15 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1

15 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1
Metin içeriği (otomatik olarak oluşturulmuştur)

VOLUME LXVII-NO. 146. THE MARKSMEN. Preparations for Their Recep tion in Germany. Unusual Honors to Be Accorded the American Visitors. An Hungarian Nobleman Placed Under the Care of a Guardian by the Authorities. Special by the California Associated Press. Berlin, April 14.— The programme for the visit of the American riflemen, who vn ill arrive during the latter part of June, is published. They will be received at Bremen by the Bremen Rifle Associa tion, thence go to Hanover, where the local association has organized a con test for all comers, from June 22d to 29th. The visitors will reach Berlin July 2d. The riflemen will meet in Kroll's garden, where a procession will be formed. The pro cession will march by Friedens Allee, .Brandenburg Tbor and Uiiter den Linden Avenue past the palace to the Town Hull, where the flags will be deposited. VTeber, the President of the Traveling Com mittee, will deliver on oration at the ban quet July 4th. On July sth there will be a picnic at W'eissensee. The entries for the contest far exceed the expectations of the Central Committee. A PRINCELY SPENDTHRIFT. An Hungarian HoV.emin Placed Under the Care of a Guardian. Vienna, April 14. — Prince Charles Trauttmansdorf, the celebrated turfman and crack pigeon shot, has been judicially declared a spendthrift and placed under guardianship. The Prince is 45 years old and the head of a princely family, with vast estates in Bo hemia, and in fact every province in the empire. His income is estimated at half a million ilorins. lie has always had a magnificent racing stable, and in his betting he was favored by fortune and is understood to have cleared large sums. Last December he lost at the Jockey Club in one evening at baccarat 900,000 florins. lie then bought a large number of options on spring wheat and March cereals which, going down, caused a loss of 15,000,000 florins. These could cot have been settled with the promptness which the exchange demands had not his brother-in-law, Mark graf Pallavicini, come to his assistance. THE PANAMA CAXAL. An Extension of the Concession to Be Applied For. PANAMA, April 14.— The following cable gram is pub:i=Led by the blar and Herald, which says it is very important, inasmuch as the means of carrying on work at the canal must necessarily have been pr before any effort to approach the Colombian Government was contemplated : "M. San trreau of the Panama Central Con;.! intends soliciting frum the Colombian Gov trnment bd extension of the concession in favor of the holders of titles (oorteurs de titri-91, with the concurrence of the-liquida tor of the canal, b.ised on the Santereau project." A BIG BLAZE. The Madrid Gas Works Take Fire and Great Destruction Threatened. Matvbtt). April 14.— A fire broke out at the gas works this evening, and at present is blaziug fiercely. Immense crowds have been attracted to the scene and great con sternation prevails. The consequences will probably prove dsiastruuj. PERUVIAN ELECTIONS. The Preient GoYernmeot Evidently Given a Stron? Majority. Lima, April 14.— The Presidential and general elections yesterday passed off quietly. The result seems to favor Colonel *I. rales Bermudes, the official nominee, aDd to give the present constitutional gov ernment a strong majority. ONE MAN DKOWXED. A French Brigantine Wrecked Off the Cosit of Newfoundland. St. Piebbe (Newfoundland), April 14.— The French brigantine Joseph, Captain Xicul. from Cftdiz with salt, went ashore Saturday night on Dog Island, in a fog, 'j ii" crew of eight were rescued in a basket swung on a r«pe. The captain was the last to leave the ship and was lost by the basket upsetting. w Submarine Navigation. Paiii?, April 14.— Further trials of the new electric submarine torpedo-boat Gou b.e, named after the inventor, have been held at Clierbourg. The boat was sub merged three-quarters of an hour. She performed a number of maneuvers, which prove that she can be handled with perfect euse »ua safety underwater. Count Hubert's Marriage. Berlin, April 14.— Count Herbert Bis marck's resignation is said to have been provoked by the Emperor's resolution not to recognize the Count's private marriage with the divorced I'rincess Carolatb, aunt of Piinee Uatzield, who married Clara Hanttngton. The Cur's Cjmin Arrest»d. Buciiahest, April 14. -A dispatch from Jassy to the Telcgraful states that Grand Dukn Constantine Constantinovitch a cousin of the Czar, has been arrested at St. Petersburg for his connectiuii with the revo lutionary propaganda. LABOR INTERESTS. Points Gained by Chicago Carpenters. Earopsan Workingmen to Parade. Chicago, April 14.— Very few journey men carpenters presented themselves for work this morning, aud, seeing how matters stood, refused to go to work. Police protection is offered to journeymen carpenters, but it is refused by them, as they arc afraid of tho plumbers and gas fitters working in the buil-Jiuus where work was to be resumed this morning. There is do trouble so far, but it is feared that if the master carpenter* put on non-union men bs they say they will, there will be blood shed. Ihe master carpenters have asked for police protection. Assignor Goodman of C. J. Meyer & Sons Company, which is the contractor for the carpenter-work in the new Eand-MeNally building here, was to-day ordered by Judge Prendergast to accede to All the demands of the strikers, including 40 cents an hour, eight hours and recognition of the union. This is practically a victory for the strikers. L0.m.0.n, April 14.— The Grand Council of the Federation of Trades has decided on c parade of worklngmen on May Ist. Prep arations fur a similar parade are going on throuisiiout Germany. Kmperor William lias iorbiddeu the police to interfere. He WWbes the workingmen to have the greatest freedom consistent with the preservation of good order. There is de termined opposition to the proposed dis play lv Austria. France and Italy, but tlie movement for simultaneous demonstrations giowj stronger uotwith>tauaing. Five thousand dockers have struck at Birkeuhead in consequence of the refusal of the masters to accept the uuion hours schedule. BILLIARD MATCH. Bctaefer and S!oiaon tc Flay for $500 and a Ch. inpiomhip Emb>m. Chicago, April 14.— Schaefer and Slos- Bon were to-day matched for an 800-point game, fourteeu-iueh balk line, for $SiJO a •ide, the gaiuo to be played in New l'ork The Morning Call. Pome timo In Jiine. The Brunswick-Balke Company has also decided to present tho winner with a championship emblem, sub ject to challenges every sixty days uutil the winner can hold tho same 'for two years, when It becomes his private property. HORRIBLE DISCOVERY. The Body of a Murdered Man Found in a Barrel Xe-w Touk, April 14.