18 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1

18 Nisan 1890 Tarihli The Morning Call (San Francisco) Dergisi Sayfa 1
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VOLUME LXVII-NO. 149. CONVICTS ESCAPE. Desperate Fight on a Railroad Train. Four Guards Suddenly Assaulted by a Gang of Prisoners. One of the Officers Shot in the Breast— Helen Diu.raj Ward Hakes a Statement. Special br the California Associated Press. -^-^.-isS*!*— _'"""-""'" l """"-fl8HBJ— __^BI ___——— MM- Louisville, April 17.— Fourteen con victs on their way to the Eddyville Feni tentiary made a desperate attempt to escape to-day. They were chained in ' couples ln the smoking car, and were watched by four guards. As the train was running at full speed through the mountains, and a heavily wooded country near Litchfield, John Heine, a notorious burglar, with seven years to serve, walked with his companion to the water-cooler. One of them raised a goblet as If to drink and dashed the water into the eyes of the nearest guard. At the next Instant the other convict seized the guard by the throat and choked him, bringing him to his knees, In a mo ment the car was in an uproar. One of the other prisoners knocked out lights with a poker and another seized a pistol from the helpless guard and fired two shots, both taking effect in a guard's breast. In the melee Heine and his companion opened the door and leaped from the plat form nnd escaped in the darkness. Two others rolled out of a window and also got away. The remaining guards rushed to the doors and began tiring their pistols in the air. This had the desired effect, for the striped-garbed passengers were so frightened that they crawled under the seats anil begged for mercy. Oue man who lay on the floor screamed that he was shot ami attention be ing directed to him for a moment, he suddenly leaped up and m>ide a break tor the door, but he was caught and brought back. Four men, however, had gotten safely away when quiet was restored, and as none of the guards could be snared to hunt for them they were not pursued. Several Of the passengers were in tlie smoking-car at the time of the firing, and they added their shrieks to those of the terrified con victs. HELEN'S STATEMENT. Mrs Ward Corrects Certain Exports About H-r Separation From H*r Husband. New York, April 17.— Concerning their separation, Shortstop Ward's wile to-day makes public a card in which she says: It Is true that Mr. Ward and I are living apart; it is also true that I am going back to . the stage, but that my separation Is caused by my uncontrollable desire to returu to the stage is absolutely false. I love my arc, but I love my . husband more, and the stage has never in the past nor at the present moment possessed for me charms as attractive as those of a happy home. Igo back to the stage because lam separated from my husband, and 1 have not separated from my husband be cause 1 want to go back to the stage. There is a vast difference between the two. I have never broken a promise to my husband. I have never done anything as a wife that an honest woman would disclaim. I have made all the statements with reference to my do mestic affairs that 1 Intend to make. My professional life belongs to the public. My private life bebngs to myself and husband. *> ON a ij ridge. A Chinaman Barred Out of the United States and Canada. Niagara Falls, April 17.— Three Chi namen, two of whom attempted to cross the frontier with Man Lee two weeks ago, the other a stranger, presented themselves for admission to Canada this morning, having been hustled over by the United States officials. The two belonging to Man Lee's party were allowed admission, having Canadian Customs certificates in their pos session, The stranger, not having the necessary document, and only §10 to pay the Canadian tax of Sft 0 was denied the privilege and was sent back to the American side and there stopped, and the gates of the bridge were closed upon him. The only place for the China man to remain «as on the bridge, where he has been since and is likely to remain for some time. Grand Army Encampment. Denver, April 17.— eleventh annual encampment oi the department of Colorado and Wyoming of the Grand Army of the Republic convened in this city this morn ing. Eighty posts are represented, besides a large number of visiting veterans. Gen eral Alger, the Commander-in-Chief, with his party, including Mrs. General Logan, arrived in a special car this morning, and were enthusiastically received. The de partment was in secret session during the day. The sixth annual encampment of the Woman's Relief Corps of Colorado and Nebraska also convened here to-day. Destructive Forest Fires. New York, April 17.— Forest fires are reported in many places. In Atlantic County, N. J., a Dutch settlement, three miles north of Port Republic was destroyed, despite the fierce struggle of the inhabi tants. The losses amount to upward of $M,OOO. FREE SUGAR. Opinions of. Leading Kew England Im porters on the Proposition. Boston, April 17.— The placing of sugar on the free list and advocating bounties has occasioned as much discussion in New England as tho question of the duty on hides. While opinions are unanimous in opposition to bounties, they vary in the matter of free sugar, save that all agree that the act is of the greatest moment and benefit to California. As far as the na tional policy goes many do not think free sugar will make raw material any cheaper. Silas Fierce, the largest wholesale im porter, said: "I don't believe the bill will be as big a boon to the consumer as some expect. I remember that when the duty was removed from coffee the price of the tame Immediately went up ln Europe and benefited parties abroad and not home consumers. 1 feel pretty certain that as soon as the measure becomes a law the price of sugar will jump up in Cuba and conse quently here. It will be California's op portunity." Howard Spurr 4 Co. said it would benefit Importers and California, but they did not think it would lower prices. The manager of the Howard Sugar Trust Combination of New England laid* "I think the bill very Californian, for with free sugar a great many new industries will be developed there. With free sugar the consumption per capita would probably In crease to that of England, which is about Seventy-five pounds per capita, while ours Is about fifty-three. It will help the pre serve and fruit dealers. As to the bounty proposed, I am opposed to bounties on principles. Still, in the last four years the increased production of the beet sugar of the world has been over a million tons, and at tbe same time there lias been uo Increase in the produc tion of cane sugar. For 1889 and 890 the production of beet sugar was about -.uOU.