Throwing a Cigar- Biub. Dktkoit, April 13.-TIIO Plankinton llouso was partly burued at 8 o'clock this evening. It was owned by John C. Dev ereaux and occupied by Len J. Clark, land lord. The loss Is $60,000, fully insured. The cause of the fire was a cigar-stub thrown from an adjoining gambling-house. • BALTIMORE'S EX-TREASURER. The Eefaulter'i Bail Fixed-Hit Property. As signed to Bondamen. Baltimore, April 14.— Attorney-General Whyte has fixed Treasurer Archer's bail at $25,000, which, it is said, will be furnished to-morrow. Archer has assigned his prop erty in Cecil and Harford counties to his bondsmen. It amounts to 540.000. GORGO IN BANDAGES. Her Trainer Says Thit Her Campaigning Days Are Over. New York, April 13.— Gorgo, the pride of the California contingent of racers, is moving in bandages. Trainer Allen says she will he only started in the most remu nerative handicaps. He says her campaign ing days are over, but believes she will stand training. Star Tips. New York, A»ril 14.-The Star tips for Clifton are: First rßce, Esau or Student; second, Pomery Sec or General Gordon; thud. Little Jake or Nonage filly; fourth, Vendetta or Lotion; fifth, St. Paris or Glory; sixth, Addie T or Remembrance. A Montana Rancher Killed. Helena (Mont.), April IX— John Sulli van, one of Montana's pioneers, a rancher, fell from his wagon this afternoon aud was instantly killed. Ho leaves a family. BROWN'S PARROT. He Nearly Causes a Breach Be tween Two Families. An Anery Servant-Girl and an Angrier Mis tress—Trouble Averted by the Par rot's Interference. A parrot— nn ugly green one, with rumpled, scraggy (earners and a wicked gliut Id his red eyes— very near being the cause or a s n«a tional scene on Webster street tlie other day, I'ssidei creating a rupture between two respect able Western Addition families, who live In ad joining houses. Mr. Brown, by which name the head of one of the families may be termed, purchased Polly several days ago lor hi* wife, who bad expressed adeslie to become possessed of a good parrot. Folly was given a good character for peace and quietness, as well as moral love la language, by her owner. Mr. Hi own had heard ol wicked parrots creating confusion Id households by giving vent to questionable language which they had picked up In the course of an adventurous career. lie was determined that his parrot should be most thoroughly respectable. After the second day he was quite sure that he had not been deceived. Polly was demure Id bis demeanor, would chirp "Pretty Toll" and "Want a cracker" la a subdued tone of voice. In fact he seemed to be a model parrot, and no one In the neighborhood was aware of bis pres ence In the Brown household he was so quiet. AN AXQKY SEKVANT-HlttL. In Older to accustom him to the house as much as possible the parrot's cage was bung up In side the blinds at tlie window overlooking the yard of the Simmons', who lived next door. Poll could look out through the blinds, but could not be seen. On tin- third day of his arrival Poll was at his place, and Mrs. Simmons' hired girl was hanging up some doilies In the yard, suddenly she heard a voice proceed from Mrs. Urowu's wiadow; "Ho hang yourself, Hannah!" Now, It happened that the girl's name was Ilaunau, and sue looked up iv surprise at the window. she saw no one, but again ibe voice came: "KaH, rats. You've cot 'em agnlu. Hannah." Could it bo Airs. Brown speaking to her thus. Hannah was sure of It, because Mrs. Brown never had liked her, and " iced head, red head. Uj hang yourself Han nab," came the voice. MKS. SIMMONS TO THE FRONT. It was 100 much, and Hannah dashed Into the house and sought her mistress. With tears In her eyes she said Mrs. Brown bad insulted her. She related what had occurred, and claimed she saw Mrs. Brown's face at the blinds, which was a little lie on Hannah's part. Mis. Simmon* got quite angry, and .11 she had had several little neighborly " tills with Mrs. Biowu, she went down la the yard to remon strate with her neighbor. The first thing that greeted her as she reached the yaid was: '• Oh, you brazen thing, chase yourself." The voice unmistakably came from Mrs. Brown's window and in her shrill tone*. " Mrs. Brown," began Mrs. Simmons, " I — " "Chase yourself. Hang yourself. You're a thief." cried the voice mm the window. "Why, Mil. Brown-" "Ha. ha; you old