— A horrible dis covery has been made at the Appraiser's stores. The body of a murdered man was found in a barrel consigned here from Copenhagen. The discovery was made by the Appraiser's clerks in the second depart ment. The body is that of an elderly man ami was covered with lime. The customs ofheials have not the slightest doubt but that the body is that of Philipsen's victim, the story of "whose eriuio was told in a pre vious dispatch. The cablegrams have narrated how a Co penhagen merchant was strangled to death by a soap-maker of that city, who shipped the body to New York in a cask of lime. On February Oth a mysterious cask, con signed to Beresford Bros., Racine, Wis., arrived on Che steamship Thingvalla. Wells, Fargo * Co., in whose care the cask was addressed, promised to ascertain for whom the lime was intended, although they had no patron in Racine Darned Beresford and hail received no request to forward the cask there. Meanwhile tho cask remained iv Appraiser's store. Alter a cablegram detailing the facts of the Copenhagen murder were published the cask was broken open. From the top of the barrel protruded the right hand of the mur dered nia.u, with a gold ring on one linger. The arm hud been forced down by the tup of the cask, and had sprung up when the weight w:is removed. The cask was partly filled with dry plaster, piled arouul the boil}' so that only the head and one arm were visible. The face was that of a man 5u years of age. He wore a brown beard, streaked with gray. Tlie body was fully dressed. Even his hat was found In the plaster. The clothes were of good quality, and nothing was iv the pockets to tell who the ileaii man was. The face was distorted, as if the man had died in agony, and looked as if he had been nailed iv the cask while insensible and striven to get out before he became over come by suffocation. The body was Left in the cask and the head nailed up to await developments. Ad vices from Copenhagen state that the mur derer is one Fhilllpsan, a soap-maker, lie needed money to strengthen his waning business. The murderer was arrested while about to embark on a steamer for South Africa. A POWERFUL TELESCOPE. Southern California to Haye the Largest Object-Ghss in the World. Boston, April 14.— An object-glass for the lorty-inch telescope to be mounted at the University in Southern California was taken to Cambridge to-day. It will be the largest refracting telescope ever constructed. From its lofty position In i>an liie^o it will pierce further into the recesses of si ace. than any instrument heretofore de.-igned by hand. The glass was taken to the establishment of Clark Bios., who will spend nearly two years upnn it before it will be ready for use. It came from the establishment of Mantois in l';iri-. It is the bicgest piece of work of the Kind they have ever done or which lias ever been done anywhere. It has a superlatively pure and beautiful circular plate crown. The glass is forty inches In diameter, or mere thnn ten feet in circumference, two and a half inches thick, and »o clear that when balanced upon its edge it is invisible. It interposes no obstacle to the rays of light which fall upon it, and they pass through it absolutely unchanged. When completed it will have an exact di ameter of forty inches, with a maximum thickness of about two iuches; the curves of its double concave surfaces are not calculated. The complementary glass and the plates for the convex lens, which *vill be placed about eight inches behind the object glass, have not been cast. The tube ol th.c telescope will have a length of about sixty feet, thus exceeding the Lick telesci.pe in length, as an object glass, and also in diameter. STARCH WORKS BURNED. Narrow Escape of Employes— A Number of Girls Seriously Injured. Dcs M.>ine<=, April 14.— The Gilbert Starch Works were destroyed by fire to day. Los, $125,000. The works are situated three miles from the business center of the city. The flames broke out in the first story, and as coon as the cry of "Fire" was carried fn/m floor to Moor a mad rush was made by the. employe* to escape. Many tumbled downstairs and several girls were seriously injured, three having their arms broken. The property was, it is reported, turned over to the starch trust a few days ago, permission having been given by the insurance com panies, so that the insurance holds good. The factory was in full operation and em ployed 112 men and as many women and children. Later details show that no lives were lost, but there were man; narrow escapes. The building and contents were insured for $200,000. COWARDLY MURDER. A Prominent Kentuckian Shot and Mort ally Wounded. Louisville, April 14.— A sensational murder occurred near Springfield, Ky., this morning. While quarreling over their wives. Abraham Kelly shot and instantly killed Samuel Logan, a well-known citizen of Springfield, both men worn but recently married. The men talked of their wives, as newly made husbands are wont to do, and finally from bantering on the respective merits and demerits of their wives, the joking gradually changed to bittor remarks. Kelly then went away. In a short time he re turned, armed with an army musket. Walking quietly toward Logan he ad vanced to within 100 yards of his vic tim, when, without a word, he fired full at Logan, who fell with blond flowing from his wnuudt. Kelly es caped to the woods, and up to to-night has not been captured. FAILURE OF BROKERS. Buipeniions Caused by the Recent Chicago Wheat D-al. Detroit, April 14.— The rumored failure of Charles V. Bryan, Presideut of the Board of Trade, was confirmed to-dny. lie was caught short on 4,000.000 bushels of May wheat during the recent rise and is very heavily Involved. Nabiivii.i.k, April 14.-McCrea & Co., a large commission firm of this city, failed this afternoon. Tlie failure is duo to be ing •short." and their inability to cover trades on the Chicago Board of Irade. Mctrea & Ccs house at Louis ville also announced their failure to-ni"ht 1 heir liabilities cannot be learned, but are understood to be very large. TO WED A I'HINCE. Aa American Heiress Captures One of the Bourbons. New Youk, April 14.— Alexander Cam eron, the wealthy Toronto lawyer, who re cently married a rich Detroit widow named Ward, has returned from Europe. Mrs. Cameron and her stepdaughter, Miss Ward, are still in Paris. It Is an nounced that the young heiress will in June wed Prince de lirnyon Caraiuan of trance. Miss Ward la 17 years old. With the bride me I'riucn will receive an income of nearly Sisu.uoo a year. Failed to Materialize. Chicago, April 14.