-'M tons in Europe, The Morning Call. and of cane sugar about 2,360,000 tons, showing the very great increase which will take place in beet over cane sugar under the bounty system." Charles E. Moody, one of the largest im porters.said it was a question whether reduc ing the revenue $50,000,000 a year by free su gar would be compensated for by the saving to the consumer. Many others seemed to question the Advisability of free raw sugar, without some better adjustment of the tariff on refined sugar. TURF EVENTS. Winning and Place Horses at Memphis and Elizabeth. Memphis, April To-day was clear and pleasant. The track was slow. The results of the races were as follows : First race, two-year-olds, four furlongs. Brown won, Philora second. Black Knight third. Time, 0:0314. Second race (selling), seven furlongs, Mary II won, Carlton second, Bonnie An nie third. Time. 1:37.4- Third race, Tennessee stakes, nine fur longs Blackburn won, Marie li second, Fairy Queen third. Time, 2:03. Fourth race (handicap), one and a six teenth miles, Hocksey won, Hypocrite sec ond. Race third. Time, 1:57%. Fifth race, one mile (selling), Mountain won. Willie second, Burke third. Time, A-.WA- Winners at Elizabeth. Elizabeth. April 17.— weather to day was clear and the track in good condi tion. The races resulted as follows: First nice, five and a half furlongs, Blue Rock (Bergen) won, Meriden (Moser) sec ond, Tipstaff (Warwick) third. Time. 1 Second race (selling), half mile, best Boy (Bergen) won, Hands Off (Littlefield) sec ond, Lottie (Stevenson) third. Time, 0:5154. Third race (selling), one and a sixteenth miles, Maia (Taylor' won, Esau (Hamilton) second. Clay Stockton (Stevenson) third. Time, 1 :52) i. Fourth race (Jersey Central stakes), half a mile, for two-year-olds, Eclipse (J. Ryan) won, Terrifier (Littlefield) second, Gray Rock (Bergen) third. Time, 0:51%. Fifth race, one mile, Watterson (Ander son) won, Sam Morse (lleuston) second, Kingsbridge (Moser) third. Time, 1:45%. Sixth race, one and a sixteenth miles, King Crab (Hamilton) won, Eon (Moser) second, Martin Russell (French) third. Time, 1:51. Entries f:r El.zsbs'.h. New* York, April 17.— Following are the entries for the Elizabeth races to-morrow: First race, all ages, six furlongs— Fordham 124. St John 1.4, Castaway II 123, Carnot 121, Village Maid irn, Lisimouv 110, Extra Dry 110. Sir William 110. Second rae<-,niue furloncs (free handicap), Eric lift Ten Booker 110, Refund 105, Salvini 102, Bonanza 98, Hamlet 96, Jim McCormick 91. Third race, for three-year-olds and up ward (selling), one and a sixteenth miles— Tne bourbon 112, Golden Reel 112, Black Thorn 112, Burnside 106, Lotion 106, Sparling 105, Pericles 105, Vandergrif t 105, Admiral '.ii. Fourth race (the Meadow stakes), for fillies of all ages, six furlongs— lima B 113, Puzzle 115, Rocho 115, Golden Reel 110, Sa maria 115, Belinda 11"., Aurauia 115, Co tillion 115, Meriden 115, Autumn Leaf 115, Minuet 110, Bon Lassie 110, Faustina 110, Beatify 110, Homeopathy lift Fifth race, for three-year-olds and up ward (selling), six furlongs— Theora 119, Planter no. lie 110, Jennie McFarland 108, Futurity 107. Cupid 107, Golden Rod 104, Alva 104, Can't Tell 104, Top-sawyer 104, Miss Olive l"-', Chambly 101. King Volt 101, Ring Idler 101, X. Guilt* 98, Squandro 98, Darling 96, Zulu 96, Fast line 94, O C DO. Sixth race, for maidens 3 years old and upwards, one mile— Trojan 115, Dublin 115, Long Time ill. Lee Christy ill, Sam Love 96, Daly 96, Kyrwia 96, Kingsbridgo 96, Minuet 01. Memphis Entries. Memphis, April 17.— Following are the entries for to-morrow's races: First race, three-quarters of a mile, for maidens— 101, Jasper 103, Virgie, DOr, Oklahoma Kid, John Sherman, 100 each. The second race for three-year-olds, seven furlongs, did not fill. Entries will close at the track at 9 o'clock to-morrow. Third race (Turf Exchange stakes), for two-yeai-old colts, four furlongs— Bowen, Joe Carter, National, Dundee, Liberty Bell, Ascot, 115 each. Fourth race (Owners' handicap), for all ages, one' and a sixteenth miles— Little Minch !i_, Bonnie King GO, Alphonse 75, St. Albans SO, Hornpipe %',' Big Three 95. Fifth race (selling), all ages, one mile— Chilhowie IIS, Buaz 120, Mountain 106. Har vester 103. Bayard's Tips. New York, April 17.— Bayard's tips on the Elizabeth races for to-morrow are: First race, Fordham or Castaway; second. Erie or Salvini; third, Sparling or Golden Reel; fourth, Belinda or Meriden; fifth. Golden Rid or Can't Tell; sixth, Kingsbridge or Miuuet RIO GRANDE WESTERN. A Denial That the Rock Island Road Has Absorbed It. Denver, April 17.— Colonel D. C. Dodge, general manager of the Rio Grande West ern, was interviewed by a California Asso ciated Press correspondent, who asked him if the Rock Island had secured any interest in his line. 'The Bosk Island has not secured control of the stock so far as mv knowledge extends," said Mr. Dodge, "and there are no negotiations peuding." "What is the significance in the order that passes, signed by General Manager S. T. John, would be honored an your train'?" "There is no special meaning to the or der. We have simply given the Rock Island that privilege." "Do you mean to say that the Rock Island has made no traffic deal with the Rio Grande Western?" "Yes, that is what I mean." Further than this Colonel Dodge would not talk. Memphis. April 17.— Concerning the re port that the Kansas City. Fort Scott and Memphis Load would be extended to Savannah, President Nettleton said to a reporter to-day that the report is wholly untrue, and he could not account for its origin. "We have all the road we intend to build for the present, and do not intend to absorb any other line." Kansas City, April 17.— official an nouncement oi the promotion of W. C Nixon to the position of Superintendent of the Chicago division of the Santa Fe Rail way will be made by General Manager Robinson some time during the present week. Mr. Nixon has been superintendent of terminals for the Santa Fe here. In his new position he succeeds A. H. Crocker. The Rock Island road to-day led the other Western roads iv rescinding the order made Wednesday reducing the Colorado rate from S7 50 to £0. The action is a complete surprise to railroad men. Montreal, April 17.-Hickson, General Manager of the Grand Trunk Railway, knows nothing of the agreement between the Grand Trunk and Northern Pacific for the construction of rallioads in Manitoba and the Northwest, nor that the Grand x runic is making arrangements to construct any railways in that part of the Dominion. ,_;i 0, „ tT M A D ' Apr ', 1 . "--Articles incorpo rating the Oregon Railroad Company were filed in the office of the County Clerk this afternoon by R. Koehler, George U. An drews and W. A. Grandahl, with a capital 53,000,000. The object of the Incorpo rator-! is to equip a railway from this city or from East Portland southerly on the east side of the Willamette River, by way of SU verton, Springfield and the middle fork of the Willamette River to the boundary line between this State and California, and another line from this city southerly on the west side of the Willamette River to Airlie, Polk County, and from thence southerly by the most practicable route to the south boundary of the section, etc. A Warning to Workmen. Beki.ik, April 17.