cat. Go bang yourself. Ob, Hannah." Iv her rage Mrs. Simmons did not notice the tncohereucy of the remarks. She fairly screamed out: "I'll tell my husband of this, Mrs. Brown—" "Ah, you cat. lio hang yourself. Thief, tblef." SHE TOLD HEtt HUSBAND. Putting her lingers In her ears Mrs. Simmons ran into the nousi-. When her husband came home he found her In a hysterical st.ite of excitement. Shu told him all. " Why," said Simmons, " I'll go and see Brown and Mill out what's at the bottom of this If I have to flay him alive." He rushed out Into the yard and saw Brown in his back dour. He called to him, aud when Brown came over riled loudly: •' What does your figurehead of a wife mean by calling my wife a thl-f?" " rut do you mean?" queried Brown la sur prise. "Just what I say. Your wife has been calling my wife and servant names all day, and 1 want an apology." ■Are you crazy?" asked Brown. "No; but I'll make It warm for some on« for this day's work." "Look here ! I don't want any of your threats," said Brown, who was getting angry. THE PAKHOT BREAKS LOOSE. "Well, you'll set 'em," cited Simmons, putting up his lists. v • "Go it Suagsy. Slug him. Hang the thief," came iv shrill tones from the Brown window. "Hear that," routed Mutinous, furiously. Brown stepped back and looked at the window for a moment in amazement. "If it aiut that parrot," he cried. '•Hang yourself, d you," yelled the parrot, louder than ever. ; "He's a terror," went on Browu, "and that fel low said he was so quiet." "Have you got a parrot?" asked Simmons. "\ is; don't you hear the fiend. I'll wrlug bis neck." That settled It. Matters were very easily ex plained. The next day Brown took bis parrott, who, now that he was started, made the air blue with profanity, and sold Him to a saloon-keeper on the water front, where his language would Dot shock his bearers. A Poetic Contest. The members of the Silver State Literary and Dramatic Society assembled last Fri day evening for the purpose of witnessing a contest between thirteen of the members for a sold medal. The prize was to bo awarded to the one who should read the best original production inverse. James F. Colton delivered a poem on the subject "America," delineating the exploit* of na tional heroes, tho progress of the. nation and the glorious future in store for it. George Crockett read a pcjm on "Colum bus" and proved Himself a lavored disciple of the sir>-ns of Helicon. C. Horatio Jes sen, the acknowledged bard of Santa Clara College, then ascended the rostrum and de picted the scene ot the "Death of Father Marquette." The seven judges awarded him the medal. A Singers' Picnic. Ine singing section of the San Francisco Turn Verein held a private picnic at Sea side Gardens yesterday, a large delegation of members being present. Singing, danc ing ami bowling were indulged in all day. Most Enjoyable. " So dellciously fragrant, soveiy refreshing!" Is the verdict of all who sweet SOZODONT try. "A positive luxury 'ils lo enjoy It,"— Thus say all the people who SOZOUONT buy. It cleanses and heals and Imparts such a fra- grance, 'Tis the prince of all dentifrices In the world. Once used, a necessity 'tis for the toilet; Before It the flags of all rivals are fuiled. Yet It costs but a trifle, the poorest may buy It ; Then purchase a boille without more delay; Aureeableness in it comblues with rare merit, Buy SOZODONT theu, aud be happy lo day. Cash Well Spent. Money expended In personal adornment Is oftrn foolishly wasted upon articles of no Intrin- sic value. A bottle ot SOZODONT, however, Is worth Us weight In gold to anyone troubled with poor teeth, aud Its prtoe Is caali well speut by the purchaser. TbOQgh it. will not make teeth regu- lar, they who use It are astonished at the rapid Improvement it effects in the denial row. More- over, I hey breathe sweetness, aud have healthy gums aud ruddy lips. STRUCK BY A TRAIN. Accident to a Party of Italians at San Aiiselmo. Their Miracu'ous Escape From Death— Se Hen and a Boy Severely Injured. A Driver's Careleuneii. Yesterday morning a party of twenty Italians, composed of men wilh their wives, children and female relatives, left this city for the purpose of visiting some friends who own a vegetable garden near Sun Auselmo, Matin County. After speudlug a day of pleasure they started to return home In me afternoon, They