— The prophesied doom of Chicago and Milwaukee by flood so far lias not materialized uor is it expected. Everything is in statu quo. SAN FRANCISCO, TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 15, IS9O-EIGHT PAGES. MADE A MISTAKE. McCaffrey's Error in Facing Jim Corbett. The San Francisco Boy Has Matters all His Own Way. His Antagonist Saved From a Knock-Out by the Call of Time— A Body-Blow Lands Him Across the Ropes. Special by the California Associated Press. New York, April 15. — Doniiniek Mc- Caffrey made tlie mistake o£ his pugilistic career last night. Fat, heavy and soggy, and without an hour's training, he undertook to stand before Jim Cor bett, the young Californian, for four rounds. Tiio battle lasted four rounds, but McCaffrey was practically out of it, for he could not have lasted another round. As for Corbett he proved that he is a big, strong young man with clever hands — a man who may be rated as a first - class boxer and able to stand an even show with men of McCaffrey's class. He cannot be compared with Sullivan, however, for the champion, iv the opinion of sportiug men and judges of fighters, who witnessed last evening's set-to, would be able to handle him with ease. A SUCCESSFUL BENEFIT. The benefit tendered Corbett w;is a suc cess, for the Fifth-avenue Casino, Brooklyn, was crowded with men well known in sporting circles and with men about town who are fond of exhibitions of this character. McCaffrey wore flesh colored tights, while the Califorulau was dressed in blue knee-breeches and a light colored close-fitting sleeveless shirt. McCaffrey's condition was apparent the moment he stood up, and a murmur of dis approvement was beard. Corbett, on the contrary, looked in the pink of condition. He is t ill and thin, with pipestem legs, small narrow hips, sud arms long and a trifle lanky, but he has a good reach, as McCaffrey later on found out. M'CAFFBKT LEADS TWICE. Steve O'Donuell was chosen referee and time-Keeper, but was forced to give the watch to Mike Donorin, who was also Corbett's second. At the tall of time Corbett arose smiling and shook bauds with McCaffrey. The two men squared off and played for an opening. McCaffrey found it and led with his left, landing light'y ou Corbett's ebiu. Ho re peated this two or three times, getting some light blows over Corbett's low guard. Corbett lost his smile and went at McCaf frey, lauding hard on his face and body. There were two or three clinches in this round, followed by hot inuVhliue. The Californian was suspicious of McCaffrey, for he failed to obey the call of "break mid go to the center," trying to pu.-h Mc- Caffrey back just far enough to hit him. The call of time lound McCaffrey blowiug and Corbett smiling. There was a howl from the spectators that the round lasted but two minutes and then Johnny lleagau took the watch. 61XOND I'.OUXD. In the second round McCaffrey a^ain landed lightly. Then Corbett took a turn and pounded at McCaffrey's stomach and face, getting in some telling blows. McCaf frey tried hard to laud several times, but each time he fell short, giving the Califor nian a chance to Counter heavily. One blow, flush on the nose, drew blood from the New Yorker. He was fought almost through the ropes twice. This round was also marked by clinching, in which Corbett pushed Mc- Caiirey all over the ring and ended with the odds a long way in favor of the man from the Pacific slope. Tnil'.D BOUND. In the third round McCaffrey was very weak and saved himself several times by clinching, but when the Californian could do it lie punished his adversary very hard in the body and on the side of the head. McCaffrey ducked one or two savaco blow cleverly, and a couple of times got in heavy blows, Corbett in almost each instance countering. At the end of the round it was seen that McCaffrey was almost out of the fight. When the fourth round opened it was as foregone conclusion that Corbett would win. McCaffrey was weak and Hood flowed from liis nose. The terrific lighting pace had told on him in his poor condition, but he came up gamely. ■Jin: NEW rOBKXB DEFEATKD. Corbett went at him from the start and clinches wete in order. Whenever they l'okn away both men 'ought hard, landing hard almost every linin. The Califoruiau's blows told, while McCaffrey's were weak and ineffective. When they had been fighting about two minutes McCaffrey swung his right and misled and was given an awful blow in the stomach, which knocked him over the ropes, where he huug with his hands down. Corbett did not hit him again and Mc- Caffrey said something about going to the center of the ring. Corbetf did so and time was called while the crowd shouted lor Curbett. lIV'AI I ■■HKY'S FBI2KDS CKESTF ALLEN. Corbett had won, and his friends were wild with delight. Sieve O'Donnell atinounced that McCaffrey had not trained for the con tent, but tuo throng of sporting people who were friendly to McCaffrey would not be comforted. In the matter of points, leading and land ing, McCaffrey had a shade the best of it, but the young fellow from the far West was clearly the best man in power of de livery and judgment. Ho lias shifty shoul ders, which juuges said were very de ceptive in that a man never knew when he was about to deliver a blow. SHOUT KOUKDB. The actual time by rounds was: First, 2 minutes 7 ae.onds; second, 1 minute SO seconds; third, 2 minutes 3j seconds; fourth, 1 minute 13 seconds. The three rests occu pied 5 minutes and 10 seconds, no that tho whole time it to»k Corbett to "do up" Mc- Catfrey was 12 minutes 20 seconds. A STATEMENT DENIED. Dominick McCaffrey said to a reporter that there was not the slightest ill-feeling between himself and Corbett. It has been said th.tt McCaffrey refused to accompany Corbett on his tmir uttleu he (Corbett; could defeat him, but "Dom" says this report is without foundation, as his meeting with Corbutt was a business arrangement. A COLLEGE SCANDAL. The Preiident of a Wisconsin Institution Summarily Removed. Blue Ejlbtb (Minn.), April 14.— The citi zens (if Winnebago City and the faculty of tiie Northwestern Baptist College at that place are greatly excited over a scandal in volviug the head of the college, Key. A. J. Marshall. Recently Dr. Marshal] went to Minneapolis, and through his influence a young woman, whom he said had been heart lessly betrayed, was admitted to an institu tion conducted by a number of prominent and charitable Indies for persons of her claas. Shortly after her admission sho gave birth to an illegitimate child and in response to repeated questioning stated that the R«v. Mr. Marshall was responsible for her condi tion. The college authorities have removed the Rev. Mr. Marshall from the presidency of the institution. lie claims to be inno cent. CITY OFFICIALS INDICTED. Minneapolis Aldermen Plead Not Guilty and Are Released on Bail. Minneapolis (Minn.), April 14.— As ft result of the Grand Jury's investigation of the Aldermanic boodle charges, bench warrants were issued this morning for tho arrest of Aldermau John T. McGowan, Fred Brueshaber in tlie First Ward, and City Clerk Charles F. Haney. The bearing is set for this afternoon. Aldermen McGowan and Brueshaber were brought into the court-room this afternoon and the indictment was read to them, which was a lmix paper, in brief charging them with agreeing to receive a bribe. They both pleaded not guilty and wero held in $2500 bail each, which was furnished. The case ws set for trial April '.'lst. GENERAL ALGER'S TOUR. A Grand Ovation Tendered Him by Grand Army Men at Kansas City. Kansas City, April 14.— General Russell A. Alger and party, on their way to the Pacific Coast, were accorded a grand ova tion by tbo Grand Army uieu at Music Hall to-night. Major Warner, ex-Com mander-iii-cliief, delivered a stirring ad dress of welcome. General Alger responded with the highest eulogy of the heroes of the war. The General said if the whole Treas ury of the United State 3 was turned uver to the old soldiers it would not repay them for their work. Mrs. Logan was called to the front. Ohio State Miners' Convention. COLUMBUS, April 14.