— The Executive Com mittee of the United Guilds requests the members of the guilds to warn workmen who propose to take part in the labor demonstration of May Ist, that they will Incur the risk of losing their places if they do so. Chinese In-micrraticn Permitted Panama, April 17.— Chinese immigration to Ecuador under certain restrictions is again perm I tted. Wy^MMWJlWi^_Wfl_fal SAN FRANCISCO, FRIDAY MORNING, APRIL 18, IS9O-EIGHT PAGES. A BORDER TRAGEDY. Cowardly Murder of a Wyoming Druggist. Shot Down in His Store by a Physician Without Cause. Failure of a New York Firm or Silk Im porters for a Large Amount Sioux Disturbance. Special by the California Associated Press. Cheyenne, April 17.— A tragedy oc curred to-night at Lauder, Fremont County, a town on the edge of the Shoshone Indian reservation. Dr. J.|A. Schuelko shot and instantly killed a pharmacist nained|Gcorge A. Sullivan in the store of the latter. Schuelke has been locked up. lie had pre scribed for an Arapahoe brave and the red skin succumbed. His two brothers and half a dozen bucks descended on the infirmary and were about to attack the proprietor when Schuelke entered. Sullivan pointed to the doctor and told the Indians that he was the cause of their brother's demise. S.huelke resented this imputation on his skill by using, with fatal effect, a bit; gun he lias been ostentatiously lugging since he came from the States. The murderer col lapsed when he was jailed and declared that the Indians killed Sullivan. The store is just off the principal street of the little town, and nothing was known of the trouble until the shot was heard. BUSINESS FAILLTiE. Suspension of a New York Firm of Silk Im porters and Manufacturers. N_fW Yoke, April 17.— silk trade was surprised by the announcement to-day of the suspension of Louis Franke & Co., Importers of raw silk, in this city, and manufacturers of thrown silk in Pater-son. X. J. The partners in the firm are Louis Franke and Henry W. Strugs, and they have made si general assignment, without preference. The embarrassed firm always stood well and was.supposed to have a capi tal of at least £500.000. The liabilities are upward of $906,000; nominal assets, £1, --200,000. The embarrassment is attributed to the inability to raise money to meet ma turing obligations, the stringency of the money market, stoppage of accommodatious by the banks, and losses sustained by re cent failures in this city and Paterson. It is said the firm were caught in tbe recent failures in the silk trade. Their outstand ing accounts are said to be very large. UNEASINESS AT OKLAHOMA Guthrie Lot-Jumpers Driven Off by a Vigi lance Committee. GuTiir.iE, April 17. — The lot-jumping craze is again causing excitement in Guth rie, and twenty-five lots were jumped to day -as a result. A Vigilance Committee headed by one of the officials of the town has been formed for the purpose of protect ing the owners of property. This commit tee did effective work to-day in driving the jumpers off lots. Considerable exeite nient_ was occasioned. Chief Marshal it. W. Walker of Kansas arrived to-day, and will put a quietus on the lot-jumping mal ady. It has been three mouths since At torney-General Miller ordered the Marshal to maintain a condition of status quo in Ok lahoma, but the people are becoming nerv ous and discontented as a result of the long continuance of the status quo. Marshal Walker intends to utilize all the power of the Government to maintain it, however. OKDEKED TO VACATE. Troops Driving Boomers Out -of the Sionx Country— A Big Wow. Chamberlain (S. Dak.), April 17.— A detachment of troops under Captain Yer ran arrived at the town-site of Sherman to night. The hundreds of boomers located thereon were ordered to vacate the laud at once or suffer the confiscation of their prop erty. Captain Yerrau will enforce to the letter his orders. Pierre, April 17.— Another big pow-wow has been arranged by the several tribes of the Sioux nation, to be held next Sunday several miles up Bad River, at which time they will adopt a plan of campaign. Col onel Lounsberry, special agent of the Gen eral Land Office, and Register Bailey have been invited and will be present, PKESBYTEItIAN WORSHIP. Efforts Being Made to Form a Union Between the Churches. Pittsburg, April 17.— Delegates from the Old Beformed Presbyterian and the United Presbyterian churches are holding meetings here in order to form, if possible, a union of these two churches. Prominent foreign churchmen are here, but they express no hopes that a union will be formed, as the churches are as widely apart as ever, and the Reformed Church positively will not use the revised psalmody, while the United churches that have adopted organ music will not give it up. He'd for Misappropriation of Fundi. New York. April 17.— Samuel Fassen den, late Secretary of the Cape Cod Canal Company, is held here to await extradition papers from Boston on a charge of appro priating S2OOO furnished by Henry Jenkins, a Boston broker, for the purchase of canal company stock. Fasseuden expected to start for San Francisco with his wife and daughter this afternoon. Bequest Tax Must Be Paid. New Yokk. April 17.— Surrogate Ran som decided that the tax on the bequests under the will of Mrs. Cornelia N. Stewart, wife of the deceased millionaire, must be fully paid with interest. According to this decision, the heirs will bo forced to pay £200,000 Into the city treasury. Body to Be B'turned. New York, April 17.— The body of Clerk Meyer, who was murdered in Copenhagen and shipped to this country in a cask pur porting to contain plaster, was to-day taken from the Appraisers stores to be returned t*> Denmark, as requested by the Danish authorities, • Westers League Season. Denver, April 17.— The Western League season was opened here to-day by the Omaha and Denver teams. The game was witnessed by a large crowd, and resulted in a victory for the home team, the score standing Denver 6, Omaha 2. Denial From Mrs. Ward. New York, April 17.— Helen Dauvray Ward denies the story that she Is about to separate from Shortstop Ward on account of her determination to return to the stage. The story as printed Is wrong in every par- Opposed to B-vi-ion. St. Louis, April 17.— The Presbytery, by an overwhelming majority, voted against the revision of faith, saying that the old doctrine was good enough for them. They refused to allow the minority to submit a report. • FOUII MEN UItOW.NED. Loss of the British Bteamer Euclid by a Collision Hear H nlepool. London*, April 17.— British steamer Euclid was sunk near Hartlepool in collis ion with the British steamer Altyre yester day. The captain and three of the crew ol the Euclid were drowned. The Altyre has arrived at Shields? The Euclid was an iron screw steamer of 1540 tons and owned at Aberdeen. A HUMAN SLiAUGHTEn-UOUSE. The Bodies cf Sixty Infants and Ycung Girls Found in the Bulns >f a Horn*. San* Jose de Costa Rica, April 17.— The press of Varsovia, Colombia, contains a horrible story to the effect that in the ruiiiß of the house of a woman named Sko hiske, which was destroyed by fire there, the police discovered more than sixty corpses. Forty were infants and the others were of young girls from 12 to 17 years of age. The woman has been arrested and is now in prison, surrounded by a strong guard to prevent threatened lynching. ALL WORK STOPPED. The Portland Lockout Likely to Result in a General Strike. Portland, April 17.