were driven to Sau Anselmo Station lv two express wagons. U.ie of the wagons contained the frinales of the party, aud in the other were nine men and two children. Botli patties were merry and lv high glee as they were driven to ibe depot In o-der to catch the 6:05 North Pacific Coasl Railroad train Iroin Sau Rafael. It was ciose upon the time (or the train to reach the station. Just the other sldo of the station the county road crosses the track. The wagon wilh the females was a good ways ahead of tho other vehicle, and v got across the tract and Its occmiuuts were left at the depot, where they stood awaiting the others. As the second wacon approached the track la charge ol uue of the men connected with the ranch, the train from Sau Kafael (Tierney, engi neer) came along. Wneu within eighty yards of the station the usual warning whistle was given and the bell ruug. The train was drawn by two locomotives. ( STUCCK BY THE TRAIN. Before the sound of the whistle had died away the man who was driving the second express wagon with the Italians In it, drove along the road at a rapid puce, and urn tbe two horses at tached to t!ie vehicle almost across the track be fore he discovered the approach of tne train. Ue evidently became confused, for lie applied the biakes lo tbe wagon. The action made It im possible to back away or advance wiili sufficient rapidity to prevent a collision. On came ihe train at a slackened rate of sneed and crashed into Hie wueoo with its load of bu nianlty, striking the vehicle on a line with the rear axle. The wagon was overturned amid the piercing cries of the men in it, and shrill shrieks Hud cues ol horror from Ibelr relatives oo tbe station platform and others who weie waiting there for the train. A scene ensued that fairly becgais di icrlpilon. Tne women at the station toro their balr and cried Iv wild despair, young children shrieked, and there was such a state of excitement that it seemed as if no one bad the power lo do any thing, except lo give vent to their borior. AS INJURED BOY. Although the engineer of the train saw the ac cident aud applied the air-brakes at once, the cars went ahead several hundred feet. As the train moved towaid the station the horror stricken spectators of the scene saw the bleeding form of a boy impaled on the cow-catcher, while on the pilot on the right side a man was hanging. There was a look of despair on bis face. Also hanging to the pilot was the shattered body of the wagon, and every moment, with the move ment of the train, It struck the man on the pilot. One of the horses was being rolled along like a ball by the second locomotive. When tne train was at last brought to a siaud'tlll the body of the wacou fell and me man with It. Willing hand* seized the boy ou the cow-catcher, and his limp form was carried to the station platform. tie proved to be Heury (Juueo of 015 Bay street, in this city. His mother was aiming ilia party at the depot, and when she saw him car ried along she believed be was dead, and gave vent to loud lamentations. She rushed forward and etubiaced him, calling him by name, ami saying 111 beitrt-ieuding tones: "lie Is dead." •■THANK GOD, HK LIVES." TUe scene bi ought tears to the eyes of many of tbe specimors. v lien blie dlscover«d mat be was sllil alive a smile appealed 10 light up her face, and slie lnurmured, '-Thank God, lie still lives." It was found that lie had sustained a fracture of the left leg, a dislocation of the left knee and a fiY.cturu of the nasal boue. In the meantime the railroad officials, passen- H", rs aud others rushed to the place where the collision took place. Those who bad occupied the wagon weie scattered arouud the ground In various attitudes. All were dazed, and, stianna as it may :.eem, none had been killed. Several bad beeu seveiely iujured. it was found thai Jobu H. Cliapai I, who lives on Keamy street In this city, bad sustained •eveie scalp wounds aud biuises about the body. Piairo ltouele was laceiatea arouud the upper pail of the left arm. Au^elo Pietro, lusidlnu at 1717 Stockton street, bad an Injury on the head. Carlos Mai quiet, who lives ou Keafuy street, was shaken up anci seveiely inj'.iud internally. TAKEN TO BAUSALITO. The officials of the company did all In their power under the circumstances for the injured ones. The were placed on the