— The State Miners' Convention this evening decided to have but one State organization, and adjourned to 8 o'clock to-morrow morning, when the State officers will be elected. Trial Pcstpinel. Asiiland (Wis.), April 14.— The second trial of Phelps Perrin for complicity iv the Iron Exchange Bank robbery has been postponed uutil the 28th of April. Prize-Fight Stopped. Boston, April 14.— The heavy-weights Godfrey and Cardiff were to have fought with gloves to-night, but the police pre vented the meeting. RACE MEETINGS. Six Events at Memphis— Close of the Winter Season at Clifton. Mi :mi'jiis, April 14.— The first race to-day was for a purse ol SKA, S7."> to the seennd, and SJS to tiie third, four furlones. Uowen won, Joe Center second, Chimes tliird. Time, 0.51. Second race, for a ptirse of 5350, 57." to the second and $'J5 to the third, seven furlongs, Workman won, Mary X second, Mary J third. Time, 1 :li3. The third race, subscribed to by the Memphis cotton factories and buyers, closed with thirty-six subscriptions, (700 added, Sl5O to the second, 550 to the third, one nixl a; sixteenth miles. Mamie Fonso won, Tudor second. Jacobin third. Time, 1:51 & Fourth race, fora purse of $300, $100 to the second, one and an eighth miles, Fay elte won, Stoney Montgomery second, •Mstcauliiy third. Tim-, 1:88%. Fifth race, for a parse of $400, $75 to the second and $35 to the third, six furlough, .Barney won, Bonnie Taw second, Okla homa Kid third. Time, 1 :09& Closisg Day at Cii ton. Clifton, April H. — This was the closing day of tbe winter racing at this truck. The weather was pleasant aud tlie track fast. Tlie attendance was rery large, tho fcur ...... i ..ce. beiu s thr featuic ol ttte day. The events were as follows: First race, fifteen-sixteenths of a mile (selling)— Monte Crlsto won, Cupid second, Roger third. Time, I :.'<7^4. Second race, one and v sixteenth miles (selling)— The Sheriff won, E=au second, Eatontown third. Time, 1:51%. Third race, hall mile (gelling} — Osceola won. Moonstone second, Little Jake third. Time, .4'Jli. Fourth race, four miles (selling)— Miss Cody won, Vigilant second, Bela third. Time. 7 :-7' 4 . Fifth race, tho Adieu handicap, one mile — St Paris won, .St. John second, Shotover third. Time, I M.'t. Sixth race, three-quarters of a mile (maidens)— Remembrance wop, Addie T second, Weiland filly third. Time, 1:18)4. Hemrh.s Entries MEMPHIS, April 14.— First race, selling purse, four furlongs— Royal Flnsii 113, Rose Howard uo, Nome West no, Qenesee no. Second race, selling purse, all ages, six furlongs, heats— skobeloff 100, Ktitie S !'B, Leo Kriaelbii, Chilhowle 99, Jack Cocks 05. Third race iSeuorita slakes), for two year-old lillics, four furlongs— Monterosa 113, Katuni 111), Shilora 110, Ktiiel S 110, Too Sweet 110, Annie Brown 113, Drilt 110, Lady Washington 110, Laura Dorcey 110, Lizzie Gwyune '.w. Fourth race (Owners' handicap^, for three year olds, one mile— Harvester 10j, Julia M.fgee 100. Winner !H>, John Sherman 80, Lady iilai-kburn S2, Forever 101, Jessica I*3, Mnry II 85, Dollikiui TO Filth race, selling purse, three-year-olds nnd upward, one and n sixteenth miies— Carltou 111, Lucy I' 102, Dyer 100, Ujiinie Kin; 96, Boaz 109, Walker 102, Eight to Seven 98, Fred Fink 92. Bud for the Pool-Sellers. New Yoisk, April 10.— No racing tips fcr Memphis are published, and none of the morning papers contain the entries for Elizabeth, tha management withholding them to prevent the pool-rooui9 doing ousi iie?". It is announced that the entries will not be given at the track until a few min utes before the racea. A wholesale raid was made on the poul-rooms to-day, mid many arrests woie made. VVAKKIMG WOKiSHIPhBS. A Row In a Synagogue Results In the Arrrnt of Two. The, synagogue-going population of the community about Seventh and Folsoin streets has long been divided on religious •luestions into two factions, and disputes and even personal encounters have occurred from time to time. The congregation is poor and cannot af ford to erect a synagogue r.f its own, so the meetings are held in an old building ou Fol soiii street, near Seventh, which was for merly used as a saloon. ft ling been during the religious services that the dillieulties have occurred, and on one or two occasions officers have been ap pealed to to stop the disturbance. The re sult of the latest row, which occurred on Saturday last, whs the arrest last evening of Abraham and Morris Simon, father and sou, by Oflicers Dean and Ma<;ulre. Tlih former was locked up ou charees of buttery and disturbing a refigioui meeting and thfl latter on two charges of battery and one of disturbing a religious meeting. .Both wen subsequently released on $100 bonds on each charge. The complaining « itnesses are Isaac SilveruiHU, K. Hassan aud Morris (ilucknian. U I tick man preferred the charees of disturbing the meeting and Silverman and iliissau the charges of battery. From what could be learned last evening it appears that the faction to which the Simons belong objects to the manner in which the Uluekman-Silverman-Uassau faction worship and manifested their dis approval in forcible terms and this was re sented and a little scrimniuge ensued, in which the Simons used nature's weapons ou their opponents. This is the story told by the faction op posed to the Simons. Some Interesting developments ar« anticipated when the cases come up in the Police Court. Morris Simon, the son, is a peddler living at 34 Garden street, and the father, Abraham, keeps a tailor-shop at 22 Kuss street. CONDENSED TELEGRAMS. Ottawa, April 14.— Her Majesty's ship

\\arsi>He, a turret-ship, is on her way to British Columbia. She will be • the largest niao-of war tver in the Pacific Ocean. Camden (S. J.). April 14. — The hand some residence and outbuildings of Mason, Him inventor of the Mason fruit-jar, near V ineland, was destroyed by an incendiary lire. -The loss is $20,000. Chicago, April 14. — The Public Service Committee of the County Board lias refused to pay the snecinl ; attorney fees for the Crontn case, amounting to §3000. Great in dignation i- caused by this action. SAWYER SUSTAINED. Supreme Court Decision in the Neagle Case. The Killing of Terry Justified in me Opinion of Jastice Miller. He Deputy Marshal Only Did His Duty When He Protected Field From As sault—Not Liable for Murder. Special by the Calirorn' . Associated Press. Washixgtox, April 14.