— 1t Is estimated that at present there are no less than 1500 car penters, painters, plasterers, brick-layers, tinners, and, in fact, workmen of trades now out of employment in this city by reason of the lockout which was declared yester day morning by the Builders' Union. The workmen are simply waiting to learn what the builders intend to do. They say they will fight it out If it takes all the season, and that non-union men cannot be hired. The situation is Interesting, and the longer It lasts Iho more critical it will become. All building will, of necessity, have to stop un til the matter Is settled, hence the blow is at the very vitals of the city. Captain John O'Brien, President of the Federated Trades, states that if arrangements are not perfected within tlie next forty-eight hours a general strike will occur. Chicago, April 17. — The carpenters' strike is no nearer an adjustment to-day than it was yesterday. A movement is on foot to have three or four prominent jurists act as arbitrators between the strikers and bosses. The strikers this afternoon had a monster parade through the central part of the city, and were addressed by prominent men on the lake front. As matters now look an early settlement between strikers and bosses must be made, otherwise serious trouble will lesult shortly. Columbus, April 17.— A joint meeting of the miners and operators this afternoon agreed upon the following scale of prices to rule from May 1, 1890, to May 1. 1891: For Hocking Valley 70 cents per ton, and for Pennsylvania 79 cents per ton. An ad journment was then made to the first Tues day in April, 1891, at Pittsburg. This agreement averts an immense strike which has seemed imminent since ttie meeting be gan. Tlie miners and operators left in the best of spirits and with good feelings. Indianapolis, April 17.— At a mass meeting of striking carpenters to-night it was ascertained that thirty-one bosses, em ploying 135 journeymen, had signed an agreement to pay the advance demanded. Less thai forty scab carpenters area*, work. The great opposition to the advance comes from the Builders' Exchange, numbering sixty-five bosses, and it was these who here tofore cave employment to several hundred men, but they have now backed out. The exchange still persists In their refusal to advance wages. Yii'.NNA April 17.— The employes nt the Wittkovitz Iron Works, to the number of 12,000, have struck. THE WORKING-GIRLS. Closing Session of the Convention— mation of Clubs Recommended New York, April 17.— The Working girls' Convention continued in session to day. Papers were read by Miss Homer of Montreal on "The Founding of the Mon treal Women's Industrial Society" ; by Miss Caroline Huliug of Chicago on "The Women's Improvement Association of Chi cago"; by Mrs. Browning of Lawrence, Mass., ou "The Mutual Friends' Society of Lawrence; by Miss Graeff of Philadelphia on "The New Century Guild of Philadel phia"; by Miss Jarvis of Connecticut on "The County Club." Miss Snioot was introduced as a repre sentative of the Knichts of Labor of Wash ington. She spoke without notes. She said she represented two hundred ladies, who sent greeting to the convention and who were working to help the working-girls in the same way as the societies did, and she should take back to them many valuable ideas gathered during her attendance at the convention. She was heartily applauded. Various matters connected with the man agement of clubs were discussed, including the question whether it is well to have boys and tills together in the junior clubs. Such a club is run in Boston, and Mis Justice of Boston reported that it is a good idea, as experience has demonstrated. It was voted to establish a newspaper, to be run in the interest of the working-girls' societies. The following preamble and resolutions were passed : Whereas, The convention realizes that Hie time has come lor foiinallou and oig.iiiiz.iti.ii; ami whereas. it is inure than ever convinced ol the need aud value ofco-opei atlou; therefore, belt Resolved, That Ibis convention recommends tin; loiiuaiioii In the Lulled Mates of worklug- K>' ls* societies, whose coustlluttou and by-laws shall be piescnled tv each association lor ap proval by a committee composed of the First Di rectress and the sseciet-iy uf each association. Resolutions were also adopted favoring the appointment of women as deputy factory Inspectors. The convention closed by a speech from Miss Dodge, who said: "This has been the first time in history that young women representing all sorts of homes and occupa tions have thus met together to discuss such topics as we have taken up. We are repre sentatives of thousands and thousands of other girls and women, from San Francisco to Maine, from Pittsburg to Montreal, and upon us rests the responsibility of bringing to those who sent us the ideas and inspira tion that we have gathered." CONDENSED TELEGKAMS. London, April 17. — The attempt to float the Portuguese loan has tailed. Malta, April 17. — The Chicago and Yorkt.wn, of the American squadron of evolution, have arrived here. Nashville, April 17.— Flames in the fac tory of the Goubb Crockery Company here to-day caused a loss of $90,000. New York, April 17.— 1t is denied that Rev. Lyman Abbott intends to resign the pastorate of Plymouth Church. Mount Holly (N. J.), April 17.— Mrs. Carrie Vaudergnfl has been indicted for the attempted murder of Frank C. Norman. London, April 17.— German steam ship Martha, from Hamburg, is aground at Vera Cruz and will probably be a total loss. Boston, April 17.— The Senate yesterday, by a vote of 9 to IS, refused lo pass a reso lution asklug Congress to remove the duty on raw wool. Marseilles, April 17.— Carnot arrived here to-day and had a great reception. An Italian squadron of honor is waiting for him at Toulon. City of Mexico, April 17.— 1n the House of Representatives yesterday the contract with Martinez for the establishment of bonded warehouses on the coast passed its first readlug. London. April 17.— body of Lieuten ant Wordsworth, a grandson of the poet, was found in the river Severn yesterday. It Is a case of suicide, caused by disappoint ment in love. New Yoke, April 17.— George H. Pell, the broker of the Claasen bsiuk wrecking syndicate, has been indicted for aiding and abetting Claasen in tho Sixth National Bank matter. Berlin, April 17. —50 many students have committed suicide that the Govern ment has sent a circular to the directors of the high schools urging leniency in the mat ter of discipline. Washington, April 17.— Secretary Win dow has approved the action of the Board of Investigation which exonerated Captain Healv of charges of cruelty to sailors while in Alaskan waters. London, April 17.— An action for breach of promise has beeu brought against Sir George Elliott, Baronet, M. P., by Miss Alice Hairs. The plaintiff is SB years old.