train, which then made a quick run to Sausalito, where medical attendance was obtained. Dr. f. W. Lux of this city was on the train, and when he was apprised of what had occurred he volunteered his ser vices and rendered aid to the Injured, lie tem porarily set aud bandaged the leg of the injured boy aud gave the others what assistance be could. A young lady member of the Sight Seers' Club, who was In the station awaiting the train, bad shortly before the accident been looking out ot the window facing the direction from which the train was coming, and when she saw the first load ot Italians coming said, "Here comes some more passengers." A moment afterward she remarked that another load was coming. To a Call repieae'ttatlve she stated mat when the second express-wagon approached, she saw the driver speed his noises across the trade ahead ot Hie train. The driver looked towaid the train before be had cleared the track, and she then saw him lean down and apply his brake. Then the collision occurred. When the brake was applied lie could not have backed away or goue ahead In time to escape the train. l'as»eogers on 111 ■ train aud those at the depot corroborated tills statement. THE ENGINEER'S STORY. Engineer Tierney, when questioned, said that be saw the wagon approaching the track, but did not suppose the man In charge would be foolhardy enough to cross the track, and while he was thinking the man made the attempt aud the collision occurred. He at once putouihe Drakes mid did all in bis power to bring the train to a standstill. Alter the accident and the Injured parties had been atleuik-d 10 It was discovered that the horses had been stripped of their harness, except their collars. Besides a tew bruises, neither .ml mal was Injured, and when the train moved away they were seen ruuuini; down the hill as if nothing bad happened. Upon arrival In this city the Injured Italians were taken to their respective homes. It was a source of comment among those who saw the ac cident that the entire paitvwasnot killed iu sUully by the collision. 'Their escape from death was truly miraculous. HIS TEMPORAL POWER. Eloquent Lecture ou the Pope's Earthly Possessions. A lecture In aid of the Children's Day Home was given last night by Itev. Father Rooney, O. 1., in St. Francis Church, cor ner Viiilejo street and Montgomery avenue. Before the lecture began a concert of sacred music was given by the following choir, under the direction ol Mrs. 11. J. Stewart: Mrs. A. B. Collins, Mrs. Sides, Misses Agnes J. O'Brien, Bella A. Brongham, Amelia O'Clair, Mary Fay, A. Travers, Lizzie Durham, Susie Hultlen, Dody Henueueriy, Angela Devlin. Clotilda Devlin, Maggie Brougham, M. Schaffer; Messrs. Harold Anderson, C. Clark, M Keilly, A. F. Woodbridge. Mrs. Stewart played an organ voluntary, after which '"Ingi-nusco," from Verdi's requiem, and selections from Kossini's "Stabat Mater," including the "intlamniatus" were rendered by the choir with charming execution and finish. Father Rooney began his discourse with an elcquent and striking introduction, and then taking up his subject, went on to say that the protecting hand of God is ever with th<» church, and that in Goo s own time the papacy shall appear triumphant before the wurld. The Pope is the vicar of Jesus Christ, the prefect of the house of God, Alelchi3edeck by holy orders, Jesus Christ by unction, castor of all pastors, mouth of Jesus Christ, the very foundation ou which God's church is built. He then quoted from the New Testament many ex pressions of Christ to St. Peter and the Apostles relating to their teachings and the Christian church. The temporal power of the Pope rests upon the luve and devotion of Christians for the Supreme Pontiff. In early days Christians laid their worldly possessions at the f uot of Peter, and when Constantino became a Christian he endowed churches of Rome, and since then the papacy has had its distinct territories. Its income whs used for the propagation of the faith, the alleviation of distress. The Pope saved Koine for many years from the hands of barbarian hordes who assailed Italy. Rome is nut the property of Italy; Home does not belong to Italy; It was given to the Church by the rightful owner, and belongs to the faithful Catholics all over the world. The temporal power of the Church re mains to-day, although