— The celebrated Ne»gle habeas corpus case from California was decided by the United States Supreme Court to-day, the judgment ot the Circuit Court being affirmed. This disposes of all proceedings against .Vcagleforthe shooting of Judge Terry in the railway station atLa throp ou tho Hth of last August to prevent hi:n from taking the life of Justice Field. Tae opinion was delivered by Justice Mil ler. Justice Field was not present. Justic - .iVer opened with a statement of the facts oJ.fbe assault, already known, aud. then miller's statement. ft Is useless to over tlie testimony on this subject more partlculaily than tills. It Is sutn clem to say that Hie evidence Is abundant; that bom Terry and Ills wife cuutem i>laleii some at lack ui.ou Judge Flrld diirlui! Ins visit to Cali fornia iv til- summer of IHB9, wlilcli they in tended should result In Ins death. Mauy ul these outers were published In the newspapers, and Hie pi ess of California was filled with conjectures or the probable attack by Terry on Justice Field a» soon as it was made known that be was goiug to attend the Circuit Couit that year. hTM — I II 11 mm " ENSTBUCTIONS TO XEAQLE. The Justice then recites the correspond ence between the Department of Justice and tin; United States Court at San Fran cisco, including the instructions of the Attorney-General to the Marshal to exer cise unusual caution for the. protection of Justice Field against the violence of Terry. The result of this correspondence whs that JNenglo was appointed a Deputy Marshal, with sppcial instructions to attend upon Judjio field, both In court and while going from one court to another, and protect him from any assault that might be attempted i.' on him by Terry and wife. Iv the per formance of this duty Neagle attended Judne Field from San Francisco to Los An geles and was on his way back with him to San Francisco When Terry made the as sault upon Justice Field at Latlirop, aud refusing to dtaist when so commanded by Neacie, iv his character of officer of the lav,, he was snot by Neagle and Killed. FACTS or llli: HOMICIDE. The facts of the homicide arc then stated by Justice Miller, lie say.-,: 'lhere are material cin.'umsuiicei produced in Ihe ewdeuce bWoie the Circuit Court on the luarluu of ihisliabc»s Co ipus case. It is but a siioi t sketch of uliiury. which is given iv lour (.r live huudied uaKN lv the record, but we think II l- -uliicirut to enable us to apply me law of the case to the question hefoieus. Without more minute discussion of tins testimony it produces upon us tlie conviction of a seMed puipose ou p.nr of Terry and bis wife, ainountiui: to con ■lilracy to murder Field. And we are qiule sure lhat If Neagle had been inertly a bmther or fnend of Judge Field, traveling with him, and . v.aie vi all thu previous relations of Teiry to the Judge as be was, of his bitter animosity, his d eclated purpose lo have tevcuge, even tothe point of killing mm, be would havi been justified in wliat he aid in deleuse of iiela' s Hie aud pos sfuly of his own. ' A SUBJECT FOlt CONSIDERATION. But such justification is a proper subject for cocsideialion on Uie trial of tlie <■.!■.■ 1..1 murder lii Hie courts of the United Slates, ami to dis charge the prUoner while held Hi custody by tlie Slate authorities (or this ulleuse. unless ibere Ci'.n lie lound lv aid i:l 11, c defeuse uf the prlsouer I :■■• '.luni' nt of power and authority asserted unaer the lioveiumeul ol the United states. Justice Millor then devotes considerable space to showing conclusively that Justice Field, when on his way from Los Angeles to San Francisco, was in the discharge of bis duties as Circuit Judge, lie quotes the law and the. Chief Justice's assignments and lays: HXAQUt'B DUTY. A Judge may teas much In the discharge of his duties outside his court-room as wltliln. Under these circumstances It is the right of the Juilße to claim protection.. It Is nut supposed that any special act of Cougreis exists which author izes the Marshals or Deputy .Marshals or Hie Limed Slates la less lei ms to follow Judges o! the Supreme Court around their circuits aud act ai bodyguard to them to defend them against malicious assaults against tin Ir person, but we aie of the opinion that this view of the statute Is an unwarranted restriction ot the meaning of the law designed to extend iv a liberal manner the beuetitof a writ of habeas. We are satisfied that It was Hi duly of Neajtle under the circumstances —a duty which could only arise under in- laws of the L lilted States— to defend Mr. Justice Field from the murderous attack upon him, and that he brings himself within the ineaiiiiii! of the sec tion we have recited. This view of the subject Is couliiined by an alternative iirovislou that he must belli custody in pursuance of the Uws of the United Slates under the process of com t or the Judge thereof, or is lv custody lv violation of the coimitutiou or uf the law or treaties of the United States. IXTKKPKKTI.NG TUE CONSTITUTION, In the view we take of the Constitution ol tlie Lulled Stales, uuy obligation fairly and properly inlerablo trom that insliumeut, or any duly of a Mai shitl to be derived troni the general scope of ins duties under the laws of the (Tailed States, Is a law within the meaning of this phrase. It would be a gieat reproach to the system of government of the United .States, which Is declined to be within Its sphere sover eign mid supieme, if there Is to be found wltlna the domain of Its poweis no means of piolecuuiz Its Judges lv the conscientious discharge of their duties from me malice and hatred of those upou whom Its judgment may operate unfavor ably. It has in modem times become apiment that the physical health of a community is mote i-mcieutly promoted by Hygienic ar.d preventive means than by the skill winch Is applied to the cuie of a disease alter It has become lully de veloped. So also with the law, which Is in tended to prevent crime, either iv 119 geueial spiead among the community or In Hie regula tions, police organization and other means which are adopted for the protection of the lives and properly of the citizens, for the dtspeisiou of mobs, for the arrest 01 thieves and assassins, lor the watch which Is kept over Hie community as well as over this class ol people. Is more elii cleut Hi. in the punishment uf crimes at lei they have been commuted. INSUFFICIENT MtOTKCTIOX. If a person In Hie situation of Judge Field coulu have no oilier guardian of lili peisonal aalely while engaged In Hie conscientious dis charge of a disagreeable duly tti.tu Hie lad thai It lie was murdered his murderer would bo sub ject to the laws of the State, mid by those law: could be punished seveiely, it Would be very lu biillleU'ut. The plan which tatty mid Ills wile had In miud ol lusulilng and assaulting linn Hud drawing him Into a drlonslvo physical contest, in the course of which they would slay him, shuns tin- little value of such remedies. We do not be lieve mat the Government of me United States Is thus iiii'tncieui nod Hint Its Constitution and laws have lelt high utllceiti of the Government so defenseless Hud unprotected. The opinion then quotes from exparte Stebold and other authorities in support of the principle of the supremacy . of tlio Government of the United states in the ox ercise of all the powers conferred upon it by the Constitution. Concerning the power of the executive to protect the federal ju diciary tile opinion says: AUTHOMTY OF MARSHALS. Where then are we to look for the protection which we have shown Judge Field was entitled to when engaged In the ducuarite or Ills official duties? Motto the com is of the United States, liecause, as has been mure than once said in this court, in tue division of the powers of the Uov. eminent between the thiee great departments, executive, legislative aud judicial, the judicial Is toe weakest lor the purpose of self-urolectlou and for she enforcement of the powers which it exercises. The mlulHerlal officers through wiioni Us commands must be executed are Mar shals of the United Stales and belong emphati cally to me Executive Department of the (Joy ernment. They are appointed by the I'iesldent with the advice and ouBMBI of the Seuate. They are removable from ottice at his pleasure. They are subjected by an act of Congress to the super vision and control of the Department of Justice, lv the hands of one of the Cabinet otllcers of the I'resldeut, and their compensation is pro vided for by acts of Congress. DISTRICT ATTOItNKYS. The same may be said of District Attorneys or Hie United Stales who prosecute anil defeud the claims of the Uoveiciusiil In the courts. The k'Ki»l:illve branch of the Government can only protect the Judicial officers by mi enactment of laws ("i thai 1 111 -pi)-.!