Sir George is aged 70 years. Concord (N. li.), April 17.— The roof was burned off the main building of the New Hampshire State Prison to-day while the building was filled with convicts. None es caped and none were hurt Great Britain's D bt. London, April Goschen, the Chan cellor of Exchequer, stated in the House of Commons to-day that the public debt last year was reduced £8,295,000. Tho profit was Increased on alcohol by £1,800,000, and on silver £774,000. Suicide of a Banian Family. . Moscow, April 17.— The Indigent widow of nn army officer and her five daughters locked themselves in a room aud committed suicide by inhaling illuminating gus. ARID LANDS. Work of the Committee Nearly - Completed. A Bill to Be Reported to the Honse Some time Next Week. iEiprenlTß Services at the Funeral of the Late Congressman Randall— Senate Proceedings. Special by the California Associated Press. Washington, April 17.— The House Committee on Irrigation of Arid Lands, at a meeting to-day, was addressed by Major J. W. Powell, Director of the Geological Survey. A sub-committee will report to the full committee Saturday, and the Cali fornia member, General Vande.ver, siyg that on Thursday next a bill will probably be introduced in the House. ICANDALI/S I'l'SEllAL. Impressive Services Held at Washington—ln terment at Philadelphia. Washington, April 17.— The funeral 0! the late Congressman Randall took place this morning, and was largely attended, thousands being unable to get Inside the church. At 8 o'clock the remains were taken to the Metropolitan Presbyterian Church, where they lay In state two hours, during which time it is estimated that 7000 people passed lv and viewed the remains of the great Democratic protectionist. At 10 o'clock the President, Vice-Presi dent, the Cabinet and nearly every Sena tor and member in the city arrived and took the seats reserved for them. Shortly after ward a large delegation of Philadelphians arrived and were followed immediately by the family of the deceased. The coffin was almost hidden by floral tributes, which were many and of hand some designs. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Chester, pastor of the church, and Dr. Milburn, the blind Chaplain of the House. The services were simple and im pressive. At llielr conclusion the remains were taken to the depot and there placed on a special train on the Pennsylvania road and conveyed to Laurel Hill Cemetery, Phila delphia. A delegation from the Grand Army acted as escort to tho remains. About thirty members of the House and Senate accompanied the remains. ♦ California P-iisioni WAsniNGTON, April 17.— California pen sions—Original invalid: Ed McCormlck, San Francisco; Hayden W. French, Mer ced; Timothy Fenton, iienicia. Increase: George K. Bus well. Golden Gate, reissue; Darvey W. GUllngham, San Francisco, re issue and Inclusive; Joseph Ciabb, Mill ville. Original widows, etc. : Henrietta, widow of Jeremiah Leavitt, Saticoy. Acts Approved. Washington, April 17.-The President baa approved the acts for a public building at Houston, Tex.; providing for an Assist ant General Superintendent and Chief Clerk of the Railway Mail Service; grant ing an Increase to the pension of General Horace Bouglitun, and to correct the patent issued to John Seehler to certain lands in Colorado. To Test the Cuihine. Washington, April 17.— The new tor pedo-boat Cushing, recently built by the Herreschoff Company for the Government, will probably make her appearance here before long. It is proposed to send her on a run from Norfolk to this city on the out side course, in order to test her sea-going qualities. COJiGRIiSS. THE SENATE. Montana's New Senators Seated- Walla Walla Military Reservation. Washington, April 17.— 1n the Senate to-day Cullom presented petitions from the citizens of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Wash ington and other States asking that sugar, lumber, salt and twine be placed on the free list Frye, from the Committee on Commerce, reported favorable the bill to make Arizona a customs district, and adversely the bill authorizing the removal of a wreck from the Columbia River, near Astoria, Oregon. This adverse action was taken be cause the Treasury Department was ready to remove the wreck without legislative action. Among the bills introduced was one by Reagan proposing an amendment to the Constitution for the election of Senators by the vote of Hie people. Sanders and Power, the Montana Sena tors, were In their seats, their desks having been placed on the Republicau side since the adjournment yesterday. The desks were first located on the Demo cratic side after the four new States were admitted, and there they remained until the action of the Senate yesterday seating the Republican contestants. Powers and Saunders drew ballots from a box to decide the length of their present terms In the Senate. S.uiuders drew the ballot which entitled him to serve until March 4. 1893, and Powers drew the ballot entitling him to serve until March i, ISOS. A number of bills then passed. Among them were the following: Making au ap propriation of S2o,ooofor the improvement of the Fort Walla Walla Militar*. Reserva tion, Wash. ; to place General Fremont on the retired list of the army, with the rank of Major-General. The bill to transfer the revenue marine from the Treasury to the Navy Department came up aud precipitated debate. Sherman opposed the transfer and made a speech against It. Gray replied and favored the passage of the bill. Without coming to a vote the bill was laid aside at 2 o'clock. Plumb then called up as unfinished busi ness the bill authorizing thirty additional medical examiners in the Pension Office aad debate proceeded upon it. An amendment was offered exempting medical examiners from civil service exam inations. Cockrell took the floor and vigorously de nounced the civil service reform professions and policy of the Republican party. The entire afternoon was consumed in a running debate between tbe Democrats and Republicans. At 6 o'clock tbe Senate was proceeding with the discussion of the matter. THE HOUSE. An Adjournment Taken on Account of Randal 's Funeral. Washington, April 17.— The House met at 12 o'clock this morning. Many leading members were at Randall's funeral and the Ilouse adjourned until to-morrow without transacting auy business. McCaffrey Acquitted. • VI- tt- .<.