its use is forbidden. It is in the hands of robbers, but it belongs to the Church still. The day will come as certainly us day succeeds night and night day when the temporal power shall be re stored to the papacy and the enemies of the Church driven from Koine. If the Pope lived in Paris his mandates would not be obeyed with good grace prob ably in Vienna, Berlin or Madrid and vice versa. "From the depths of our hearts," continued the speaker, " we tlianit the PRICE FIVE CENTS. great God that the Pope live 3in his owa dominions, far away from the courts of tha world. " The Pope hag too exalted an office to ba the subject ot an earthly king. He must b« free aud Independent to discharge to tha fullest extent the sacred prerogative of bis divine calling. Tha temporal power shall be restored, a papacy with all its rights and prerogatives shall continue to live foe ever." KILLED BY THE CARS. An Unknown Man Mangled at the Railroad Depot. At 10:50 o'clock yesterday morning th« Morgue officials were notified by telephone from the Southern Pacific Railway office* at Fourth and Townsend street that an un known man was lying dead upon the track* just fifty feet west from Fourth street. Deputy Coroners Magner and Smith went for the body and lound it under a covet alongside a freight shed where some o£ tho yard workmen had laid it. The man's akult \va* horribly crushed on one sid?, giving his head the appearance of a ma3s of man gled tlesh and bone. ilia l*ft hand tiuhtly shut, with muselei standing out rigidly from its surface, ws* close against the wound, and from this it was thought that he had been killed by a freiuht train or engine backing along tha yards, and In a struggle for life he had thrown up his arm to protect his head, When found his body was warm. Trains were moving and shunting ud and down at the depot all the morning, but no person had seen tho fatal accident, nor did the engineers know who was respousibts for the man's death. Deputy Coroner Mag ner took the name 3o£ the two engineers working in the yards and also o£ soma couplers and brakemeu, who will be called upon to give testimony at the inquest. The deceased was a man 45 to 5u years of age, above medium height aud had a rather thin and worn face. Apparently he was a laborer, dressed in a suit of dark-gray check tweed, which was little worn, and a blue flannel shirt. He wore/ 1 , soft felt hat. All that was found in his pockets was a key with a brass tag attached bearing the num ber seventy-one, such as are used in lodg ing-houses. Not a shred ol paper to tell who he was could bo discovered in search ing his clothes. Nobody identified him yesterday and ha is now on a Morgue slab awalliug identili cutlon. A HEADSTROG WOMAN. The Blethod Her Iluabnud Adopted to Give Her a Fright. A slender young man with a woe-begona expression upon his face wandered into the new City Hall Police Station the other evening. "Well," said the sergeant in charge, as be surveyed the new-comer, "what can I do for you?" "Lock me up, please," was the reply, ac companied by a sign of emotional intensity. "Luck you up? why, what have you done??" queried the sergeant. "Nothing, but I want to be locked up," persisted the man, sinking Into a chair and resting his head on his hand in a de jected way. "We're not in the habit of locking peopla up for nothing," replied the sergeant. "You had better lock hip up. for I may do something desperate. 1 dou t want to in juru her." "Her? Who is that." "My wire. I have had trouble with her and 1 came right down here to get locked up." " VVhat kind of trouble ?" "Every kind; she's so In adstrone 1 can't get along with her. Been married eight years now, aud it's been this way for nearly all that time. If she knows I'm set on anything, why she'll go the opposite way on purpose. No, to-night I told her my brother Tom lost his leg in the brittle of Frederieksburg when he was under General McClellan. She SDeered mid told me that McClellan was never in the battle of Fred orieksburg, and that it was General Sher man. Then I got mad aud told her that she was as ignorant of history as a lightuinii bug. She replied that she didn't believe my brother ever was iv a battle, and, if lie was, be 1' at his leg while running away. Now, ain't that aggravating? Who can put m> with such a woman?" " What did you do theu?" asked