-, and Hi'- argument we are vow combating assumes that no Midi law has been passed. If we turn to the Kxeculive De liartment 1. 1 Hie i.uin iinii-nt we llnd a very dlf- Jerent condition of affairs. .-The Constitution, Section 3, Aitlcl- 11, declares thai the I'iesldeul shall take care that the laws are faithfully exe cuted, mid he Is provided with the inraoi of ful lilllUß lliu obligation by his authority to commis sion all officers of the United Maim, and by and with tlie consent of the Senate to appoint the most Important or them mid to rill vacancies. ■ THE PBSBn>XHi'B DUTIES. lie is drcUred in tie me commander-ln chief ot Hie army and navy of tile Uuili'd SttlM. The duties which are thus imposed upon Imu he U fun her enabled to peiioi in by recognition In the ( 'oiHiiiuilun ami ilia creation by acis ot the ex ecutive ucp.ii iiueiiis, wliicu ii.ivj vailed la uuiu her from four or five to seven or eight, who are familiarly called Cabinet Ministers. These aid him In the performance of the great duties ot his office and represent him In a thousand acts to wliicb it can hardly be supposed his personal at tention Is called, and thns he Is enabled to fulfill the grand duty ol bis great department, as ex pressed In the phrase that he shall take caro thai the laws be faithfully executed. A CASE IX rOI>'T. Is this duty limited to the enforcement of the acts of Congress or of the treaties of the United Slates, or dues It Include the rights, duties and obligations growhig out of the Constitution It ■etr, our luleruallonal relallous and all the pro tection Implied by the nature of our Goverunieut under the Consututlou? Upon what principle does the Executive Interfere in foreign Slates, as lie bas frequently done with efficiency, In the case of a naturalized citizen ot the United States of foreign birth who. upon making a visit to the place of his nativity, Is arrested and placed In the army as * soldier of that counti y ? We know of no statute which makes It the duty of the Fresideut to Interfere Iv such cases. If therein any law upou the subject it la an International law aud uot a statute of tba United States. A PBOPXB.COUBSS. After illustrating at length tho power of the President in protecting citizens, public lands and timber of the United States with out tho existence of actual statutes author izing him thereto, Justice Miller says: We cuuuot doubt the power of the l'resldent to take measures for the protection of a Justice of one of the courts of the United States who, while In the discharge of the duiles ot his otllce, is threatened with personal anack which may prob ably result in his death, and we think it clear Ilia!, wlieie ibis protection Is to be attorded iM'ougli ihe civil powers the Department ot Jus lice Is (he proper one to set in motion the ueces saiy means of protection. The coirespondence already recited in this opinion between the Mar shal of Urn District of Caliloinla and the Atior ury-Ueneral and District Attorney of the United stales fo: that district, althuui;h piesci ihins; uu very spccitic mode of affording ibis protection by the Altorney-cieueial, Is sufficient, 1 thluk, lo warrant t tie Marshal In taking Ihe steps which be did take in making ihe piuvi>ioiu which ha did make for the protection aud uefeuso ol ilr. Justice Xield. tower or maksiials. The Court then cited the law under which Marshals and their deputies are invested in each State with the same powers in exe cuting the laws as the Sheriffs and deputies iv such States have in executing tho laws thereof, and cited the law of California to show the powers and duties of tho Sheriffs in that State, lie asserted that tUe Siier ifts and Deputy Sheriffs would be called upon by the peace and dignity of the State of California even if there had been no statute law to act as Xeugle did aud kill any person attacking a Judge should it be a question as to who should be killed. SAWVEIi'S KULINO SUSTAINED. The opiuion next dealt with the position taken on behalf of the appellants that the question of the guilt of a prisoner of the crime of murder is a question to be deter mined by the laws of California aud to be decided by its code, and that there exists no power in the Government of the United States to take a prisoner from the custody of the proper authorities of the State of California and carry him before the Judye of a court of the United States aud release him without a trial by jury according to the laws of the iitate of California, and said in response that tlie Statutes of the United States authorize and direct such a proceeding aud such judgment in a case where an offense charged against a prisoner consists iv an act done in pursuance of the laws of the United States and by virtue of authority and where tlie imprisonment of tin- party is in violation of tbe Constitution and laws of the United States is clear by its express lau£iiai;e. The Court then reviewed the legislation of Congress upon the subject ol tho writ of habeas corpus, stating the necessities to meet wliich the original art has been en larged aud extended lv its present, form. Uf the present statute the Court says it includes all the cases of the restraint of libeity in violation of the Constitution or the laws or treaties oi the Uuiteu States. nkaole's ACTION UPHELD. After a lout; discussion of the poit>t above mentioned and citing extensively authori ties as to the right of Circuit or United States courts to take cases out of Mate courts, thu opinion closes as follows: We have thu« Riven to this case the most at tentive consideration of all the questions ol law and fact which we have thought to be pioperly involved lv lv We have lelt it to be our duty to examine lulu the facts with the completeness justified by the Impoitauce of the case, as well as limn the duty imposed upon us by the statute, which we think requites us to place oursalvej as far as possible lv the place or the Circuit Court and to examine the testimony and arguments in It, aud to dispose of the case as law and justice require. The result at which we have arrived ui on this examination Is that lv (tie protection of the person and life of Mr. Justice Field, while In the discharge of his official duties, Neagle was authorized to resist any attack of Terry upon that eminent judicial officer; that be was Justified lv the belief that without lustaut action on his par: tun assault of Teiry uuon the judge would have ended lv Hie death of the latter; that such being his well founded belief he was instilled in taking the lire of Terry as the only means of preventing the death of the man who was Intended to be his victim. NOT LIABLE FOE MURDER. That In taking the life of Terry under these circumstances he was acting under authority of the lulled States and was justified in so doing, and that lie Is not liable to answer for murder to the couits ot California on account of his pan lv the transaction. We therefore confirm the Judg ment of the Circuit Court authorizing his dis charge from the custody of the Sheriff of San Joaqulu County. Justice Miller's reading lasted two hours, durini: which time the court-room was crowded to tulTocation. THE SILVER QUESTION. Senate and House Committees Hold Im- portant Meetings. Washingtok, April 14.