<-._. . a . .... ■*■ . ii. McCaffrey, charged at the instance of Attorney John F. Burris with conspiracy to extort money by blackmail, was acquit ted yesterday by Judge Lawler. The de fendant had been tried and acquitted in the United States Circuit Court upon the same charge, and as no more evidence could be brought to light In the Police Court the second charge was dismissed. Oneida "Icinocrats. TliaO n .S.I C.S., - .» -a ..... s., * . me *-*neiua social and Political Club of the Forty-fifth Assembly District met last night at Mission Turn Hall. President Fred Raabeln the chair. Ex-Judge Rob ert Ferral spoke on the tariff aud other issues from a Democratic standpoint Fred Emerson Brooks, John Flood and Edward deGarnao favored with songs aud lecila tions. Five Ilurelara Caughta Joseph Kelly, ; Frank Ellsworth, Jack Meyer, George Kramer and Edward Wilson. young men; who are well : known to the police, were arrested Wednesday night by Officers Farley and Crockett and charged with burglary for having entered the dye works of Wassman & Co. and stealing $100 worth of silks and clothing.' POORLY PROVIDED FOR. Appropriations Made for the Coast in the River and Harbors Bill. Washington, April 17.— The California Associated Press has been furnished with a copy of the House River and Harbor Bill as printed and it will be roported to-motrow. The total amount appropriated is a little over $20,000,000. For continuing to Improve the Sacramento and Feather rivers, $30,000. Completing improvements of Napa River, $10,000. ' Continuing to improve the San Joaquin River, $75,000, of which sum $23,750, or so much as is necessary, is to be expended in closing Lairds Slough and Paradise Cut; $24,090, or so much as ls necessary, to be expended in dredging, and $27,250, or so much as is necessary, to be expended for other work. • For improving Petalunia Creek, 8-1000. To complete dredging on Redwood Creek, $8000. Continuing to improve the canal at the Cascades, Oregon, 54530.000. For improving the Upper Columbia, in cluding Snake River, in Oregon and Wash ington, $20,000. Improving the mouth of the Columbia River, $425,000. Improving the Lower Willamette and Columbia rivers, in front and below Port land, $80,000. Improving the Willamette River above Portland, 1,000, of which sum $5000 may be used for the improvement of the river at Clackamas Rapids and Ross Island. For improving Coquille River, Oregon, $30,000. For improving the Umpqua River, Ore gon, $9000. For improving the mouth of the Siuslaw River, Oregon, to commence the construc tion of a jetty. $50,000. Improving Youngs and Klasknine rivers, Oregon, $1000. Improving Chehalis River, Washington, $3000. Improving Cowlitz River, Washington, $4000. Improving the Skagit, Steilaquamish, Nootsack, Snaliomisli and Suoqualme rivers, Washington, $12,000. For improvement of the harbor at Hum boldt, Cal., $80,000. Improving the harbor at Oakland, $250. --000. Improving the harbor at Wilmington, Cal., $34,000. ' Improving the harbor at San Luis Obispo, $40,000. ' Improving the harbor at San Diego, $00, --500, of which SSOOO is for dredging, $.500 for repairs, and the remainder to commence the construction of a jetty on Zuningsi Shoals. Improving the entrance to the harbor at Cooks Bay, Oregon, $175,000. Improving the harbor at rau&l__a Bay, Oregon, $125,000. Improving the harbor at Tillamook Bay, Oregon, SSOO. Improving the entrance to harbor at Xe balem Bay, Oregon, $10,000. For the purpose of commencing jetty con struction the Secretary of the Treasury Is directed, at his discretion, to secure surveys and ascertain the cost of improvement at the following localities: Colorado River, Ariz., above Yuma, to El Dorado Canyon; to determine the advisability and probable cost of improving the Sacramento aud feather river?, which is to be ascertained by a board of United States engineers, with a view to projects for futuro improvement of the same; also, for the following Califor nia rivers and harbors : Sau Rafael, Alviso Harbor aud straightening Alviso Creek; harbor of refuge at Santa Cruz; improving and straightening Redwood Creek, and Mokelumue Rivet for snagging purposes, and IWundo Beach Harbor; the Missouri Liver, between Great" Falls and Stubbs Jerry, in the State of Montana; Tillamook Bay and bar at Oregon ; for the new project for Coo- Bay; improving upper harbor by the oval of shoals in the Willamette River; deepening the channel on the west side of Swan Island; improvement of navi gation at Clackamas Rapids and Roos Island, near Corvallis, Lower Columbia River, on the south side, between Astoria and Woods Landing; for snasging Lewis and Clarke River; for snagging Coquille Kiver; deepening the channel from Coquille Lily to Myrtle Foint; ascertaining the depth and the following improvements of rivers and harbors in Washington: Xoto sack River, Grays Harbor and bar; for survey of the harbor to Cosmopolis, and Grays Harbor for snagging. ITEMsS UF INTEREST. A Fort Smith (Ark.) man suicided be cause his wile wished he was dead. Up to date lie is the most accommodating man on record. At a recent sale of skins In London one of the lots was 250,000 Australian opossum skins. At another sale 30,000 African monkey skins were offered. ' Any person who believes that Brice'a campaign broke him will be agreeably sur prised when it is known he paid two mil lions ami a half for a new railroad, and he is looking for several more. In making soundings for the new rail road bridge at Astor, Fla., the engineers struck an artesian flow of sulphur water in mid-stream. It comes Irom a depth of fifty feet aud is quite a curiosity. The Pope has now formally set his face against cremation, and has forbidden the priests to accord the rites of Christian burial to peisons disposing of their own or anybody else's body in this fashion. A man named Catoni, a giant about seven feet high and proportionately siout, with an enormous head, has just died iv Italy. Before his death he sold his skeleton to the Anatomical Museum at Rome for £2000. Robert Garrett, ex-President of the Balti more and Ohio, has gone to Europe, accom panied by Mrs. Garrett, a maid aud valet. They will pass the summer abroad, but further than that they have no decided plans Au English photographer claims to have obtained a photograph in which the natural colors were reproduced when the exposure was made, by accident, just at the moment when there came a vivid flash of lightning. The magnificent railway train built by the Queen of Italy, and which was burned in the Florence station three weeks ago, cost more than 70,000 lire. It was ornamented with gold and silver and upholstered in the most costly manner. Of the 10,000 diamond-cutters in Amster dam, who are all Jews, 7000 are stated to be now without work, as the principal dia mond-cutting establishments have ceased their operations in consequence of the enor mous rise iv the price of raw diamonds. An old bachelor who died at Newton, Conn., recently, said on his death-bed that there whs one thing that would make him contented. That was that he might be able to swallow every dollar of the 8100.000 lie had amassed by his life of slaving and saving. The British Museum has now on exhibi tion lor the first time part of a pillar that has been placed together from the fragments of the older Temple of Diana at Ephesus. This was the temple which was burned down iv the night on which Alexander the Great was born. A young Englishwoman writing from Johannesburg, South Africa, says: "Ty phoid and typhus are raging, and last week forty-two people died of the two fevers in one day. The hospitals are badly over crowded. The lack of business is so great that people are actually starving." Klecllaan uf Officers. The Cosmos Club has elected the follow ing officers and directors: President, Samp son Tarns; Vice-President, Samuel G. Mur phy; Treasurer, Henry L. Taium; Hon orary Secretary, Fred H. Green; Direc- William Center, Charles L. Weller. Joseph li. F'olsom, \\ infield S. Zellen, and James B. Laughorne. 