the ser geant. " i told her to look upon me for the last time aud rushed from the house." "Do you contemplate suicide?" "No." with a sigh, "but lam going to give her a fright?" "How?" "I want you to lock tue up on a chatge of murder. When she hears of my beiun in prison it will give her such a fright that she 11 never contradict me again. I'm not headstrong and don't contradict every thing she says. Why, I give in to her, aud even admitted the other day that her father did not peddle rags and bottles but was a junk-dealer, so lock me up." "Sorry we can't do it," said the sergeant decidedly. "Charge me with petty larceny, burglary or anytliiug." "It can't de done." "Pl.-ase do," pleaded the man. "Wont you help me break that woman's spirit?" ' No; I'm not paid for that," was the cold rejoinder. " Take me in for vagrancy," was the next tearful appeal. "Can't. You've eot a home." "Well, if I can't stop here I'll stay away to-night and I'll send her word that I was locked up. I'll give her a scare if it costs 520. She isn't going to insinuate that my brother Tom was a coward. I can atand anything but that." Then the sad-faced man drifted out iuto the cold night air. George's Disciples. James H. Barry addressed a large as sembly nf single -tax advocates at St. Geurgn's Hall last night. His subject was "The Unemployed, Trades Unions and the Single Tax." He held that the unions failed to accomplish their object on account of the great numbers of idle men who rush In when ever the unions are called upon to battle for their principles, and employers who are forever shouting for home industry are ever ready to enrich themselves at the expense of their workmen. Ho said that a few year* ago the iron-manufacturers of this city were howling for protection against Europe, and are now importing meu from Europe to all their foundries. A tax imposed uDon hind value* would, he thought, relieve the strain upon labor by throwing open vast areas of land to set. tlement and thereby decreasing the number of men who are seeking for employment iii the cities. The audience was entertained by Mrs. Hossach, Mrs. Muluner, Miss Grace Isley and George Aspden. A nnual Election. The Eureka Roller Bearing Companr elected the following Board of Directors Thursday: A. T. Hatch. William H. Mead, John Cochran, E. B. Mastict and R. \V. Heat. A. T. Hatch whs appuiuted J'resi dent, William U. Mead v ice-Pr«sidont, John Cochrane Treasurer, Q. Kiclmni Layton Secretary and D. P. BdlknaD at torney for the company. Sneezing Catarrh. The distressing sneeze, sneeze, sneeze, the acrid, watery discharges from the eyes and nose, the pain- ful Inflammation extending to the throat, the swelling of the mucous lining, causing choking sensations, cough, ringing noises in the head and splitting head- aches—how familiar these symptoms are to thou- sands who suffer periodically from head colds or influ- enza, and who live In ignorance of the fact that » single application of San-ford's Radical Cubic ram Catarrh will afford inttanlaneout relief. But this treatment In cases of simple Catarrh give* but a faint idea of what this remedy will do in tha chronic forms, where the breathing Is obstructed by choking, putrid mucous accumulations, the hearing fected.smeil and taste gone, throat ulcerated and hack- ing cough gradually fastening itself upon the debilita- ted system. Then It Is that the marvelous curative power of Saxford's Radical Curs manifests Itself In instantaneous and grateful relief. Cure begins from the first application. It is rapid, radical, per- manent, economical, safe, San-ford's Radical Cure consists of one bottle of the Radical Core, one box Catarbhal Solvsnx and an Improved Iniiai.er; price, »1. Potter Duini & Chemical Corporatios, Boston M m IT STOPS THE PAIN. &ZJ:^^ Aching Muscles, Hack, Hips and Side* HKBjl 1 "' 11 "' 1 ' and uterine I'alns, and all Pain, 8T iy«^^lull;iinmatlon and Weakness relieved f Mm. ft lnone minute by the CutlcuraAntl- '""I'ain Piaster. The first and only paln- subdulng plaster. New. original, lustantaaeous, never failing. Vastly superior to all other plaster* and remedies for the relief of pain. At all drug- gists, 86 cent*; live for f1 ; or, postage free, of Pur- TKU.UIII.-ii AND CHIUUOAL CORPORATION, Bo«t«m. Mas*. ocISMoXUMIf

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