— A meeting of the Republican members of the Senatorial Silver Committee was held this morning, and at noon a recess was taken. The dis cussion at times was animated, but a spirit of compromise was shown. The members pledget) themselves to secrecy a3 to the de tails of the meeting. It was intended that the House and Senate committees should meet in joint session to-night, but this was found to he impracticable, owing to Senato rial engagements. Members of the House Silver Committee had a two hours' session this morning, and there was a general disposition to reach some kind of an agreement, and a spirit of concession characterized the entire proceed ings. As a result, when recess was taken tiie indications were that the members had at last lound common ground, and that they would be reaily very shortly to agree upon a formal proposition, acceptable to them selves, at least, although further modifica tions may havo to be made to meet the views of Republican Senators. The basis of the agreement will be the Wlndom bill as it emerged from the House Committee on Coinage, with the addition of a few provisions intended to meet the views of the silver Mien. It will probably pro vide for ihe unlimited purchase of bullion produced in the United States at the market price not to exceed 81 for 371% grains, and when that price is reached there is to be free coinage. The treasury notes to be is sued in payment of silver will be redeema ble, in bullion or coin. At present this proposition has not been formally adopted and the committee Will havo another meet ing to-morrow, when it is expected that Secretary Windom will be again called upon to state nil views. Theopiniun is expressed that definite conclusions will soon bo reached. PORK AND WHEAT. The Chicago MarV.et More Quiet aad Shorts Bicomisg K'assured. Cuicaoo, April 14. — There was very lit tle excitement on 'Change to-day, trade having become more accustomed to wild fluctuations. May wheat is selling a cent and a hail higher than on Saturday. Ilntch inson was not conspicuous in the market, lv au interview he declared himself to be a seller for May and June at tlio prevailing premium over July. Pork showed little of Saturday's excitement. Armour was offer iug pork, and it was understood that he was ready to sell heavily if prices took the course they did Saturday. This has re assured the shorts and there is less of a wild rush to buy. AN ARSON CASE. Dr. Ma'liscn of Chicieo Ex'miaed and Ad- mitted to B >il. Chicago, April 14.— Dr. F. M. Madison, who was arrested Saturday on a charge of arson, was brought before Justice Wallace this inoruiug. The doctor showed signs of nervousness and was anxious to have the case tried as soon as possible. The State decided on a continuance, which was grunted until April 24th, and the doctor was admitted to bail. Dr. Madison and his friends promise to make things interesting for tlie police before the case is completed. Dr. C. A. Kuggles of Stockton has been appointed by the State Board of Health as delegate to the national conference held next month at Nashville, Tunn. KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. Twenty - second Annual Conven- tion of the Grand Lodge. Opening of Session - Statistical Beport of Grand Keeper of Records and Seal. Officers and Committees. The twenty-second annual convention of the Grand I.odße of California, Knights of Pythias, was called to order last eveulug at 8 o'clock In Uulon-square Hall, T. J. Crowley, Grand Chan cellor, prealding. Alter calling the roll of officers and represent atives and a quoium found to be iv attendance, the Grand Lodge was opened In regular form. The Committee on Credentials nr.d Returns presented a report ol those eligible to sit at this session and also upon a number of Past Chau cellors entitled to receive tl;e Grand Lodge rank, which report was concurred In, after which the Grand Masterat-Aims lutroduced nearly 200 last Chancellors, upon whom the Uraod Lodge rank was conferred and who were then given seats as members of the Grand Lodge. Appointments or an official reporter and two assistants to the Grand Keeper of Records and Beat were made. The reports of tlie grand officers were pre nented and refenea tome Commltee on Distri bution. Fran ilie report of H. Scbaflner. Grand Keeper of Kecotds and Seal, the following statistical In formation is taken: Since toe last annual sea- W 1 1 i / T. J. Crowley, Grand Chancellor. slon Eve new lodges have been lust ltn led, as fol lows: University, No. 162, at Berkeley, July 3, 1889; Eagle Cliff. No. 163, at Mutt. August 23, 1889: Ni|.omo, No. 104, at Ntpumo, September 0, 1889; River View, No. ICS, at Ilio Vista, October 11. 1889; Ilathboue, No. 100, at Jack sou, February 1, 18' JO. Two lodges have ceased to exist. viz: West End, No. 133, of ml* city, cousolliluted wltli Triangle, No. 104, September 6. 1889, aud Cual leuge. No. 128, Challenge Mills, defunct. The membership account It Riven as fol lows: Number of member* January 1, 1889, 10,170; Initiated dining the year. 1013; ad mitted by card, 152; reinstated. 89; a total of 11.424; lets, suspended 838, withdrawn 204, died 102, a total of 1144; leaving lie total mem bership at date of January 1, 1890, as 10,280; total gain lor the year. 1292; total loss, 1182: levying a net Rain of 110. The subordinate lodges had on hand at date of January 1. 1889. a total of $177,549 83; during the year (16,426 was received for Initiations and thecoufenlug of ranks; $833 25 for deposit of cuds; $205 for issue of cards; $1017 50 for re instatements; 13.403 00 for dues, lines and assessments; $7270 41 for benefits advanced oilier lodges and $15,748 CO from oilier sources; a grand total of $332,666 71. The disbursement* were: For sick benefits, 847,745 36; for relief of brothers, $5972 55; for burial of brothers, $8132 60; for relief of widows »nd orphans, $GB7 70; for brothers of other lodges, J8049 20, and for current expenses, $83,414 70 ; a total of {153,092 17 disbursed, leaving a balance on band In the subordinate lodge treasuries of $178.