1 — m Damages for rt Broken Leg. David Midland, a carpenter, was injured by a falling scaffold on March 10th last, on Page street, near Golden Gate Park. His left leg was dislocated, fractured and broken. He has entered suit against his employer*, James and Moses E. I.ountree, for $15,000 damages. A Calcutta Defaulter. Calcutta, April 17.— The cashier of the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China is officially announced to be a de faulter to that institution. The amount Is, about £50,000. The Work cl Nihilists. St. Petersburg, April 17.— The Imperial palace at Oranienbaum has been burned,' it is supposed by Nihilists. ; Seven persons perished in the flames. TEMPLARY MASONRY. Thirly.second - Annual Conclave Of Grand Commandery. Representatives From Foreign Jurisdictions Received and Accredited—Elec tion of Officers. The Grand Commandery of Knights Tem plar of the State of California commenced its thirty-second annual conclave In the asylum at the Masonic Temple in this city, yesterday morning at 10 o'clock (anno or dinis 771), Samuel Hopkins Wagener, Deputy Grand Commander and acting Graud Commander, presiding. Upon calling the roll of officers of char tered commanderies or their proxies duly appointed, together with a number of Past Commanders by service within this juris diction, a quorum was voted present. • There being more than a sufficient repre sentation present the Grand Commandery was opened in ample form with music by the choir and prayer by the Grand Prelate. The acting Grand Commander announced the following Committee on Credentials: Thomas 11. Caswell, William M. Petrie and Joseph M. Litchfield. ■ ipif &$n George Aslmry Johnson, Depu'y Grand Commander. After a brief recess the committee re ported on representatives and officers en titled to seals, which report was con curred in. t . The reading of the minutes of the last ann;:r.i conclave was dispensed with, the members being furnished with printed copies thereof. The acting Grand Commander then read his annual address, which treats of official duties performed during his term of office, and a reference to the death of Carnot Courtland Mason, Grand Commander, who died during his term of office. The report was referred to the Cora mitteo on Doings of Grand Officers, con sisting of Edward S. Lippitt, Edward R. Hedges and Freeman G. Teed. The annual reports of the Grand Re corder, Graud Treasurer, Committees on Finances and Accounts were, on motion, duly received and referred to the Committee on Reports of Officers. Thomas 11. Caswell, read a voluminous report ou the proceedings of the several Grand Commanderies located in the United States, the Canadas and in foreign countries, which report was ordered printed with the proceedings of the Grand Con clave. The election of grand officers was made the special order for. 3 " .lock In the after- noon. The acting Grand Commander announced the appointment of the following com mittees: On Appeals and Grievances— Andrew G. Booth, Francis M. Casal, William D. Knights. On New Commanderies— William Buck ley Davis, Clement T. Park, William L. G. Soule. On Returns— Levi Kackliffe, Joseph B. Cooke. Thomas Flint Jr. On Pay of Delegates— Milo S. Davis. John L. Simpson, James A. Day. The Grand Commandery was then called off until 2 o'clock. if IP Trank in.am Sumner, Grand Senior Warden, On reassembling in afternoon session the following credentials of representatives near the Grand Commandery of California were received and the Sir Knights named were accredited as such representatives: Hiram T. Graves, Alabama, Missouri and Vermont; Thomas 11. Caswell, Arkansas, Mississippi and Iowa; Alfred A. Reding ton, Connecticut and Georgia; Tristam Burges, Illinois; Alexander G. Abe 11. In diana; George C. Perkins, Maine; Charles F. Lott, Massachusetts and Rhode Island; Philip W. Keyser, Nebraska; William C. Belcher, Pennsylvania; George A. John son, Tennessee. The Committee on Doings and Reports of Grand Officers made a report recommend ing that the same be adopted, which report was concurred in. A special committee to draft suitable reso lutions on the deaths of Carnot Courtland Masou, Grand Commander, and James Lawrence English. Past Grand Com mander, was appointed, consisting of Reuben H. Lloyd, William O. Gould and George A. Johnson. The Special Committee on Ritual pre sented a report recommending several changes and modifications, which report was adopted. The hour for the special order— the election of grand officers— having arrived, the acting Grand Commander appointed Sir Knights Cooke and Higgins as tellers, and the election was proceeded with, re sulting as follows: Samuel Hopkins Wago ner of San Jose Commandery, No. 10, San Jose, Grand Commander; George Asbury Johnson of Santa Rosa Commandery, No. 14, Santa Rosa, Deputy Graud Commander; Jacob Hart Sett of .Nevada Commandery, No. a, Nevada City, Grand Generalissimo; William Yauderhurst of Watsonville Commandery, No. 22, Watsonville, Grand Captain General; Hezekiah Lord Hosmer of Golden Gate Commandery, No. 16, San Francisco, Grand Prelate; Frank William Sumner of Golden Gate Commandery, No. 16, San Francisco, Grand Senior Warden ; Edward Spalding Lippitt of Mount Olivet Commandery, No. 20, Peta lunia, Grand Junior Warden; John Fran cis Merrill of Golden Gate Commandery, No. 16, San Francisco, Grand Treasurer (re elected) ; Thomas Hubbard Caswell, P. G. C. of Nevada Commandery, No. 6, Nevada City. Grand Recorder (re-elected). Ou motion duly carried the installation of the elective and appointed officers was mane the special order for 11 o'clock this morning. **°*?H^i->"*ilM-W The Grand Commandery then adjourned until 10 o'clock this morning. - Local Democratic Headquarters. The Democratic County Committee hat opened its quarters for : campaign work at 729 Market street. All Democrats are in vited ,to make recommendations for a pre liminary board of enrollment composed ot three Democrats in ere i of the 136 precincts iuto which the city \-_.i divided at the last election. These names must be handed in PRICE FIVE CENTS. to