<504 54, a gain of 114 75. The per cent of expenditures lor relief of all kinds was 431 --1000, and for expenditures for all other pur poses 5G9-1000. In Hie Uraud Lodge treasury at date of -March 31, 1889, there was a balance on hand of $6832 73, the receipt!) for the year were $10, --121 97, a total of $16,954 70; the disburse ments amounted to $12,701) 56, leaving a bal ance on baud of $4185 14. There ate now 149 subordinate lodges In this jurisdiction who have since the order was lustl lined lv this State iv 18G9 Initialed 19,431 per sons, have received 1712 by caid, 705 by re instatement and 210 by consolidation. During the period of twenty years 7945 suspensions have taken place, 1990 have withdrawn, 870 died and 037 have gone out of tlie order by lapse of charter. The net gain has been 10,841 and the net loss 542. There buve been 880 i elections In all. Lodges are In process of organization at Holll*. ter, Monterey, Salinas, Gridley, Edcewood, .Mon rovia, Mayln-ld, Uklali, Yreka, Angels, San Mateo, San l.eandro and Sanger, petitions being now in circulation at these places for an early institution. Tbe session will probably last all of four days, as there Is considerable legislation to be enacted. To-moirow evening at Hie pavilion an enter tainment ami bail will take place, given by the lodges of Ibis city to the officers and represent atives of the Grand Lodge. The uuiform rank: will bo present and will give an exhibition drill. The following are the present grand officers Bud members of standing committees: OFFICERS. A. J. Buckles, Fall field, I'ast Grand Chancel lor; T. J. Ciowley, Sau Kafael.Urand Chancellor; J. li. Swiiinertim, Stockton, Grand Vice- Chancellor; Georue K. Chuicli, Fiesuo, Grand hi elate; lluiman Schatlner, San Francisco Graud Keeper of Kecords and Seal; A. 11. Gage, jr. SchajtTntr, Qrand Keeper 0/ Kg cords and S'nfJ. San Francisco, Grand Master of Exchequer; W. C. Oidwav, San Francisco, Grand Master-.it- Arm; S. F. Uullard, Hydesvlllo, Grand Inner Guard; ,1. 11. Johnston (.fifth term), Sacramento, Grand Outer Guard. Grand Trustees (Corporate Dliectois)— W. C. Gravus, \V. K. Forsytli Sail Francisco; Georpe W. Fox, Krdwood city. E. T. Blacknirr, San Diego, and I, F. Uacljelder, buuul, Supreme Kepr«sentalive!i. STANDING COMMITTEES. On Appeals and Grievances— Frank McGowan of No. 34, B. N. Shoecrafi of No. 48, J. \V. Gutlnle ot No. 42, Charles E. FleiiiniiuK of No. 30. George K. Church of No. 07. On Credentials ana Kei urns— George W. Lovle or No. 82; Aba Lewis of No. 117, E. J. G. liana of No. 103. On Correspondence— H.Scharfner. O. K. of R. and S. ; J. 11. Winter of No. 8, E. F. Leuuou of No. 63. On Finance mid Mileage— A. MarcbeDout of No. 53, C. S. Hodman or No. 16, J. G. Martin of No. 104. On Laws and Supervision— P. J. RazeD of No 81, Manlon L. Carter, 11.I 1 . G. C. ; 0. W. Nevln of No. 10, George Samuels of No. 17, John Uuber of No. 1. On i'etltlons-C. E. Lindsay No. 89, William Walker of No. 4. Charles I. Burks of No. 113, No W^Stockwell of No. 148. W. A. C. Smith of vv°u 'i te Of , the Order-Fifd W. Bell, P. S. R.; W. H. Bodflsli, FG. C; Geor K « B. K-ilzensteln 1 . G. C. ; Frank H. b arrar, l\ G. C. ; J. U. Gyse laar, > . o. k. On Foreign Correspondeuee-A. K. Stevens ol So. 3, E. J. Jolly of No. 70, A. Miller ot No. 58. EXCESSIVE ASSESSMENT. Derrnheim * Co.'s Complaint Against Hunting ton Ordered Amended. ' New York, April 14.— Justice O'Brien of the Supreme Court to-day decided that the complaint in the suit of Dcrnsheim & Co., to restrain the reorganization of the Hous ton and Texas Central Railway Company, :be amended: : The plaintiff-!, who are stock holders of the company, charge that Hiiiit ington tried to wipe out the old stockhold ers of the company by excessive assess ments, so he can secure control of the road to the Southern Pacific. The assessment for the issuance of new stock in exchange PRICE FIVE CENTS. for the old was 75 percent. It appeared that the Central Trust Company, which, purchased thn Houston find Texas Central at foreclosure, had not exercised its poweri to make the assessment, and that i lie assess ment complained of was not actually levied by it. 1 hese facts, and the allegation that the assessment was excessive and unauthor ized, O'Brien says, should be stated in tha complaint. An adjournment of one week was given to let plaintiffs' counsel fix thlnst up iv better shape. THE OLD AND THE NEW. Officers of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters. At the annual meeting of the Grand Council of Royal and Select Masters ot thi II'. Frank Pierce, Grand Jfaiter. State of California, held in Masonic Tem ple yesterday, William Edward Oughton, Grand Master, was succeeded to t!ie offic* W qsfy w*f William E. Oajh'on, Pasl O. X. by Deputy Grand Master William Frank Pierce of Oakland Council, No. 12. Thomas H. Casswell of Sacramento Council, No. 1, 1 Thomas If. Ca'nctlh Grand Recorder. was re-elected to the office of Grand Re corder, a position he has long and credita bly tilled. THE HANDY BOY DISASTER. The Engineer and Pilot Arreßtcd on a Charge cf Criminal Carelessness. East Sagixaw (Mich.), Aoril 14.— Among the missing by t!ie Handy Boy dis aster are: Miss May Haight, Mrs. Cath erine Nevius, Joseph CassMy, 13ay City, and a young man and two women, whose names are unknown. Among the wounded aro: David Bliss, hit by flying timbers; —Fish, scalded; D. F. Parker, scalded; Miss Delia Bock, taken out of the wuter unconscious; L. \V. Thompson, R. \V. Hege, scalded, and Cap tain Dolsen. The engineer, George Little, and Trump, the mau at the wheel, are in Jail, charged With criminal carelessness. Schedules Filed. Xett York, Auril 14.— The schedules of the dry-goods merchants, Julin F. Plummet & Co., were filed in the Court of Common l'leas. They show the liabilities 5587, --605 S2; nominal assets, $1,041, 69; actual assets, ■ $75,803 44. I'lumiuor's individual liabilities, $70,354 67; nominal a;seii<i3ißV 905 ; actual assets, SI3S.SH! 98. The International Yacht Ric». New York, April 14 The New York Yacht Club has sent a letter to the Earl of Dunniven in which it names conditions under which an international yacht race can be made this season. The club is willing to waive ail formalities in order to insure the race. A Fugitive From Justice. Doylkstown (I'enn.), April 14.— J. Mon roe Shellenbereer, a lawyer, but now a fugitive from justice 1 , niter hnvinic swindled the residents of Bucks County out of §150,000, was seen in New York on Satur day. .Liiriie rewards have boen offered for his capture^ J. W. Green of Ilollister has loaded an incubator with GOO ducks' eggs and is now watching the machine do its work. OPRINO 111 MORS. WHETHER ITCHING, BURY- O ins, bleedlMg, scaly, crusted, pimply, or blutcby. whether of the skin, scalp, or blood, with Urns ot hair, whether simple, scrofulous, or hereditary, from lofimer to a -e, are now speedily, permanently and economically cured by that greatest of alUnonn humor cures, tho (gtylcura Resolvent A skin and blond purifier of Incomparable purity and curative power. An ac^oowied^ed specloc or world-wide celebrity. JJntlrely vegetable, safo. In- nocent, and palatable. Effects aally more (treat cures of skin, scalp, and blood humors than all other skin and blood remedies before the public. Baia .- greater than the combined sales of all other blood and skin remedies. Sold everywhere. Price. $1. Potter Diioo and CUEMICAI. t'OttPOKATIOS, liOStou. *3-Sendfor "llow to Cure Spring Huniort." HUMORS nirlB Xv lp FrAWy 2p aw

Aynı gün çıkan diğer gazeteler