Secretary James H. Long on or before the 26th Inst, The sub-committee on these recommendations meets every afternoon at 4 o'clock. Richard T. Condon, the re nowned Assistant Secretary, will be in at tendance from 9 o'clock in the morning to 9 o'clock in the evening. S. W. GARNESS' ESTATE. Mrs. Roberts Declines to State if She Is Divorced. The estate of S. W. Garness, who was killed by ex-Sheiiff Arnold of Colusa, waa before Judge Coffey yesterday, the mother of the deceased, Mrs- Roberts, having filed an account and resigned as administratrix. The account showed $141 14 in receipts and $125 50 expenses. Mrs. Roberts testified she had not dona anything In regard to the moneys due tho deceased for loans made by him and evi denced by entries In his book. These bave been officially appraised 'as being worth $2134 80. Her attorney commenced to examine her on the witness-stand, but Lawyer Whitte more raised an objection, claiming she was a married woman; that all her acts as ad ministratrix were void; that she had noth ing to resign, and that the court could not consider her account, He made also, inde pendently, the objection that the adminis tratrix bad left out of the inventory a por tion of the real estate. Mr. Troutt replied that no real estate had been left by de ceased. Mr. Whittemore's direct question, "Ara you a married woman ?" Mrs. Roberts de clined to answer. The account filed, and also a motion by Mr. Wbittemore to annul the order appointing Mrs. Roberts adminis tratrix, were postponed for further hearing • on next Monday. It appears that a deed from Garness to his mother for the real estate in question was recorded after his death, and her name is written Mary A. Garness. The property is worth $5500. The mother has also coma in for S'JOOO life insurance, which leaves tha little child of Garness only the book ac counts. Joseph Taylor, the maternal grandfather of the child, is looking after its interests. He says he did not oppose the granting of letters to Mrs. Roberts in the first instance, understanding that she had testified to tha court that she was divorced. FIVE ROUNDS FOUGHT. A Hammer and Tongs Battle In the Heavy Rain. Edward Moran and Frank Frayne, water front rounders, became involved last night in a dispute regarding their respective pugilistic abilities and urged on by friends decided to settle the question in regulation prize-ring style. Accompanied by about fifty men the pair proceeded to Valleio-street Wharf, where a rude squared circle was pitched, -and Al White was chosen referee and also time keeper. Although rain was falling heavily the men discarded the greater purtion of their clothing and began a hammer and tongs battle. Frayne had the longer reach and pounded his opponent's face unmercifully. Five rounds were fought, but while Frayne had the best of it, he was suddenly knocked out by a heavy blow that landed under the float ing rib*. While his seconds were endeavoring to bring him to consciousness Officer Mahoney and squad appeared. The crowd quickly scattered, but both fighters were taken to the Harbor Station, where a char go of bat tery was placed against them. Frayne is not the pugilist of the sV.-.->« name who ac quired some notoriety a few years ago.-- OKDEB GOLDEN SHORE. The Supreme Lories Abolishes the Sick.- Keurlit Fund. At the annual session of the Supreme Lodge, Order Golden Shore, yesterday, a large part of the session was consumed in passing upon the report of the Committee on Distribution. The report of the Committee on Laws was considered, with the following result: The law admitting members at large was adopted; the law in relation to the per capita tax was amended and made mora complete ; the basis of representation was reduced from 300 to 200; the Supreme Sec retary will hereafter be required to issue quarterly circulars giving receipts and dis bursements in detail; the Sick-benefit Fund was abolished, and all money paid by mem bers for assessments into the fund was or dered returned. The laws pertaining to District Grand Lodges were referred to the Committee on Laws, with instructions to draft suitable ones covering the whole subject The election of officers was made the spe cial order for the adjourned session. PROTECTION WASTED. Young liejdenfeldt Calls Upon the Secret Service Agent* _' J , Solomon Heydenfeldt Jr., the young at torney, who some time ago developed ten dencies which led to his being examined on a charge of insanity, called upon Secret Ser vice Agent Harris yesterday and asked for protection. He said that four enemies of his were fol lowing him about from place to place, try ing to attach electric batteries to his body. They took rooms wherever he did and fre quently attempted to enter his apartments to work their evil designs upon him. He asked Mr. Harris to aid him in driv ing them away, so that he could go on with bis work without being bothered. Mr. Harris realized with whom he was dealing and told Mr. Heydenfeldt to call again to-day. A New Cable-Car. A convertible car, which can be changed from an open to a closed conveyance at will, was run over the Omnibus cable line yes terday on a trial trip. Should it prove suc cessful it will save tbe necessity of having so many cars as at present, as the company will not have to keep open cars for fine weather and the ordinary close car for wet seasons. At Korrlstown, Pa., there is a -saloon keeper who refusesto sell liquor to a neigh bor because of the receipt of an anonymous letter directing him not to do so. Purify Your Blood The Importance of thoroughly purifying the blood This Spring: cannot be over-estimated. The ex- traordinary epidemic of "the grip" and other dis- eases, the unhealthful winter, close confinement in- doors aud carelessness in diet, have caused accum- ulation of impurities in the blood which must be expelled before you can feel well and atronj* again. The universal praise given Hood's SarsapariTl^Vj- those who have taken It, should certainly convince you that It is the ideal Spring; Medicine. It acts especially and immediately upon the blood, over- comes physical weakness, revives the health-tons and creates a good appetite. Try It this spring. "My sou was afflicted with the worst type or scrofula, and on the recommendation of my drug- gist I gave him Hood's Sarsaparllla. To-day he is sound and well, notwithstanding It was said there was not enough medicine In Illinois to effect ft cure."— Christian, lUlpolls, 111. Hood's Sarsaparilla Sold by all druggists, tl ; six for tS. Prepared on by C. I. HOOD a CO., Apothecaries, Lowell, -in 100 Doses One Dollar mr!s Fr lp - Coronado f Natural i«k Mineral ill Water pi Far Sale Everywhere. J3j|flC. M. MILLER, Agent, •" «^iP 204 California Street aplB FrTu lm 8p iHW"--- Mu., ,i i».-n fl-"*********

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